for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 341 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 341 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 196, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 131, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access  
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 119, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 171, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 369, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.377, CiteScore: 1)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
Chinese Management Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.278
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1750-614X
Published by Emerald Homepage  [341 journals]
  • Conflict coping strategy evolution of top management team members in
           China’s family enterprises
    • Pages: 246 - 267
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 246-267, June 2018.
      Purpose Conflicts among top management team (TMT) members have a significant impact on sustainable development of family enterprises in China. The complex attributes of different kinds of conflicts in a TMT have dual effects on firm performance and its stability. Thus, avoiding conflicts in a TMT through a systematic conflict management strategy is very important. This paper aims to therefore investigate how to maximize the performance and income level of the TMT in family enterprises through managing conflict systematically, while adopting the best conflict coping strategies. Design/methodology/approach In this study, the authors apply conflict coping strategies as a useful tool of conflict management and propose five kinds of dynamic conflict coping strategies among TMT members. Repeated game and multi-agent simulation by computer experiment are used to dynamically simulate the rules and evolution of individual conflict coping strategy choices. Findings It is found that with the passage of time, different conflict coping strategies have different effects on earnings of individuals and teams at different conflict levels. It is also revealed that conflict coping strategies affect not only the earnings of individuals and teams but also their distribution; it also reflects the conflict level in TMT of a family enterprise but in reverse. Originality/value This study contributes to the existing literature on conflict management in relevance to the choice and revolution of conflict coping strategies in a Chinese business culture context. It focuses on strengthening the unity and cooperation of TMT members. Controlling the conflict level of TMT members at a reasonable level, investigating the primary cause of conflict and identifying its nature lead to better performance of the TMT and the sustainable development of Chinese family enterprises. Based on these outcomes, different conflict coping strategies can be appropriately used to solve TMT conflicts.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-03-09T02:57:32Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-08-2017-0227
       
  • Exploratory innovation, exploitative innovation and employee creativity
    • Pages: 268 - 286
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 268-286, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between exploratory/exploitative innovation and employee creativity in the Chinese context and how these two relationships can be moderated by an important cultural dimension – collectivism. Design/methodology/approach A theoretical framework was developed to explore the relationships between exploratory/exploitative innovation, employee creativity and collectivism. Data were collected by sending out surveys to managers and employees in various industries in mainland China. Hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regressions. Findings The results show that both exploratory innovation and exploitative innovation are positively related to employee creativity. Furthermore, collectivism negatively moderates the effects of both types of innovation on employee creativity, despite its positive main effect. Originality/value This study explores the relationship between organizational innovation and individual employee creativity in the Chinese context. This paper empirically analyzes the moderating effect of collectivism in the relationship between organizational innovation and employee creativity. It also indicates the factors inherent in Chinese culture that influence innovation and gives explanations from education, subordinate relation, etc.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-03-12T02:00:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-11-2016-0228
       
  • Does a second-generation returnee make the family firm more
           entrepreneurial'
    • Pages: 287 - 304
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 287-304, June 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to focus on a special group of people in family firms in China, the second generation who are returnees, and to study their impact on family ownership and corporate entrepreneurship. Design/methodology/approach Survey data from China’s private enterprises in 2015 were used to test the hypotheses. Data were collected through a joint effort by the China Federation of Industry and Commerce and the School of Management of Zhejiang University. The authors used a stratified sampling method, and questionnaires were distributed to 12 provinces in East, Central and West China. Two sets of questionnaires were distributed and answered. Findings Compared with those family firms without second-generation returnees, the relationship between family ownership and corporate entrepreneurship is significantly enhanced in family firms that have second-generation returnees. Furthermore, compared with the second-generation returnees who stay overseas for a short time, returnees who stay overseas longer are more likely to promote corporate entrepreneurship. Originality/value This study explores the unique characteristics of second-generation returnees and explores these returnees’ impact on family ownership and corporate entrepreneurship in the Chinese context. This could generate a new value to the family entrepreneurship literature.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-03-12T02:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-08-2017-0241
       
  • The effects of innovation speed and quality on differentiation and
           low-cost competitive advantage
    • Pages: 305 - 322
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 305-322, June 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to verify the effect of organizational learning (OL) and two specific aspects of innovation, innovation speed and innovation quality, on competitive advantage. Design/methodology/approach Structural equation modeling has been applied to test the degree of influence of OL and innovation on two types of competitive advantage (differentiation and low-cost advantage) using data collected from 279 Chinese firms. Findings The findings show that innovation speed and quality play mediating roles in the relationship between OL and competitive advantage. In general, while innovation speed has greater effects on low-cost competitive advantage, OL and innovation quality have greater effects on differentiation competitive advantage. Research limitations/implications This paper offers directors/managers a deeper understanding of the factors necessary to promote competitive advantage in their firms. Practical implications This paper offers CEOs/managers a deeper understanding of the necessary factors needed to promote competitive advantage in their firms. Originality/value This paper provides practical and theoretical initiatives on innovation and competitive advantage that can be used to promote specific aspects of innovation and build up competitive advantage for relevant organizations.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-02-23T01:29:21Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-10-2016-0195
       
  • How entrepreneurs’ Zhong-yong thinking improves new venture
           performance
    • Pages: 323 - 345
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 323-345, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to focus on the cultural cognition of Chinese Zhong-yong thinking, which is deeply rooted in Chinese Confucius culture, and to examine how entrepreneurs’ Zhong-yong thinking is related to new venture performance through guanxi network, and also examine how environmental turbulence affects the influencing mechanism. Design/methodology/approach This paper follows an empirical design. Data are collected from a survey administered to entrepreneurs in new ventures of China. Regression analysis is used to test the hypothesis. Findings Results show that entrepreneurs’ Zhong-yong thinking is positively related to guanxi and new venture performance, and guanxi mediates the relationship between entrepreneurs’ Zhong-yong thinking and new venture performance. In addition, environmental turbulence moderates the relationship between entrepreneurs’ Zhong-yong thinking and guanxi such that the relationship is stronger under higher technological turbulence or lower market turbulence. Research limitations/implications This research uses cross-sectional data, so causal conclusions cannot be made. In addition, more moderators should be considered. Practical implications The present study enriches the understanding of how entrepreneurs’ Zhong-yong thinking affects new ventures, which helps entrepreneur understand how to strategize according to external environment and develop what kind of cognitive style to deal with complex situation of their own venture. Originality/value This study is a pioneer in exploring non-Western cognitive style–Zhong-yong thinking in entrepreneurial context. It not only enriches the understanding of how Chinese wisdom affects organizational strategy and organizational performance but also advances the cognition research in the field of entrepreneurship.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-03-05T03:16:35Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-10-2016-0219
       
  • Why do I conform to your ideas'
    • Pages: 346 - 368
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 346-368, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to advance and test a new construct, harmony voice. Furthermore, according to the social influence theory, the relationship between zhongyong, an essential Confucian orientation mode and voice behavior, and the moderating role of coworker’s regulatory focus (promotion focus and prevention focus) has been examined. Design/methodology/approach A field study has been designed to test our hypotheses. We used samples of 291 employee–coworker dyads from a variety of organizations in China to test this study’s hypotheses. Findings The results of this empirical study show that zhongyong is positively related to harmony voice. Coworkers’ promotion focus strengthens the positive effect of zhongyong on harmony voice, and coworkers’ prevention focus weakens the positive effect of zhongyong on harmony voice. Research limitations/implications Traditionally defined voice and harmony voice might cause different risks to the voicer. However, how and what kinds of risks may be differently caused by these two types of voice behaviors have not been examined in this study. Future empirical research can explore the different effects of traditionally defined voice and harmony voice. Practical implications Managers responsible for managing Chinese employees should notice the difference in some important ways of thinking between Easterners and Westerners. Specifically, zhongyong may direct people to express issues related to work in ways that are different from those of their Western counterparts. Harmony voice can benefit the Chinese organization without disrupting organizational development. Social implications By examining the relationship between zhongyong and harmony voice, we contribute to identifying antecedents of voice by using an emic research perspective. Originality/value We made significant theoretical contributions to voice literature. We developed the construct of harmony voice, and we examined the relationship between zhongyong and voice.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-03-15T12:00:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-03-2017-0056
       
  • Cognitive diversity and creativity in teams: the mediating roles of team
           learning and inclusion
    • Pages: 369 - 383
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 369-383, June 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to identify the mechanisms through which cognitive diversity affects creativity. It explores how and in what ways cognitive diversity affects team members by examining the mediating roles of team learning and inclusion. Design/methodology/approach Questionnaire survey data were collected from matched supervisor and employee pairs from a direct sales company in the health-care industry in China. The final sample consisted of 216 employees from 48 teams, with a response rate of 90 per cent. Each employee’s immediate supervisor rated his or her creativity and in-role performance. Findings The empirical results indicate that team learning and inclusion mediate the effect of cognitive diversity on creativity. Research limitations/implications This study was conducted in a single organisation in China and used subjective self-reported measures. Practical implications The results suggest that diversity training reduces the negative consequences of team diversity and offer practical insights into the effectiveness of diversity management and the ways to create a diverse and inclusive workplace. The study should help human resource professionals to identify human resources strategies that stimulate an inclusive environment and leverage the benefits associated with higher levels of diversity. Social implications The findings have significant implications for developing and maintaining social harmony. Originality/value The uniqueness of this study is its simultaneous investigation of diversity and inclusion and how they lead to creativity.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-03-05T03:22:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-09-2017-0262
       
  • Linking authoritarian leadership to employee creativity
    • Pages: 384 - 406
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 384-406, June 2018.
      Purpose The present study aims to examine how and when authoritarian leadership affects employee creativity. Based on social exchange theory and team identification literature, the present research attempts to simultaneously explore how leader–member exchange (LMX) and team identification serve as two important mediating processes in the relationship between authoritarian leadership and employee creativity. Furthermore, this research uncovers the mechanism under which conditions the effects of authoritarian leadership will be magnified or minimized. Design/methodology/approach A survey has been conducted in China by using a questionnaire to collect data. The study sample consisted of 325 employees. LISREL 8.7 and SPSS 18.0 were used to test the mediating and moderating effects, respectively. Findings Results from 325 employees revealed that both LMX and team identification mediated the negative relationships between authoritarian leadership and employee creativity. Specifically, the relationship between two mediators was that LMX was positively related to team identification. In addition, the relationship between authoritarian leaderships and LMX and team identification was moderated by power distance, such that the negative relationships will be weaker with high power distance and stronger with low power distance. Practical implications First, firms and managers should recognize and take actions to reduce the negative effects of authoritarian leadership, such as effective selection system and interventional mechanisms because authoritarian leadership is important in influencing employee creativity. Second, managers are suggested to take specific actions, such as increasing communications and team-building activities, to promote LMX and team identification, thereby enhancing employee creativity. Third, managers should engage in behaviors that motivate employee creativity, such as empowerment behaviors, other than authoritarian leadership, when the employee has low power distance. Originality/value The primary contribution of this research is that two psychological processes (i.e. LMX and team identification) have been identified through which authoritarian leadership is related to employee creativity. Meanwhile, this study explores the relationship between LMX and team identification. Moreover, the current research deepens our understanding of power distance by empirically examining the moderating effect of power distance. Overall, the findings extend our understanding about the relationship between authoritarian leadership and employee creativity and contribute to literature on authoritarian leadership and creativity.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-03-09T03:00:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-10-2017-0294
       
  • Effect of the critical human resource attributes on operating performances
    • Pages: 407 - 432
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 407-432, June 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to explore the relationship between human resource attributes and the operating performances of accounting firms by sampling data from the 2012-2013 Survey Report on Accounting Firms, as compiled by the Financial Supervisory Commission in Taiwan. Design/methodology/approach Multiple regression analysis is conducted to measure operating performances with various measurements, such as operating profits and business diversification. The independent variables include male to female ratio, percentage of senior executives, percentage of employees with higher education backgrounds, organizational vitality, human resource diversity, percentage of employees with certified public accountant (CPA) qualifications and human resource costs (HRCs). The control variables are the firm history, market shares and ownership structures since the inception of the firms. Findings The empirical results regarding the operating profits model suggest that the higher the male to female ratio, the percentage of employees with higher education backgrounds, organizational vitality, human resource diversity, percentage of employees with CPA qualifications and HRCs, the greater the operating profits. Meanwhile, the findings regarding the business diversification model indicate that the higher the male to female ratio, percentage of senior executives and human resource diversity, the greater the business diversification. Originality/value It is intended that the research findings can assist the management of accounting firms to understand the human resource attributes critical to operating performances, which will help to enhance the competitiveness of employees, mitigate the operating risks and improve the operating performances of the firms.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-04-18T10:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-10-2017-0296
       
  • Linking leadership styles to work engagement
    • Pages: 433 - 452
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 433-452, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between leadership styles, psychological capital and job engagement. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected among knowledge workers working no less than 1 year in three high-tech enterprises in Henan Province, China. The investigation was conducted with the cooperation from the human resource departments of the selected enterprises from August to October 2014. To minimize potential common method bias, the authors adopted a cross-lagged design with a time gap of four months. The statistical methods included descriptive statistics, structural equation modeling (SEM) and bootstrap analysis. Findings The results showed: leadership styles significantly influenced employees’ psychological capital and work engagement; specifically, transformational and transactional leadership positively predicted employees’ psychological capital and work engagement; compared with transactional leadership, transformational leadership had stronger predictive power to employees’ psychological capital and work engagement; employees’ psychological capital positively predicted their work engagement; and employees’ psychological capital acts as partial mediator between leadership styles and employees’ work engagement. Originality/value Although a body of studies have shown that leadership is an important factor influencing employees’ work attitude and outcomes, it is only in recent years that the effect mechanism of leadership becomes a hot subject in organizational behavior and management fields. As for leadership styles, in general, most research concerned transformational leadership, rather than transactional leadership and only a little of research compared the effects of transformational leadership and transactional leadership on employees’ work outcomes. In terms of outcomes of leadership, as noted earlier, the previous research mainly explored job performance, job satisfaction, innovation behavior, job burnout and so on. Regarding the effect of leadership styles on employees’ work engagement, in spite of more and more supportive evidence of the link between transformational leadership and work engagement, few studies examined the relationship between transactional leadership and work engagement. What’s more, to the best of our knowledge, till now, no empirical research has explored the internal mechanism of this effect from the perspective of psychological capital. Therefore, the present study is a breakthrough for the direct model of leadership styles and employees’ engagement, theoretically bridges the research gap and contributes to the existing literature by presenting a new picture of leadership behavior effect mechanism.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-04-12T09:19:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-04-2017-0108
       
  • How destructive leadership influences compulsory organizational
           citizenship behavior
    • Pages: 453 - 468
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 453-468, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the underlying influence of destructive leadership on hindrance stress and compulsory organizational citizenship behavior (CCB) by developing a moderated mediation model, which examines the mediating role of hindrance stress and the moderating role of supervisor–subordinate guanxi. Design/methodology/approach By using 324 samples collected from multiple companies in southeast China, the model is tested through multiple linear hierarchical regressions, correlation analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and PROCESS bootstrapping program in SPSS and AMOS software. Findings Results reveal that hindrance stress fully mediates the relationship between destructive leadership and CCB, and supervisor–subordinate guanxi moderates the strength of the indirect effect between destructive leadership and CCB (via hindrance stress), so that the mediated relationship is stronger when supervisor–subordinate guanxi is low rather than high. Originality/value The study contributes to display the influence path and contingency mechanism of destructive leadership as a stressor on employees’ negative behavior in the workplace. The moderated mediation model results not only develop the research on the relationship between negative leadership and employee behavior in terms of leadership effectiveness but also provide a new viewpoint to explore the relationship between leadership and employee behavior.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-04-11T10:40:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-10-2017-0298
       
  • Perceived organizational support and employee well-being
    • Pages: 469 - 484
      Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 469-484, June 2018.
      Purpose Considering work and family responsibility has become an important issue due to changes in the lives of people, understanding work and family responsibilities is essential for organizations in assisting employees to increase their well-being. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to find the impact of perceived organizational support (POS) on work–family facilitation (WFF) and work–family conflict (WFC) and eventually on employee well-being. Design/methodology/approach A survey questionnaire is administered to 1,340 employees of Chinese enterprises. Structural equation modeling is used to test the model fit. Findings Results of this study indicate a significant positive relationship between POS and WFF and significant negative relation between POS and WFC. Results of this paper also indicate that WFF and WFC partially mediate the relationship between POS and employee well-being. Originality/value Over the past two decades, the extent of research on work–family literature has been increased. Most of the work–family research works have been conducted in the Western countries. Very little is known about whether these results are applicable to Eastern societies. This study is extended to focus on work–family literature by drawing a sample from different regions of China. The findings of this study may provide a good understanding of WFC and WFF for Chinese employees. This study stresses the importance of providing organizational support to increase the well-being of employees.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T10:35:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-07-2017-0211
       
  • How HR practice, work engagement and job crafting influence employee
           performance
    • Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Scholars have adopted different theoretical perspectives to explain the influence of HR practice on employee outcomes. However, few studies have investigated the role of human resource (HR) practice in fostering higher in-role and extra-role employee performance by encouraging employee participation in job design, a process referred to as job crafting. Drawing on human resource management (HRM) process theory and the job crafting literature, this study aims to examine how work engagement and job crafting mediate the relationship between employee perceptions of HR practice and employee performance. Design/methodology/approach The authors use survey on a sample of 455 employees working in five Chinese manufacturing firms to test their theoretical model. Findings This study finds that where management maintains a strong HR system, employees are more likely to be engaged in their work and participate in job crafting. In addition, job crafting on its own, and work engagement and job crafting together, are shown to mediate the HRM–performance relationship. Research limitations/implications In a Chinese context, line managers (including supervisors) are both important implementers of HR policy and vary in their adoption of particular roles. Yet our research did not consider the role of these persons in facilitating work engagement or job crafting. Future studies could usefully explore how these managers vary in their attitudes towards job crafting and the roles they play in encouraging this important activity. Practical implications One important implication is that strong HR system with distinctive, consistent and consensus HR practices should be used by managers to motivate employees to encourage work engagement and job crafting behaviours. Originality/value This study enriches the theoretical framework to explain the underlying mechanism between HRM and employee performance from job crafting perspective.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-05-25T01:06:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-11-2017-0328
       
  • Work values across generations in China
    • Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to examine how the perceived importance of work values differs among the three generations (Cultural Revolution, Social Reform and Millennial) in the Chinese workforce. Design/methodology/approach Grounded in work values and generation theories, hypotheses were tested by empirical data collected from 464 Chinese employees from companies located in the Yangtze River Delta of China. A one-way multivariate analysis of covariance and a series of one-way analysis of covariance and t-tests were conducted to compare the three generations with respect to work values. Findings The results revealed significant generational differences existing in China with respect to extrinsic–intrinsic work values measured by the work-need typology (Huseman and Hatfield, 1990). After controlling for demographic variables, Millennial employees were found to show the highest preference for both extrinsic and intrinsic work values, followed by the Social Reform generation, whereas the Cultural Revolution generation scored lowest. Additionally, important similarities across the three generations were also found. Research limitations/implications These findings highlight the complex nature of generational phenomena and suggest the need to further develop a deep appreciation and understanding of the underlying reasons for those generational differences and similarities. Originality/value Drawing from generation and work values theory, the authors developed a theoretical framework that allows us to directly compare the three generations in the Chinese workforce with respect to the magnitude of importance each generation attaches to various work priorities. The present study represents an important initial step in throwing more light on the mechanisms underlying the observed generational differences and similarities in work values.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-05-18T12:51:29Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-12-2017-0357
       
  • Advance or face
    • Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose In accordance with the traditional ranking of “scholar, farmer, artisan and merchant” in China, entrepreneurs are characterized as having lower social status, and are driven by face consciousness to engage in conspicuous consumption. Education is not only a human capital investment but also a conspicuous consumption good. This study aims to investigate how entrepreneurial households manage their education expenditure differently from non-entrepreneurial households and what the underlying mechanism is. Design/methodology/approach Using Chinese Household Finance Survey 2011 data, this study empirically examines the education expenditure differentials between entrepreneurial and non-entrepreneurial households. Regression analyses on matched samples are carried out and the results are quite robust across different model specifications. Findings On the basis of the empirical analysis, this study finds that entrepreneurial households annually spend 19.30 per cent more on education than non-entrepreneurial households. The empirical results provide no evidence that education generates a greater increase in income for entrepreneurial households than for their non-entrepreneurial counterparts, which indicates that the education expenditure differentials do not result from different income returns to education. The findings show that education is a conspicuous good and the gap in education expenditure is partially attributable to different demands for the conspicuous consumption, which results from different face consciousness between the two kinds of households. Originality/value The results of this study reveal the significance and economic consequences of face consciousness for entrepreneurial households from the perspective of education.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-05-18T12:49:29Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-11-2017-0321
       
  • Firm CSR implementation and societal moral degradation
    • Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to examine how firms respond to societal moral degradation in a transition economy from the corporate social responsibility (CSR) perspective. Design/methodology/approach Based on a survey of 302 firms operating in China and using hierarchical regression, this study explores the effect of societal moral degradation on firm CSR implementation. Findings The study finds that the amount of CSR performed by firms in a transition market will reduce when they face increased moral degradation in the business field. The authors also find that CSR philanthropy is more significantly deterred by societal moral degradation than CSR sustainability. Practical implications These findings reveal that firms conducting CSR initiatives need to strategically consider the great influence of environment. Meanwhile, strategic CSR decisions should be fully aware of the different characters of different CSR forms. Originality/value This paper draws on the strategic choice theory and contributes to understanding of the influence of specific environmental factors in transition economies on CSR implementation. Based on two main categories of CSR, this study develops a framework that explores how firms choose different CSR forms when they encounter severe moral degradation in business sector.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-05-17T12:57:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-08-2017-0248
       
  • Building firm capability through imitative innovation: Chinese
           manufacturing SME cases
    • Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to investigate how firm capability can be accumulated with the inputs of learning efforts targeted at resolving barriers existing in the imitative innovation process. This paper takes imitative innovation as a process involving a few stages during which learning efforts are targeted at overcoming barriers existing within each process. Design/methodology/approach The multiple case study approach has been adopted to explore how Chinese manufacturing small and medium enterprises (SMEs) learn and increase their technological capabilities through a continuous process of product refinement and improvement based on imitative innovation. In particular, the authors accentuate the learning efforts that firms must make to cope with various technological barriers Findings It is revealed that during the initial stages of imitative innovation, the organizational learning of Chinese manufacturing SMEs is highly constrained by the limitations of their technological resources and capabilities. It is also found that original equipment manufacturers can play an important role in providing Chinese learners with both explicit and tacit technological knowledge. Originality/value This study investigates how firm capability can be accumulated with the inputs of learning efforts targeted at resolving barriers existing in the imitative innovation process. The multiple case study approach has been adopted to explore how Chinese manufacturing SMEs learn and increase their technological capabilities through a continuous process of product refinement and improvement based on imitative innovation that could add new and great value to this research area.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-05-14T02:03:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-05-2017-0117
       
  • Exploitation versus exploration
    • Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to draw on the network perspective of organizational innovation to present an argument on how a subsidiary should select innovation behavior. Design/methodology/approach In this framework, the paper analyzes middle- and high-level managers of subsidiaries from various industries located in the Chinese Mainland. Findings The results suggest the following ideas: internal embeddedness is positively related to exploitation innovation, external embeddedness is inverted-U related to exploration innovation, the availability of alternatives positively moderates the main effects, whereas restraint in the use of power negatively moderates them. Research limitations/implications The current study has a few limitations that provide meaningful research directions for future investigations. First, it only considers the industry and ownership as control variables. Second, this study was conducted in the Chinese context. Practical implications The analysis of the relationship between embeddedness and innovation behavior also shows that focal subsidiary must dynamically adjust the way of embeddedness on the basis of its strategy, and it can reasonable leverage strategic assets for exploitation innovation or exploration innovation. From the perspective of headquarters, establishing deep embeddedness with a subsidiary and giving it indispensable support are important to promote that subsidiary’s exploitation innovation. Social implications The focal subsidiary should establish relationships with more alternative partners and develop relationships with power-advantaged partners through strategies such as a long-term contract, establishing an R&D alliance and entering a joint venture. Besides this, more powerful partners in the internal network should adopt various power usage strategies to promote focal subsidiary exploitation innovation and more powerful partners in the external network should show restraint in the use of power toward any subsidiary in an over-embedded situation. The result shows environment dynamism affects subsidiary exploration innovation more deeply than exploitation innovation. Consequently, managers should recognize the importance of dynamic adaptation to environmental changes and adjust their firms’ innovation behavior accordingly, especially when they are implementing an exploration innovation strategy. Originality/value The extent of embeddedness in an innovation network shapes the subsidiary innovation behavior, and this effect is moderated by power. The focal subsidiary should dynamically and strategically adjust its innovation behavior considering various its type and level of embeddedness.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-04-20T01:27:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-09-2017-0278
       
  • Gain without pay causes lazybones’ loss
    • Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Building on social informational processing theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop and test a theoretical model of moderated mediation in which social loafing tendency serves as an intervening mechanism that explains associations among two dimensions of leader–member relationships (formal and informal relationships, namely, leader–member exchange and leader–member guanxi) and customer service performance. Design/methodology/approach The authors designed a field study to test the hypotheses presented in this paper. A survey of 304 supervisor–employee pairs and matched customers generally provide support for this model. Findings The authors found that social loafing tendency played a mediating role between leader–member relationships and customer service performance. Co-worker service-oriented OCB moderated the positive relationship between leader–member guanxi and loafing tendency. Research limitations/implications More samples should be collected from both private and state-owned company. Both the informal and formal leader–member relationships should be unanimously included in examining how the leader–member relationships influence focal employee’s attitude and behavior, particularly in societies where the informal relationship plays noticeable role. Practical implications Managers should properly deal with formal and informal relationship with subordinates. Originality/value The influence of leader–member guanxi on employees and organization is controversial in extant literature. In some sense, this finding contributes to extant literature by further clarifying the influence of guanxi on the focal employee’s performance.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-04-19T09:02:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-03-2017-0057
       
  • The impact of B2B seller’s value appropriation upon customer
           relationship performance
    • Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Value appropriation and value creation are two sides of the same coin. How B2B seller’s value appropriation impacts customer relationship performance still remains an under-researched topic. This paper aims to probe into this question in the context of Chinese B2B markets. Design/methodology/approach This study identifies two kinds of value appropriation, namely, competitive and non-competitive and then examines their impacts upon customer relationship performance, as well as the moderating roles of distributive fairness and procedural fairness, based on questionnaire survey among 273 Chinese B2B firms. Findings The authors find that seller’s competitive value appropriation has negative impact upon customer relationship performance, and this link is positively moderated by customer-perceived distributive fairness. Besides, non-competitive value appropriation by the seller has significant and positive impact upon customer relationship performance, and this link is positively moderated by customer-perceived procedural fairness. Originality/value The paper contributes greatly to literature of value management and industrial buyer–seller relationship. Managerial implications are provided for B2B companies operating in Chinese market to tackle with the tradeoff between appropriating sufficient value and retaining harmonious relationship with customers.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-04-03T10:38:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-09-2017-0253
       
  • Triple-down model of capability, job characteristics and burnout
    • Abstract: Chinese Management Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose A Chinese proverb states: “Able people should do more work.” Although working hard is a common workplace phenomenon, does it lead to burnout in capable people' This study aims to examine the interactive effects of superior-perceived capability and subordinates’ self-efficacy on subordinate job demands, job involvement and burnout in frontline employees in the hospitality industry. Design/methodology/approach Data on 41 superiors and 161 subordinates from 16 hotels in Taiwan were collected. Hierarchical linear modeling is used to examine the research hypotheses. Findings The findings support the hypothesis that self-efficacy leads to high levels of burnout and job involvement. However, superior-perceived capability has no impact on subordinate job demand, job involvement or burnout. While job demands are positively related to the emotional exhaustion of burnout, job involvement is negatively related to depersonalization of burnout. In addition, job involvement partially mediates the relationship between self-efficacy and depersonalization of burnout. Originality/value Based on the job demands–resources theory, this study reveals the fresh point of view for the effect of self-efficacy on burnout. This paper explores the dark-side role of self-efficacy for burnout – higher self-efficacy leads to higher burnout – that is contrary to the findings from previous studies and hinges on Chinese cultural values. In addition, the current study provides guidelines for top managers to protect capable employees from burnout by enhancing intrinsic motivation and job involvement.
      Citation: Chinese Management Studies
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T10:36:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CMS-05-2017-0120
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-