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Journal Cover Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
  [SJR: 3.127]   [H-I: 73]   [17 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1359-8546
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [312 journals]
  • The role of motivation in relating green supply chain management to
           performance
    • Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 6, September 2016.
      Purpose Not all companies deal with GSCM in the same way. The aim of this paper to understand a company’s GSCM motivation and how this motivation is linked to stakeholder pressures, a company’s GSCM practices and performance. Design/methodology/approach The authors report the findings of a survey on GSCM motivations. Findings We see clear differences in why companies are motivated to pursue GSCM. Based on these different motivations, we could explain differences in perceived stakeholder pressure and performance. Research limitations/implications GSCM motivation is a sensitive topic and as such might cause respondents to provide socially desired answers. However, our analyses show clear variances in the answers, indicating that our measures are valid. Originality/value First, our study tests a framework for GSCM motivations and shows that motivation mediates the relationship between stakeholder pressures and performance. Second, we show that these differences in motivation impact performance outcomes.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-11-08T12:55:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-05-2016-0143
       
  • Impacts of non-GMO standards on poultry supply chain governance:
           transaction cost approach vs. resource based view
    • Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 6, September 2016.
      Purpose Following a negative attitude of consumers toward Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) and the spaces left by the labeling legislation on GMOs of different countries, some retailers and processors introduced their own non-GMO standards, with the intention of avoiding the presence of GMOs in their products. This article aims to understand: a) how the implementation of these new retailer-driven standards affects governance structures along the supply chain; and, b) the determinants of such change focusing on transaction costs approach (TCA) vs. resource based view (RBV). Design/methodology/approach The non-GMO introduction is investigated as a case study in the poultry industry of France and Italy. The case relies on data primarily collected from interviews with the main actors at five stages of the supply chain, from the retailer up to animal feed and crop production. Findings Findings indicate that the introduction of non-GMO products had different impacts on the transactions along the supply chain, generally leading to more integrated relationships. Theoretical relevance depends on the observed transaction and the type of governance structure considered. Interestingly, only RBV explains the shift toward hierarchical governance, when this is observed. Originality/value This article contributes to the empirical literature highlighting the upstream effects caused by the adoption of new standards. On the theoretical side, building on Conner and Prahalad’s (1996) seminal work, and leveraging on the concepts of opportunism, “potential” superior knowledge, and strategic importance of an activity, this research suggests a comparative framework for identifying governance structures and their determinants under TCA and RBV.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-11-08T12:55:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-03-2016-0089
       
  • Supply chain readiness, response and recovery for resilience
    • Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 6, September 2016.
      Purpose Despite the proliferation of supply chain risk management studies, theoretically supported and empirically validated study on justifying the antecedents and measurement dimensions of supply chain resilience is rare. Therefore, drawing on extensive literature review this study attempts to explore and validate the antecedents and the measurement dimensions of supply chain resilience (SCRE). Design/methodology/approach This study uses positivist paradigm employing quantitative method. However, it also uses qualitative approach in the form of field study to contextualize the research model. The Quantitative study is conducted by operationalising a survey research. Partial least square (PLS) based structural equation modelling (SEM) has been used to analyse the data. Findings Study results suggest that the psychometric properties of the supply chain resilience dimensions: supply chain readiness, response and recovery are reliable and valid. It also affirms that supply chain orientation, learning & development and supply chain risk management culture significantly influence the supply chain resilience. Further, Supply chain risk management culture mediates the relationship between supply chain orientation and supply chain resilience. Practical implications The findings of our study will assist the supply chain managers in taking decision on readiness capability development as well as reducing the decisional uncertainty during response and recovery. Originality/value Drawing on extensive extant literature on crisis management and supply chain management this study develops and validates the measurement dimensions of SCRE in terms of readiness, response and recovery as well as justifies the antecedent factors of SCRE which is a novel attempt in supply chain risk management literature.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-11-08T12:54:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-12-2015-0463
       
  • Accounting for external turbulence of logistics organizations via
           performance measurement systems
    • Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 6, September 2016.
      Purpose To investigate the role of upper management in designing performance measurement systems (PMS) that account for external turbulence of the organization, and to show how this PMS design for turbulence impacts organizational resilience and distribution service performance. Design/methodology/approach Hypotheses are developed by integrating management accounting and strategic management perspectives into SCM and subsequently tested based on data from 431 logistics organizations (i.e., both logistics companies and internal logistics departments of manufacturing and retailing companies). Findings An attention focusing usage type of the PMS by the upper management fosters incorporating the element of risk into the PMS of the company. Further, PMS design for turbulence enhances organizational resilience and, indirectly, this also leads to improved distribution service performance. Originality/value This article is the first to introduce the concept of PMS design for turbulence to the literature and to show that it is relevant for supply chain risk management by fostering the capabilities and the performance of logistics organizations. Further, it is shown that a seemingly detached issue like the general PMS use focus of the upper management impacts supply chain risk management.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-11-08T12:54:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-02-2016-0040
       
  • To eliminate or absorb supply chain complexity: A conceptual model and
           case study
    • Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 6, September 2016.
      Purpose Existing works in the supply chain complexity area have either focused on the overall behavior of multi-firm complex adaptive systems (CAS) or on listing specific tools and techniques that business units (BUs) can use to manage supply chain complexity, but without providing a thorough discussion about when and why they should be deployed. This research seeks to address this gap by developing a conceptually sound model, based on the literature, regarding how an individual BU should reduce versus absorb supply chain complexity. Design/methodology/approach This research synthesizes the supply chain complexity and organizational design literature to present a conceptual model of how a BU should respond to supply chain complexity. We illustrate the model through a longitudinal case study analysis of a packaged foods manufacturer. Findings Regardless of its type or origin, supply chain complexity can arise due to the strategic business requirements of the BU (strategic) or due to suboptimal business practices (dysfunctional complexity). Consistent with the proposed conceptual model, the illustrative case study showed that a firm must first distinguish between strategic and dysfunctional drivers prior to choosing an organizational response. Furthermore, it was found that efforts to address supply chain complexity can reveal other system weaknesses that lie dormant until the system is stressed. Research limitations/implications The case study provides empirical support for the literature-derived conceptual model. Nevertheless, any findings derived from a single, in-depth case study require further research to produce generalizable results. Practical implications The conceptual model presented here provides a more granular view of supply chain complexity, and how an individual BU should respond, than what can be found in the existing literature. The model recognizes that an individual BU can simultaneously face both strategic and dysfunctional complexity drivers, each requiring a different organizational response. Originality/value We are aware of no other research works that have synthesized the supply chain complexity and organizational design literature to present a conceptual model of how an individual business unit (BU) should respond to supply chain complexity. As such, this paper furthers our understanding of supply chain complexity effects and provides a basis for future research, as well as guidance for BUs facing complexity challenges.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-11-08T12:54:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-02-2016-0044
       
  • Antecedents and consequences of supply chain information integration: A
           resource-based view
    • Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 6, September 2016.
      Purpose This study aims to investigate the antecedents of supply chain information integration (SCII) and their consequences on company performance from the perspective of resource-based view (RBV). Design/methodology/approach Based on empirical survey data collected from 202 Australian manufacturers, this study examines the effects of strategic supply chain relationship (SCR) and supply chain technology (SCT) internalization on external and internal information integration (II) and the effects of external and internal II on operational (operational efficiency and service quality) and financial performance. Structural equation modeling (SEM) and the maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE) method are used to test the proposed relationships. Findings The results indicate that both strategic SCR and SCT internalization are positively related to external and internal II. Moreover, strategic SCR has a stronger positive relationship with external II than with internal II, and SCT internalization has a stronger positive relationship with internal II than with external II. Internal II is positively related only to service quality, and external II is positively related only to operational efficiency. Both operational efficiency and service quality are positively related to financial performance. Originality/value This study contributes to the SCII literature and provides significant managerial implications for manufacturers to leverage their supply chain resources and capabilities by establishing a resources-capabilities-performance framework for the antecedents and consequences of SCII.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-11-08T12:07:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-08-2015-0336
       
  • The effects of behavioural supply chain relationship antecedents on
           integration and performance
    • Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 6, September 2016.
      Purpose To examine the effects of behavioural antecedents of collaboration in supply chain relationships on supply chain integration and performance by developing and empirically validating a model linking these constructs. Design/methodology/approach A conceptual model was developed based on Relational Exchange Theory, Social Exchange Theory and Resource-Based View. An international survey with supply chain/logistics managers from manufacturing focal firms based in Europe, US and Asia was conducted; they provided input on upstream and downstream relationships based on their actual interaction and experience with supply chain partners. The collected data, which reflect supply chain managers’ perceptions on the above described phenomena, were analysed using the Partial Least Squares (PLS) method. Findings Mutuality, reciprocity, trust and commitment are instrumental for the formation of supply chain relationships characterised by higher information integration. In turn, information integration has much stronger impact on the coordination of operational decisions related to production and demand planning than on decisions related to actual production processes but, interestingly, the latter affects supply chain performance much more than the former. Research limitations/implications The research could benefit from a) a longitudinal rather than cross-sectional approach, b) incorporating multiple respondents such as representatives of supply chain partners and senior management of the focal firm, to capture potentially varying opinions on the supply chain phenomena under examination. Practical implications The results can assist supply chain decision-makers in understanding the importance of behavioural closeness between supply chain partners for the development of collaborative supply chain relationships that lead to higher integration and superior performance. Insight is provided on linkages between examined dimensions of supply chain integration. A process view of intermediate steps needed to translate collaborative relationships into higher supply chain integration and performance across the supply chain is offered. Originality/value The development and testing of an integrated model examining linkages between supply chain relationship antecedents, integration and performance is an original contribution. By proposing and confirming a sequential order in the influence of behavioural antecedents, integration dimensions, and their impact on supply chain performance, the paper sets foundations of a roadmap for achieving higher supply chain performance from collaborative supply chain relationships. Finally, the paper contributes to the limited theoretical justification on the development of knowledge for assisting decision-making in SCM/logistics and its integration into models, processes and tasks.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-11-08T12:07:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-06-2016-0211
       
  • Who’s to blame or praise? Performance attribution challenges in
           outsourced service provision in supply chains
    • First page: 513
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 5, August 2016.
      Purpose The aim of this paper is to understand the antecedents and effects of performance attribution challenges arising in the provision of business-to-business (B2B) services in supply chains. Design/methodology/approach The study draws on three in-depth case studies of logistics service providers (LSPs) offering supply chain solutions to their clients in Sweden. The analysis of performance attribution challenges and their antecedents and effects is based on 38 semi-structured interviews and review of 43 documents, including contracts and performance monitoring records. Findings Three key antecedents of performance attribution challenges are stressed. Two of these, the inseparability and contestability of service inputs, are closely related to the notion of service co-production. The third antecedent is the limited provider capability in performance data collection and analysis. Performance attribution challenges may result in provider aversion to performance-related risk and have a harmful effect on client relationships e.g. in terms of provider perceptions of opportunism and unfair allocation of gains. These effects can be mitigated through contracting, interventions in performance measurement system design and deployment of relational mechanisms. Research limitations/implications The paper extends the service management literature emphasising service co-production by suggesting that inputs of the client firm and its supply chain partners may not only vary in quality but can also be inseparable from provider inputs, and highly contestable. It also empirically demonstrates how performance attribution challenges and their antecedents and effects manifest themselves in B2B service provision, as opposed to supply chain settings where the main user of logistics services is the consumer. Practical implications LSP managers should contract for performance based on high-quality and incontestable external inputs they rely upon. Contractual specifications (performance indicators and related incentives) should explicate and consider the inputs required by clients and their supply chain partners in order to minimise their contestability. Originality/value The study proposes an empirically-based framework of the antecedents and effects of performance attribution challenges, an issue that has received scant attention in logistics outsourcing research and the business services literature more broadly.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-08-03T11:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-11-2015-0439
       
  • Does finance solve the supply chain financing problem?
    • First page: 534
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 5, August 2016.
      Purpose Recently, in response to the credit crunch and the increased costs of financing, new solutions for supporting the financial management of Supply Chains, known as Supply Chain Finance (SCF), have been developed. They exploit the strengths of supply chain links to optimise working capital. The purpose of this paper is to provide a reference framework linking together the objectives leading to the adoption of SCF solutions and several moderating variables. Design/methodology/approach This paper adopts a multiple case study methodology, analysing 14 cases of the application of SCF solutions among Italian companies. Findings The main findings are: (i) the identification of the different objectives leading to the adoption of SCF; (ii) the analysis of the impact of moderating variables (the level of inter- and intra-firm collaboration, the level of the trade process digitalisation, and the bargaining power and financial strength of the leading firm) on SCF adoption, and (iii) the formulation of a reference framework supporting the effective adoption of SCF solutions. Research limitations/implications This contribution is exploratory in nature; theory-testing contributions should be the focus of further research. Also, the sample is limited to Italian companies. Finally, the service provider point of view has been marginally taken into consideration in this study. Originality/value The article addresses the need for more empirical research on SCF. It provides a reference framework focused on the objectives and moderating variables leading to effective SCF adoption, providing a theory-building contribution on the general topic of SCF and on the specific topic of the adoption process of different SCF solutions.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-08-03T11:25:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-11-2015-0436
       
  • Interplant coordination, supply chain integration, and operational
           performance of a plant in a manufacturing network: A mediation analysis
    • First page: 550
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 5, August 2016.
      Purpose The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationships at the level of plant in a manufacturing network, labelled as networked plant in the paper, between (1) inter-plant coordination and operational performance, (2) supply chain integration (SCI) and operational performance, and (3) inter-plant coordination and SCI. Design/methodology/approach This paper is developed based on the data obtained from the sixth version of International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS VI). Specifically, this paper uses a subset of the IMSS VI data set from the 606 plants that identified themselves as one of the plants in a manufacturing network. Findings This paper finds that external integration is significantly related to operational performance of networked plant, whereas internal integration is not. As an enabler for external integration, the influence of internal integration on operational performance of networked plant is mediated by external integration. This paper also provides evidence to the purported positive impact of internal integration on inter-plant coordination, as well as the positive impact of inter-plant coordination on external integration. It further suggests inter-plant coordination can influence operational performance of networked plant through external integration and also mediate the relationship from internal integration to performance through external integration. Originality/value This paper contributes to the SCI literature and extends our understanding of the impact of SCI on the operational performance by selecting networked plant as a unit of analysis. Besides, this paper distinguishes inter-plant coordination from SCI and investigates the relationship between SCI and inter-plant coordination for the first time.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-08-03T11:24:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-10-2015-0391
       
  • Humanitarian Supply Chain Use of Cloud Computing
    • First page: 569
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 5, August 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of cloud computing use on collaboration and its ultimate impact on the agility of humanitarian supply chains. Further, we wish to analyze the moderating role of inter-organizational trust in the relationship between cloud computing use and collaboration. Design/methodology/approach We provide an empirical assessment of cloud computing use based on an interview analysis of 19 individuals from humanitarian organizations. A survey questionnaire is later employed with 107 participants from United States relief organizations. Partial least squares is used to examine the relationships depicted in the conceptual model. Findings The results provide an account of how cloud computing is used in a humanitarian context. Further, the results indicate that cloud computing use has a positive and significant impact on collaboration between humanitarian organizations and their suppliers. Collaboration is found to be significantly positively associated with agility in humanitarian organizations. Research limitations/implications No study to our knowledge has empirically assessed the impact of cloud computing use on humanitarian supply chain collaboration. This will be the first study to empirically analyze the relationships between cloud computing use, inter-organizational trust, collaboration, and agility in a humanitarian context. Practical implications This study provides a theoretically and empirically validated model depicting the relationships between cloud computing use, collaboration, agility and inter-organizational trust in humanitarian supply chains. Humanitarian organizations can use these findings to optimize agility. Originality/value This study contributes to supply chain management research, particularly humanitarian supply chain management knowledge, by empirically examining the usefulness of cloud computing use on collaboration and agility in the supply chain.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-08-03T11:24:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-01-2016-0024
       
  • An analytical model for system-wide and tier-specific assessment of
           resilience to supply chain risks
    • First page: 589
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 5, August 2016.
      Purpose Based on the emerging view of supply chains as complex adaptive systems, this study aims to build and test an analytical model for resilience assessment surrounding supply chain risks at the level of the supply chain system and its individual tiers. Design/methodology/approach To address the purpose of this study, a multimethod research approach is adopted as follows: first, data envelopment analysis (DEA) modelling and fuzzy set theory are used to build a fuzzy network DEA model to assess risk resilience of the overall supply chains and their individual tiers; next, the proposed model is tested using a survey of 150 middle- and top-level managers representing nine industry sectors in Iran. Findings The survey results show a substantial variation in resilience ratings between the overall supply chains characterizing nine industry sectors in Iran, and their individual tiers (upstream, downstream, and organizational processes). The findings indicate that the system-wide characteristic of resilience of the overall supply chain is not necessarily indicative of the resilience of its individual tiers. Practical implications High efficiency scores of a number of tiers forming a supply chain are shown to have only a limited effect on the overall efficiency score of the resulting supply chain. Overall, our research findings confirm the necessity of adopting both the system-wide and tier-specific approach by analysts and decision makers when assessing supply chain resilience. Integrated as part of risk response and mitigation process, the information obtained through such analytical approach ensures timely identification and mitigation of major sources of risk in the supply chains. Originality/value Supply chain resilience assessment models rarely consider resilience to risks at the level of individual supply chain tiers, focusing instead on the system-wide characteristics of supply chain resilience. The proposed analytical model allows for the assessment of supply chain resilience among individual tiers for a wide range of supply chain risks categorized as upstream, downstream, organizational, network, and external.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-08-03T11:25:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-11-2015-0430
       
  • The growing scale and scope of the supply chain: A reflection on supply
           chain graduate skills
    • First page: 610
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 5, August 2016.
      Purpose The growing scale and scope of the supply chain requires a greater understanding of the broader supply chain skills picture. This study assesses the supply chain skills needs within the context of a UK based higher education institution involving graduates, academics and employers in order to appreciate the graduate skills demands of supply chains. Design/methodology/approach A mixed methods study entailing in-depth interviews with academics followed by a questionnaire distributed to graduates and employers has been designed and utilised. Findings The findings indicate that the changing supply chain scope encourages the requisition and development of different supply chain skills with varied levels of emphasis in relation to twenty five skills identified in the literature. Key graduate skills needs are highlighted, including time management, collaborative learning, teamwork and problem solving, with the addition of two supply chain skill areas, namely specialist training and the understanding and application of regulations. The findings of the current study presents a limited emphasis on information technology skills, despite the significant information technology advancements and changes in supply chains. Research limitations/implications The study has been carried out in a UK university delivering undergraduate supply chain management courses. It would be beneficial to test whether the findings are exemplary across other supply chain undergraduate courses, and to investigate the integration of these skills within the supply chain syllabus, and how employers, graduates and academic parties could actively engage in developing the agenda for future supply chain skills needs. Practical implications This research paper highlights the gaps in supply chain skills, which inevitably puts considerable pressure on operatives and managers whose responsibility it is to ensure compliance with regulations and professional bodies. Originality/value This paper contributes to the supply chain skills discussion and reports subject relevant challenges for supply chain educators by engaging three key stakeholders; graduate employers, graduates and academics. The findings have generated additional supply chain skills to the academic literature as well as providing an understanding of the weighting of skills in terms of their importance and application to industry needs.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-08-03T11:25:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-02-2016-0059
       
  • Lean and Green Synergies in Supply Chain Management
    • First page: 627
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 5, August 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate how synergies between lean and green supply chain practices emerge. In particular, we explore which practices identified in the literature are actually implemented in a synergic way and we determine what synergic results they bring. Design/methodology/approach An in-depth case study of the Brazilian subsidiary of a large multinational company was conducted using interviews, in-plant observations, and document analysis. Findings The majority of the practices (26 out of 31) bring synergic results to lean and green performance. Synergies can emerge spontaneously (rather than being strategized) even when the implementation of green and lean practices is compartmentalised in different areas, with no department or supportive management team to treat them in a joined way. The strongest synergic results are found in practices related to suppliers and customers because these supply chain actors act as bridges between the lean and green areas. Research limitations/implications We did not have access to the company customers and suppliers. This restriction made our analysis of drivers skewed towards the perspective of the focal company and the way they framed their interactions. Secondly, our assessment of synergies was in the majority of cases qualitative. Originality/value Empirically, it is the first time that all synergic practices identified in the literature are explored through a case study. Theoretically, we developed a model of determinants of lean and green synergies based on constructs emerging from our data; behavioural literature in synergies, and research on synergies in mergers & acquisitions.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-08-03T11:24:52Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-03-2016-0101
       
  • Supply Network-Enabled Innovations. An analysis based on dependence and
           complementarity of capabilities.
    • First page: 642
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 5, August 2016.
      Purpose This study seeks to explain the influence of power asymmetry and the moderating role of an organization´s absorptive and desorptive capacity on enhancing supply chain competence from its orientation to open innovation with its supply network. Design/methodology/approach To perform this study, we use data collected from 262 European firms. We apply regression analysis to test the moderating role of an organization´s absorptive and desorptive capacity on enhancing its supply chain competence from its orientation to open innovation. Findings Our results confirm both the influence of power asymmetry and absorptive capacity on obtaining benefits that derive from an organization´s orientation to open innovation. The results do not, however, support the moderating effect of an organization’s desorptive capacity. Subsequent analyses performed in the study show that organizations that achieve complementarity among their own absorptive capacity and the capacities of its supply network manage to obtain greater benefits from its orientation to open innovation. Originality/value This paper responds to the need to study innovation in the context of a supply network and respond to calls in the literature on open innovation and supply chain management for the need to study the moderating role of absorptive and desorptive capacity.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-08-03T11:24:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-02-2016-0062
       
 
 
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