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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 342 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 342 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 196, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 297)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 136, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 128, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 175, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 368, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)

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Journal Cover
Benchmarking : An International Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.559
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1463-5771
Published by Emerald Homepage  [342 journals]
  • Organizational logic to prioritize between the elements of triple bottom
           line
    • Pages: 1626 - 1640
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1626-1640, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess both private and public organizations in order to compare the similarities and differences between the organizational priority logic of TBL elements. The research objective is, therefore, to describe the organizational logic, so as to prioritize between economic, social and environmental elements of the triple bottom line (TBL). The approach is also to describe the common denominators and differentiators between private and public organizations. Design/methodology/approach Based on judgmental sampling and in-depth interviews of executives at private and public hospitals in Spain. Data were collected from the directors of communication of private hospitals, and from the executive in charge of corporate social responsibility of public hospitals. Findings The organizational logic for prioritizing the elements of TBL differs between private and public hospitals. The economic element of TBL is crucial to survival for private hospitals. Compliance with the legal requirements and certifications of the environmental element is the major concern for public hospitals. Private and public hospitals would both pay considerably greater attention to the social element of TBL, if there were no judicial and economic restrictions. Research limitations/implications This study differs from previous ones in terms of exploring the interfaces and relationships between TBL elements, which focus on the organizational logic to prioritize between the elements of TBL. There are both common denominators and differentiators between private and public hospitals, when it comes to the priority logic of TBL elements. Practical implications The priority logic of determining the most important TBL element it is mainly about satisfying organizational needs and societal demands. Determining the second most important TBL element is mostly about organizational preferences and what it wants to achieve. Determining the least important TBL element it is about the organizational mindset for and with respect to the future. Originality/value This study contributes to determining the appropriate organizational priority logic of the TBL elements, as well as common denominators and differentiators between private and public organizations. It also contributes to explaining the organizational reasoning as to why one TBL element may be prioritized over another, an issue which has not been addressed in existing theory and previous studies.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:16:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-02-2017-0027
       
  • R&D portfolio management practices in Brazilian electric power
           utilities
    • Pages: 1641 - 1655
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1641-1655, August 2018.
      Purpose Project portfolio management (PPM) has been recognized as critical for the productivity of research and development (R&D) investments, but empirical research on PPM use and outcomes in non-commercial R&D environments is limited. The purpose of this paper is to investigate PPM processes and outcomes in a unique R&D context within Brazilian electric power utilities. Design/methodology/approach An exploratory best practice survey was used to collect data on PPM processes, methods and performance results in the power sector. Analysis of the data employs descriptive statistics and comparative analysis in the light of the literature. Findings The findings emphasize the importance of strategic value and the need for PPM to be customized for the specific context. The results also demonstrate the importance of adopting selection criteria and measures in accordance with the organizations strategic goals. Practical implications The findings may help organizations better understand how PPM can be tailored for the environment. PPM managers in utilities and other non-commercial R&D environments may find guidance in tailoring and improving their PPM approaches. Originality/value The contributions of this paper are twofold. First, it provides empirical findings to support PPM concepts on strategic alignment and the importance of context by demonstrating how PPM works to deliver strategy in a unique environment. Second, it contributes to the management of R&D projects and portfolios in power utilities, providing an example and analysis that may offer guidance. The contributions from this study may also offer insights that are valuable for R&D management in other utilities, or for R&D management in general.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:16:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-10-2016-0159
       
  • A study of e-Research and its relation with research data life cycle: a
           literature perspective
    • Pages: 1656 - 1680
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1656-1680, August 2018.
      Purpose The traditional means of pursuing research by having all the parameters and processes under one roof has given way to collaborative mechanisms of performing the same task. Collaborative work increases the quality of research and it is a big contributing factor to augment the growth of the scientific knowledge. This process leads to training of new and well-informed academicians and scientists. e-Research (Electronic Research) has gained significant amount of traction as technology serves as the backbone for undertaking collaborative research. The purpose of this paper is to provide a synoptic view of existing research surrounding e-Research and suggest a data lifecycle model that can improve the outcome of collaborative research. Design/methodology/approach Systematic literature review methodology has been employed to undertake this study. Using the outcome of the literature review and the analysis of the existing data lifecycle models, an improvised version of the data lifecycle model has been suggested. Findings This study has brought a conceptual model for data lifecycle for collaborative research. The literature review in the domain of e-Research has shown that the focus of these papers was on the following stages of data lifecycle model: concept and design, data collection, data processing, sharing and distribution of data and data analysis. Research limitations/implications In this paper, only journal papers have been considered and conference proceedings have not been included for literature review. Originality/value This paper suggests a conceptual model for the data lifecycle for collaborative research. This study can be useful for academic and research institutions to design their data lifecycle model.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:15:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-02-2017-0030
       
  • Decomposition of efficiency using DEA window analysis
    • Pages: 1681 - 1705
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1681-1705, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the efficiency types of Islamic and conventional banks. It seeks to show whether the efficiency level of conventional and Islamic banks significantly differs from each other. In addition, it investigates the influential factors on each type of efficiency. Design/methodology/approach The paper utilises the data envelopment analysis in its windows version to estimate the efficiency scores reflecting the time variance and compares between banking models. The paper uses pure technical efficiency (TE) and scale efficiency to achieve the objective of the study. In addition, the panel data technique is adopted to assess the determinants of the efficiency of the banks econometrically. Findings The findings of panel regression initially indicate that the pure TE is higher for conventional banks compared to Islamic banks. However, the Islamic banks are more scale efficient than their conventional counterpart. Macro and micro indicators have different impacts on the both types of efficiency. However, the unique factors that show consistent influence on the efficiency types were loans/finance, non-interest income/finance/liquidity and GDP. Furthermore, the determinants are shaped differently for Islamic and conventional banks when the banking model is controlled for. Originality/value This paper examines the efficiency types using a unique window analysis approach to examine the types of efficiency with a longitudinal set of data from 1996 to 2011.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:17:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-12-2016-0183
       
  • Quantitative tool for market sector strategic analysis
    • Pages: 1706 - 1728
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1706-1728, August 2018.
      Purpose A competitive business strategy with a greater chance of success depends on an accurate quantitative analysis of business strategic factors prevailing in a company. The purpose of this paper is to conduct the latter to determine the level of competitiveness in a sector. Design/methodology/approach This study develops a tool based on literature classics and tested in the telecommunications industry to determine market segment competitiveness, market attractiveness and the relative ability of companies to generate profits. Findings The proposed tool allows managers to quantify each strategic factor and, thus, identify positive factors leading to a competitive advantage and weaknesses leading to vulnerability, which enables an improvement in daily strategic decision making. Practical implications Implementing the tool can enable managers to both quantify each strategic factor and improve strategic decision making. Originality/value This methodology employed here is novel. As such, this study provides new insights into how to compete in the telecommunications industry and discusses useful implications for academia, new entrepreneurs, buyers and suppliers.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:17:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-12-2016-0182
       
  • Performance assessment and capital budgeting based on performance
    • Pages: 1729 - 1745
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1729-1745, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to propose two performance-based capital budgeting (PBCB) approaches. The proposed approaches aim to assign limited capital within different firms based on their performance. These approaches have been applied to capital budgeting process of the technical and vocational training schools of Semnan Province, Iran for the fiscal year 2014–2016. Although the current capital of each decision-making unit (DMU) is secured in the first approach, the second approach provides possibility of sharing the capital between DMUs. Design/methodology/approach Data envelopment analysis which is a broadly used mathematical programming technique for assessing performance of DMUs is utilized for the first phase of both approaches. The proposed models are based on linear programming. Different scenarios are presented and their pros and cons for the capital budgeting process are discussed. Findings The proposed approaches are applied to capital budgeting process for a fiscal year of technical and vocational training schools of Semnan Province, Iran. The budget allocation of the previous year has been found to be non-optimal in terms of budget consuming. This emphasizes reconsideration of budget allotment within schools. The results show a high potential for producing more outputs. The second approach that provides the possibility of sharing and realloting of budget between schools based on their performance may be crucial for those schools that are not performing efficiently because there is possibility of losing budget in each given year in contrast with the previous years. Originality/value This paper proposes two linear programming-based approaches for the PBCB. The author not only deals with static framework but also proposes dynamic structured models. Using performance-based budgeting in organizations has been emphasized by authorities in Iran for many years. Using the proposed approaches, different suggestion and policy recommendation for decision makers in process of capital budgeting process within period of study are provided for technical and vocational training schools of Semnan Province, Iran.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:16:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-07-2016-0116
       
  • Benchmarking manufacturing industries based on green practices
    • Pages: 1746 - 1761
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1746-1761, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to develop a statistically reliable and valid model of performance measures (PMs) to observe the environmental behavior of different enterprises; second, at benchmarking the enterprises based on their green practices. Design/methodology/approach A PM model has been proposed using an empirical analysis of manufacturing industry. The developed model has been tested using structural equation modeling technique. The level of green manufacturing (GM) performance in different sectors and sizes of Indian manufacturing industry has been studied and benchmarked using hierarchical cluster analysis with one-way ANOVA. Findings The results indicate that top management commitment and product design are the root PMs for the success of GM practices. It has been found that chemical, automotive, food and pharmaceutical industries are the high performing sectors. It has also been found that large scale enterprises are performing better than medium-sized enterprises which are doing better than small and micro enterprises in GM practices. Research limitations/implications The indicators/variables in questionnaire are subjective in nature and collected data are from Indian manufacturing organizations only. Practical implications The governments, trade bodies and NGOs can use the proposed model for measurement of green performance of any manufacturing industry. The benchmarking can be used by the different policy influencing and making agencies to develop future policies for the improvement. The industry can also use the benchmarking for its peer performance improvement. Originality/value The major novelty of the paper is benchmarking the green performance of manufacturing industries based on the different sectors and sizes using empirical investigation. The level of GM performance in different sectors and sizes of industries has been studied and benchmarked using hierarchical cluster analysis with one-way ANOVA.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:14:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-12-2016-0192
       
  • Estimating the efficiency of Greek banking system during the last decade
           of world economic crisis
    • Pages: 1762 - 1794
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1762-1794, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the efficiency of the four largest Greek banking organizations for the period 2004–2014, including both a period of strong economic growth and a period of economic crisis and recession, which is still plaguing the Greek economy and more specifically the Greek banking sector. Design/methodology/approach The study incorporates the application of financial ratio analysis and the data envelopment analysis (DEA) in order to calculate the technical efficiency of Greek financial institutions. More specifically, a two-stage output-oriented DEA model is developed in order to estimate the global efficiency of banks. The banking function is considered as consisting of two stages in series, a service/operational efficiency and a profitability efficiency. In both output-oriented models, methods of constant returns to scale and variable returns to scale were applied. Findings The results show that in terms of operational efficiency, banks started from a low rate of return in 2004, which improved until 2008, which marked the peak of operational efficiency. By 2010, the operating efficiency varied with downward trend until 2012–2013. In terms of profitability efficiency, the image is clearer, since the impact the financial crisis had on bank’s profit efficiency led, by 2012, to a plunge in the average efficiency by 30–40 percent. Originality/value A multi-stage DEA process, input oriented, was used in order to estimate changes in the performance and efficiency of banking system. The period 2004–2014 has not been examined until recently and all previous studies used the output-oriented DEA model.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:16:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-01-2017-0009
       
  • Benchmarking the logistics management implementation using Delphi and
           fuzzy DEMATEL
    • Pages: 1795 - 1828
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1795-1828, August 2018.
      Purpose From last few decades, logistics management (LM) constitutes a global concern among organization’s supply chain (SC) to improve their business effectiveness. The purpose of this paper is to uncover and analyze the critical factors (CFs) related to the implementation of effective LM concept and benchmark the SC performance. Design/methodology/approach The most common (16) CFs were identified and selected through literature and use of the Delphi method. Subsequently, the selected most common CFs were analyzed to distinguish their causal relations using the fuzzy Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) technique under unclear surroundings. A case example of Indian Logistics Company is also discussed to reveal the practical applicability of the research. Findings Provision of the effective information communication and technological developments in the system and Management dedication, support and involvement CFs are found to have the top most influences in the effective implementation of LM. This paper also groups the CFs into cause and effect relationship which provides valuable insights for analyzing the factors in successful implementation of LM. Practical implications This work attempts to understand the different CFs, their relative position and the importance rating in the system, due to which, managers can differentiate the factor which greatly affects the concepts of implementing LM, and thus, improvements can be made accordingly. Originality/value First, this work offers 16 CFs to LM implementation from a SC scenario. Second, in the context of contributing to the theory, the combined Delphi and fuzzy DEMATEL-based model is provided that helps in managing the logistic related issues effectively.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:17:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-01-2017-0006
       
  • Benchmarking accountability of local government authorities in public
           procurement in Tanzania
    • Pages: 1829 - 1843
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1829-1843, August 2018.
      Purpose Public management work has tended to ignore the application of benchmarking accountability of local government authorities (LGAs) in public procurement. To that effect, the purpose of this paper is to present the applicability of a benchmarking model as an instrument for improving accountability of procuring entities such as LGAs in public procurement practices. Design/methodology/approach A case study from United States Agency for International Development funded Chemonics International’s Program—Pamoja Twajenga in Tanzania has been used to effectively showcase the efficacy of the benchmarking model in increasing compliance and improve accountability of LGAs as procuring entities. Performance assessment of eight Tanzania LGAs’ internal public procurement practices was conducted using the benchmarking model. Benchmarking Framework of Compliance Standards and Performance Indictors in Public Procurement (FCSPIPP) was developed and applied in conducting a benchmark assessment of the LGAs. The methodology of a benchmark assessment encompassed number scoring of perceived performance of each LGA for each indicator of a compliance standard. Findings The case study has conceded that the benchmarking model is an instrument which can be applied for improving the accountability of LGAs in public procurement practices. Looking at the scale of LGAs’ purchases, the case study reveals that monitoring compliance may greatly benefit from the methodological approach of benchmarking. The benchmark assessment adopted in this case study offers a collective instrument for LGAs in developing countries to measure, compare and learn to improve in public procurement practices. The model offers public procurement entities, such as LGAs, with an opportunity to learn based on performance and improvement of peers. The FCSPIPP presented in this case study is the main pillar of the benchmark assessment in public procurement. Research limitations/implications The major limitation of this case study is that it relies only on the findings and lessons learnt from the benchmarking of eight LGAs in Tanzania. Presumably, it would be useful to would have been more useful if more countries from developing economies were included in the case study; it could have increased the plausibility of the applicability of the model at the local government levels. Practical implications Implicitly, public procurement and regulatory authorities in developing countries need to learn, improve its role and develop capacity in the application of benchmarking for enforcing compliance in public procurement practices. Since the approach is based on listening from the procuring entities, the model provides the procurement Authority to work on policy challenges affecting the procuring entities to comply with what the procurement process requires. Deliberate efforts are needed to strengthen the capacity of developing countries to put in place policies and reforms that pave the way for the use of process benchmarking in public procurement at the LGAs level. Social implications Since benchmarking encourages active participation of the user department and community in the procurement process, presupposes curbing corruption red flags and improved value for money contracts for improved social services. The methodological approach of monitoring procuring entities, using process benchmarking, provides public procurement and regulatory agencies and LGAs a collegial, participative and self-discovering on what constitutes compliance. This may enhance the sense of answerability of procurement officers to citizens. Originality/value This study confirms the efficacy of the benchmarking model as an alternative and complementary instrument to traditional compliance audit in public procurement. The application of an FCSPIPP means that benchmarking results may be used to improve public procurement practices.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:16:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-08-2016-0120
       
  • Evaluating the key performance indicators for supply chain information
           system implementation using IPA model
    • Pages: 1844 - 1863
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1844-1863, August 2018.
      Purpose To enhance the transparency of the supply chain and ensure proper dissemination of information among the supply chain members in a timely manner, more and more companies are implementing supply chain information system (SCIS). Often the challenge among the organizations is how to go for a proper SCIS implementation and to identify the key performance indicators (KPIs) to evaluate the SCIS. The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework to evaluate the KPIs for SCIS of SCISs implementation from user’s perspectives. Design/methodology/approach In this paper, 16 KPIs were identified based on extensive literature survey. A fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model is constructed to measure the users’ perceived importance and satisfaction for the KPIs. Subsequently, based on these two measurements, an importance-performance analysis (IPA) model along with a customer satisfaction attitude (SA) index is developed to categorize and prioritize the KPIs. As an empirical study, SCIS users across five industries belonging to different sectors were investigated to validate the model. Findings An IPA model along with a customer SA index is developed based on a fuzzy AHP model to evaluate the KPIs and provide the priorities of their improvement. Based on this result, some management implications and suggestions are proposed. Research limitations/implications The study was limited to five organizations. More representative samples which can be sector specific can ensure better confirmation of the empirical results. Originality/value The KPIs identified in the research indicate the nature and dynamics of a complex SCIS implementation. It can serve as a checklist of areas that require attention when implementing a SCIS. The KPIs are presented through grouping in a systemic way. The development of the SAs in IPA model using fuzzy AHP is a novel approach.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:14:20Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-03-2017-0041
       
  • Wine business performance benchmarking: a comparison of German and
           Ukrainian wineries
    • Pages: 1864 - 1882
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1864-1882, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and compare the efficiency of wine making in Germany and Ukraine in order to find the controllable factors of wine business performance using benchmarking tools. Design/methodology/approach The models of data envelopment analysis and other benchmarking tools are used to analyse the efficiency of wineries in two countries. Returns to scale, scale efficiency, super-efficiency and some other indicators are examined. The research is based on the sample of 36 German and Ukrainian wineries. Findings The hypothesis of higher wine making relative efficiency in Germany was compared with Ukrainian wine making, then analytically and statistically verified. A relatively high average scale efficiency score indicates good potential (above 30 per cent) for efficiency growth, due to the optimisation of a scale of production and sales. Generally, wine making in Germany and Ukraine has increasing returns to scale. The high-efficient wine business cannot bring great losses. It was found that the most efficient combinations of size and legal form of business organisation for wine business are presented in Germany. Research limitations/implications The research is limited by a single industry of only the two countries. Practical implications This study provides useful information for researchers, investors and policy makers, enabling them to understand the current state, basic problems, controllable factors and efficiency levels of wine making in Germany and Ukraine. It may be useful to wine producers in these countries for improving their business performance. Originality/value This is the first paper that compares wine business performance and discloses its factors for Germany and Ukraine.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:13:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-06-2017-0131
       
  • Privacy protection laws and public perception of data privacy
    • Pages: 1883 - 1902
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1883-1902, August 2018.
      Purpose The move toward e-health care in various countries is envisaged to reduce the cost of provision of health care, improve the quality of care and reduce medical errors. The most significant problem is the protection of patients’ data privacy. If the patients are reluctant or refuse to participate in health care system due to lack of privacy laws and regulations, the benefit of the full-fledged e-health care system cannot be materialized. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the available e-health data privacy protection laws and the perception of the people using the e-health care facilities. Design/methodology/approach The researchers used content analysis to analyze the availability and comprehensive nature of the laws and regulations. The researchers also used survey method. Participants in the study comprised of health care professionals (n=46) and health care users (n=187) who are based in the Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The researchers applied descriptive statistics mechanisms and correlational analysis to analyze the data in the survey. Findings The content analysis revealed that the available health data protection laws are limited in scope. The survey results, however, showed that the respondents felt that they could trust the e-health services systems offered in the UAE as the data collected is protected, the rights are not violated. The research also revealed that there was no significance difference between the nationality and the privacy data statements. All the nationality agreed that there is protection in place for the protection of e-health data. There was no significance difference between the demographic data sets and the many data protection principles. Originality/value The findings on the users’ perception could help to evaluate the success in realizing current strategies and an action plan of benchmarking could be introduced.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:13:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-06-2017-0133
       
  • Application of combined MADM methods as MOORA and PSI for ranking of FMS
           performance factors
    • Pages: 1903 - 1920
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1903-1920, August 2018.
      Purpose Due to the increasing demand of customer and competitive market pressure, manufacturing organizations should be modernized in strategies, production operations, processes and its procedures to remain competitive. So, a flexible manufacturing system (FMS) was adopted by the manufacturing system to fight with competitive pressure. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the performance of manufacturing system, with a focus on its factors. Design/methodology/approach In this research, the ranking of the performance factor of FMSs is done by using multiple attribute decision-making (MADM) methods as multi-objective optimization on the basis of ratio analysis (MOORA) and preference selection index (PSI). Weights of attributes are defined by the AHP method. Findings Ranking of performance factor is done on the basis of six variables which affect three elements of performance of FMS, i.e. productivity, flexibility and quality. MOORA is applied in three ways such as the ratio-based, reference point and full multiplicative method. In the MOORA method, ranking was done considering weights of attributes and also without it. A PSI method is used to find the best factor among the factors. The results of these methodologies, i.e. MOORA and PSI, are same, i.e. productivity is the primary factor in the manufacturing system. The ranking is validated by the result of different methodology used in this research. Practical implications This research has evaluated the important factors and performance variables which can enhance the performance of manufacturing organizations. So, the manufacturing persons can focus on these to enhance its performance. Originality/value Combined MADM methods, i.e. MOORA and PSI methodologies, are used in this paper to deal with the ranking of performance factors of the FMS considering qualitative characteristics. These approaches show the conversion of a qualitative attribute to quantitative attributes by using fuzzy logic.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:18:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-04-2017-0056
       
  • Measuring the invisible
    • Pages: 1921 - 1934
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1921-1934, August 2018.
      Purpose Construction logistics is an essential part of Construction Supply Chain Management for both project management and cost aspects. The quantum of money that is embodied in the transportation of materials to site could be 39–58 per cent of total logistics costs and between 4 and 10 per cent of the product selling price for many firms. However, limited attention has been paid to measure the logistics performance at the operational level in the construction industry. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge about managing logistics costs by setting a key performance indicator (KPI) based on the number of vehicle movements to the construction site. Design/methodology/approach A case study approach was adopted with on-site observations and interviews. Observations were performed from the start of construction until “hand-over” to the building owner. A selection of construction suppliers and subcontractors involved in the studied project were interviewed. Findings Data analysis of vehicle movements suggested that construction transportation costs can be monitored and managed. The identified number of vehicle movements as a KPI offers a significant step towards logistics performance management in construction projects. Originality/value This research paper demonstrates that framework of using vehicular movements meet the criterion of effective KPI and is able to detect rooms for improvements. The key findings shed valuable insight for industry practitioners in initiating the measurement and monitor “the invisible logistics costs and performance”. It provides a basis for benchmarking that enables comparison, learning and improvement and thereby continuous enhancement of best practice at the operational level, which may accelerate the slow SCM implementation in the construction industry.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-11-2016-0176
       
  • A SERVQUAL approach to identifying the influences of service quality on
           leasing market segment in the German financial sector
    • Pages: 1935 - 1955
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1935-1955, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine the nature of the relationship between service quality and desired customer behaviours in the leasing market using an appropriate service quality measurement model. The authors take a step further by recognising the possible differences in influence of service quality in private and corporate customers, and those business dealings with low, medium and high lease values. Design/methodology/approach The authors use deduction method to test the SERVQUAL in the German leasing market and the relationship between customer satisfaction and desired behavioural outcomes. The developed questionnaire is based on the 22-item scale of the SERVQUAL approach. Samples are selected based on convenience sampling. Findings The authors found differences in the levels of influence by SERVQUAL dimensions on corporate and private customers as well as among those customers with different leasing contract values. From the regression analyses, it is clear that “assurance” from the leasing company is the most common SERVQUAL dimension that has significant impact on overall service quality perceptions and obtaining customers satisfaction and loyalty (behavioural outcomes). Originality/value The authors recognised that all financial services are not created equally to meet customer demands. Hence, the customer expectations of service quality from these services will be different. The authors contributed to the marketing literature by studying customer perceptions of service quality by specifying financing aspects of financial services, i.e. leasing. The authors further contributed to the literature of SERVQUAL model in financial services by dividing customers into two different types of customers and those with diverse leasing contract values. The authors found that priorities given on service quality dimensions by them are different. These concepts were never considered in the literature. This also implies that future studies on financial services marketing need to recognise such differences in the research.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:15:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-12-2016-0194
       
  • Analysis of barriers to sustainable tourism management in a protected area
    • Pages: 1956 - 1976
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 25, Issue 6, Page 1956-1976, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers to sustainable tourism management (STM) implementation in a protected area (PA) of a developing country, India, by taking a case study of National Chambal Sanctuary (NCS). Design/methodology/approach This study develops a framework to analyse the interaction among a set of barriers of STM using the interpretive structural modelling approach. Findings In this study, 16 relevant barriers responsible for the failure of STM in Indian scenario have been selected. The lack of coordination among various stakeholders and the lack of government incentives are found as the most significant barriers among the selected barriers of STM implementation in the sanctuary. Research limitations/implications This study provides most influencing barriers and how these barriers hinder the sustainability efforts in NCS. The study’s main limitation is its generalisation. The problems in implementing sustainable practices may differ with the region. Practical implications This study provides strong practical inferences to both practitioners as well as academicians. The practitioners are suggested to focus on identified barriers and formulating strategies to achieve sustainability in the tourism sector. Academicians may propose the solutions and necessary interventions for identified barriers. Originality/value Identification and presentation of barriers to STM implementation in the context of a PA are rare to find in literature.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2018-07-25T10:18:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-09-2016-0149
       
 
 
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