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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal  
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 171, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 246)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 121, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 183, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 381, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)

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Journal Cover Benchmarking : An International Journal
  [SJR: 0.556]   [H-I: 38]   [11 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1463-5771
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Problems of benchmarking greenhouse gas emissions in dairy agriculture
    • Pages: 1470 - 1489
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1470-1489, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the suitability of free carbon calculators aimed at the agricultural industry, for use in greenhouse gas (GHG) emission benchmarking, using the European dairy industry as an example. Design/methodology/approach Carbon calculators which were claimed to be applicable to European dairy farms were identified and tested using six production scenarios based on data from real European farms supplemented using published literature. The resulting GHG emission estimates, together with estimates apportioned using three functional units, were then compared to determine the robustness of the benchmarking results. Findings It was found that although there was a degree of agreement between the seven identified carbon calculators in terms of benchmarking total farm emissions, once a suitable functional unit was applied little agreement remained. Tools often ranked farms in different orders, thereby calling into question the robustness of benchmarking in the studied sector. Research limitations/implications The scenario-based approach taken has identified issues liable to result in a lack of benchmarking robustness within this sector; however, there remains considerable scope to evaluate these findings in the field, both within this sector and others in the agricultural industry. Practical implications The results suggest that there are significant hurdles to overcome if GHG emission benchmarking is to aid in driving forward the environmental performance of the dairy industry. In addition, eco-labelling foods based on GHG benchmarking may be of questionable value. Originality/value At a time when environmental benchmarking is of increasing importance, this paper seeks to evaluate its applicability to sectors in which there is considerable scope for variation in the results obtained.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:40:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-10-2015-0101
       
  • Brand resonance score for CBBE model: an application in financial services
    • Pages: 1490 - 1507
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1490-1507, August 2017.
      Purpose Brand resonance will significantly improve the profits of the services industry in the twenty-first century. The purpose of this paper is to find the resonance score for modified customer-based brand equity (CBBE) model in mutual fund financial services and improve the conceptualization of customer-based mutual fund services’ brand equity through brand resonance. Design/methodology/approach The path values of SEM model was used to estimate the relative weights of criteria and sub-criteria in analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model and it was empirically tested with a sample of 240 mutual fund investors. Findings The brand resonance using AHP has been quantified. The resonance quantification of each brand has been demonstrated using two renowned Indian mutual fund services brands State Bank of India and Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation. Research limitations/implications The interdependency of the factors which influence the resonance score is not explored. Practical implications Research findings provide useful guidelines for fund managers/analysts of mutual fund services companies while improving the brand equity and strong brand’s resonance with investors. Originality/value The paper examines quantification of resonance for modified CBBE model in mutual fund services using data from a sample of investors in India with two mutual fund brands. The AHP structure model helps firms effectively quantify the resonance score.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:39:26Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-07-2015-0073
       
  • A modified multiplier model of BCC DEA to determine cost-based efficiency
    • Pages: 1508 - 1522
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1508-1522, August 2017.
      Purpose A cost-oriented data envelopment analysis (DEA) is a non-parametric tool for discriminating the best performers from a number of homogenous decision-making units (DMU) using allocative efficiency, technical efficiency and a cost-based efficiency score. Cost of each resource has been an important input in such cases. However, the purpose of this paper is to propose a method, which, in absence of it, helps to define the targeted output for all DMUs. Eigenvector derived from the first principal component of specific covariance matrix from each allocated outputs is used here for computing such targets. An orthogonal projection of resources to such radial directions is another indicator of a relative economic use of resources. Unlike regular cost-oriented DEA model, the current model proposes a multiplier model of BCC DEA. With the provision of the targeted output set for a DMU, the modified multiplier model measures the orientation of a DMU towards cost. A case study of six schools is incorporated here to identify the superior cost efficient school. Design/methodology/approach The problem referred here is concerned about six private pre-primary schools situated in a locality. The financial condition of the population is heterogeneous. The school management has the option to select the group of students according to the richness of the family. Thus, an average richness is taken into account here for each school to understand the motive of providing service to the targeted section of the society. Cost borne by each school per student per month is incorporated here to notice the intention of the school to offer education. The selection of input variables is inspired from the valuable findings of Hillman and Jenkner (2002). According to them in many developing countries, the governments lack either the financial resources or the political will to meet their citizens’ educational needs. Moreover, “Children are entitled to a free, quality basic education. Many children who do attend school receive an inadequate education because of poorly trained, underpaid teachers, overcrowded classrooms, and a lack of basic teaching tools such as textbooks, blackboards, and pens and paper […].” The inclusion of the first input is due to the measurement of willingness of a primary school to impart education. Commenting on the ill-effects, they mentioned “In an ideal world, primary education would be universal and publicly financed, and all children would be able to attend school regardless of their parents’ ability or willingness to pay. The reason is simple: when any child fails to acquire the basic skills needed to function as a productive, responsible member of society, […]. The cost of educating children is far outweighed by the cost of not educating them. Adults who lack basic skills have greater difficulty in finding well-paying jobs and escaping poverty […].” Thus, the second input plays a key role to measure the intention of a primary school to stand them in a good stead serve for the sake of ensuring social benefit. In this regard, two scores refer the outcome of the endeavor of whole system to create better students and to help society to progress. Findings The cost-oriented multiplier BCC DEA model is presented here to cite a proof of an existence of an ideal cost frontier originating from an MPSS-based DEA (referred in Sarkar, 2014a). The former model has mentioned that it is not necessary for a CCR efficient DMU to remain cost competent. However, the major drawback of that model was its inability to show the impact of return to scale. In the present model, this problem has been tackled nicely. School A, in this example, under the variable return to scale, can become a cost efficient school. However, the proposed model, in this paper, under constant return to scale, has accepted the ranking, which was proposed before. Research limitations/implications Only six schools, situated around Northwest Durgapur, were observed. Practical implications The prescribed model iterates how a smaller number of intermediate inputs can be used in DEA to identify benchmark. These variables, which emblem the control through lean approaches, can be representative of a large number of other actual inputs which have already been mentioned by many erstwhile researchers. Social implications The selection of input variables is inspired from the valuable findings of Hillman and Jenkner (2002). According to them in many developing countries, the governments’ lack either the financial resources or the political will to meet their citizens’ educational needs. Moreover, “Children are entitled to a free, quality basic education. Many children who do attend school receive an inadequate education because of poorly trained, underpaid teachers, overcrowded classrooms, and a lack of basic teaching tools such as textbooks, blackboards, and pens and paper […].” The inclusion of the first input is due to the measurement of willingness of a primary school to impart education. Commenting on the ill-effects, they mentioned “In an ideal world, primary education would be universal and publicly financed, and all children would be able to attend school regardless of their parents’ ability or willingness to pay. The reason is simple: when any child fails to acquire the basic skills needed to function as a productive, responsible member of society, […]. The cost of educating children is far outweighed by the cost of not educating them. Adults who lack basic skills have greater difficulty in finding well-paying jobs and escaping poverty […].” Thus, the second input plays a key role to measure the intention of a primary school to stand them in a good stead serve for the sake of ensuring social benefit. In this regard, two scor...
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:40:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-01-2016-0007
       
  • Aspects of corporate wellness programs: comparisons of customer
           satisfaction
    • Pages: 1523 - 1551
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1523-1551, August 2017.
      Purpose With the passage of the Affordable Health Care Act in the USA, many companies are investing in corporate wellness programs as a way to reduce healthcare costs and increase productivity of their workforces. Increasing healthcare expenditures and the pandemic of obesity and chronic diseases are driving forces to the development and implementation of workplace wellness programs across the globe. Companies expect to experience a return on their investment through lower healthcare costs and increased productivity. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In this study, 109 business professionals were surveyed (primarily almost equally divided between Russian and Americans citizens) to examine their health-promoting and health risk behaviors. Demographics were compared in an effort to identify the key differences in order to pinpoint development opportunities to increase efficiencies among target populations. Findings According to the results, nationality was related to certain differences in health-promoting behaviors, participation rates and frequency of wellness programs offered by employers. No differences were found among different age groups. The results indicated that not even a single wellness program design is appropriate for all companies or even one company across all locations. Research limitations/implications Although there were no general conclusions have been drawn nor have the influencing factors for the different behaviors of the various target groups been adequately examined in this exploratory study, there were baselines developed for future research. Originality/value Few empirical studies exists that measure the perceived value of corporate wellness programs, especially among different cultural settings. In effect, wellness programs need to be developed specifically for the target population, with considerations to perceived value differences.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:39:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-02-2016-0020
       
  • Improving the quality of Sweden’s rail freight rolling stock
    • Pages: 1552 - 1570
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1552-1570, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical conceptualization of how data envelopment analysis (DEA) can be applied to rail freight rolling stock in order to develop a tariff for track access charges which is functionally dependent upon the derived relative benchmark values of performance. Design/methodology/approach It is posited that track access charges should be differentiated to reflect differences in the performance of rolling stock and that this can be achieved purely on the basis of technical and other characteristics. The performance benchmarking of rolling stock is proposed as the basis for formulating and justifying a performance-based tariff structure. Using DEA, relative index measures of rolling stock performance can be derived, benchmark performance can be identified and a tariff structure can be developed. Findings A workable approach to implementing the concept, utilizing existing in-house databases, is found to be feasible and a template for tariff setting is established. Research limitations/implications In the absence of access to in-house technical data on rolling stock, which is commercially sensitive, no empirical application of the concept is possible. Originality/value There are many ways to improve the efficiency of a railway system. Many are inherently long term and involve significant investment. Using Sweden as an example, this paper proposes the more immediate, simpler and cheaper approach of incentivising the use of better rolling stock through appropriate track access charging. Such an approach should reduce the number of problems arising on the rail network and the costs imposed on other rail users, the infrastructure providers and society. Ultimately, the implementation of this approach would support the objective of increasing long-term robustness and reducing disruptions to railways.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:41:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-01-2016-0015
       
  • An exploratory study on supply chain analytics applied to spare parts
           supply chain
    • Pages: 1571 - 1580
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1571-1580, August 2017.
      Purpose Big data analytics (BDA) has created a buzz around the world. It has been hailed as the new paradigm which has the potential to unlock value from otherwise non-productive aspects of the business. BDA has found application in the field of logistics and supply chain management (LSCM) too. Army has a large supply chain of various commodities which can benefit from BDA. The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of BDA in spare parts supply chain of the army. Design/methodology/approach The paper conducts a literature review to explain the application of supply chain analytics (SCA) to army spare parts supply chain. The paper presents a proposed architecture to apply SCA in the context of army supply chain. Findings The paper identifies various data points applicable to the field of LSCM in army. It also presents the impact areas of SCA on this supply chain. The architecture is presented which can serve as a roadmap for implementing SCA. Originality/value The paper is novel in its attempt to explain the supply chain of army and then apply SCA to it. The paper brings out a proposed architecture which can be further investigated to work on a roadmap to apply SCA to army supply chain.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:40:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-04-2016-0053
       
  • Clarity of CSR orientation and firm performance: case of Japanese SMEs
    • Pages: 1581 - 1596
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1581-1596, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how clarity of corporate social responsibility (CSR) orientation of Japanese small and medium enterprises (SMEs) achieves constructive firm performance outcomes. Design/methodology/approach On the basis of the literature review, the authors present a research model that defines key constructs and provide propositions that explain the interrelationships with theoretical rationale and practical implications. Using careful selection criteria, the authors have further conducted the in-depth interviews of the executives of two prominent Japanese SMEs. Findings The results suggest that CEOs with strong CSR orientation are more likely to influence their firms to achieve effective firm performance. If CSR philosophy is strategically formulated, clearly communicated, and widely accepted, then such firm is more likely to attain desirable business performance outcomes for larger stakeholders. Furthermore, CSR implementation of SMEs is not necessarily too costly; in fact, the long-term rate of return on SMEs’ CSR investment, with proper priority and prudent focus, is quite competitive. Research limitations/implications In spite of the specificity of the two case studies, the research model and the study findings give valuable insight on the role of CEO’s philosophy on CSR implementation in the international market. The linkage mechanism between business operation and CSR by these SMEs is applicable to many innovative entrepreneurial firms that target beyond domestic markets. Originality/value The authors highlight how the clarity of CSR philosophy in terms of firm orientation and linkage mechanism aids SMEs in overcoming their resource constraints. Furthermore, well-implemented CSR activities may become instrumental in achieving long-term desirable performance in the form of customer loyalty, employee’s sense of pride, and corporate socio-economic reputation.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:39:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-03-2016-0035
       
  • Selection and evaluation of third party logistics service provider (3PLSP)
           by using an interpretive ranking process (IRP)
    • Pages: 1597 - 1648
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1597-1648, August 2017.
      Purpose The concept of third-party logistics service provider (3PLSP) has been considered as an essential organizational philosophy to achieve profits. The purpose of this paper is to analyze and examine the contextual relationship among the critical success factors (CSF) of 3PLSPs practices in the cement manufacturing industry. Design/methodology/approach In this paper, the total 20 critical selection criteria with nine processes for the 3PLSPs, of an Indian cement manufacturing industry have been identified through an exhaustive literature review and opinions of the experts i.e. academics and industries. Interpretive ranking process (IRP) methodology has been presented to find out the rankings of the individual criteria and the mutual influence in the selection process. Findings The proposed model establishes the dominance of relationship among identified criteria, which plays a vital role in the 3PLSPs selection process which are experience in similar product, quality of management, information technology capacity, flexibility in operation and delivery, compatibility with the users. Research limitations/implications An empirical research approach has not been used to collect primary data to rank different criteria for effective 3PLSPs implementation in the Industry. In this paper, an example of Indian cement industry is presented to show the real world applicability of the proposed model. Originality/value This model would help a decision maker to decide the issues related to a selection of 3PLSPs. The third party service provider comprises the use of external companies who controls and delivers logistic activities. The paper discusses very practical issues in an analytical manner, using the case base method.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:40:14Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-04-2016-0055
       
  • Benchmarking between vegetable suppliers in Greece
    • Pages: 1649 - 1662
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1649-1662, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop and implement benchmarking methods on food safety and hygiene between suppliers of fruits and vegetables, regardless the food safety management systems they implement. Design/methodology/approach A tailor made questionnaire was prepared of 64 questions, divided into ten sectors regarding hygiene and food safety. The suppliers were selected from the inventory of a large chain of retail stores. The audits were performed by a food safety expert on the site of the company. Totally, 72 audits were conducted in several geographic regions of Greece. The data collected was statistically analyzed for benchmarking with technical, geographical or financial criteria. Findings The large size companies have a level from satisfactory to very satisfactory in the transport and need improvement on their packaging materials. Improvement in procedures of cleaning and disinfection is required by companies which are in the region of Attica and the Peloponnese. Originality/value The proposed methodology and analysis can be used to benchmark groups of food companies with common commercial profile in order to prioritize both the frequency of audits and the importance of interventions and preventive measures.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:40:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-05-2016-0071
       
  • Measuring the comparative performance of branches of a credit union for
           internal benchmarking
    • Pages: 1663 - 1674
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1663-1674, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify the efficiency scores of branches and districts, the sources of inefficiency for branches and projections of variables for inefficient branches. It measures the comparative performance of branches of a credit union for internal benchmarking. Design/methodology/approach The paper measures the performance of 35 branches of a credit union in the USA and suggests managerial insights. Data envelopment analysis is used for measuring the relative performance of the branches and districts of the credit union. The paper also compares performance differences among the districts using non-parametric statistical analyses. Findings Parts of the findings indicated that branches should focus on cost containment by reducing operating expenses and increasing their loan balances. In addition, districts were operated in different market conditions, which were evidenced by scale efficiency. The major contributions of the study are filling the void of benchmarking studies at a branch level in the credit union sector, suggesting a framework for internal benchmarking, and providing practical insights to managers of credit unions. The framework of this study can be applied to similar financial institutions with minor revisions. Research limitations/implications The limitation of this study is found in the use of cross-sectional data, which is mainly due to the sensitivity of information disclosure of the credit union. Practical implications The paper includes implications for the development of benchmarking studies at a branch level in the credit union sector. Originality/value This paper fulfills an identified need to study how to identify source of inefficiencies so as to further improve the efficiency of branches.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:40:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-03-2016-0029
       
  • Benchmarking project management dimensions at the lapse of a century
    • Pages: 1675 - 1689
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1675-1689, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate project management dimensions while constructing the Panama Canal from the end of ninetieth century to the start of twentieth century and then benchmarking against the Palm Diera Island at the lapse of a century. Second, to highlight issues of project management, specially the risk management with its economic, social and political domains at the construction site and in France and America. Design/methodology/approach The case study research method of qualitative research has been adopted when comparing two mega projects executed in different time and space. For the Panama Canal project documentation investigation was performed. However, a semi-structured interview data collection method was adopted for the Palm Diera Island project. A comparative study of two projects helps in deeper understanding of cross-project management dimensions. Findings The research reveals that the French team failed to complete the Panama Canal construction project due to inadequate planning, inappropriate design, lack of risk management, health and safety of the staff and non-availability of finances. However, the Americans successfully completed construction of the canal within budget and time and this was due to the support of change in the purpose of the canal construction adding to achieve its commercial objectives and at the same time strengthen its naval presence. American took its construction as a national objective than the individual enterprise as executed by the French team. Research limitations/implications Data collection for the Panama Canal was limited to only historical data available from the literature as documentary investigation. The researchers visited the canal to get in-depth understanding of the construction practices and the scale of construction. However, for the Palm Diera project, data collection was limited to three key personnel interviews. Practical implications The Americans were successful in completing the canal due to the US Government control on management and finances of the canal construction and lessons learned during the French construction period. The paper serves as a benchmark for project management dimension in two different regions in different times. The paper bears economic implications for the construction of the mega projects both in South America and the Middle East. Cost overrun construction of the Panama Canal during the French period influenced political spectrum in France resulting into the defeat of the government. During the American period of construction first time out of country visit by the sitting president of the USA reflects its economic and social importance. The valley of death was converted into the valley comfort during the American period resulting into social welfare of the workers. Completion of the canal by the Americans helped them secure operations of the Panama Canal for the next 100 years, contributing to its economic and naval strength. Social implications The paper reveals that safety and social implications for the work place in two different regions and at two different times. The impact of safe and improved working conditions at Palm Diera Island resulted into no injury or loss of life, however, during the Panama Canal construction more than 30,000 workers died affecting not only families of the respective workers but their nations as well. The impacts of both the projects on the society were also significant. The public opinion against the construction of the canal during the French period of construction was so significant that they had to abandon their construction equipment at the site. On the contrary, completion of construction of the Panama Canal during the French period helped secured political mileage for President Roosevelt and his party. Originality/value The paper benchmarks two different mega projects with different scope executed in two different regions at the lapse of a century. No such research work was found to have compared project management dimensions of two mega projects at the lapse of a century and in two different regions.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:40:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-03-2016-0043
       
  • Analysis of financial close delay in PPP infrastructure projects in
           developing countries
    • Pages: 1690 - 1708
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1690-1708, August 2017.
      Purpose The presence of previous awarded public-private partnership (PPP) infrastructure projects that significantly delays reaching financial close constrain the likely success of new PPP projects. However, effort at investigating financial close delays of PPP projects through empirical studies by the research community received scant attention. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the factors causing delays in PPP projects from reaching financial close in developing countries. Design/methodology/approach The study adopted literature review and questionnaire survey. In order to capture a broad perception, a questionnaire survey was adopted, which was administered to three different primary stakeholder categories comprised public sector authorities (i.e. ministries, department, and agencies), concessionaires, and lenders/banks already involved in PPP infrastructure projects implementation in Nigeria. The data obtained were analysed using mean score, Kruskal-Wallis test, and factor analysis. Findings The study revealed the mean score ranking of 39 identified causes of financial close delays in PPP projects, and the mean score values for all the identified 39 causes of financial close delays are very high. The study, through factor analysis, categorised the 39 identified causes of financial close delays into eight principal factors. The factors are: decreased bankability of PPP projects; unstable economic policy; weak financial, technical, and managerial capabilities of the concessionaires; weak public institutions; lack of creditworthiness of both the project sponsors and active partner; unfavourable economy of the host country; weak legal and unfavourable environment; and high contingent liabilities, respectively. Practical implications The identification and evaluation of the factors delaying PPP projects development from reaching financial close in a reasonable time manner would be useful for PPP primary stakeholders to develop strategies to safeguard the present and future PPP projects implementation in developing countries. Originality/value The study findings would be useful for both policymakers considering PPP projects and private investors seeking to finance PPP projects in developing countries. This study is crucial as not many empirical studies have been conducted in developing countries.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:39:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-05-2016-0076
       
  • Evaluation of educational performance of Indian states using PROMETHEE-GIS
           approach
    • Pages: 1709 - 1728
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1709-1728, August 2017.
      Purpose Quality education is a key requirement of a burgeoning country, like India as it aims to establish a sustained growth. However, the current situation of Indian education system is extremely poor. Although efforts are being made nationwide to improve the present situation, it is incontrovertible that different complications ail different Indian states. Some states suffer from a poor gross enrollment ratio, while others have an extremely high student-teacher ratio. The purpose of this paper is to compare the educational performance of 28 Indian states in order to identify those which require immediate attention. Design/methodology/approach For fulfilling this objective, a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) framework utilizing preference ranking organization method for enrichment of evaluations and geometrical analysis for interactive aid methods is adopted. Findings The results indicate that the educational performance of Goa is the best amongst all the considered alternative states, while Bihar is the laggard in this direction. Research limitations/implications From the results, the states which fare to be the worst can easily be identified along with the specific areas/criteria, where they are falling behind. Based on these findings, necessary remedial actions can be undertaken so as to improve the educational performance of the ailing states. Originality/value This paper employs a novel geographic information system (GIS) method and a hue-saturation-value color coding scheme in order to determine the influence of individual criterion on the overall state rank, thereby representing an integration of MCDM and GIS which has never been applied before for educational performance evaluation.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:39:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-12-2015-0118
       
  • Analyzing technical and super efficiency of aluminium firms in India
    • Pages: 1729 - 1741
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1729-1741, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the efficiency of aluminium firms in India. Design/methodology/approach Different data envelopment analysis (DEA) models have been employed to calculate the various efficiency scores of aluminium firms in India. Findings The major findings of the DEA analysis suggest that 62 per cent firms are found to be technically efficient. Overall, the industry shows good performance with mean technical efficiency levels of 0.936 and 0.911 for VRS and CRS frameworks, respectively. Further, five firms show decreasing returns to scale, signifying the overutilization of plant capacities. Six firms exhibit increasing returns to scale implying underutilization of plants. The results show that domestic firms are more efficient than the foreign firms, young firms are more efficient than young firms and small- and medium-scale firms are more efficient than large-scale firms. Practical implications The results of this study would help the aluminium firms to formulate an appropriate strategy to cautiously use their resources to increase their efficiency levels. Originality/value To the best of authors’ knowledge, no earlier studies seem to have ranked the aluminium firms based on their super-efficiency scores. Further, no previous studies seem to have examined the efficiency differences among aluminium firms across different size, age and ownership groups.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:39:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-03-2015-0026
       
  • Evaluating sustainable supply chain indicators using fuzzy AHP
    • Pages: 1742 - 1766
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1742-1766, August 2017.
      Purpose Sustainability in supply chain is gaining attention in recent years due to environmental concern, enforced legislation, green issues, social responsibility, etc. Sustainable supply chain (SSC) has revolved around the various dimensions including economy, environment and societal factors since its inception. The purpose of this paper is to identify, prioritize and evaluate the indicators of SSC so that organizations can cultivate strategies to implement them on priority. Design/methodology/approach This paper proposes a methodology based on fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to prioritize the indicators of SSC. A numerical analysis of Indian automotive industry is presented to demonstrate the use of the proposed method. This proposed method considered fuzzy framework that can handle impreciseness and uncertainty. Sensitivity analysis is also performed to test the robustness of the proposed model. Findings Potential indicators are identified from relevant literature and validated by industry experts. This research finalizes the SSC indicators under three dimensions so that prioritization of identified indicators can be developed and the insights relationship of factors would be explored. The results of the study found that environmental and social dimensions of sustainability contribute more toward the sustainability. Research limitations/implications This study is limited to identify evaluation factors and other factors have not been identified and categorized. Evaluation is done by experts in this area so it is natural that views of decision makers may be subjective and vary with regard to industry type, priorities, resources, etc. Practical implications This study will help industry to identify, evaluate and prioritize factors for successful implementation of sustainability in their supply chain. Automotive companies could device these factors by applying the outcome of the study in their operations with higher priority to integrate sustainability in their supply chain. Originality/value These factors are identified to implement sustain ability into supply chain practices for automotive industry.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:40:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-11-2015-0111
       
  • The benchmarking of the use of toolkit for mass customization in the
           automobile industry
    • Pages: 1767 - 1783
      Abstract: Benchmarking: An International Journal, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1767-1783, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the relation between the utilization of the customization strategy and the availability of the online toolkit and its features with the commercial variables of businesses. Design/methodology/approach The sample used in this paper consists of 134 cases of corporate brands in the automobile industry; their sales correspond to 49.12 percent of vehicles produced in 2012. The logistic regression analysis was then applied to the sample. Findings This paper confirmed the relationship between the use of toolkits for customization and business variables, like vehicle sales. Originality/value The generated model allows the prediction of market conditions which recommended to provide the toolkit for customization, and if implemented, what combination of features it must have.
      Citation: Benchmarking: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-09T08:39:54Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BIJ-01-2016-0002
       
 
 
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