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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

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Journal Cover Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
  [SJR: 3.127]   [H-I: 73]   [21 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1359-8546
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Taking advantage of disruptive innovation through changes in value
           networks: insights from the space industry
    • First page: 97
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 2, March 2017.
      Purpose The aim of this paper is twofold: firstly, to provide further insights into the challenges and opportunities that arise from simultaneously being an entrant and an incumbent and secondly, to help these firms effectively use SCM capabilities to respond to disruptive threats. Design/methodology/approach This is an “insights from industry” paper. It is based on a retrospective analysis of rich data obtained at the SIRIUS Chair in Toulouse, France, from an important cluster of aerospace firms and our accumulated experience. Findings We found that, under conditions of disruptive change, the ability to make the final customer the focal point and to build a comprehensive understanding of the overall supply network are key in shaping and taking advantage of future opportunities. These abilities enable firms to analyse different scenarios and identify the roles they want to play, the collaborations they need to establish and the possible internal changes required. Originality/value This paper offers several new perspectives from practice. The authors analyse two types of space industry innovations: individual small satellites (or “smallsats”) and smallsat constellations. Three types of capabilities are focused on: inside-out, outside-in and spanning. Disrupt-or-be-disrupted does not fully describe the dynamics we observed; cooperative competition and complementarity provide a better framework for ideas on how to cope with disruptive opportunities.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T09:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-01-2017-0017
       
  • Business process management and supply chain collaboration: effects on
           performance and competitiveness
    • First page: 107
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 2, March 2017.
      Purpose This study examines the interrelationships among Business Process Management (BPM), Supply Chain Collaboration (SCC), collaborative advantage and organisational performance. Design/methodology/approach Data was collected from 204 manufacturing firms in Thailand, and the interrelationships proposed in the framework were tested via Structural Equation Modelling. Findings Our study highlights the role of intra- and inter-organisational practices, and clearly demonstrates the joint role and impact of BPM and SCC respectively. The results provide empirical evidence that BPM improves both organisational performance and collaborative activities. Also, SCC and collaborative advantage can have indirect positive impacts on organisational performance. Research limitations/implications This work could be expanded by adopting a supplementary dyadic or extended supply chain approach, and could also consider contextual factors, which were outside of the scope of our study. Practical implications The BPM approach has a positive impact on organisational performance, which is essential for collaborative activities between a firm and its supply chain partners. Further, effective BPM and SCC practices lead to enhanced performance and collaborative benefits. Practitioners should be better able to define and measure specific actions relating to their BPM and SCC practices. Originality/value This paper stresses the need to consider the interrelationships between BPM, SCC, collaborative advantage and organisational performance for both direct and indirect effects. Rather than focusing only on improvement at individual firm level, SCC is vital to compete in the market. Improving the effectiveness of SC allows higher organisational performance levels than those that could be achieved in isolation.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T09:51:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-01-2017-0008
       
  • The influence of supply chain quality management practices on quality
           performance: an empirical investigation
    • First page: 122
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 2, March 2017.
      Purpose The extant literature highlights the notable lack of a consensus among operations and supply chain management scholars regarding the theoretical underpinnings and associated empirical evidence for the performance impact of supply chain quality management (SCQM) practices on quality. The aim of this study is to redress this imbalance in the literature through empirical examination of the relationship between SCQM practices and quality performance outcomes. Design/methodology/approach In accordance with the research aim, a quantitative approach was adopted, and a multi-item scale web-based survey was designed to collect primary data. A total number of 325 questionnaires were collected from a sample of UK-based manufacturing companies. Factor analysis, internal consistency and multivariate regressions were employed to validate the multi-item scale and test the hypotheses. Findings The findings confirm the proposed hypotheses and reveal statistically significant results for the performance impact of SCQM practices on quality at an aggregate level. However, the results of the individual level analysis of SCQM practices appear to vary from practice to practice. Of various SCQM practices, customer focus with the highest beta value (i.e. β= 0.303; t-value= 6.120; p=0.000) was found to have the greatest impact on quality performance. Practical implications The findings encourage managers to place high priority on both inter-firm and intra-firm relationships as prerequisites for achieving superior quality performance. The propositions and the results of the study provide managers with some guidelines about effective management of upstream, midstream and downstream supply chain networks and awareness of the potential synergies arising from the combined effects of SCQM practices that could bring about desired quality performance outcomes across the entire supply chain network. Originality/value Real and sustainable quality performance often requires an equal focus on both intra- and inter-firm relationships among supply chain partners. So effective management of quality across the entire supply chain is deemed essential if a firm is to smoothly supply high quality products and services to customers. But, little research has been devoted to understanding conceptual underpinnings of SCQM as well as empirical support and validation for the conceptualisation and measurement of SCQM practices. Based on the insights gained from social network theory (SNT), this paper makes an attempt to address this gap and examine the impact of SCQM practices on quality performance.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T09:51:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-08-2016-0286
       
  • Traceability and risks: an extended transaction cost perspective
    • First page: 145
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 2, March 2017.
      Purpose The aim of the paper is to investigate the determinants leading firms to choose among different voluntary standards within food supply chains. In specific, we explored the role of transaction risks, i.e. internal and exogenous risks, in the adoption of different traceability standards. Design/methodology/approach A survey was conducted within the Italian population of 216 food-processing firms that adopt voluntary traceability schemes. The identification of different transaction risks was based on the literature on supply chain management and transaction cost economics. An ordinal regression model was used in the analysis. Findings Empirical results highlight that the transaction risks perceived by food firms play a significant role on the kind of traceability schemes to adopt. There is a positive link between internal risks and the decision to implement complex schemes. Moreover, a negative relationship between the perceived exogenous risks and the complexity of the standard adopted is also observed. Exogenous transaction risk lead to the implementation of standards which do not imply strong co-ordination. On the contrary, internal risks imply complex schemes that lead to closer supply chain relationships Research limitations/implications The analysis is limited to cross-sectional data for a single country and further investigation would help assess the generalization of the findings. Practical implications The analysis can be considered a useful framework to orient firms strategic decisions towards the most appropriate voluntary standard to adopt for an efficient management of vertical relationships within food supply chains. Originality/value The present analysis is the first attempt to explain the determinants leading firms to choose among different kinds of voluntary standards within food supply chains. The approach used reveal that transaction risks can be considered a useful framework to explain firms strategic decisions related to the kind of schemes to adopt.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T09:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-07-2016-0268
       
  • Exploring the impact of geographical traits on the occurrence of supply
           chain failures
    • First page: 160
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 2, March 2017.
      Purpose This research explores the impact of geographical traits on the occurrence of on-time or the risk of late deliveries; one vital category of supply chain failures. Specifically, the regulatory environment framework and national and organizational culture are explored as potential contingency factors affecting these supply chain failures. Furthermore, we assess whether or not potential negative cultural characteristics at the national level can be addressed through specific organisational culture at the organisational level of practice. Design/methodology/approach This study combines primary survey data from 647 plants in 12 countries collected through the Global Manufacturing Research Group (GMRG) with secondary national data from the World Economic Forum and Hofstede’s national culture dimensions to test our six hypotheses. Findings Results indicate that firms situated in a regulatory national environment that is conducive to trade experience fewer late deliveries; a national infrastructure that has continuously been neglected leads to more late deliveries. Firms situated in countries with low levels of national uncertainty avoidance experience fewer late deliveries. Supplier communication should be practiced at an organisational level to excel in these countries. Originality/value This article adds to the ongoing discusses about the importance of contingency factors at the country level (i.e., institutional and cultural factors), which need to be considered when setting up global supply chains. It also contributes important empirical insights to the convergence/divergence discussion.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T09:51:32Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-11-2016-0380
       
  • Infrastructure framework and manufacturing supply chain agility: the role
           of delivery dependability and time to market
    • First page: 172
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 2, March 2017.
      Purpose The main purpose of this study is to examine the role of delivery dependability and time to market respectively, on the relation between the infrastructure framework and supply chain agility. Furthermore, examine the impacts of supply chain agility on firm performance. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from 113 respondents’ senior executives and managers in purchasing, operations, supplying, planning, and other supply chain functions in large manufacturing firms in the MENA region, which includes twelve countries (Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Bahrain, Qatar, Morocco, Tunis and Algeria). A Large-scale survey questionnaire was used for data collection process. The research framework was tested by using hypothesis-testing deductive approach. The results are based on covariance-based analysis and structural equation modelling using AMOS software. results are based on covariance-based analysis and structural equation modelling using AMOS software. Findings The results show that infrastructure framework elements do not contribute significantly to support supply chain agility. It is also found that delivery dependability and time to market partially mediate the relationship between infrastructure framework elements and supply chain agility. Additionally; it is found that supply chain agility is associated with enhanced firm performance. Originality/value This paper provides an overview and empirically shows that delivery dependability and time to market are appropriate logistics practices for mediating the impact of infrastructure framework and supply chain agility. These relationships indicate a contribution to theory that explains how infrastructure framework elements can procreate supply chain agility, through the synchronising of appropriately matched logistics practices.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-15T01:08:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-09-2016-0335
       
  • The impact of external integration on halal food integrity
    • First page: 186
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 2, March 2017.
      Purpose Much has been written about the importance of external integration for the integrity of food products. To achieve food integrity, all actors along the supply chain have to be fully integrated and comply with an assurance system or process. The more complex the supply chain operations are, the greater will be the need for integration. This research paper investigates the impact of external integration on compliance with halal standards, as an example of product integrity within the food industry. Design/methodology/approach A survey of 1000 food manufacturers was conducted. Partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the effect of external integration on compliance with halal standards. Findings The results showed that there were links between halal assurance system and external integration. Nevertheless, it was discovered that only customer integration mediated the relationship between the halal assurance system and product quality and production cost. Practical implications The practical implications of the findings extend to managers in the food industry who might pursue supply chain integration as a structure to achieve excellence. The findings suggested that the deployment of a halal assurance system has a positive effect on operational performance. Furthermore, the results show that managers who wish to implement the halal assurance system should carefully invest in an external integration strategy, depending upon the operational performance improvement intended. Originality/value This research is one of the first studies to investigate the effects of external integration on halal food in general and is the first empirical investigation of the effect of safeguarding halal integrity on operational performance.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T09:51:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-05-2016-0171
       
  • Competence in supply chain management: A systematic review
    • First page: 200
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 2, March 2017.
      Purpose This paper presents an integrated view of the literature published on all aspects and facets of competence in supply chain management (SCM) and furthermore provides a framework for classifying and analyzing literature to facilitate further study, practice, and research. Design/methodology/approach A systematic literature review identified 98 peer-reviewed scientific journal publications on the subject of competence in SCM. Findings This review identifies and classifies the key content of the subject based on whose competence (level of analysis) and the type of competence (competence element), resulting in a framework that brings together aspects at the individual and organizational level, and of the functional, relational, managerial, and behavioral elements of competence from the SCM literature. It furthermore displays the timeliness and wide-ranging character of the subject, as presented by the evolutionary timeline and the main research streams. Research limitations/implications Although competence in SCM is a key to business success, the subject is ambiguous and an explicit need exists for more research. This paper provides a foundation for future examination of and theory building in this subject. It also alerts researchers to complementary studies outside of their own “customary” domains. Practical implications This paper can support managers in their pursuit to secure competence in SCM and thereby improve outcomes on both individual and organizational level. It can furthermore assist in the development of relevant programs and training sessions. Originality/value To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first systematic literature review on the subject of competence in SCM. In addition, it proposes a taxonomy for mapping and evaluating research on this subject.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T09:51:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-09-2016-0324
       
  • On green market segmentation under subsidy regulation
    • Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, January 2017.
      Purpose This study aims to provide a better understanding of the market balance between regular (high-carbon) and green (low-carbon) products. Further, this study analyses the role of government subsidy policy, based on the results of the government's optimal green subsidy decision and its implication to green market segmentation and social welfare. Design/methodology/approach This study adopted a Stackelberg game framework to study the interaction between the government's subsidy regulations and the firms' marketing regimes. When considering government subsidy decision, we use multi-objective programming theory and turn the problem into weighted single-objective optimisation programming. Findings This study explores three marketing regimes and identifies the conditions under which each regime should be adopted by a firm. Further, investigating the optimal subsidy decision problem for the government reveals three subsidy regimes corresponding to the three marketing regimes. The government may be stuck in a regime of useless subsidy and the reason for this phenomenon is analysed as well. Research limitations/implications Developing the model into a more complex supply chain situation will enhance the applicability of the framework. Incorporating other environmental regulations, such as carbon tax, can be interesting research extensions of this study. Practical implications This study provides a quantitative framework, which can help the regulator gain a deeper understanding of green subsidy policies and assist focal companies in acquiring a better appreciation of green marketing segmentation. Originality/value The study is one of the first few works to explore the optimal design of green subsidy regulation for the government and its impact on market segmentations of high- and low-carbon products by using quantitative modelling approaches and deriving vital managerial insights.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-02-15T10:25:52Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-11-2015-0425
       
  • The effects of vulnerability mitigation strategies on supply chain
           effectiveness: risk culture as moderator
    • First page: 1
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, January 2017.
      Purpose The vulnerability issue in supply chains is among the most pressing concerns that firms are currently facing. As a preliminary attempt to address the lack of empirical research, this study primarily aims to explore the relationship between vulnerability mitigation strategies and supply chain effectiveness with security culture as a moderator. Design/methodology/approach Data are gathered via a survey of 209 Indonesian manufacturing firms. The data are analyzed using partial least squares technique. Findings Results indicate that supply chain visibility, supply chain flexibility, and supplier development strategies positively affect supply chain effectiveness. Moreover, risk culture positively moderates the effects of supply chain visibility and supplier development on supply chain effectiveness. Practical implications The findings may improve supply chain effectiveness by mitigating the effects of vulnerability causes. Originality/value This study contributes to the advancement of knowledge on the relationships between vulnerability mitigation strategies and supply chain effectiveness.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-02-15T10:25:17Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-12-2015-0482
       
  • Analysing supply chain resilience: integrating the constructs in a concept
           mapping framework via a systematic literature review
    • First page: 16
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, January 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyse the concept of supply chain resilience (SCRES) within a concept mapping framework to seek conceptual clarity, with an emphasis on SCRES definitions, essential elements and managerial practices. Design/methodology/approach A systematic literature review was conducted of 103 peer-reviewed journal articles from the year 2000 to 2015, with the aim of answering a focus review question. Findings Through analysis and synthesis of the literature, the study revealed three major constructs used to define SCRES: phases of resilience, resilience strategies, and the capabilities needed to be resilient. Emerging from the capabilities construct are five core SCRES capabilities: the ability to anticipate, to adapt, to respond, to recover, and to learn. Also, given the need to consolidate the various constructs of SCRES, the study identified 13 essential elements and 84 managerial practices that support firms to achieve the five capabilities, which are then linked to SCRES strategies and phases to establish the connections that provide an integrated view of the concept. Research limitations/implications The explorative nature of this study and the role of the concept mapping framework, which does not empirically test the relationships in the model, are considered as limitations, to be addressed by the authors in future research. Originality/value The originality of this paper lies in the classification of different features of SCRES through a comprehensive concept mapping framework that establishes relationships and interactions between them. This study, therefore, lays a foundation for testing these connections in future empirical studies. The article brings together fragmented literature from multiple studies to create a solid body of knowledge that addresses the need for conceptual clarity in SCRES literature.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-03-21T12:21:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-06-2016-0197
       
  • Developing third-party purchase (3PP) services: New Zealand third-party
           logistics providers’ perspectives
    • First page: 40
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, January 2017.
      Purpose This research examines the opportunity for third-party logistics providers (3PLs) to develop further value-added services for their clients, focused on purchasing. The provider perspectives on third-party purchase (3PP) services are examined in conjunction with their business environment, with a survey informed by transaction cost economics (TCE). Design/methodology/approach New Zealand 3PL providers were surveyed and 166 responses were received. Structural equation modeling was employed to test the conceptual model. Findings From the perspective of 3PL providers, uncertainty, frequency, and transaction size, but not asset specificity, are significantly associated with client value from a 3PP service. While asset specificity in investments is not required by 3PLs, they need a high frequency of orders, sufficient order size, and low levels of uncertainty as supporting conditions for the development of 3PP services. Research limitations/implications The sample focuses on 3PL providers and therefore does not address the behavioral characteristics of users or customers of the services. Originality/value This study shows that 3PP services may be further developed by 3PL providers to improve the value offered to their clients.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-02-15T10:25:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-06-2016-0189
       
  • Green supply chain management: an empirical investigation on the
           construction sector
    • First page: 58
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, January 2017.
      Purpose Curtailing the adverse environmental impacts of the construction sector is one the major challenges of the twenty-first century. However, despite the significance of this problem, the limited efforts so far to tackle the negative impacts associated with this particular sector have been largely fragmented and disjointed. Given that the net green outcome of a construction project is the sum total of the efforts undertaken at the various supply chain stages (from the initial design to the end-of-life demolition) by different stakeholders, the green supply chain management (GSCM) approach is seen as a way forward toward streamlining the fragmented efforts at greening the sector. This forms the motivation of the present work, which aims to develop, validate, and apply a multi-dimensional GSCM framework for the construction sector. Design/methodology/approach A comprehensive GSCM assessment framework consisting of nine constructs (external and internal drivers; external and internal barriers; core and facilitating GSCM practices; economic, environmental and organizational performance implications) and their underlying factors was developed through an extensive literature review. Using data collected through a structured questionnaire, the framework was validated, and the relevance/appropriateness of each construct and its underlying factors, along with the hypothesized relationships between the constructs, were assessed separately for each supply chain stakeholder. Findings The findings confirm the validity and reliability of the constructs and their underlying factors as well as the assessment framework. In general, the implementation of green practices has had a positive impact on the environmental, economic, and organizational performance for all stakeholders, while the extent of the green practices implemented depends on the relative strength of the drivers and barriers. Research limitations/implications This study fills a gap in the literature about applying/implementing GSCM in the construction sector. Practical implications The findings provide practitioners, policy makers, and organizations associated with the UAE construction sector, as well as the construction sector in general, insight into all key aspects of GSCM. Originality/value A comprehensive survey-based assessment of GSCM for the construction sector has not been previously attempted and constitutes the novelty of this work.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-02-15T10:26:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-07-2016-0227
       
  • Humanitarian-business partnerships in managing humanitarian logistics
    • First page: 82
      Abstract: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, January 2017.
      Purpose The aim of this article is to conduct a systematic literature review to understand the state of the art of partnerships between humanitarian organizations and business corporations in managing humanitarian logistics. Design/methodology/approach A systematic literature review is conducted based on the steps proposed by Denyer and Tranfield (2009). The Context-Intervention-Mechanism-Outcome (CIMO) logic is applied to identify the state of the art of partnerships between humanitarian organizations and business corporations in humanitarian logistics. Thirty-six papers related to the topic are extracted from recognized journal databases and then classified into four categories based on the CIMO logic: situational context, intervention factors, mechanisms, and outcomes. Findings The study shows that while the context and mechanisms for developing cross-sector partnerships between the humanitarian and the business sector have been examined and illuminated by many researchers, additional research (in particular, empirical studies) is needed to measure outcomes as well as the contributions of partnerships to the performance of humanitarian logistics. In addition to synthesizing the literature in this area this study also presents challenges of such partnerships. Practical implications The study improves the understanding of the state of cross-sector partnerships in humanitarian logistics as well as identifies opportunities for future research in this area. The study provides reasons and motives of initiating humanitarian-business partnerships in humanitarian logistics as well as their mechanisms and potential outcomes. This may help in developing successful logistics partnerships with each other. Originality/value This is the first systematic literature review to examine the nature of partnerships between humanitarian organizations and business corporations in humanitarian logistics using CIMO logic.
      Citation: Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-02-21T09:35:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/SCM-07-2016-0262
       
 
 
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