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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 342 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 342 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 196, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 297)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 136, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 128, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 175, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 368, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)

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Journal Cover
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.653
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0969-9988
Published by Emerald Homepage  [342 journals]
  • Barriers to the adoption of value management in developing countries
    • Pages: 818 - 834
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 25, Issue 7, Page 818-834, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine the barriers to the adoption of value management (VM) in the construction industry of developing countries with a view to providing possible measures in avoiding these barriers and increasing the usage of the system within the construction industry. Design/methodology/approach The level of knowledge and adoption of VM practices, as well as the barriers to its adoption in the construction industry were assessed through a survey design. Construction professionals were sampled from the six geo-political zones in Nigeria through the use of a structured questionnaire. Factor analysis was conducted on data gathered on the barriers of VM. Findings The study revealed a moderate level of knowledge of VM among construction professionals. This implies that the problem of VM is not that of awareness, but readiness to adopt the system. The study also reveals that the barriers to the adoption of VM can be categorised under the general stakeholder’s barriers, training and education barriers, client barriers and government/top management barriers. Practical implications This study was conducted across the six geo-political zones of the country as against common practice of selecting a particular region or states to represent the entire country. The findings therefore show a true reflection of the barriers to VM adoption in the country and its recommendations can to a large extent promote the adoption of VM in the country and also other developing countries where construction projects are executed through similar method, style and approach. Originality/value This paper highlights the possible barriers to the adoption of VM in Nigeria construction industry and provides ways to avoiding these barriers in order to achieve better quality construction and value for money.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-10T10:34:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-04-2017-0070
       
  • Structural equation modelling for subcontracting practice: Malaysia
           chapter
    • Pages: 835 - 860
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 25, Issue 7, Page 835-860, August 2018.
      Purpose Most of the previous studies conducted on the subject of subcontractors often focussed on a single phase of subcontracting practice; either on registration, selection of subcontractors or on monitoring of subcontractors without much integration to other different phases involved. Thus, on the basis of that reason, the purpose of this paper is to link the gap between different phases of subcontracting practice. This study also attempts to explore the relationships between the key criteria used by general contractors in selecting subcontractors before job awarding (CSSC) and the key criteria used for monitoring subcontractors during construction work (CMSC); which will then include an investigation of the effects these criteria have on project performance (PP). Design/methodology/approach The data obtained from a total of 162 G7 contractors in Malaysia were analysed. The interrelationships between the criteria and the effects of these criteria on PP were investigated simultaneously by employing a single model based on structural equation modelling (SEM) method. Findings The final model has discovered four major criteria that are often considered during the selection of subcontractors namely, “communication”, “relationship”, “general obligation” and “resource management” of a subcontractor. Meanwhile, the major criteria that are referred to in the monitoring of subcontractors are “workmanship”, “awareness of environment, health and safety” and “communication and relationship”. The four CSSC were found to be interrelated among themselves and affected CMSC during the construction stage. The research also revealed that the criteria used in monitoring subcontractor do affect the performance of a project. Thus, based on the result of this investigation, the monitoring of subcontractor is essential in discerning the performance level of a project. Originality/value An established SEM improves a subcontracting practice by creating platforms for CSSC, CMSC and PP to influence each other. With the gap between selection and monitoring subcontractors are filled, then the prediction of the subcontractors’ performance can be made possible.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-10T10:34:42Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-04-2017-0073
       
  • Survival strategies of built environment organisations in a challenging
           economy
    • Pages: 861 - 876
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 25, Issue 7, Page 861-876, August 2018.
      Purpose The economic downturn in Nigeria calls for the need to appraise the survival strategies being adopted by organisations within the built environment, as it plays a major role in the development of every nation. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, to appraise the survival strategies of organisations within the built environment, with a view to showcasing these strategies to ensure continuous survival of organisations within the industry. Design/methodology/approach The study adopted a survey approach, and construction professionals across the six geo-political zones of the country were sampled using structured questionnaire. Data gathered were analysed using percentage, Kruskal–Wallis H-test and factor analysis. Findings The study revealed that organisation- and workforce management-related strategies are the most adopted survival strategies in the country, as they have the highest factor loading and accounts for about 37 per cent of the total extracted factors. This is followed by the adoption of strategies relating to organisation’s innovation, diversification, financial management and organisation’s networking, the combination of which accounts for 27.5 per cent of all extracted factors. Research limitations/implications Findings of this study imply that although organisations within the built environment see the need for effective management of their organisation and workforce in a bid to survive in the harsh economic situation of the country, more need to be done as regards the other identified survival strategies, as they can help ensure the survival of these organisations. Originality/value This study contributes to the body of knowledge as it showcases the survival strategies being adopted by the different organisations within the built environment in the challenging Nigerian economy, as against the usual common practice of studying specific organisations within the industry.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-10T10:34:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2017-0106
       
  • Optimization of concrete placing operation based on competing carbon
           footprint, cost and production rate objectives
    • Pages: 938 - 957
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 25, Issue 7, Page 938-957, August 2018.
      Purpose Due to considerable contributions of the construction industry to the global carbon emissions, a great deal of attention is placed on possible incorporation of carbon footprint minimization as an important objective in the planning of construction operations. The purpose of this paper is to present a framework to estimate and minimize the carbon emissions of the concrete placing operation through identifying the optimal number of pumps and the inter-arrival time of truck mixers. Design/methodology/approach The proposed framework integrates discrete event simulation and multi-objective optimization to estimate and minimize the carbon emission, costs and production rate of the concrete placing operation. An actual construction project is used to demonstrate the application of the proposed framework. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate the sensitivity of the results to variations in modeling parameters including the ratio of idle to non-idle emission rates of equipment and the activity duration distributions. Findings The results of the case study highlight that variations in the number of pumps and inter-arrival time of truck mixers significantly affect the carbon emissions, cost and production rate of the concrete placing operation. Furthermore, the results of the sensitivity analysis show that variations in the ratio of idle to non-idle emission rates for pumps and truck mixers have little effects on the selected setting for the project. This is contrary to the effect of uncertainty in the activity duration distributions, which was found to be significant. Originality/value Results of this study provide an insight into the trade-off between carbon emissions, cost and production rate of the concrete placing operation.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-10T10:34:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-05-2017-0080
       
  • State-of-practice for risk-based quality assurance in state departments of
           transportation
    • Pages: 958 - 970
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 25, Issue 7, Page 958-970, August 2018.
      Purpose Selecting an optimal quality assurance (QA) process can have significant implications on the long-term durability and lifecycle costs of transportation projects. Currently, the approaches used by state departments of transportation (DOTs) to optimize QA are undocumented and the impact of project-specific factors are unknown. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach State-of-practice was documented via a review of DOT guidance documents, standard specifications and minimum sampling and testing requirements; a survey of 58 state DOT representatives; and interviews with eight DOTs. Findings DOT approaches to QA management are very diverse but can be organized into five levels that range from ad hoc visual inspection of materials to DOT-managed sampling and testing. Project size, location and complexity have strong influence on the selection of a QA approach, but DOT demographics and project delivery method are less significant. Practical implications Present approaches to the selection of a QA approach are generally informal, subjective and do not involve formal risk analyses. A data-driven approach for transportation projects is clearly needed. Originality/value Understanding how state DOTs approach QA method selection will serve as a foundation for new methods of QA optimization.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-10T10:34:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2016-0143
       
  • Quality cost of material procurement in construction projects
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Material procurement constitutes a large share of the overall cost of construction projects. Understanding the factors influencing the cost of quality (COQ) in the procurement process could help identify opportunities for lowering quality cost without compromising quality. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In this paper, a COQ model for the construction material procurement process is developed using the traditional prevention–appraisal–failure (PAF) approach. Using data from a $4bn aluminum smelter construction project, the authors conducted a simulation of the COQ model to evaluate various quality assurance policies. Findings This paper confirms that raising the prevention cost leads to a drop in failure cost as well as COQ for the project studied. While the authors are unable to provide blanket recommendations as the results are derived from a single project case study, it does suggest that construction material procurement processes would benefit from a higher prevention expenditure. And for certain cases where the authors observe a deviation from the traditional Juran’s model of COQ – the high appraisal cost in the procurement process – reduction of appraisal expenditure may in fact be more beneficial than its increase. Originality/value The research results suggest that appraisal expenditure should be tailored to each purchase order in order to maximize the total benefits. Additionally, this paper presents the first COQ model developed for the construction material procurement process. Another unique feature of the model is its inclusion of supplier-side costs, which are excluded in the conventional COQ analysis.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-17T12:57:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-04-2017-0068
       
  • BIM coordinators: a review
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the role, practices and responsibilities of building information modeling (BIM) coordinators (BCs). Design/methodology/approach The aim is achieved through a review of existing publications (n=183) in which the term “BIM coordinators” has been described and discussed (n=78), complemented by interviews with four Norwegian BIM experts. Findings The findings from the review indicate that the core responsibilities of BCs involve clash detection, managing information flows and communication flows, monitoring and coordinating design changes, supporting new working procedures and technical development and acting as a boundary spanner. The complementary interview study extends these findings with two additional practices and a reflection on the experienced challenges, obstacles and potential future development of the role. In essence, the authors propose that the role of BCs can be defined as being responsible for external/internal alignment and coordination of actor needs, and engaged in product-, process- and system-oriented practices of BIM. Research limitations/implications Given that this study is primarily an integrative literature review of BCs, it has the limitations common with such an approach. Therefore, future studies should preferably extend presented findings through either a survey, further in-depth interviews with BCs or reviews of closely related BIM specialist roles such as BIM managers or BIM technicians. Practical implications With BCs seemingly being central to information management and knowledge domain integration within the architecture, engineering and construction industry, an understanding of their importance and role should be of interest to anyone seeking to tap into the potential of BIM. This paper outlines specific implications for construction manager, educators and BCs. Originality/value The value of this study lies primarily in the fact that it is the first thorough investigation of the role, practices and responsibilities of BCs.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-14T01:50:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-03-2017-0050
       
  • Environmental design and awareness impact on organization image
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how environmental design features of a green building contribute to the formation of employees’ organization image (OIM) through better environmental awareness (EAW) within employees. Design/methodology/approach Based on a comprehensive literature review on environmental design features of a building, a theoretical model was proposed for investigation. Three putative paths linking workspace (WSP) to EAW, departmental space (DSP) to EAW and EAW to OIM were then tested relying on a survey data of 362 employees collected from three Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certified buildings by using structural equation modeling methodology as prescribed by Hair et al. Findings Significant evidence was found in support of all three purposed paths. Further, the study found that workspace and the DSP together explained around 46 percent of the variance in employee’s EAW, which then explained around 54 percent of the variance in the formation of the employees’ OIM. Research limitations/implications The study drew data only from green certified organizations. Future research should involve other green organizations or a larger sample of green buildings. The size and character of the sample were restricted by organizational constraints. Practical implications The organizations need to be extremely cautious of green concerns during the design phase in order to capitalize on the yields of better employees’ OIM. It also motivates the other organizational group toward the green building concept to increase the employees’ EAW and to enhance organizational values and image. Originality/value While the green concept has been a significant research topic for more than decades, barely any research has been conducted that focuses specifically on environmental design features of a green building on employees’ EAW and OIM. This study tries to make a link between green building design features with employees’ EAW and OIM. These links are rare in Indian perspective.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-12T11:18:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-02-2017-0029
       
  • Enhancing the value of facilities information management (FIM) through BIM
           integration
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Building information modelling (BIM) provides a robust platform for information management in built environment facilities. However, one of the consequences of the limited application of BIM in facilities information management (FIM) is that the potential value gain through the integration of as-built information during the operations management process has had limited exploration in current practice. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential impact of BIM to enhance the value of FIM. Design/methodology/approach A detailed literature review was undertaken to identify BIM application in a construction context, and to develop a framework to investigate the value of information. An interpretative approach was adopted for data collection and analysis. A total of 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with construction industry professionals to identify how value of FIM can be enhanced through BIM integration. The interview data were analysed using open and selective coding. Findings The findings confirm that information exchange between the construction and facilities management (FM) phases of a project are important in terms of efficient and effective maintenance of a facility as well as optimising the design task. With these promising benefits, BIM is an efficient mechanism to facilitate construction information exchange. However, there is an uncertainty over the optimum level of information that ought to be on a BIM model for FM purposes. The relationship between different aspects of value is a starting point to filter the required information for each individual project. In contrast, limited awareness of value of information exchange and the potential of BIM enabled FIM during construction is noted. Research limitations/implications The information exchange considered within this investigation was limited to two key phases of the facility life cycle, namely, construction and FM (in-use). Practical implications The findings bring insight into an unseen aspect of FM information needs that should be given priority in upcoming BIM developments. Also, it draws attention to how value is concerned in a daily basis beyond monetary terms. Originality/value The investigation of value enhancement through BIM integration in particular to FIM and ongoing research with new value dimensions.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-12T11:13:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-02-2016-0041
       
  • Driving forces influencing the uptake of sustainable housing in New
           Zealand
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Sustainable houses remain at a low rate among the housing stock in New Zealand. Government, industry and the public are wanting to deliver homes that are energy and water efficient, healthy and adaptive to the climate. The purpose of this paper is to find out the driving forces influencing the uptake of sustainable housing in New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach Comparative case studies of Hobsonville Point, Wynyard Quarter and Long Bay were adopted as the primary research method. Semi-structured interviews and an online survey were both conducted for data collection to increase the validity of the research. Findings Central and local governments were the most effective driving forces for encouraging sustainable housing. Corporate brand and leadership were critical drivers for public-owned companies, whereas private-owned companies were mainly driven by local governments’ policies and strategies. Social awareness and client demand were increasing to influence the sustainable housing, but there was still room for improvement. Research limitations/implications The developers can learn from the sustainable development frameworks to set the sustainability goals. Policymakers can draw lessons from the public sectors’ experiences to carry out new policies and inspire the private sectors to follow. Besides, the basic framework could help the further study to use a larger sample size and more rigorous statistical analysis to explore the synergies among the identified drivers. Originality/value This paper provides the useful information on how to promote the uptake of sustainable housing in New Zealand.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-07T10:10:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0111
       
  • Mobile BIM implementation and lean interaction on construction site
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Building information modeling (BIM) and lean construction are two practices that are developed in order to increase productivity, efficiency and quality in construction by implementing various procedures. However, the practical execution of both BIM and lean is mostly limited with the tasks performed in the office environments in the design phase. The purpose of this paper is to examine the benefit realizations in terms of lean interactions resulting from mobile BIM processes through a framework by focusing on digital transformations performed on the construction site. Design/methodology/approach This paper examines the benefit realizations in terms of lean interactions resulting from mobile BIM processes through a framework by focusing on digital transformations performed on the construction site. To describe the case, BIM project management processes during construction phase have been explained by a participatory research. With a comprehensive literature review, interactions between site BIM processes and lean principles have been defined and the case has been evaluated accordingly. Findings By focusing on the mobile BIM delivery of project information via tablets to construction site, it has been identified that through the use of technology enabled by BIM practices, lean construction principles are also simultaneously accomplished. This achievement is not only realized with technology but also with the strategic implementation and transformation of organization with the proper BIM practices. Research limitations/implications The research is focused on mobile BIM processes applied on-site to enhance traditional project management processes. With the findings of this paper, practitioners may identify research questions to resolve real-life implementation challenges. Practical implications This research will enlighten construction practitioners regarding site BIM application capabilities and lean achievements with the utilization of improved project management processes enabled by BIM. Originality/value Through the implementation of project management processes enabled by BIM practices on construction site, lean principles are achieved and bottlenecks are identified.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-07T10:10:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-08-2017-0188
       
  • Barriers faced by new-adopter of Last Planner System®: a case study
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Documented evidence supports the improvements resulting from the use of the Last Planner System® (LPS) as a lean construction technique; however, several barriers to the implementation of the technique have been identified. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation process of LPS by a project team that is transitioning from the traditional planning and control to LPS on a typical commercial project. The paper compares the adopted implementation process with that of the recommended best practices and identifies the overlaps and variances. Design/methodology/approach An in-depth case study was conducted to accomplish the specific objectives: document the process of LPS implementation in detail; identify the overlaps and variance from the recommended practices; and investigate the causes for variance from the recommended practices. The authors used direct observations, document investigations and semi-structured interviews with key project participants to gather data. Constant comparison and content analysis were used as data analysis method for this study. Findings The paper identified critical barriers to the implementation process of LPS in the case study project, which are supported by existing literature and are considered typical of project teams that are new adopters and transitioning to the implementation of LPS. Research limitations/implications Based on a single case study, the outcomes may lack generalizability. However, similar findings of existing literature and evaluations by the project personnel substantiated the findings of the study. Originality/value The study attempted to conduct a systematic investigation on the implementation process of LPS, which is a less investigated topic. The paper draws attention to the major barriers experienced while adopting LPS in the case study project and suggested possible ways to address similar issues in the future. The barriers experienced by the case study project are typical of project teams who are new adopters and transitioning to the adoption of LPS, process and have the potential to be alleviated through the recommended practice implementation and process maintenance strategy.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-03T01:33:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-08-2017-0162
       
  • A structural equation model for enhancing effectiveness of engineering,
           procurement and construction (EPC) major projects
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to define and analyze causal factors shaping the effectiveness of engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) major projects in meeting the product objectives, from the end-user’s perspective. Design/methodology/approach An online survey questionnaire was developed and administered to end-users working in major oil and gas projects. Data collection process was initiated on, around 275 end-users, and 213 responses were received, achieving a high response rate of 77 percent. Findings The results indicate that both alignment of objectives and end-user’s engagement factors exhibit a positive influence on effectiveness of EPC, with the former having higher contribution than the latter. In this context, the product success triangle reveals higher preference of the end-user’s team toward quality than schedule and cost objectives. Research limitations/implications Shifting the efforts of involving the end-user forward in time, starting from the planning stage, alleviates the adverse impacts of design changes as well as increases the ability to save cost, improve performance and increase end-user’s satisfaction. Practical implications The model raises the awareness of oil and gas industry practitioners toward the critical factors influencing the project effectiveness and proposes useful techniques for maintaining proper alignment between project and product objectives as well as facilitating end-user’s engagement at the site level. As such, it can serve as a motivation tool for aligning the objectives and acknowledging the engagement, with the aim of achieving the product success. Originality/value The effectiveness of EPC structural model was developed and tested using PLS–structural equation modeling statistical technique. The interpretation of the structural model demonstrated that both end-user’s engagement and alignment of objectives are essential to successfully achieve project effectiveness.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-03T01:25:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0130
       
  • Reframing construction within the built environment sector
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Official statistics on the output of the construction industry capture on-site activities of contractors and sub-contractors; however, the role of the industry linking suppliers of materials, machinery, products, services and other inputs is also widely recognised. These two views have been called broad and narrow, with the narrow industry defined as on-site work and the broad industry as the supply chain of materials, products and assemblies, and professional services. An argument is made for using the term “built environment sector” (BES) for the broad industry definition of construction. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach Construction industry statistics capture the on-site activities of contractors and sub-contractors. This paper reviews research that adds to construction output the contributions of suppliers of materials, machinery and equipment, products and components, professional services and other inputs required to deliver the buildings and structures that make up the built environment. Findings The same term, “construction”, has been used in a number of ways in different definitional studies of the narrow and broad industry. The term that best encompasses the large number and range of participants in the creation and maintenance of the built environment, from suppliers to end users, is the BES. Research limitations/implications Construction economics makes an important contribution to researching the macroeconomic role of the BES. There is also a special role for construction economics in researching both the boundaries of the BES and the data available on the industries that contribute to the BES. Practical implications Measuring the BES would improve the understanding of its macroeconomic role and significance. Social implications Measuring the BES would contribute to city policies and urban planning. Originality/value The paper proposes a new approach to defining and measuring the industries that contribute to the production, maintenance and management of the built environment. It introduces a new name for the combination of those industries.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-03T01:24:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-02-2018-0088
       
  • Alternate beeline diagramming method network analysis for interdependent
           design entities
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The design phase is generally characterized with two-way multiple information exchanges/overlaps between the interdependent entities. In this paper, entity is a generic term to represent teams, components, activities or parameters. Existing approaches can either capture a single overlap or lack practical application in representing multiple overlaps. The beeline diagraming method (BDM) network is efficient in representing multiple overlaps for construction projects. However, it considers any entity as indivisible and cannot distinguish partial criticality of entities. In reality, the design phase in any construction project is driven by need basis and often has numerous interruptions. Hence, there is a need to develop an alternate network analysis for BDM for interruptible execution. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach A pilot study is conducted to formulate the hypothetical examples. Subsequently, these hypothetical BDM examples are analyzed to trace a pattern for criticality. This pattern study along with the existing precedence diagramming method network analysis enabled to derive new equations for forward pass, backward pass and float. Finally, the proposed concepts are applied to two design cases and reviewed with the design experts. Findings The proposed network analysis for BDM is efficient for interruptible entity execution. Practical implications The proposed BDM network is an information-intensive network that enables the design participants to view the project holistically. Application to two distinct cases emphasizes that the concept is generic and can be applied to any project that is characterized with beelines. Originality/value An alternate network analysis for BDM is investigated for interruptible entity execution. This study also clarifies the related concepts – interdependency, iteration, overlaps and multiple information exchanges/linkages.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-28T07:28:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0112
       
  • A simulation-based framework for concurrent safety and productivity
           improvement in construction projects
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Safety and productivity are key concerns in the construction projects. While safety looks to the construction workers need to work in a safe environment, productivity affects the project’s profitability and is of a paramount importance from the project owner’s view. The different perspective to the safety and productivity from these two major players in construction projects poses a potential for the conflict between the two. This problem can be fundamentally addressed by methods concurrently improving project safety and productivity. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach To this aim, a discrete event simulation (DES) based framework applicable was proposed for complex and hazardous operations. The utility of the framework was tested using a case study of an eight-story residential building in the north-east part of Tehran, Iran. The excavation and stabilization operation was identified as the most hazardous and critical operation in this case. The framework could improve safety and productivity of this operation by 38 and 4 percent, respectively. Findings This framework is a complement to the conventional construction project safety and productivity planning methods. Its main application is in complex and hazardous construction operations. Originality/value For the first time, a comprehensive framework for concurrently improving safety and productivity of an entire project was proposed in this research. DES was used as the main modeling tool in the framework to provide an ex-ante evaluation foundation applicable to a wide range of construction projects.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-24T09:18:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-12-2017-0266
       
  • The use and abuse of safety indicators in construction
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present a critical review of the use of safety performance indicators in the construction industry. The authors consider the strengths, limitations and managerial consequences associated with commonly used indicators. Design/methodology/approach The authors combine two separate data sets in this critical review. These include 32 semi-structured interviews with construction industry representatives involved in the collection and reporting of safety indicators, as well as a multi-level safety climate survey that was conducted at 12 construction sites across Australia. Findings The analysis provides new evidence that, in their current use, commonly used H&S indicators are subject to manipulation and misinterpretation. Their usefulness as tools to support safety management activities in construction projects and organisations needs to be understood in the context of their limitations. In particular, safety indicators do not reflect the full set of factors that affect workplace safety and there will always be disagreement about what should be counted and how. Originality/value As a result of the substantial shortcomings of safety indicators, great care needs to be taken when using them to determine or evaluate organisational safety policy and practices.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-24T09:14:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0121
       
  • Innovation in construction firms of different sizes: drivers and
           strategies
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The importance of innovation has been increasingly highlighted in construction as a large and complex industry sector that is more challenging than ever before. To bridge the knowledge gap about how firm size affects innovation in construction, the purpose of this paper is to explore firm-level innovation through an empirical investigation and compare innovation in construction firms of different sizes in terms of drivers and strategies. Design/methodology/approach This research adopts a combination of a literature review, a group of qualitative interviews and a quantitative questionnaire survey. In this research, the questionnaire survey is the main instrument to collect empirical data. Main contractors, subcontractors and specialist contractors as well as suppliers of labor, material and equipment are used in this research to represent construction firms of different sizes. On the other hand, client organizations, design firms and management consultants are not included in this research. Findings This research provides clear evidence for the embrace of innovation in construction. Many forces can drive construction firms to innovate and many strategies can be applied to construction innovation. Innovation drivers can be either internal or external. On the other hand, innovation strategies fall into four categories: technology, resource, marketing and management. For innovation drivers and strategies, both commonalities and differences can be found among construction firms of different sizes. Originality/value The finding of commonalities describes the general trend of innovation development in construction. It also encourages all construction firms to innovate regardless of firm size. On the other hand, the finding of differences enables construction firms of different sizes to realize what forces better drive their innovation and what strategies are more appropriate for their innovation. A thorough understanding of innovation drivers and strategies offers an important framework for construction organizations and practitioners to pursue best practice.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-24T09:10:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-04-2017-0067
       
  • Factors affecting the market development of steel construction
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The steel construction market has undergone gradual development in the past decades given its profound impacts on environment, economy and society. The purpose of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the major drivers and issues behind the market development of the steel construction industries around the world. Design/methodology/approach A three-step desktop research was conducted to select relevant research outputs published in the past 20 years. The research methodology in conducting these studies and their research trends were analyzed. Then the potential influencing factors for the market development of steel construction were identified through a content analysis of the selected studies. Findings A total of 59 articles were identified accordingly. These influencing factors were divided into five main themes: contextual, institutional, industrial, project-related and individual factors. In terms of the frequencies of these factors appeared in previous studies, “continuous development of standards, codes, and specifications” and “advance in product and process technology” were the top two driving forces in the market development of steel construction, while “cost issues” was the most frequently reported obstacle. Originality/value The study takes an initiative to establish a practical classification framework that can be dedicated to illuminating the critical issues or success factors affecting the development of the steel construction market. This framework can help policymakers, industry practitioners and researchers achieve sustaining success in steel construction in the developed, emerging and inactive markets.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-23T01:44:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2017-0095
       
  • A systematic approach for public-private partnership projects CSFs
           evaluation
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Public–private partnership (PPP) projects are increasingly significant in many countries. The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of critical success factors (CSFs) on PPP projects and comprehensively consider the interrelations and interaction among dimensions and factors to achieve a better understanding of PPP project management. Design/methodology/approach An evaluation index system for PPP projects such as the presented case study is proposed based on a literature review and a survey. Then, interpretative structural modeling is used to transform the CSFs dimension into a multi-level hierarchical model to reflect the driven-dependency relation of each dimension; the fuzzy analytic network process model optimized by moment estimation theory is used to investigate the impact of CSFs by considering their internal impact. Findings Regarding the project used as the case study, the driving force and dependence for driving layer and dependent layer are determined. Moreover, in driving layer, efficient and well-structured payment mechanism is the most important CSF if considering the internship and interaction among CSFs, and efficient and well-structured payment mechanism and good governance provide most positive interaction; in dependent layer, population of beneficiaries is the most important CSF if considering the internship and interaction among CSFs, and public client’s satisfaction provides most positive interaction. Originality/value This paper developed an evaluation model to explore the interrelationships of dimensions and factors and then determine the impact of CSFs. The model propose in this paper relaxes the independence assumptions of traditional methods and is more in line with reality; besides, weighting method is optimized to obtain more objective and reasonable evaluation results. Through an empirical study, the validity of the model has been verified; therefore, the study can help project stakeholders better understand the CSFs and further improve project performance.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-20T12:26:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-05-2017-0083
       
  • A framework for ad hoc information management for the building design
           process
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The building design processes today are complex, involving many disciplines and issues like collaboration, concurrency and collocation. Several studies have focused on understanding and modeling formal information exchange in these processes. Few past studies have also identified the importance of informal information exchanges in the design process and proposed passive solutions for facilitating this exchange. The purpose of this paper is to term the informal information as ad hoc information and explores if components of ad hoc information exchanges can be actively managed. Design/methodology/approach An MDM-based framework integrating product, process and people dependencies is proposed and a prototype platform to implement this framework is developed. The demonstration on the usage of this platform to identify information paths during collaboration and hence manage ad hoc information exchanges is presented through an example problem. Findings Based on the effectiveness of the prototype platform in identifying information paths for design queries, it is concluded that the proposed framework is useful for actively managing some components of ad hoc information exchange. Originality/value This research enables the design manager/participants to make a more informed decision on requesting and releasing design information.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-20T12:25:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2017-0097
       
  • Reducing construction material cost by optimizing buy-in decision that
           accounts the flexibility of non-critical activities
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The goal of making buy-in decisions is to purchase materials at the right time with the required quantity and a minimum material cost (MC). To help achieve this goal, the purpose of this paper is to find a way of optimizing the buy-in decision with the consideration of flexible starting date of non-critical activities which makes daily demand adjustable. Design/methodology/approach First, a specific algorithm is developed to calculate a series of demand combinations modeling daily material demand for all the possible start dates. Second, future material prices are predicted by applying artificial neural network. Third, the demand combinations and predicted prices are used to generate an optimal buy-in decision. Findings By comparing MC in situation when non-critical activities always start at the earliest date to that in situations when the starting date is flexible, it is found that making material buy-in decision with the consideration of the flexibility usually helps reduce MC. Originality/value In this paper, a material buy-in decision-making method that accounts non-critical activities’ flexible starting date is proposed. A ternary cycle algorithm is developed to calculate demand combinations. The results that making material buy-in decision considering non-critical activities’ flexible starting date can reduce MC in most times indicates that contractors may consider non-critical activities’ flexibility a part of the buy-in decision-making process, so as to achieve an MC decrease and profit increase.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-16T07:14:47Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-12-2016-0263
       
  • BIM adoption model for small and medium construction organisations in
           Australia
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present a model for building information modelling (BIM) implementation at small and medium-sized construction contractor organisations (SMOs). The proposed BIM adoption model assesses BIM implementation benefits, costs and challenges faced by SMOs. Correlation between BIM adoption in SMOs and the associated impacting factors, including knowledge support and BIM adoption motivation, is captured through the model. Design/methodology/approach A literature review of BIM adoption in construction was first presented. Research data, collected from 80 SMOs in Australia through a conducted survey, are then analysed. Descriptive analysis and structural equation modelling were used to investigate SMOs’ understanding of BIM, and to qualify the correlations among the proposed latent variables impacting BIM implementation at SMOs, respectively. Additionally, this study used χ2 test to compare differences between BIM users and non-BIM users regarding BIM understanding, interested applications and attitudes towards implementation benefits and challenges. Findings Potential benefits associated with BIM implementation are a major motivation factor when it comes to BIM adoption at SMOs. In addition, existing staff’s capability in using BIM tools positively affects the establishment of an organisational knowledge-support system, which determines the decision of adopting BIM eventually. Ultimately, there is a need for further emphasis on staff engagement in the implementation process. Research limitations/implications The results presented in this paper are applicable to SMOs in the building sector of construction. BIM implementation at organisations involved in non-building activities, including civil works and infrastructure, needs to be assessed in the future. Practical implications The results indicate that rather than placing the focus mainly on benefits of BIM implementation, successful implementation of BIM in practice requires adequate effort to assess implementation problems, establish knowledge support and engage staff in using BIM. Originality/value Results of this study provide an insight into the adoption challenges of BIM in SMOs, given that the focus of previous studies has been mostly placed on BIM adoption in architectural firms and large contractors.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-16T07:11:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-04-2017-0064
       
  • An investigation of modern building equipment technology adoption in the
           Australian construction industry
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Research into the construction industry’s adoption of modern equipment technologies, such as remote-controlled trucks, excavators and drones, has been neglected in comparison to the significant body of research into the adoption of information technology in construction. Construction research has also neglected to adequately consider the important role of vendors in the innovation diffusion process, focussing mostly on the role of the customer. Set within the context of Australia’s construction industry, the purpose of this paper is to address these gaps in knowledge by exploring the role of customers and vendors in the diffusion of modern equipment technologies into the construction industry. Design/methodology/approach Using contemporary models of innovation diffusion which move beyond the simple dualistic problem of whether innovation is supply-pushed or demand-pulled, 19 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with customers and vendors involved in two major modern equipment technology trade exhibitions in Australia. This was followed by the collection of documentary data in the form of photos, directory books, marketing material, catalogues, websites and booth and exhibition layouts to validate the proposed model and provide insights into vendor marketing strategies. These data were analysed using both content analysis and principal component analysis (PCA). Findings According to the PCA and content analysis, vendor’s engagement in the adoption of modern equipment technologies falls into three stages that correspond to three stages in the customer’s adoption process. In the first stage, customers identify possible solutions and recognise new technologies following a previous recognition of a need. Vendors provide facilities for attracting potential customers and letting customers know that their technology exists and can help solve the customer’s problem. The second stage involves customers gaining knowledge about the details of the new technology, and vendors focusing on detailed knowledge transfer through written materials and demonstrations of the functionality of the new technology. In the third stage, customers have specific questions that they want answered to assist them in comparing different vendors and solutions. By this stage, vendors have built a close relationship with the customer and in contrast to earlier stages engage in two-way communication to help the customer’s decision process by addressing specific technical and support-related questions. Originality/value The originality and value of this research is in addressing the lack of research in modern equipment technology adoption for building construction and the lack of data on the role of vendors in the process by developing a new empirical framework which describes the stages in the process and the ways that customers and vendors interact at each stage. The results indicate that conceptually, as the construction industry becomes more industrialised, current models of innovation adoption will need to develop to reflect this growing technological complexity and recognise that vendors and customers engage differently in the adoption process, according to the type of technology they wish to adopt.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-16T07:06:29Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-03-2017-0052
       
  • Phase-based analysis of key cost and schedule performance causes and
           preventive strategies
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose It is estimated that more than half of the construction industry’s projects encounter significant cost overruns and major delays, resulting in the industry having a tarnished reputation. Therefore, it is crucial to identify key project cost and schedule performance factors. However, despite the attempts of numerous researchers, their results have been inconsistent. Most of the literature has focused solely on the construction phase budget and time overruns; the engineering/design and procurement phase costs and schedule performances have been rarely studied. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach The objective of this study was primarily to identify and prioritize engineering, procurement and construction key performance factors (KPFs) and to strategize ways to prevent performance delays and cost overruns. To achieve these objectives, more than 200 peer-reviewed journal papers, conference proceedings and other scholarly publications were studied and categorized based on industry type, physical location, data collection and analysis methods. Findings It was concluded that both the time required to complete engineering/construction phases and the cost of completing them can be significantly affected by design changes. The two main causes of delays and cost overruns in the procurement phase are construction material shortages and price fluctuations. Other factors affecting all phases of the project are poor economic condition, equipment and labor shortages, delays in owners’ timely decision making, poor communication between stakeholders, poor site management and supervision, clients’ financial issues and severe weather conditions. A list of phase-based strategies which address the issue of time/cost overruns is presented herein. Originality/value The findings of this study address the potential confusion of the industry’s practitioners related to the inconsistent list of potential KPFs and their preventive measurements, and pave the way for the construction research community to conduct future performance-related studies.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-14T10:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-10-2017-0219
       
  • Risk paths in BIM adoption: empirical study of China
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to model the paths of risks associated with building information modeling (BIM) adoption in the Chinese architecture, engineering and construction industry. Design/methodology/approach A total of 16 risks were identified from the literature review and grouped into nine categories. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey with 95 professionals in China. The partial least square structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Findings The results suggested the risk categorization was confirmed, and that 15 hypothetical risk paths were statistically significant, which formed 13 chains of risk paths. “Inadequate relevant knowledge and expertise” was the primary root risk category of all the 13 chains of risk paths. Additionally, “technological issues,” “poor information sharing and collaboration,” and “liability for data input” had direct effect on the “cost overrun with BIM,” while all the other risks indirectly influence cost via these three risk categories. Research limitations/implications Most of the respondents were designers because few clients and contractors have adopted BIM. In addition, the impact and likelihood of risks were accessed by respondents’ judgment based on their experience, which is a common problem of risk management research. As this study focuses on the Chinese architecture, engineering and construction industry, there would be geographical limitation on the findings. Practical implications This study provides practitioners with a clear understanding of the risks associated with BIM adoption and enables practitioners to take measures to mitigate the root risks and assure the potential benefits of BIM. Originality/value Although there have been studies on the risks associated with BIM adoption, most of them lacked empirical evidence and failed to examine the interactions between risks. This study is different from these prior studies, because it focuses on the interrelationships between risks and identifies the risk paths and root risks using the empirical data. Therefore, this study expands the literature relating to both BIM and risk management. Also, this study enables practitioners to take measures to mitigate the root risks and assure the potential benefits produced by BIM, thereby contributing to the practice.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-14T10:23:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-08-2017-0169
       
  • Improving transparency in construction management: a visual planning and
           control model
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to discuss a production planning and control model known as the Lean construction management (LCM) model, which applies a number of visual tools in a systematic way to the planning and control process. The application of the visual tools in this way facilitates the flow of information, thus improving transparency between the interfaces of planning, execution and control. Design/methodology/approach Design Science research is adopted for this investigation, which analyses the original development of the model and reports on its testing and refinement over different types of projects. The research is divided into three parts, each part focussing on a different stage of development and construction project type. Findings The main findings are related to the benefits of visual management in the construction planning and control process, such as maintaining consistency between different planning levels, so that feasible execution plans are created; control becomes more focussed on prevention rather than correction, and creates opportunities for collaborative problem solving. Moreover, the physical display of the visual tools in a discrete planning area on-site encourages a regular exchange between participants on actual work progress as it unfolds, leading to more timely reaction to the problems at hand. Originality/value The problem of a lack of transparency in construction planning and control leads to communication issues on-site, poor process orientation and high levels of waste. LCM improves process transparency by making information related to system-wide processes more readily available to project participants. This enables them to foresee problems in a timely manner and to take necessary measures to resolve them or to adapt the process to current circumstances. The LCM model proposes a new way of applying visual tools and controls systematically to improve transparency in construction planning and control.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-10T01:22:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0122
       
  • Bridging the digital divide gap in BIM technology adoption
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose In the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, a “digital divide” exists in technology adoption because SMEs (who often form the bulk of AEC organisations in most countries) are thought to be “Late Majority” and “Laggards” in the adoption of Building information modelling (BIM) technology. Larger organisations not saddled with financial and socio-technical constraints might be considered as being among the “Early Majority” or “Innovators”. It is crucial to understand how these organisations differ in their speed of BIM technology adoption and the rationale for this difference. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential causes of the digital divide and suggest solutions for bridging the gap. Design/methodology/approach Using mixed research method, data were collected through online questionnaire survey of over 240 global respondents as well as a semi-structured interview with nine experts for which statistical and thematic analyses were used, respectively. Findings Organisations can be zoned into “layers” and “levels” of BIM technology adoption and their size is not always significant in terms of the speed at which they adopt BIM. The digital divide is unequal across layers/levels and large organisations utilise technologies across the BIM maturity levels depending on project circumstances. A conceptual model for BIM technology was developed to aid identification of the “Laggards” and “Late Majority” from the “Innovators” through which change agents can customise adoption strategies for each group. Originality/value The developed model could serve as a tool for engagement and policy making and it contributes to the body of knowledge in the field of BIM technology adoption.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-10T01:18:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-05-2017-0091
       
  • Lean talent management: a novel approach for increasing creativity in
           architectural design firms
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Architecture is classified as one of the creative industries worldwide. However, it is plagued with a number of problems that confine its creativity towards developing innovative solutions that fulfil society needs. One of these pressing problems is the lack of creativity due to the non-utilisation of talented architects. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of lean talent management (LTM) as a novel approach to increase creativity in architectural design firms (ADFs). Design/methodology/approach In order to achieve the above-mentioned aim, a mixed qualitative and quantitative methodology is designed to accomplish three objectives. First, reviewing literature to investigate the concepts of creative industries, motivation, demotivation, talent management (TM), talents utilisation (TU), lean thinking (LT) and lean innovation (LI). Second, presenting and analysing five case studies to explore the integration between TM, LT and LI in real-life context to overcome barriers of creativity. Finally, analysing the results of a survey questionnaire conducted with a representative sample of Egyptian ADFs to evaluate their perception and application of TM as a facilitator for creativity. Findings The five barriers of creativity encompassed lack of motivation in ADFs and demotivation and lack of TU in ADFs and Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry. TM facilitated motivation and eliminated six demotivating factors. The seventh factor was eliminated through LT. In AEC industry, TU was achieved through LI with five considerations. In ADFs, TU can be achieved through LTM. However, two additional barriers have been identified for further investigation. Egyptian ADFs failed increasing creativity with TM solely. Hence, a LTM framework is required. Research limitations/implications Although the study focussed on architecture as a case for creative industries and targeted Egyptian ADFs, the application of LTM is to be applied at any industry that is talent-based although barriers related to the design process could vary. Originality/value This paper presents an innovative approach through discussing the integration of lean concepts into TM towards increasing creativity in ADFs. This ideology has received scant attention in construction literature and is the first of its kind in the architectural field. The proposed ideas represent a synthesis that is novel and creative in thought and adds value to the knowledge in a manner that has not previously occurred.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-09T09:45:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0139
       
  • Exploring the BIM and lean synergies in the Istanbul Grand Airport
           construction project
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a solid understanding of how integrated building information modeling (BIM) is implemented in a mega project such as the (Istanbul Grand Airport IGA) construction project, which is the main case study in the research methodology. Design/methodology/approach The paper examines and identifies the lean efficiency gains achieved in the IGA project and highlights the synergies between BIM and lean concepts based on the facts and figures from the case study analysis. In complex projects, there is a vital need for a comprehensive approach that would enable successful managing of design and construction information via accurate modeling, collaboration and integration throughout the project lifecycles covering various disciplines. Findings The research findings in the paper make a significant impact in understanding the strategic perception for BIM as a new way of working methodology for the construction industry in Turkey, since the IGA project has become not only a key learning hub for the Turkish construction industry, but also a global landmark for digital construction and project delivery. In addition it proves the mutual synergies between BIM and lean practices. Originality/value The IGA project is a mega-scale airport construction project with features beyond building industry challenges, and it should be designed and constructed with tight deadlines and budgets and be operated afterwards in an effective and efficient way. Can lean and BIM help for timely and on-budget completion of the project and could they support the management of the airport facility after handover' The paper also discusses the lean and BIM implementation in the project in relation to the BIM Level 3 requirements.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-09T09:43:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-08-2017-0186
       
  • The role of formal and informal mechanisms in implementing lean principles
           in construction projects
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Previous research shows that implementing lean construction is not a straightforward task. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of formal and informal mechanisms in implementing lean principles in construction projects. Design/methodology/approach The paper draws on a single case study of the implementation of innovative lean principles in a public construction project in Norway. The study is based on qualitative data, including 17 semi-structured interviews with 21 individuals, document analysis, and observations in meetings and seminars, in addition to informal conversations. Findings Formal mechanisms, including contractual arrangements, have the potential to both facilitate and hamper the implementation of innovative lean principles in a construction project. They might create coherence, but at the same time they might limit the scope of the concept in such a way that others do not accept it. Informal mechanisms, including social and lateral relationships and trust aid implementation, both directly by creating commitment and by modifying the challenges that the formal mechanisms potentially incur. Formal mechanisms may, in turn, nurture the informal ones. Research limitations/implications The research is based on a single case study within the Norwegian public sector, which is dependent on specific public procurement regulations and subject to strong contractual traditions. Originality/value The research extends the existing knowledge of implementation of lean construction in the construction industry. It helps refining the understanding of the role played by formal and informal mechanisms, and the interplay between them in the implementation process. This knowledge is also relevant for process innovations in construction in general.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-07-31T08:32:52Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0138
       
  • Project-based pedagogy in interdisciplinary building design adopting BIM
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present a pedagogical practice in the project-based assessment of architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) students’ interdisciplinary building design work adopting BIM. This pedagogical practice emphasizes the impacts of BIM, as the digital collaboration platform, on the cross-disciplinary teamwork design through information sharing. This study also focuses on collecting students’ perceptions of building information modeling (BIM) effects in integrated project design. Challenges in BIM adoption from AEC students’ perspective were identified and discussed, and could spark further research needs. Design/methodology/approach Based on a thorough review of previous pedagogical practices of applying BIM in multiple AEC disciplines, this study adopted a case study of the Solar Decathlon (SD) residential building design as the group project for AEC students to deliver the design work and construction planning. In total 13 different teams within the University of Nottingham Ningbo China, each group consisting of final year undergraduate students with backgrounds in architecture, civil engineering, and architectural environmental engineering, worked to deliver the detailed design of the solar-powered residential house meeting pre-specified project objectives in terms of architectural esthetics, structural integrity, energy efficiency, prefabrication construction techniques and other issues such as budget and scheduling. Each team presented the cross-disciplinary design plan with cost estimate and construction scheduling together within group reports. This pedagogical study collected students’ reflective thinking on how BIM affected their design work, and compared their feedback on BIM to that from AEC industry professionals in previous studies. Findings The case study of the SD building project showed the capacity of BIM in enabling interdisciplinary collaboration through information exchange and in enhancing communication across different AEC fields. More sustainable design options were considered in the early architectural design stages through the cross-disciplinary cooperation between architecture and building services engineering. BIM motivated AEC student teams to have a more comprehensive design and construction plan by considering multiple criteria including energy efficiency, budget, and construction activities. Students’ reflections indicated both positive effects of BIM (e.g. facilitating information sharing) as well as challenges for further BIM implementation, for example, such as some architecture students’ resistance to BIM, and the lack of existing family types in the BIM library, etc. Research limitations/implications Some limitations of the current BIM pedagogy were identified through the student group work. For example, students revealed the problem of interoperability between BIM (i.e. Autodesk Revit) and building energy simulation tools. To further integrate the university education and AEC industry practice, future BIM pedagogical work could recruit professionals and project stakeholders in the adopted case studies, for the purpose of providing professional advice on improving the constructability of the BIM-based design from student work. Practical implications To further integrate the university education and AEC industry practice, future BIM pedagogical work could recruit professionals and project stakeholders in the adopted case study, for the purpose of providing professional advice in improving the constructability of the BIM-based design from student work. Originality/value This work provides insights into the information technology applied in the AEC interdisciplinary pedagogy. Students gained the experience of a project-based collaboration and were equipped with BIM capabilities for future employment within the AEC job market. The integrated design approach was embedded throughout the team project process. Overall, this BIM pedagogical practice emphasized the link between academic activities and real-world industrial practice. The pedagogical experience gained in this BIM course could be expanded to future BIM education and research in other themes such as interoperability of building information exchange among different digital tools.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-07-31T08:09:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2017-0119
       
  • Economic sustainability of buildings
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present an innovative approach for the development of a methodology to systematically assess the economic performance and for the assessment of the economic sustainability of a building, through the calculation of an economic sustainability index, within the sustainability framework according to the rules defined in EN 16627. Design/methodology/approach The methodology follows the principle of modularity, where aspects and impacts that influence the economic performance of the building during the phases of its life cycle are assigned to levels. It presents a model based on the construction costs of the building. The methodology in centered in the before use phase and restricted to residential buildings. Findings Definition of a model for assessing the economic performance and calculation of an economic sustainability index. Research limitations/implications The methodology is focused only in the before use phase of the buildings, assuming they have the same functional equivalent. It can be expanded to include the other phases of the building life cycle. Practical implications The developed methodology will allow the selection of construction procedures, based on economic sustainability, contributing to more rational and support decisions. Social implications Contributing to a more sustainable society. Originality/value The European framework of EN 15643 and EN 16627 for the assessment of building sustainability is new and, as such, not implemented in most practical tools. Also, economic sustainability is not usually considered in detail in existing models. This paper presents a methodology following the framework and, simultaneously, possible to integrate in existing approaches.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-07-31T08:08:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-03-2017-0048
       
  • Strategy management of construction workspaces by conflict resolution
           algorithm and visualization model
    • Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The spatial conflicts and congestion of construction resources are challenges that lead to the reduction in efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to enable users to detect and resolve workspace conflicts by implementing four resolution strategies in a five-dimensional (5D) CAD model. In addition to resolving conflicts, the model should be able to optimize time and cost of the projects. In other words, three variables of spatial conflicts, time and cost of project are considered simultaneously in the proposed model to find the optimum solution. Design/methodology/approach In the first step, a 5D simulation model is developed that includes time, cost and geometrical information of a project. Then, time-cost trade-off analysis was carried out to distinguish optimum schedule. The schedule was imported to the 5D CAD model to detect spatial conflicts. Finally, a novel algorithm was implemented to solve identified conflicts while imposing minimum project’s time and cost. Several iterations are performed to resolve all clashes using conflict resolution algorithm and visual simulation model. Findings The proposed methodology in this research was applied to a real case. Results showed that in comparison to the normal and initial schedule with 19 conflicts, the finalized schedule has no conflict, while time and cost of the project are both reduced. Research limitations/implications Implementing the proposed methodology in construction projects requires proper technical basis in this field. In this regard, the executive user should have a proper understanding of the principles, concepts and tools of building information modeling and have project management knowledge. Also, the implementation conditions of the basic model requires the determination of the construction methods, estimated volumes of working items, scheduling and technical specification. The designed methodology also has two limitations regarding to its implementation. The first is the fact that strategies should be applied manually to the schedule. The other one pertains to the number of strategies used in the research. Four strategies have been used in the conflict resolution algorithm directly and the two others (spatial divisibility and activities breakdown strategies) have been used as default strategies in the visual simulation model. Since the unused strategies including the changing of construction method and the activity resources are subjective and depend upon the planner and project manager’s personal opinion, the authors have avoided using them in this research. Practical implications The method proposed in this research contributes the coordination of the working teams at the planning and execution phases of the project. In fact, the best location and work direction for each working team is presented as a schedule, so that the space conflict may not come about and the cost can be minimized. This visual simulation not only deepens the planners’ views about the executive barriers and the spatial conditions of the worksite, it also makes the construction engineers familiar on a daily basis with their executive scope. Therefore, it considerably improves the interactions and communication of the planning and construction teams. Another advantage and application of this methodology is the use of initial and available projects’ documents including the schedule and two-dimensional drawings. The integration of these basic documents in this methodology helps identify the spatial conflicts efficiently. To achieve this, the use of the existing and widely-used construction tools has facilitated the implementation of the methodology. Using this system, planners have applied the strategies in an order of priority and can observe the results of each strategy visually and numerically in terms of time, cost and conflicts. This methodology by providing the effective resolution strategies guides the practitioner to remove conflicts while optimum time and cost are imposed to project. Originality/value Contrary to the previous models that ignore cost, the proposed model is a 5D visual simulation model, which considers the variable of cost as a main factor for conflict identification and resolution. Moreover, a forward-pass approach is introduced to implement resolution strategies that are novel compared to other investigations.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-07-31T08:08:20Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-08-2016-0183
       
  • Revisiting storey enclosure method for early estimation of structural
           building construction cost
    • First page: 877
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop several predictive models for estimating the structural construction cost and establish range estimation for the structural construction cost using design information available in early stages of residential building projects. Design/methodology/approach Information about residential building projects is collected based on project documents from construction companies with regard to the design parameters and the actual structural construction costs at completion. Storey enclosure method (SEM) is fundamental for determining the building design parameters, forming the potential variables and developing the cost estimation models using regression analysis. Nonparametric bootstrap method is used to establish range estimation for the structural construction cost. Findings A model which is developed from an integration of advanced SEM, principle component analysis and regression analysis is robust in terms of predictability. In terms of range estimation, cumulative probability-based range estimates and confidence intervals are established. While cumulative probability-based range estimates provide information about the level of uncertainty included in the estimate, confidence intervals provide information about the variability of the estimate. Such information could be very crucial for management decisions in early stages of residential building projects. Originality/value This study could provide practitioners with a better understanding of the uncertainty and variability included in the cost estimate. Hence, they could make effective improvements on cost-related management approaches to enhance project cost performance.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-07-31T08:12:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2015-0111
       
  • International comparisons of nominal and real construction labour
           productivity
    • First page: 896
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose A comparison of international construction labour productivity (CLP) is carried out by the conventional use of exchange rates to convert national construction output to a common base currency. Such measurement is always distorted by price-level differences between countries and therefore the purpose of this paper is to adopt a purchasing power parities (PPPs) approach, which eliminates price-level differences, as an alternative means of comparing CLP. Design/methodology/approach PPP construction expenditure data from the World Bank’s International Comparison Programme 2011 and employment statistics maintained by the International Labour Organization are used to generate the CLP of 93 matching economies. A one-way analysis of variance is conducted to evaluate the relationship between the development status and the CLPs. Findings The CLPs of developed economies are higher than developing economies in both PPPs (real) and exchange rate (nominal) measurements. The real CLPs are always higher than nominal CLP in high-income, upper-middle-income, lower-middle-income and low-income economies. Both real and nominal CLPs converge along with the economic growth. Research limitations/implications The average figures used in the study may not always be the most representative statistics. The CLPs determined provide an initial approximation for comparison between different economies to gain further insights into the best practices and policies for the more successful economies. Future research is recommended to uncover the underlying factors of CLPs congruence. Originality/value The convergence of real and nominal CLPs when economies transit from a developing to developed status indicates that the construction product has transformed from a commonly understood non-internationally traded product to an internationally traded product.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-07-31T01:25:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-12-2016-0255
       
  • Factors affecting construction productivity: a 30 year systematic review
    • First page: 916
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose A significant amount of work has been performed in the area of identification of factors affecting construction productivity. Previous studies have tried to determine the most important factors affecting construction productivity in different countries for a long time. As a result of continuous effort in this direction, researchers have identified a wide range of factors. While the subject area has matured, no general agreement could be made on the factors affecting construction productivity. To fill this gap, the purpose of this paper is to undertake a comprehensive systematic review of mainstream studies on factors affecting construction productivity published in the last 30 years (1986–2016). Design/methodology/approach A total of 46 articles from different sources such as journals, conference proceedings, dissertation and PhD theses were identified and thoroughly reviewed. Findings Gaps in research and practices are discussed and directions for future research have been proposed. The literature review indicates that despite noticeable differences in the socio-economic conditions across both developed countries and developing countries, an overall reasonable consensus exists on few significant factors impeding productivity. These are, namely, non-availability of materials, inadequate supervision, skill shortage, lack of proper tools and equipment and incomplete drawing and specifications. Nevertheless, implications of technology, site amenities, process studies, project culture, and impacts of physiological and psychological factors were not adequately covered in existing literature. The study also found that traditional construction projects have remained the main focus of these studies while green construction projects have been generally overlooked. Research limitations/implications The review does not include studies that report productivity at the organisational or industry level as well as total factor productivity. The scope of the review is limited to work on identification of factors affecting productivity at the activity level in construction projects. Practical implications The outcomes of this study would help researchers and practitioners by providing the findings of previous studies in a concise manner. It is also expected that presenting a deeper and wider perspective of the research work performed until now will direct a more focussed approach on productivity improvement efforts in the construction industry. Originality/value This review paper undertakes a comprehensive systematic review of studies on identification of factors affecting construction productivity published during the last three decades.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2018-07-31T08:16:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-02-2017-0035
       
 
 
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