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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 312 journals)

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Journal Cover Reference Services Review
  [SJR: 1.546]   [H-I: 21]   [33 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0090-7324
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [312 journals]
  • Editorial
    • Pages: 434 - 435
      Abstract: Reference Services Review, Volume 44, Issue 4, Page 434-435, November 2016.

      Citation: Reference Services Review
      PubDate: 2016-11-30T03:01:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/RSR-09-2016-0055
       
  • Library instruction and information literacy 2015
    • Pages: 436 - 543
      Abstract: Reference Services Review, Volume 44, Issue 4, Page 436-543, November 2016.
      Purpose This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types. Design/methodology/approach This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and IL published in 2015. Findings This paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain either unique or significant scholarly contributions. Originality/value The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and IL.
      Citation: Reference Services Review
      PubDate: 2016-11-30T03:01:43Z
      DOI: 10.1108/RSR-08-2016-0051
       
  • A constellation to guide us
    • Pages: 544 - 551
      Abstract: Reference Services Review, Volume 44, Issue 4, Page 544-551, November 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper was to ask Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, about her views regarding the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Design/methodology/approach This is an interview. Findings Hinchliffe believes that the Framework is one among many documents that academic librarians can and should use to promote information literacy. Research limitations/implications Hinchliffe contradicts the opinion that the Framework and the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education could not have co-existed. Practical implications Hinchliffe offers librarians practical advice for moving from a Standards-based to a Framework-based information literacy program. Originality/value Hinchliffe concludes that the old ways of fostering information literacy do not need to be rejected to adopt new practices.
      Citation: Reference Services Review
      PubDate: 2016-11-30T03:01:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/RSR-06-2016-0041
       
  • The Framework is elitist
    • Pages: 552 - 563
      Abstract: Reference Services Review, Volume 44, Issue 4, Page 552-563, November 2016.
      Purpose This paper aims to question whether the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education adheres to the theory upon which it was based and to examine the actions of the Association of College and Research Libraries following the Framework’s release and its consequences. Design/methodology/approach This paper is an essay-style viewpoint, reflecting the observations and opinions of the author. Findings The author criticizes the Association of College and Research Libraries for its inaction in educating member librarians about how to implement the Framework and observes ideological rifts that were exposed within the academic librarian community as the Framework was being discussed following its adoption. Originality/value This paper is meant to provoke thought and generate discussion in regard to the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.
      Citation: Reference Services Review
      PubDate: 2016-11-30T03:01:54Z
      DOI: 10.1108/RSR-08-2016-0052
       
  • A survey of information literacy credit courses in US academic libraries
    • Pages: 564 - 582
      Abstract: Reference Services Review, Volume 44, Issue 4, Page 564-582, November 2016.
      Purpose There is a lack of data about information literacy (IL) credit courses in US academic libraries. This paper aims to provide a detailed snapshot of IL credit courses, including percentages of libraries that offer credit courses, the number of credits offered, the audience and how public institutions differ from private nonprofits and for-profits. Design/methodology/approach The authors surveyed a stratified random sample of libraries at higher education institutions across all categories from the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Qualtrics software was used to create and distribute the email survey. The response rate was 39 per cent (n = 691). Findings In all, 19 per cent of the institutions in the survey have IL credit courses taught by librarians. Large institutions, public institutions and those granting doctoral degrees are the most likely to offer IL credit courses. The majority of these courses are undergraduate electives of 1-2 credit hours offered under the library aegis, although a significant minority are required, worth 3-4 credit hours, and taught within another academic department or campus-wide program. Originality/value The findings update previous surveys and provide a more granular picture of the characteristics of librarian-taught credit-bearing courses, the types of academic institutions that offer them and compensation teaching librarians receive. This survey is the first study of credit-bearing IL instruction to include for-profit colleges and universities.
      Citation: Reference Services Review
      PubDate: 2016-11-30T03:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/RSR-03-2016-0021
       
  • Buy, borrow, or access online?
    • Pages: 583 - 595
      Abstract: Reference Services Review, Volume 44, Issue 4, Page 583-595, November 2016.
      Purpose This paper aims to investigate the reading format choices of students in a reading-intensive course when faced with options of purchasing their assigned readings in print, borrowing them from library reserves, accessing them from their course website or any combination thereof. It also seeks to map their behaviors to their academic aptitudes and achievements. Design/methodology/approach An online survey was distributed at the end of the quarter consisting of nine multiple-choice and open-ended questions on their format behaviors and academic aptitudes. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square tests and content analysis were used to obtain results. Findings Most students in this study purchased print copies of their assigned readings even though they were available for free both in the library and online. Over 72 per cent read their assignments either in“print” or “mostly in print”. However, the data did not produce evidence of correlations between format behaviors and SAT Writing scores or final grades in the course. Research limitations/implications The self-selected sample of participants appears to be academically homogeneous without enough diversity of behaviors and aptitudes to make generalizations. Replication of this study should be performed among a more academically diverse group of students. Originality/value Studies show that students prefer print to electronic format for academic readings, but they often cite factors like cost and convenience that impact their behaviors. Rather than survey general preferences, this study examines actual behaviors when presented with several format options and discusses why students make their choices.
      Citation: Reference Services Review
      PubDate: 2016-11-30T03:01:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/RSR-04-2016-0024
       
  • Is the need for mediated reference service in academic libraries fading
           away in the digital environment?
    • Pages: 596 - 626
      Abstract: Reference Services Review, Volume 44, Issue 4, Page 596-626, November 2016.
      Purpose Academic libraries are experiencing numerous changes in their services due to high demands for digital resources and changes in users’ information needs and expectations. Many academic library users give preferences to Google, Google Scholar and other search engines on the internet when they search for information. As reference transactions are decreasing in many academic institutions, this paper aims to investigate the continuing need for mediated reference services in the technology-driven environment in academic libraries. Design/methodology/approach The authors have conducted a literature review to document and analyze the current trends in reference services in academic libraries. They have examined the relevant published literature through a series of reflective questions to determine whether the demise of mediated reference services is imminent in academic libraries. While this literature review is by no means an exhaustive one, the authors have provided a fairly comprehensive representation of articles to synthesize an overview of the history, evolution, and current trends of reference services in academic libraries. Findings This paper clearly demonstrates the importance of human-mediated reference services in academic libraries. It reinforces the need for skilled, knowledgeable professional librarians to provide effective and efficient reference services in a digital environment. Practical implications This paper provides a comprehensive overview of current trends in reference services in academic libraries and analyzes the merits and demerits of these trends to establish the need for mediated reference services in academic libraries. The arguments used in this paper will be useful for library and informational professionals as validation for the need to hire skilled, knowledgeable reference librarians to provide reference services in a digital environment. Originality/value This paper critically looks at the current trends and practices in reference services through the published literature to determine the future need for mediated reference services in academic libraries. It offers important insights to demonstrate why professional librarians’ skills, knowledge and expertise are essential to provide efficient reference services in the digital age.
      Citation: Reference Services Review
      PubDate: 2016-11-30T03:01:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/RSR-02-2016-0012
       
 
 
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