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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal  
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 275)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 137, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 123, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 362, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)

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Journal Cover Journal of Forensic Practice
  [SJR: 0.225]   [H-I: 8]   [50 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 2050-8794
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Staff perceptions of positive behavioural support in a secure forensic
           adult mental health setting
    • Pages: 42 - 53
      Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Volume 20, Issue 1, Page 42-53, February 2018.
      Purpose Challenging behaviour has been a concern across forensic services. Traditionally these have been managed reactively using medication, seclusion and restraint; however, there is growing evidence that these approaches are ineffective and counter-therapeutic. A number of reports have recommended the use of preventative approaches such as positive behavioural support (PBS). The purpose of this paper is to identify “how staff within a secure forensic mental health setting perceived the application of PBS'” Design/methodology/approach In total, 11 multi-disciplinary staff were interviewed and thematic analysis was used to identify themes. Findings Five themes were identified: “The Functions”, “Appraising a new Approach”, “Collaborative Challenges”, “Staff Variables” and “Organisational Issues”. Practical implications PBS enables staff to understand challenging or risky behaviour. It empowers patients via collaboration, although there can be some challenges to this. Services need to invest in training, support and leadership to ensure the model is embed and promote fidelity. Consideration needs to be given to how quality of life can be improved within the limits of a forensic setting. Originality/value No previous studies asking staff about their experiences of PBS within a forensic mental health context.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-18T02:08:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-10-2017-0044
       
  • Sexual aggression in sport
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the sexual aggression in sport literature, including an analysis of interventions delivered to athletes that focus on the role of the coach and wider sporting community. The paper will also discuss the limitations of applying such prevention methods and possible directions for future research. Design/methodology/approach This paper provides an overview of research investigating the prevalence of sexually aggressive behaviour perpetrated by athletes, theoretical explanations of their sexual misconduct, and the application of violence prevention methods delivered to athletes. Findings Research findings are discussed in relation to the prevalence of sexual aggression in sport and the efficacy of prevention methods. Originality/value This is a viewpoint piece on sexual aggression in sport.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-02-14T09:09:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-10-2017-0042
       
  • Staff support procedures in a low-secure forensic service
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Staff working in forensic inpatient settings are at increased risk of harm perpetrated by patients. Support offered in response to such incidents can have a significant impact on how staff recover. The purpose of this paper is to explore how staff support procedures implemented in one low-secure forensic service impacted on staff recovery. Design/methodology/approach In total, 11 members of staff who had direct patient contact volunteered from an opportunity sample. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with each participant, asking about experiences of abuse at work and subsequent staff support procedures. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings Four overarching themes were identified; experiences of harm, supported recovery, missed opportunities and therapeutic relationships. This led to a better understanding of how staff coped with incidents of abuse at work and how support procedures impacted on their recovery. Research limitations/implications The service evaluation was limited by transferability of the findings. The process of sampling may have meant there were biases in those who volunteered to take part. Further projects such as this are required to develop the themes identified. Practical implications Findings led to the development of a new integrated model of staff support. Originality/value This was one of the first studies in the UK to formally evaluate a staff support procedure in forensic low-secure services and include experiences of both clinical and non-clinical staff who are regularly exposed to potentially harmful events.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-02-09T08:56:52Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-09-2017-0034
       
  • A systematic review of risk variables for child abuse material offenders
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to collate the available research into the characteristics of child abuse material (CAM) offenders to inform future assessment and treatment options. This systematic review collates the contribution and directionality of variables from existing research assessing an offenders’ use of CAM. Design/methodology/approach Background and definitions of terminology are reviewed, and a summary of sexual reoffending rates provided. Articles were then identified for inclusion through a systematic review using online searches, EBSCOHost and other databases. Articles were also identified from reference lists. After exclusions, the final sample (n=17) were reviewed for identified variables and their directional contribution to risk. Findings Internet only (IO) offenders present with a range of similarities and differences. The demographic, psychological and offence-specific risk variables identified suggest IO offenders differ from other types of sexual offenders. Using the collated variables, IO offender profiles are suggested. Research limitations/implications Limitations have been identified in the availability of research in this area, the variety of terminology and the definitions in common usage. Additionally, there are challenges in ascertaining the truthfulness of self-reported data. Practical implications Development of IO offender-specific risk assessment tools would contribute to advances in targeted supervision and treatment. In turn, this contributes to community safety by protecting children from online sexual victimisation. Originality/value Based on identified gaps, this review contributes to ongoing research by signalling future pathways for IO offender-specific risk assessment.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-31T02:41:17Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-05-2017-0013
       
  • Psychological trauma in professionals working with traumatised children
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Clinical professionals working with psychologically traumatised children in the care system can experience potential challenges maintaining their own positive psychological health, and when repeatedly being exposed to the traumatic histories of those in their care. The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of vicarious trauma and provide a guide for focussing on future research. Design/methodology/approach This is a systematic literature review, considering 13 articles that met the criteria and identified five main themes linked to secondary traumatic stress/vicarious trauma in staff. Findings Five main themes were noted. These are: lack of organisational support; lack of health work-life balance; lack of appropriate training; failure to use self-care techniques; and staff failure to share when they are experiencing symptoms. Practical implications Various implications are noted from this review. These include: the importance of education and support for staff, to be mindful that newer staff may be considered an “at risk” group for the negative impact of such trauma, and to encourage staff in achieving an effective work-life balance. Originality/value This is a focussed systematic review on secondary and vicarious trauma on staff working with children exposed to psychological trauma, such as sexual and physical abuse.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-29T03:41:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-10-2017-0045
       
  • Outcomes of secure forensic older adult inpatients compared to younger
           adult inpatients
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Specialist forensic psychiatric inpatient services are for older adults who pose a risk to themselves or others, and are experiencing mental illness (Shah, 2006). There is a lack of information on the outcomes of older forensic inpatients. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the progress of older adults from admission to exit. Design/methodology/approach The Health of Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) is a measure of health and social functioning and the HoNOS-secure scale additionally assesses the need for secure care. The Short-Term Assessment of Risk Treatability (START) is designed to facilitate risk assessment and inform and improve risk management. Routinely collected data on age, gender, hospitalisation days, ICD-10 diagnosis, and HoNOS-secure and START entry and exit scores were extracted from an anonymous database. Outcomes for 56 older patients (aged 55 and over) were compared to 465 younger adult patients. Findings Younger patients significantly improved on all four HoNOS factors (severe disturbance, emotional wellbeing, socio-economic status, and personal wellbeing) and most START factors, but the older patients did not significantly improve on any HoNOS or START factor. Research limitations/implications Data analysed are from a single provider of secure services. Male patients were overrepresented in the sample. Practical implications The benefits of specialist old age psychiatric forensic services need to be established through further investigation of patient outcomes using appropriate measures. A study interviewing patients and clinicians is required to understand and facilitate progress on a broad range of recovery, clinical, social, wellbeing, quality of life, and risk factors. Originality/value The findings indicate that older patient’s needs may not being met or that there may be a lack of potential for progress on the measures employed.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-23T01:48:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-09-2017-0035
       
  • Healthcare assistants’ experiences on forensic mental health wards
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose In forensic mental health wards, patients spend more time with healthcare assistants (HCAs) than qualified nurses. Despite this, there is no universally utilised standardised HCA training. The purpose of this paper is to assess the HCAs’ experiences in the HCA role in order to better understand how to build on the HCA role to ensure safe practice, and enhance staff well-being. Design/methodology/approach HCAs working on low and medium secure NHS forensic mental health units were recruited through purposive methods. HCAs engaged in a semi-structured interview, with questions surrounding their support needs, clinical decision making and perception of risks in the role. Template analysis was used, applying an a priori template based on the existing literature to interview transcripts. Findings The participants described the HCA experience to be defined by two master themes: “HCA factors” and “organisational factors”. HCAs valued a holistic patient view which prized patients’ experiences. The participants described a lack of role clarity which may be defined through ward expectations and professional experience. Originality/value HCAs seek a holistic view of the patient; however, some overlooked patient offences in order to do their job. Future research should address how looking past offences impacts security and HCAs’ well-being long term.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-22T02:48:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-07-2017-0028
       
  • Violence and aggression towards staff in secure settings
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to undertake a systematic literature review to appraise the current evidence relating to the factors associated with violence and aggression in adult psychiatric hospital inpatient settings. Design/methodology/approach A systematic search of following four databases was conducted: Scopus, PsychINFO Medline, CIHAHL and PsychArticle. Following the application of the inclusion criteria, ten papers were extracted and included in the review. A quality appraisal tool, Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) version 2011 (Pluye et al., 2011), was employed for the appraisal of the qualitative and quantitative studies. MMAT has been designed for systematic literature reviews that include qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods studies. Of these, eight were of quantitative methodology and two were of qualitative studies. Findings These ten papers provide an insight into factors associated with violence and aggression towards nursing staff. Three main themes were identified: the environment, attitudes/interaction of staff, and the patient’s mental illness. The themes were important factors in the causes of violence but were interlinked highlighting the complex nature of violence towards nursing staff. The findings support the need for training for nursing staff and the development of ongoing support and for organisations to consider both the environment and the restrictive procedures to help reduce violence and aggression towards nursing staff. Practical implications The paper concludes by outlining the importance of considering the three main themes for clinical practice, training and development of secure services. Originality/value This paper gives insight into the factors associated with patient violence and aggression towards nursing staff in a secure setting.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-10T02:33:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-05-2017-0015
       
  • Changing the perception of police culture: recognising masculinity
           diversity and difference in a “dirty hands” vocation
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to problematise the application of hegemonic masculinity to police practice and culture. Design/methodology/approach This paper offers a viewpoint and is a discussion paper critiquing the application of hegemonic masculinity to police officers, their practice and culture. Findings The paper suggests that a broader conceptualisation of masculinity, offered by scholars such as Demetriou (2001), is required when considering policing and its culture, in order to more accurately reflect the activity and those involved in it. Research limitations/implications Writings concerning police practice and culture, both in the media and academic discourse, are questionable due to the application of hegemonic masculinity. The application of hegemonic masculinity can create a biased perception of policing and police officers. Practical implications The paper helps to engender a more accurate and balanced examination of the police, their culture and practice when writing about policing institutions and encourage social institutions such as academia to address bias in their examination of policing institutions and police officers. Originality/value There has been limited consideration in regards to multiple masculinities, police practice and culture.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-10T02:31:27Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-06-2017-0020
       
  • How do high-risk young adult prisoners with emerging personality disorders
           describe the process of change in therapy'
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the views of young adult prisoners with emerging personality disorders (PDs), who were assessed as posing a high risk of causing serious harm to others, on the process of therapeutic change in a non-residential treatment service in a UK young offender institute. The treatment model utilises an integrated approach, specifically adapted for the developmental needs of young adults and combining therapies for PD with offence focussed interventions and regular keywork. Design/methodology/approach In total, 13 participants, who had completed at least one year of therapy, were interviewed about their perspectives about what, if any, change had occurred and how any reported change had taken place. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed via thematic analysis. Findings All participants described having made positive therapeutic change. Three overarching change themes were identified: mentalisation of others, self-knowledge and adaptive coping. Relationships with staff were described as the key mechanism through which change was achieved. Specific treatment interventions were mentioned infrequently, although keywork and generic individual therapy and groupwork sessions were also described as drivers to change. Originality/value The findings suggest the possibility of positive therapeutic outcomes for this complex service user group. They also suggest that the domains of change and associated mechanisms may be similar to those reported for other service user groups and in other settings.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-10T02:21:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-09-2017-0039
       
  • Development of forensic normative data for the WAIS-IV
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) (Wechsler, 2008) is a cognitive assessment that is often used in secure forensic settings, however it has not been normed on this population. The purpose of this paper is to develop forensic normative data. Design/methodology/approach Patient files in a high secure forensic hospital were reviewed in order to obtain completed WAIS-IV (Wechsler, 2008) assessments and scores from the five indexes (verbal comprehension, perceptual reasoning, working memory, processing speed and full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ)). This included reviewing patient files from all directorates, including male mental health, male learning disability, male personality disorder and the women’s service, yielding a sample size of n=86. Findings The qualitative descriptors obtained across the hospital ranged between extremely low and superior. The learning disability service scored significantly lower than the mental health and personality disorder services in verbal comprehension index, perceptual reasoning index, working memory index and FSIQ, and significantly lower than the mental health, personality disorder and women’s services in processing speed index. Mean scores from this study were significantly lower in comparison to those from the UK validation study (Wechsler, 2008). Practical implications The significant difference between scores from the current study and those from the UK validation study (Wechsler, 2008) highlights the need to have appropriate normative data for forensic populations. Clinicians should consider interventions that may serve to increase cognitive function, such as cognitive remediation therapy. Originality/value Whilst several special group studies have previously been conducted, this study is the first to develop forensic normative data for the WAIS-IV (Wechsler, 2008). Whilst the sample size was relatively small with limited female participants, the data collated will enable clinicians working in forensic establishments to interpret their assessments in light of this information.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-10T02:15:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-08-2017-0029
       
  • Violent offender treatment in a medium secure unit
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to conduct a preliminary evaluation of a Violent Offender Treatment Program (VOTP) adapted for use in a medium secure unit (MSU). The patient population is adult male mentally disordered offenders. Design/methodology/approach Patient outcomes are explored using the Reliable Change Index and Clinical Significance Criterion. Outcomes are assessed using VOTP facilitators violence risk assessment (VRS), multi-disciplinary team violence risk assessment (HCR-20 and GAS-V), and patient self-report using two measures (FAVT and STAXI-2). Findings There was evidence of improved outcomes for some participants in some areas related to risk of violence. Research limitations/implications Consideration is given to using varied risk assessments to evaluate outcomes of an adapted VOTP for a MSU. Originality/value There is limited development and evaluation of psychological treatment programmes that aim to reduce risk of violence for male offenders within MSUs. Outcomes of this evaluation could influence treatment delivery and evaluation in other services.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T12:57:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-06-2017-0019
       
  • “I kind of find that out by accident”: probation staff experiences of
           pharmacological treatment for sexual preoccupation and hypersexuality
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the views and experiences of probation staff working with individuals convicted of a sexual offence who have been prescribed medication to manage sexual arousal (MMSA). Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured interviews were utilised with a sample of probation staff (offender supervisors and managers, n=12), who supervise individuals convicted of a sexual offence, either in prison, or post-release in the community. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings Two main themes emerged: barriers for probation staff and suspicious but hopeful. Theme 1 encapsulates factors that prevent probation staff from engaging with MMSA; theme 2 highlighted the samples’ uncertainty and mistrust of the use of medication as a potential tool for risk management and scepticism about individuals’ motivations, particularly in the community. Research limitations/implications The main limitation of this study was the differing levels of knowledge the sample had about MMSA and their subsequent ability to discuss MMSA other than in a theoretical sense. Practical implications Practical implications include the need for further training for probation staff, improved collaboration between departments and ongoing support for staff to support the success of the MMSA intervention. Originality/value This study offers a novel perspective on MMSA – that of the probation staff supervising prisoners taking MMSA. This has not been explored before, and the findings and associated implications are of importance for the treatment and care of those convicted of sexual offences.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T03:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-09-2017-0036
       
  • Random assignment in sexual offending programme evaluation: the missing
           method
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The need for random assignment in sexual offending programme evaluation is clear. Decades of high dependence on weak-inference methodology, that of observational studies, has inhibited professional agreement regarding the effects of programmes. Observational studies have a place in evaluation research when more rigorous scientific designs precede them, as occurs in neighbouring fields of drug development and health. If, however, observational studies remain the only method used to evaluate sexual offending programmes, the field will continue to endure uncertainty with confident causal inferences regarding their effects remaining elusive. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach The paper takes the form of a literature review and discussion. Findings The case for random assignment is made alongside a rebuttal of arguments against their use. Originality/value This is an original look at the need for random assignment in sexual offending programme evaluation taking into account existing studies and discussion topics.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T03:01:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-08-2017-0032
       
  • Investigative interviewing, dissociative identity disorder and the role of
           the Registered Intermediary
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Intermediaries facilitate communication with many types of vulnerable witnesses during police investigative interviews. The purpose of this paper is to find out how intermediaries engage in their role in cases where the vulnerable witness presents with one type of vulnerability, namely, dissociative identity disorder (DID). Design/methodology/approach In phase 1, data were obtained from the National Crime Agency Witness Intermediary Team (WIT) to ascertain the demand for intermediaries in DID cases in England and Wales within a three-year period. In phase 2 of this study four intermediaries who had worked with witnesses with DID completed an in-depth questionnaire detailing their experience. Findings Referrals for DID are currently incorporated within the category of personality disorder in the WIT database. Ten definite DID referrals and a possible additional ten cases were identified within this three-year period. Registered Intermediary participants reported having limited experience and limited specific training in dealing with DID prior to becoming a Registered Intermediary. Furthermore, intermediaries reported the many difficulties that they experienced with DID cases in terms of how best to manage the emotional personalities that may present. Originality/value This is the first published study where intermediaries have shared their experiences about DID cases. It highlights the complexities of obtaining a coherent account from such individuals in investigative interviews.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T02:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-05-2017-0018
       
  • English vs Dutch high secure hospitals: service user perspectives
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe service users’ perspectives on the difference between high secure long-stay forensic psychiatric services in the Netherlands and high secure forensic psychiatric care in England. These perspectives are relevant in considering the benefits of a similar long-stay service in England. Design/methodology/approach A current in-patient detained in a high secure hospital in England and other mental health service users and carers with experience in forensic-psychiatric settings were asked to watch a documentary on a Dutch high secure long-stay service. Then they were invited to make comparisons between this service and high secure care in England. These perspectives were gained in the context of their membership of the Service User Reference Group of an externally funded study on long-stay in forensic-psychiatric settings in England. Findings The small group of participants highlighted the importance of relational security, meaningful occupation, autonomy, positive therapeutic relationships with staff and a homely environment for those with lengthy admissions and perceived these to be better met in the Dutch service. These factors might contribute to improved quality of life that services should strive to achieve, especially for those with prolonged admissions. Practical implications Perspectives of service users with lived experience of long-stay in forensic settings are important in informing service developments. Lessons can be learnt from initiatives to improve the quality of life in long-stay services in other countries and consideration be given on how to best manage this unique group. Originality/value To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study asking service users about their view on forensic services in other countries. The findings suggest that service users have valuable contributions to make to aid service developments and should be involved in similar such exercises in the future.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T01:54:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-12-2016-0054
       
  • Developing digitally enabled interventions for prison and probation
           settings: a review
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to highlight some initial efforts within Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) to develop digitally enabled services supporting the rehabilitation of service users. It is not designed to set out either HMPPS policy on digital rehabilitative services or the position of HMPPS Interventions Services on this subject. Rather, it is a short exposition of the authors’ views on the potential of digitally enabled strategies to enhance interventions in forensic settings. In this context, the authors will also describe the development of the first digitally enabled rehabilitation service accessed via HMPPS in-room computer terminals. Design/methodology/approach The authors have reviewed current literature and outlined how the authors have and are aiming to add to this area of work. Findings This general review outlines the authors’ views on the potential of digitally enabled strategies for improving interventions in forensic settings. Originality/value This paper is a short exposition of the authors’ views on the potential of digitally enabled strategies to enhance interventions in forensic settings. In this context, the authors will also describe the development of the first digitally enabled rehabilitation service accessed via HMPPS in-room computer terminals.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T01:50:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-08-2017-0030
       
  • The impact of masculinity upon men with psychosis who reside in secure
           forensic settings
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Masculinity is a core cognitive structure that plays a central role in organising attitudinal and behavioural processes. Yet there is limited research focussing upon the meaning of masculinity for men who have a past history of violent behaviour, who experience psychotic phenomena and reside in secure forensic settings. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach Q-methodology was used to elucidate the factors regarding how men who experience psychotic phenomena perceive their masculinity. Ten participants from a secure forensic setting performed a 49-statement Q-sort task. Findings Principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation was performed on the ten completed Q-sorts which revealed a three-factor solution, accounting for 57 per cent of the variance in the data. The factors were interpreted and discussed under the following headings: “assured and asserting maverick”, “calm, confident, composed conformist” and “nurturing provider in the face of adversity”. This revealed that men with psychosis have different, predominantly pro-social explanatory frameworks for their representation of masculinity. Research limitations/implications This study revealed that men with psychosis have different, predominantly pro-social explanatory frameworks for their representation of masculinity. However, the study was limited by its lack of longitudinal assessment and the inclusion of a greater number of participants may have enhanced the representativeness and generalisability of the findings. Practical implications Therapeutic discussions in respect of masculinity itself could provide men with the opportunity to develop newer, more adaptive conceptualisations of themselves, help them develop greater self-awareness and understanding of the sources of their presenting concerns, which in turn could enhance a provisional formulation of their difficulties. It would also be potentially valuable to understand how these patterns of masculinity map onto coping, recovery style and service engagement. Furthermore, services could also benefit from becoming more aware of hospitalisation being a shameful perhaps stigmatizing time for men with psychosis. Social implications It may be useful for people working in healthcare settings to be aware of how the service users they support perceive their masculinity, so the existential and deeper needs of male patients are provided with enough consideration. This is an important point, as some individuals are often reluctant or neglect to enquire about individual’s psychotic experiences and gender identification. Originality/value Although forensic psychiatric care is primarily populated by men who have committed violent acts, there is a limited research focussing upon the meaning of masculinity in this context. This is in spite of evidence which shows that maladaptive perceptions of masculinity can be reinforced during time spent residing in secure settings. The cultural constructs of masculinity and their respective impact upon the diagnosis, management and outcome of psychosis has also received little attention. Therefore, this research represents new and significant contributions to the field.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T01:02:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-05-2017-0014
       
  • Lifers over tariff: exploring psychological barriers to progression
    • Abstract: The Journal of Forensic Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose There are a significant number of life-sentenced prisoners in Scotland who are over tariff (i.e. past their punishment part expiry date) and who appear to have difficulty in making the transition towards community reintegration. The factors involved in their repeated returns to closed conditions are not adequately understood. The purpose of this paper is to explore this issue using a qualitative approach in order to understand the experience of life-sentenced prisoners in this position, and the psychological barriers that compromise their progression to less secure conditions and the community. Design/methodology/approach In-depth interviews were conducted with eight life-sentenced prisoners who met the criteria for the research. All were significantly over tariff and all had multiple failed attempts at progression to less secure conditions. Interviews were recorded and transcripts were analysed using theoretical thematic analysis. Findings The analysis produced three identifiable supraordinate themes, each with subordinate themes. The supraordinate themes included: shaming self-identify, perception of the community as daunting, and disempowerment. The ability to generalise the findings outwith the participants of this study are acknowledged. Practical implications This has provided further understanding as to the complexity of the issue, and the ways in which it manifests into behaviour. Initial (albeit tentative) recommendations for intervention and service provision can therefore be identified. Originality/value The results are discussed against the implications for service provision in Scottish prisons, and identify the areas for further research that will help to inform the forensic practices in this context.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2017-12-15T09:58:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-07-2017-0025
       
 
 
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