for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3159 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3159 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 407, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 245, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 140, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 396, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 336, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 442, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 171, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
Landscape and Urban Planning
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.124
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 27  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0169-2046
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3159 journals]
  • Research Note: Relationship between childhood nature play and adulthood
           participation in nature-based recreation among urban residents in Tokyo
           area
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 180Author(s): Tetsuro Hosaka, Shinya Numata, Koun Sugimoto As urban areas and populations increase rapidly worldwide, experiences of nature play in urban green spaces would be a key for reconnecting people and natural environments. However, few studies have demonstrated the effects of childhood nature play on nature-related behavior among adults and its relative importance to sociodemographic factors. We conducted a retrospective questionnaire survey of 1030 adult residents in the Tokyo area, and found that the frequency of childhood play in green spaces was correlated positively with that of nature-based activities from gardening to international nature-based tourism, and even more strongly so than age, gender, and income. Given that participation in nature-based recreational activities reflects people’s interest in and appreciation of nature and can contribute to nature conservation, the creation and effective design of urban green spaces where children can interact with nature will not only improve local environments, but also contribute to global nature conservation.
       
  • Small but powerful: The importance of French community gardens for
           residents
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 180Author(s): Ana Cristina Torres, Anne-Caroline Prévot, Sophie Nadot Community gardens are increasingly implemented in cities and considered in public policies regarding the range of expected benefits they can provide. Much research has indeed emphasized their roles for community gardens members, but little research still concerns residents’ perspectives. In this paper, we explored the importance of these gardens for residents. More specifically, we assessed the knowledge, the perception and the participation of residents in the gardens. We conducted a questionnaire survey in the neighborhood of nine community gardens in Paris, France. We found that less than forty percent out of the 431 respondents know the activities going on in the nearby garden, and that these people were more often already engaged in civic initiatives. However, nearly hundred percent of interviewed people had a good perception of the gardens, based on their role in providing urban green spaces, in promoting contact with people and education. Finally, twenty percent declared frequent participation. Residents’ perceptions and participation in community gardens depended on individuals’ life experiences and involvement in biodiversity and civic initiatives.Our results highlight that city dwellers are aware of the benefits that community gardens can provide to them, to their neighborhood and to the city as a whole. These results confirm that community gardens are extremely important places to consider in urban planning and policy making, as well as in conservation research.
       
  • Measuring the use of green space with urban resource selection functions:
           An application using smartphone GPS locations
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 179Author(s): Andrew Ladle, Paul Galpern, Patricia Doyle-Baker Data describing how individuals use their urban environment is a valuable source of information in urban planning. In many cases, data used for these purposes have low spatial and temporal resolution, or sample size. Equally, comprehensive analytical approaches suitable for these data may be lacking. We present a statistical method borrowed from wildlife ecology and management called a resource selection function (RSF). We apply it to answer questions relating to the selection of urban green space by university students, using a dataset consisting of smartphone GPS location data volunteered by participants. We ask questions relating to urban greenspace selection by comparing used locations to a set of random locations at multiple spatial extents. We found that participants altered their selection of areas according to the surrounding recreational trail density and whether those areas were classified as green space. These relationships were also influenced by season. Our study also demonstrates how the design of an urban RSF can offer different insights by varying the extent of the domain: (1) to an individual’s core area; or (2) by excluding from the domain areas that are physically unavailable. We emphasize the importance of matching availability to the research question and conclude by reviewing the opportunities presented by using RSFs combined with GPS location data in an urban context. We argue that RSFs have utility beyond wildlife ecology and management, and, given the increasing availability of smartphone GPS data, can successfully be applied to determine the use and selection of spaces by urban residents.
       
  • Up and out: A multifaceted approach to characterizing urbanization in
           Greater Saigon, 2000–2009
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 August 2018Source: Landscape and Urban PlanningAuthor(s): Deborah L. Balk, Son V. Nghiem, Bryan R. Jones, Zhen Liu, Gillian Dunn In this case study of Greater Saigon, two types of satellite data are used to estimate the rate of change in urban spatial expansion, both horizontally and volumetrically (horizontal and vertical components), and integrates them with socioeconomic data to examine the correlates and potential causes of both kinds of change. We employ new data products – the Global Human Settlement Layer (GHSL) derived largely from Landsat and a Dense Sampling Method (DSM) product based on QuikSCAT – in combination with data from the 1999 and 2009 censuses of Vietnam. Unlike past studies, we examine horizontal and volumetric changes in urban form and pay particular attention to the role of migration in locations experiencing those different types of change. We find these two types of urban change occur at different rates and in different localities, with the highest rates of horizontal change occurring to the north of administrative Saigon. In contrast, we find the highest rates of volumetric change in the areas north of the central districts but mostly within administrative Saigon. In-migration is strongly associated with horizontal change, whereas increases in population density appears to drive volumetric change, controlling for other factors. Positive volumetric change is associated with necessary amenities of modern urban living, often in high-rise buildings found in dense population centers like Saigon: the increasing presence in households of computers, air conditioners, piped water, and gas fuel. Use of these new integrated data hold promise to shed new light on both the built-environment and social dimensions of urbanization in low- and middle-income settings.
       
  • Ecological urbanism in East Asia: A comparative assessment of two
           eco-cities in Japan and China
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 179Author(s): Zhongjie Lin The growth of projects translating the concept of eco-city into practices has accelerated during the last fifteen years, making the eco-city a global phenomenon. Asia in particular has witnessed notable developments, characterized by strong governmental intervention and national initiatives to create model eco-cities. In Japan, the central government launched an “Eco-Model Cities” program in 2008 and has designated twenty-three model cities. In China, hundreds of municipalities have pursued plans to become an eco- or low-carbon city following the government’s demonstration projects. Across East Asia, the eco-city is promoted as an innovative urban policy capable of advancing the agendas of sustainable urbanization and the realignment of the post-industrial urban economy.This paper compares the policies and strategies of developing eco-cities in Japan and China using Kitakyushu and Tianjin Eco-city as case studies. It examines these cities’ common and contrasting approaches to ecological urbanism, their respective technological and urban design strategies, the relationship between eco-city building and local economic development, and the roles played by different stakeholders in this effort. The research focuses on their Key Performance Indicator systems and the spatial qualities they anticipate, which reflect fundamentally different ideas about what societal role an eco-city should best play. The comparative method sheds light on debates around important aspects of planning and managing an eco-city––namely, between new town and retrofit development, between top-down directive and bottom-up force, and between the eco-city as technology and as culture. This paper thus offers critical insight into the changing notions of urbanity within Asian society.
       
  • The impact of urbanisation on nature dose and the implications for human
           health
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 179Author(s): Daniel T.C. Cox, Danielle F. Shanahan, Hannah L. Hudson, Richard A. Fuller, Kevin J. Gaston The last 100 years have seen a huge change in the global structure of the human population, with the majority of people now living in urban rather than rural environments. An assumed consequence is that people will have fewer experiences of nature, and this could have important consequences given the myriad health benefits that they can gain from such experiences. Alternatively, as experiences of nature become rarer, people might be more likely actively to seek them out, mitigating the negative effects of urbanisation. In this study, we used data for 3000 survey respondents from across the UK, and a nature-dose framework, to determine whether (a) increasing urbanisation is associated with a decrease in the frequency, duration and intensity of nature dose; and (b) differences in nature exposure associated with urbanisation impact on four population health outcomes (depression, self-reported health, social cohesion and physical activity). We found negative exponential relationships between nature dose and the degree of urbanisation. The frequency and duration of dose decreased from rural to suburban environments, followed by little change with further increases in urbanisation. There were weak but positive associations between frequency and duration of dose across all four health domains, while different dimensions of dose showed more positive associations with specific health domains in towns and cities. We show that people in urban areas with a low nature dose tend to have worse health across multiple domains, but have the potential for the greatest gains from spending longer in nature, or living in green areas.
       
  • Understanding of avian assemblage change within anthropogenic environments
           using citizen science data
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 179Author(s): Meera Joyce, Megan D. Barnes, Hugh P. Possingham, Berndt J. Van Rensburg Anthropogenic land use is a major driver of biodiversity loss, with different land use activities having a range of impacts on native communities. These myriad impacts make it difficult to identify the key drivers of species declines, especially across heterogenous anthropogenic environments. Our study aims to identify whether the species and traits being lost in disturbed environments differ across a land-use intensity gradient, in order to prioritise management effort in Greater Brisbane, Australia. We applied List Length Analysis (LLA) to standardise citizen-collected avian records, and model the change in prevalence for 182 bird species within urban, rural and forested environments. We then tested whether understorey-nesting, ground-nesting, insectivorous or small-bodied functional groups were significantly declining in prevalence within the entire avian assemblage. We found a greater probability of decline for small-bodied and understorey-nesting species in urban environments, lending support to established findings that, in urban environments of Greater Brisbane, competition with larger territorial birds and understorey loss are impacting communities. Our study also highlighted that the species declining and increasing in prevalence differed across the land use intensity gradient. Management approaches should therefore be targeted to mitigate the distinct impacts associated with particular land uses. In Greater Brisbane, managers should focus on maintaining urban understories and monitoring overabundant avian competitors. Where funds are limited, LLA represents a useful tool to harness non-standardised data, to guide early management and monitoring effort. Such tools equip managers to conserve biodiversity in anthropogenic environments.
       
  • Mapping the spatio-temporal distribution of solar radiation within street
           canyons of Boston using Google Street View panoramas and building height
           model
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2018Source: Landscape and Urban PlanningAuthor(s): Xiaojiang Li, Carlo Ratti Studying the solar radiation within street canyons would provide an important reference for increasing human thermal comfort and decreasing the potential health issues caused by too much exposure from sunlight. In this study, we used building height model and publicly accessible Google Street View panoramas to map the spatio-temporal distribution of solar radiation within street canyons of Boston, Massachusetts. Hemispherical images generated from Google Street View panoramas and building height model together with sun paths in summer and winter were used to estimate the spatio-temporal distribution of solar radiation within street canyons. Results show that street canyons in the downtown area have shorter sunshine duration and lower solar radiation to the ground compared with other regions of the study area in the whole year. The southwestern part of the study area with the abundance of vegetation canopies has relatively short direct sunshine duration and low solar radiation reaching the ground in summer, and relatively long direct sunshine duration and high solar radiation reaching the ground in winter. This study also shows that it is possible to estimate shading precisely within street canyons for a specific time and date at a specific location. Considering the public accessibility of Google Street View data in cities around the world, this study can be easily deployed in other cities. This study would give a great impetus to all studies relating the solar radiation at street level in future.
       
  • A mixture emissivity analysis method for urban land surface temperature
           retrieval from Landsat 8 data
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 179Author(s): Tianyu Li, Qingmin Meng Land surface temperature (LST) retrieval from satellite imagery is one of the most practical ways to consistently monitor urban thermal environment. Given the heterogeneous nature of urban landscape, an implicit assumption should be considered in remotely sensed LST determinations that a mixed urban land cover aggregation is the combination of its constituent components. Currently, the common LST retrieval method which utilize emissivity measures estimated by NDVI threshold method (NDVITHM), including mono window (MW), single channel (SC), and split window algorithms (SW), does not take into account heterogeneity of pixels. While in this study, a new approach, the mixture analysis of emissivity (MAoE), is proposed to calculate temperature by estimating pixel emissivity from mixed land cover classes. We conduct a comparison of six approaches by the combinations of three LST retrieval algorithms with NDVITHM and MAoE respectively. The differences among strategies are characterized and analyzed by comparing LST estimates from Landsat 8 thermal images. The LST gradients derived from transect analysis are found consistently similar for combinations of two LST algorithms (MW and SC) and the two emissivity estimation algorithms (MAoE and NDVITHM). LSTs derived from SW algorithms using band 10 have the highest mean values, while the SC algorithms have moderate mean values and the MW algorithms have the lowest values. Standard deviations of estimated LST from MAoE are smaller compared with NDVITHM methods, SC retrieval algorithm with MAoE has the smallest standard deviation, and NDVITHM temperature estimation could be more impacted by different land use land cover types.
       
  • Avian anthrophobia' Behavioral and physiological responses of house
           finches (Haemorhous mexicanus) to human and predator threats across an
           urban gradient
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 179Author(s): Melinda Weaver, Russell A. Ligon, Melanie Mousel, Kevin J. McGraw Urban environments present animals with many novel experiences, not the least of which is the physical presence of humans. However, most studies on urban predation do not take human presence into account. We examined behavioral and physiological responses of a songbird species (the house finch, Haemorhous mexicanus) that is abundant in both natural and urban areas to the presence of humans and to a native predator model to distinguish whether urban birds show consistently bolder behavior or if they differentially respond to a threatening native predator versus a potentially more benign human. During three field seasons (winter 2012, summer-fall 2012, and winter 2013), we captured birds at six sites (urban, suburban, and rural) and measured breath rate (an indicator of stress). We then tested behavioral reactions of caged finches to an approaching human and both a hawk (predator) and dove (control-bird) flyover. We found that rural birds had lower breath rates than urban birds, but that urban birds showed fewer activity behaviors (e.g., hops, flights) than rural birds in response to an approaching human. Urban and rural birds did not differ in their behavioral responses to either the hawk or dove mount, though there were seasonal differences. Because house finch behavioral responses varied as a function of type of stimulus presented, our results point to an example of plasticity rather than to a generalized bold urban phenotype and also implicate tolerance of human proximity as a key factor driving urban success in some avian species.
       
  • Six fundamental aspects for conceptualizing multidimensional urban form: A
           spatial mapping perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 179Author(s): Elizabeth A. Wentz, Abigail M. York, Marina Alberti, Lindsey Conrow, Heather Fischer, Luis Inostroza, Claire Jantz, Steward T.A. Pickett, Karen C. Seto, Hannes Taubenböck Urbanization is currently one of the most profound transformations taking place across the globe influencing the flows of people, energy, and matter. The urban form influences and is influenced by these flows and is therefore critical in understanding and how urban areas affect and are affected by form. Nevertheless, there is a lack of uniformity in how urban form is analyzed. Urban form analyzed from a continuum of a simple urban versus non-urban classification to highly detailed representations of land use and land cover. Either end of the representation spectrum limits the ability to analyze within-urban dynamics, to make cross-city comparisons, and to produce generalizable results. In the framework of remote sensing and geospatial analysis, we identify and define six fundamental aspects of urban form, which are organized within three overarching components. Materials, or the physical elements of the urban landscape, consists of three aspects (1) human constructed elements, (2) the soil-plant continuum, and (3) water elements. The second component is configuration, which includes the (4) two- and three-dimensional space and (5) spatial pattern of urban areas. Lastly, because of the dynamics of human activities and biophysical processes, an important final component is the change of urban form over (6) time. We discuss how a this urban form framework integrates into a broader discussion of urbanization.
       
  • Stewardship as a boundary object for sustainability research: Linking
           care, knowledge and agency
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 179Author(s): Johan Peçanha Enqvist, Simon West, Vanessa A. Masterson, L. Jamila Haider, Uno Svedin, Maria Tengö Current sustainability challenges – including biodiversity loss, pollution and land-use change – require new ways of understanding, acting in and caring for the landscapes we live in. The concept of stewardship is increasingly used in research, policy and practice to articulate and describe responses to these challenges. However, there are multiple meanings and framings of stewardship across this wide user base that reflect different disciplinary purposes, assumptions and expertise, as well as a long history of use in both academic and lay contexts. Stewardship may therefore be considered a ‘boundary object’; that is, a conceptual tool that enables collaboration and dialogue between different actors whilst allowing for differences in use and perception. This paper seeks to map out the multiple meanings of stewardship in the literature and help researchers and practitioners to navigate the challenges and opportunities that come with using the term. We provide the first qualitative systematic review of stewardship, and identify four distinct meanings of the concept in the literature: Ethic, Motivation, Action and Outcome. We then develop a novel framework for thinking through and connecting these multiple meanings, centered around three dimensions: care, knowledge and agency. This framework is used to identify the care dimension and relational approaches as important areas for future stewardship research. In these efforts – and for scholars engaging with the stewardship concept more broadly – this paper can act as a helpful ‘centering device’, connecting practitioners, policy-makers and researchers from multiple disciplines in pursuit of sustainability.Graphical abstractWe identify four distinct uses or meanings of stewardship in the literature: Ethic, Motivation, Action and Outcome. Using a framework based on three overlapping dimensions of stewardship – care, knowledge and agency – we demonstrate how these meanings relate to each other and how this can facilitate communication and collaboration between and among scholars and practitioners.Graphical abstract for this article
       
  • Coupling a landscape-based approach and graph theory to maximize
           multispecific connectivity in bird communities
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 179Author(s): Céline Clauzel, Alienor Jeliazkov, Anne Mimet Environmental policies have highlighted the importance of preserving ecological networks to limit the fragmentation of natural habitats and biodiversity loss. A crucial issue for landscape managers is how to reconcile conservation measures that benefit all species and the maintenance of human activities. This study aimed to promote landscape multifunctionality, i.e., improving connectivity for several species without significantly modifying human activities. The objectives were to identify the most strategic natural landscape types to prioritize for preservation and to propose landscape management actions in highly anthropized areas that would benefit a majority of species. The analysis combined landscape types and bird species observation data to model landscape suitability for six species profiles defined by their affinity for wetlands, agricultural areas, urban areas and three types of forested landscapes. By graph modelling, we analysed the functional connectivity of the ecological networks of these species profiles. The results revealed that only ten landscape types out of 72 were core habitats for three species profiles simultaneously. These were primarily forested landscape types — either strict or associated with open areas (wasteland, forest clearing). Conversely, some anthropogenic landscapes dominated by built areas and sometimes shared with agriculture were completely unfavourable for all species profiles. The graph modelling analysis showed that the transformation of some landscape types could potentially improve connectivity for four species profiles presenting different ecological requirements. This coupling approach thus provided guidance to propose some landscape management actions that benefit the majority of species while preserving land uses.
       
  • Urban green infrastructure and ecosystem services in sub-Saharan Africa
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2018Source: Landscape and Urban PlanningAuthor(s): Marié J. du Toit, Sarel S. Cilliers, Martin Dallimer, Mark Goddard, Solène Guenat, Susanna F. Cornelius Africa is urbanizing at an astonishing rate. To meet many of the Sustainable Development Goals there will be a requirement for cities in sub-Saharan Africa to plan for, and manage, the rapid rise in the urban population. Green infrastructure has the potential to provide multiple ecosystem services to benefit the urban population. The general objective of this review is to consolidate research undertaken on urban green infrastructure and the associated ecosystem services in sub-Saharan African cities. The 68 reviewed papers spanned 20 countries and included 74 urban areas. However, only 38% of sub-Saharan countries had any research carried out in them. The most represented ecosystem services were regulating and provisioning, with supporting services getting the least attention. Overall there was a lack of in-depth studies on all ecosystem services, especially supporting and cultural services. Seven overarching categories of barriers and challenges to the sustainable delivery of ecosystem services emerged from the reviewed papers, namely: (i) socio-cultural values, traditions and perceptions; (ii) lack of capacity; (iii) governance, urban planning and social inequality; (iv) lack of data and/or case studies; (v) ecosystem disservices; (vi) spatial trade-offs and conflicts; (vii) climate change. These barriers we identified will need to be addressed if the future, long-term sustainable provision of ecosystem services in sub-Saharan African cities is to be assured.
       
  • Using annual Landsat imagery to identify harvesting over a range of
           intensities for non-industrial family forests
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2018Source: Landscape and Urban PlanningAuthor(s): R. Tortini, A.L. Mayer, T. Hermosilla, N.C. Coops, M.A. Wulder The monitoring of forested landscapes dominated by many small private forest owners is difficult or not possible without spatially explicit and up-to-date information on land cover change. Analysis of time series multispectral data from the Landsat series of satellites have the spatial and temporal characteristics required to detect sub-hectare and non-stand replacing harvest events over large areas. We identified harvests that occurred in six western upper Michigan counties from 1985 to 2011 using Landsat best available pixel (BAP) image composites and the Composite2Change (C2C) approach. We detected a total of 7071 harvesting events with size ranging from 0.5 to 171.36 ha and average size of 6.42 ha, and analyzed their temporal trajectory. To gain confidence in our harvest mapping, we compared our findings to the overlapping decade of Global Forest Watch (GFW) data. Agreement between the datasets was high, with 94.24% of the C2C and GFW harvest pixels identified with the same change year and improving to 98.74% within ±1 year. This automated harvest detection system, which can capture small and otherwise missed harvests, is valuable to natural resource agencies responsible for monitoring and compliance with regulations over large areas, and researchers requiring estimates of harvest levels and the nature of forest cover status and trends on family forests.
       
  • The landscape context of family forests in the United States:
           Anthropogenic interfaces and forest fragmentation from 2001 to 2011
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 April 2018Source: Landscape and Urban PlanningAuthor(s): Kurt Riitters, Jennifer Costanza The capacity of family owned forests to sustain ecological goods and services depends on the landscape context within which that forest occurs. For example, the expansion of a nearby urban area results in the loss of adjacent forest, which threatens the ability of the family forest to sustain interior forest habitat. Our objective was to assess the status and change of the landscape context of family forests across the conterminous United States, as measured by interior forest status and anthropogenic (urban and agricultural) interface zones. We combined circa 2005 forest inventory data with land cover maps from 2001 and 2011 to evaluate changes in the vicinity of 132,497 inventory locations. We compared family forests to nonfamily private and public forests, and evaluated regional conservation opportunities for family forests. Between 2001 and 2011, 1.5% of family forest area experienced a change of anthropogenic interface zone, and 46% was in an interface zone by 2011. During that same time, there was a net decrease of 9.7% of family owned interior forest area, such that 27% of family forest was interior forest by 2011. The rates of forest fragmentation and occurrence in anthropogenic interface zones were higher for family and nonfamily private forests than for public forest, yet family forests contained 31% of the extant interior forest area. The geography of landscape patterns suggested where aggregate actions by family forest owners may have relatively large regional effects upon extant interior forest conditions.
       
  • Climate change and declining levels of green structures: Life in informal
           settlements of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 April 2018Source: Landscape and Urban PlanningAuthor(s): Manoj Roy, Riziki Shemdoe, David Hulme, Nicholaus Mwageni, Alex Gough Impacts of climate change are often acute for those who live in informal settlements, the places where poverty, inequality and deprivation are concentrated in cities across the developing world. To broaden the strategies to address this issue, many cities are now embracing ecosystem-based adaptation and resilience. But, in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) the approach is yet to make much headway. This paper examines how climate change impacts on poor urban people via one component of urban ecosystem − urban green structures (UGS) − in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. It examines: the UGS of importance to the city's informal dwellers and the range of derived services; changes over time to these UGS and derived services; and emerging adaptation practices. Using qualitative methods, the study has three key findings. First, cultural ecosystem services are of greatest importance to informal dwellers, although they do harness a range of other services. Second, the city's UGS have undergone dramatic changes due to both climatic and non-climatic factors. This has resulted in a gradual decline in the quantity and quality of UGS-derived services for the urban poor. Third, in responding to these changes, informal settlement dwellers have relied mostly on their personal, and sometimes on their collective, resources and capabilities. There are some innovative practices that draw on external institutions, but access to external support for informal communities has remained consistently low. City authorities should approach and plan greening ‘for’ (not ‘in’) informal settlements as a targeted environmental improvement endeavour – referred to here as ‘creative urban planning’.
       
  • Social drivers of rural forest dynamics: A multi-scale approach combining
           ethnography, geomatic and mental model analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2018Source: Landscape and Urban PlanningAuthor(s): Julien Blanco, Anne Sourdril, Marc Deconchat, Sylvie Ladet, Emilie Andrieu Farm forests and trees outside forests (i.e., ‘rural forests’) are key components for the sustainability of agricultural landscapes. Farmers are the main managers of rural forests and their practices vary according to a range of individual and collective factors. This diversity in management practices challenges the understanding of landscape patterns and dynamics, in particular at local and regional scales. In this study, we combined forest mapping over 150 years, ethnographic investigations and mental models to investigate the social drivers of rural forests in a French case study. Results showed a stability of woodlands and groves, favored by the social organization system, i.e., a self-reliance and house-centered system. Recent tree encroachment in abandoned lands – caused by rural exodus and the intensification of agriculture – resulted in a spread of woodlands. In addition, a shift from family-based to market-oriented woodland management was observed, contributing to the homogenization of forest management practices. Hedgerows declined but with contrasted trends according to their location and adjacent land uses: in-farm hedgerows that obstructed mechanization declined, whereas boundary hedgerows that assisted in the maintenance of farmers’ estates were reinforced. Scattered trees were considered of little interest by farmers and declined. This study achieved an understanding of rural forest patterns and underlying social drivers. Mental models provided a basis for exploring the tradeoffs between ecosystem services and disservices operated by farmers. They also revealed differences between scientific and farmer classifications of trees outside forests. Mental models constitute a promising tool for reinforcing bonds between the social and natural sciences.
       
  • Cross-boundary cooperation for landscape management: Collective action and
           social exchange among individual private forest landowners
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2018Source: Landscape and Urban PlanningAuthor(s): Alexandra Paige Fischer, Andrew Klooster, Lora Cirhigiri The landscape is an ideal spatial extent for managing forests because many ecological processes and disturbances occur on such scales. Moreover, landscape-level decision-making processes can improve the efficiency of forest management, as when many owners of small parcels increase the economy of scale of their operations by jointly hiring labor or selling products. Despite the potential benefits of managing at the landscape level, cooperation on management activities across property boundaries is rare among private landowners and poorly understood. We used a comparative case study approach to explain cooperative management among eight sets of individual private forest landowners in the Pacific Northwest and Upper Midwest, USA. We characterized how private forest owners cooperated on management and the outcomes they associated with cooperating, and we identified factors that influenced cooperation. We investigated whether cooperative management among private landowners may be constrained by social risks and whether formal institutions may be needed to facilitate cooperation. In the cases we investigated, owners jointly planned and implemented integrated management decisions on their collective forest properties. They perceived a number of beneficial social and ecological outcomes of cooperation. The key factors that fostered the emergence and continuity of cooperative management included shared concern, especially about risks to their properties and the health of their forests; pre-existing networks; trust; external expertise and resources; local leadership; and formal institutions. These factors are consistent with collective action and social exchange theory. Our findings shed light on social conditions that foster cooperative landscape management.
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.80.102.170
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-