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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3163 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3163 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 88, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 394, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 244, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.732, CiteScore: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 335, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 436, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)

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Journal Cover
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.289
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0889-5406
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3163 journals]
  • Operation Plowshare and the nuclear option
    • Authors: Rolf G. Behrents
      Pages: 761 - 763
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Rolf G. Behrents


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.04.010
       
  • Lysle E. Johnston, Jr.: Critical thinking inspiration in orthodontics
    • Authors: Florian Benicio Chauca
      First page: 764
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Florian Benicio Chauca


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.03.005
       
  • Residents' journal review
    • Authors: Eustáquio Araújo; Patrick F. Foley; Julie McCray; Dan Grauer
      Pages: 766 - 769
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Eustáquio Araújo, Patrick F. Foley, Julie McCray, Dan Grauer


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.03.008
       
  • A promise made is a promise kept
    • Authors: Peter M. Greco
      First page: 770
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Peter M. Greco


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.04.003
       
  • Treatment outcomes and patient-reported quality of life after orthognathic
           surgery with computer-assisted 2- or 3-dimensional planning: A randomized
           double-blind active-controlled clinical trial
    • Authors: Martin Bengtsson; Gert Wall; Pernilla Larsson; Jonas P. Becktor; Lars Rasmusson
      Pages: 786 - 796
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Martin Bengtsson, Gert Wall, Pernilla Larsson, Jonas P. Becktor, Lars Rasmusson
      Introduction Thorough treatment planning is essential for a good clinical outcome in orthognathic treatment. The planning is often digital. Both 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) software options are available. The aim of this randomized 2-arm parallel double-blinded active-controlled clinical trial was to compare the outcomes of computer-based 2D and 3D planning techniques according to patient-reported health related quality of life. The hypothesis was that a 3D technique would give a better treatment outcome compared with a 2D technique. Methods Orthognathic treatment for 62 subjects, aged 18 to 28 years, with severe Class III malocclusion was planned with both 2D and 3D techniques. After treatment planning but before surgery, the patients were randomly allocated via blind collection of 1 enveloped card for each subject in a 1:1 ratio to the test (3D) or the control (2D) group. Thus, the intervention was according to which planning technique was used. The primary outcome was patient-reported outcome measures. The secondary outcome was relationship between patient-reported outcome measures and cephalometric accuracy. Questionnaires on the patient's health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were distributed preoperatively and 12 months after surgical treatment. The questionnaires were coded, meaning blinding throughout the analysis. Differences between groups were tested with the Fisher permutation test. The HRQoL was also compared with measurements of cephalometric accuracy for the 2 groups. Results Three subjects were lost to clinical follow-up, leaving 57 included. Of these, 55 subjects completed the questionnaires, 28 in the 2D and 27 in the 3D groups. No statistically significant difference regarding HRQoL was found between the studied planning techniques: the Oral Health Impact Profile total showed −3.69 (95% confidence interval, −19.68 to 12.30). Consistent results on HRQoL and cephalometric accuracy showed a difference between pretreatment and posttreatment that increased in both groups but to a higher level in the 3D group. A difference between pretreatment and posttreatment HRQoL was shown for both groups, indicating increased quality of life after treatment. This supports recent findings comparing 3D and 2D planning techniques. No serious harm was observed during the study. Conclusions Improvements of HRQoL were shown after treatment independent of which planning technique, 2D or 3D, was used. No statistically significant difference was found between the planning techniques. Registration This trial was not registered. Protocol The protocol was not published before trial commencement. Funding This project was supported by personal grants to Martin Bengtsson from the Scandinavian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (25000 SEK), the Southern Region of the Swedish Dental Association (50000 SEK), and the Swedish Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (25000 SEK). The sponsors had no influence on the study design, analysis of the data, or the writing of the article.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.12.008
       
  • Treatment satisfaction and its influencing factors among adult orthodontic
           patients
    • Authors: Rami Lee; Soonshin Hwang; Hyunsun Lim; Jung-Yul Cha; Kyung-Ho Kim; Chooryung J. Chung
      Pages: 808 - 817
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Rami Lee, Soonshin Hwang, Hyunsun Lim, Jung-Yul Cha, Kyung-Ho Kim, Chooryung J. Chung
      Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the level of satisfaction for orthodontic treatment among adult patients. In addition, the influencing host factors were monitored for their associations with satisfaction. Methods A questionnaire was designed to measure the level of satisfaction in 10 items; overall satisfaction, tooth alignment, facial appearance, eating and chewing, confident smile and self-image, retention state, treatment duration, treatment costs, intention to recommend, and relief of previous concerns, using a 5-point Likert scale. Total satisfaction was calculated by averaging the Likert scores from the 10 items. The survey was conducted, and the results from 298 adults were evaluated. Results For the overall satisfaction item, 45.0% were very satisfied, and 39.9% were satisfied, resulting in a satisfaction ratio of 84.9%. Total satisfaction score was 3.9. The level of satisfaction for tooth alignment and confident smile and self-image were significantly higher than facial appearance and eating and chewing (P <0.001). Patients aged 50 and above were more satisfied than the younger ones, and men were more satisfied than women (P <0.05). Conclusions Overall, adult patients were highly satisfied with orthodontic treatment. Age, sex, motivation, expected concern, and discomfort influenced the level of satisfaction.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.09.015
       
  • Tomographic evaluation of the maturation stage of the midpalatal suture in
           postadolescents
    • Authors: Victor de Miranda Ladewig; Leopoldino Capelozza-Filho; Renata Rodrigues Almeida-Pedrin; Fábio Pinto Guedes; Mauricio de Almeida Cardoso; Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira Conti
      Pages: 818 - 824
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Victor de Miranda Ladewig, Leopoldino Capelozza-Filho, Renata Rodrigues Almeida-Pedrin, Fábio Pinto Guedes, Mauricio de Almeida Cardoso, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira Conti
      Introduction In this study, we aimed at evaluating the maturation stage of the midpalatal suture based on its morphology, using cone-beam computed tomography images in young postadolescents. Methods The sample comprised 112 patients, 68 female and 44 male, aged 16 to 20 years, consecutively selected from 2 private orthodontic clinics. They had cone-beam computed tomography images in their initial orthodontic files, requested for orthodontic planning purposes. These images were exported to the Invivo 5 program (Anatomage, San Jose, Calif), where axial sections were obtained from the midpalatal suture for morphologic evaluation. Two previously calibrated examiners interpreted the images to establish the stage of sutural maturation of each patient according to its morphologic characteristics in 5 maturational stages (A, B, C, D, and E). The kappa coefficient was applied for intraexaminer and interexaminer agreements, and their values were 0.87 and 0.89, respectively. Results The maturational stages most often observed in this study were C, D, and E, (91.9%). In males, stage C was present in 52.3%; for females this prevalence was 39.7%. Conclusions The high prevalence of stage C in this age group may justify a clinical study to confirm the good prognosis for rapid maxillary expansion in postadolescents.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.09.019
       
  • Evaluation of pharyngeal space and its correlation with mandible and hyoid
           bone in patients with different skeletal classes and facial types
    • Authors: Yuri Nejaim; Johan K.M. Aps; Francisco Carlos Groppo; Francisco Haiter Neto
      Pages: 825 - 833
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Yuri Nejaim, Johan K.M. Aps, Francisco Carlos Groppo, Francisco Haiter Neto
      Introduction The purpose of this article was to evaluate the pharyngeal space volume, and the size and shape of the mandible and the hyoid bone, as well as their relationships, in patients with different facial types and skeletal classes. Furthermore, we estimated the volume of the pharyngeal space with a formula using only linear measurements. Methods A total of 161 i-CAT Next Generation (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, Pa) cone-beam computed tomography images (80 men, 81 women; ages, 21-58 years; mean age, 27 years) were retrospectively studied. Skeletal class and facial type were determined for each patient from multiplanar reconstructions using the NemoCeph software (Nemotec, Madrid, Spain). Linear and angular measurements were performed using 3D imaging software (version 3.4.3; Carestream Health, Rochester, NY), and volumetric analysis of the pharyngeal space was carried out with ITK-SNAP (version 2.4.0; Cognitica, Philadelphia, Pa) segmentation software. For the statistics, analysis of variance and the Tukey test with a significance level of 0.05, Pearson correlation, and linear regression were used. Results The pharyngeal space volume, when correlated with mandible and hyoid bone linear and angular measurements, showed significant correlations with skeletal class or facial type. The linear regression performed to estimate the volume of the pharyngeal space showed an R of 0.92 and an adjusted R 2 of 0.8362. Conclusions There were significant correlations between pharyngeal space volume, and the mandible and hyoid bone measurements, suggesting that the stomatognathic system should be evaluated in an integral and nonindividualized way. Furthermore, it was possible to develop a linear regression model, resulting in a useful formula for estimating the volume of the pharyngeal space.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.09.018
       
  • Patient satisfaction and quality of life changes after Invisalign
           treatment
    • Authors: Camila Pacheco-Pereira; Jeremy Brandelli; Carlos Flores-Mir
      Pages: 834 - 841
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Camila Pacheco-Pereira, Jeremy Brandelli, Carlos Flores-Mir
      Introduction Our objective was to assess patient satisfaction and changes in oral health-related quality of life immediately after orthodontic treatment using the Invisalign system (Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif). Methods Adult patients were recruited from private practices in Canada and surveyed using a combination of 2 validated questionnaires: Dental Impact of Daily Living and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire. This 94-question assessment focused on various dimensions of satisfaction and changes in quality of life. Multivariate analysis of variance, regression analysis, and canonical correlation analysis were applied in the data analysis. Results A total of 81 patients, 29.6% men and 70.4% women, exclusively treated with the Invisalign system participated. The most significant improvements were seen in the appearance and eating and chewing categories, with patients responding positively to more than 70% of the questions in those categories. Food packing between teeth, affecting 24% of the participants, and pain affecting 16% were the most common sources of dissatisfaction. However, these negative experiences were not strong enough to reduce the overall positive experience that patients reported. Appearance and dentofacial improvement were strongly correlated. Canonical correlation of the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire factors showed that doctor-patient relationship had a significant correlation with situational aspects, dentofacial improvement, and the residual category. Phrases from the doctor-patient relationship category such as “the orthodontist treated me with respect” and “carefully explained what treatment would be like” were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Conclusions Although positive changes in appearance and eating categories were linked with patient satisfaction, doctor-patient relationship was the factor that correlated better with multiple aspects of patient satisfaction.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.023
       
  • Apical root resorption during orthodontic treatment with clear aligners: A
           retrospective study using cone-beam computed tomography
    • Authors: Courtney Aman; Bruno Azevedo; Eric Bednar; Sunita Chandiramami; Daniel German; Eric Nicholson; Keith Nicholson; William C. Scarfe
      Pages: 842 - 851
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Courtney Aman, Bruno Azevedo, Eric Bednar, Sunita Chandiramami, Daniel German, Eric Nicholson, Keith Nicholson, William C. Scarfe
      Introduction We aimed to investigate the incidence and severity of orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption (OIIRR) on maxillary incisors with clear aligner therapy using cone-beam computed tomography and to identify possible risk factors. Methods The root lengths of maxillary incisors were measured on orthogonal images from pretreatment and posttreatment cone-beam computed tomography examinations of 160 patients who received comprehensive orthodontic treatment with clear aligners. Results Mean absolute reductions in root length varied between 0.47 ± 0.61 mm and 0.55 ± 0.70 mm and were not significantly different between maxillary central and lateral incisors. The prevalence of severe OIIRR, defined as both maxillary central incisors experiencing greater than a 25% reduction in root length, was found to be 1.25%. Potential risk factors included sex, malocclusion, crowding, and posttreatment approximation of apices to the cortical plates. Race, interproximal reduction, previous trauma to the teeth, elastics, age, treatment duration, and pretreatment approximation of apices to the cortical plates did not significantly affect the amount of OIIRR. Conclusions Comprehensive treatment with clear aligners resulted in minimal root resorption. Sex, malocclusion, crowding, and posttreatment approximation to the cortical plates significantly affected the percentage of change in root length. Posttreatment approximation of root apices to the palatal cortical plate showed the strongest association for increased OIIRR.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.026
       
  • Periodontal health and compliance: A comparison between Essix and Hawley
           retainers
    • Authors: Licia Manzon; Giovanni Fratto; Eros Rossi; Alfio Buccheri
      Pages: 852 - 860
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Licia Manzon, Giovanni Fratto, Eros Rossi, Alfio Buccheri
      Introduction Many studies on removable retainers have focused on retention efficacy and characteristics. However, studies on plaque accumulation, periodontal health, breakages, and patient compliance are still lacking. Thus, in this study, we aimed at evaluating these parameters in 2 groups of young patients wearing Essix or Hawley retainers for a 6-month period. Methods Seventy subjects were included. Periodontal health was investigated by measuring the plaque, gingival, calculus, and bleeding on probing indexes. Evaluations were performed at 1, 3, and 6 months of wearing. Accumulation of plaque on the retainers was also evaluated. Furthermore, compliance on wearing retainers and breakage data were collected by specific questionnaires. Results Subjects wearing Essix retainers had significantly higher levels of plaque, gingival, and calculus indexes and increased percentages of bleeding sites, compared with subjects wearing Hawley retainers. The Essix group also had increased accumulations of plaque and calculus on the retainers. Nonetheless, subjects of the Essix group had better overall experiences, self-perceptions, and comfort compared with those of the Hawley group. Essix retainers had higher incidences of little and serious breakages compared with Hawley retainers. Conclusions Our results suggest that Essix retainers are well accepted by patients for their esthetic and oral comfort characteristics. However, Essix retainers may cause greater accumulations of plaque on both teeth and retainers, presumably because of inhibition of the cleaning effect of saliva caused by the thermoplastic material or the reduced opportunity for good hygiene on the retainer.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.025
       
  • Effect of local administration of simvastatin on postorthodontic relapse
           in a rabbit model
    • Authors: Hani AlSwafeeri; Walid ElKenany; Mohamed Mowafy; Sahar Karam
      Pages: 861 - 871
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Hani AlSwafeeri, Walid ElKenany, Mohamed Mowafy, Sahar Karam
      Introduction Posttreatment relapse is a major challenging clinical issue. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of local administration of simvastatin on posttreatment relapse. Methods Orthodontic tooth movement was induced in 10 white New Zealand rabbits. After 21 days of active tooth movement, the orthodontic appliances were removed, and the experimental teeth were allowed to relapse for 21 days. During the relapse phase, 1 mandibular quadrant received local simvastatin administration, and the other received the control vehicle solution on a weekly basis. Three-dimensional models of the experimental teeth were created to allow the measurement of experimental tooth movement and posttreatment relapse. The animals were killed at the end of the relapse phase for histomorphometric analysis of alveolar bone remodeling. Results The mean relapse percentages were 75.83% in the quadrant receiving the control vehicle solution and 62.01% in the quadrant receiving simvastatin. Neither the relapse magnitude nor the relapse percentage showed a significant difference between the 2 quadrants. Histomorphometric analyses showed that local simvastatin administration yielded a significant reduction in the area of active bone-resorptive lacunae and a significant increase in newly formed bone area. Conclusions Although local administration of simvastatin aids in bone remodeling associated with posttreatment relapse by reducing the area of active bone resorption and upregulating bone formation, it did not significantly minimize posttreatment relapse.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.024
       
  • Atorvastatin inhibits osteoclastogenesis and arrests tooth movement
    • Authors: Gabriel Schmidt Dolci; Ana Ballarini; Gustavo Hauber Gameiro; Diogo Onofre de Souza; Fabiana de Melo; Anna Christina Medeiros Fossati
      Pages: 872 - 882
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Gabriel Schmidt Dolci, Ana Ballarini, Gustavo Hauber Gameiro, Diogo Onofre de Souza, Fabiana de Melo, Anna Christina Medeiros Fossati
      Introduction In addition to their cholesterol-lowering effects, the statin class of drugs appears to enhance osteogenesis and suppress bone resorption, which could be a clinical concern during orthodontic treatment. In this animal study, we aimed to determine whether atorvastatin (ATV) affects orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) through osteoclast inhibition. Furthermore, we analyzed the potential adverse effects of ATV on long-bone turnover and endochondral ossification. Methods Rats were administered ATV (15 mg/kg) or saline solution via gavage (n = 12 animals/group), starting 2 weeks before initial OTM. Tooth displacement was measured after 7, 14, and 21 days. Histologic sections of the maxilla and femur were obtained after 14 and 21 days of OTM and stained (hematoxylin and eosin; TRAP assay) for histomorphometric analysis. Results ATV was associated with significant (P <0.05) reductions in OTM and osteoclast counts. Independently of drug administration, OTM increased the number of osteoclasts and reduced the bone-volume ratio compared with the control maxillae without OTM. Long-term statin administration did not appear to affect femoral endochondral ossification. Conclusions This experimental study showed that the long-term use of ATV can significantly promote osteoclast inhibition and slow the OTM in the first week in rats. Under physiologic conditions, the drug did not affect bone turnover and endochondral ossification.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.09.021
       
  • Interdisciplinary approach for a patient with unilateral cleft lip and
           palate
    • Authors: Letizia Perillo; Maddalena Vitale; Fabrizia d’Apuzzo; Gaetano Isola; Riccardo Nucera; Giovanni Matarese
      Pages: 883 - 894
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Letizia Perillo, Maddalena Vitale, Fabrizia d’Apuzzo, Gaetano Isola, Riccardo Nucera, Giovanni Matarese
      The oral rehabilitation of patients with cleft lip and palate is a challenge. The aim of this case report was to underline the importance of a sequential interdisciplinary approach to correct functional problems and improve facial esthetics for a patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Few clinical reports have described this treatment in a teenager. The patient, a girl, age 12.6 years, had a complete right cleft lip and palate with a Class II molar tendency and a full Class II canine relationship on the right side, and a full Class II molar relationship with a canine Class I on the left side. Transposed, impacted, and anomalously shaped teeth and crowding added to the patient's problems. Treatment included maxillary expansion and maxillary and mandibular extractions. An interdisciplinary approach was necessary to achieve proper occlusion and better esthetics.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2016.12.035
       
  • Fluid structure interaction simulations of the upper airway in obstructive
           sleep apnea patients before and after maxillomandibular advancement
           surgery
    • Authors: Kwang K. Chang; Ki Beom Kim; Mark W. McQuilling; Reza Movahed
      Pages: 895 - 904
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Kwang K. Chang, Ki Beom Kim, Mark W. McQuilling, Reza Movahed
      Introduction The purpose of this study was to analyze pharyngeal airflow using both computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and fluid structure interactions (FSI) in obstructive sleep apnea patients before and after maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgery. The airflow characteristics before and after surgery were compared with both CFD and FSI. In addition, the presurgery and postsurgery deformations of the airway were evaluated using FSI. Methods Digitized pharyngeal airway models of 2 obstructive sleep apnea patients were generated from cone-beam computed tomography scans before and after MMA surgery. CFD and FSI were used to evaluate the pharyngeal airflow at a maximum inspiration rate of 166 ml per second. Standard steady-state numeric formulations were used for airflow simulations. Results Airway volume increased, pressure drop decreased, maximum airflow velocity decreased, and airway resistance dropped for both patients after the MMA surgery. These findings occurred in both the CFD and FSI simulations. The FSI simulations showed an area of marked airway deformation in both patients before surgery, but this deformation was negligible after surgery for both patients. Conclusions Both CFD and FSI simulations produced airflow results that indicated less effort was needed to breathe after MMA surgery. The FSI simulations demonstrated a substantial decrease in airway deformation after surgery. These beneficial changes positively correlated with the large improvements in polysomnography outcomes after MMA surgery.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.027
       
  • When apologies go too far
    • Authors: Laurance Jerrold
      Pages: 905 - 906
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Laurance Jerrold


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.02.005
       
  • Emma gets braces!
    • Authors: Rolf G. Behrents
      First page: 908
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Rolf G. Behrents


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.04.013
       
  • John Joseph Sheridan, 1932-2018
    • Authors: Marshall Gottsegen
      Pages: 909 - 910
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Marshall Gottsegen


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.03.009
       
  • June 2018:153(6)
    • Authors: Allen H. Moffitt
      Pages: 907.e1 - 907.e2
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Allen H. Moffitt


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.03.010
       
  • Principles of ethical practice
    • Authors: Edward “Chopper” Snyder
      First page: 613
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Edward “Chopper” Snyder


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.02.007
       
  • Prevalence of gingival recession after orthodontic tooth movements
    • Authors: Samuel A. Finkleman; Burcu Bayirli
      First page: 614
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Samuel A. Finkleman, Burcu Bayirli


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.03.003
       
  • Authors' response
    • Authors: Jason W. Morris; Phillip M. Campbell; Larry P. Tadlock; Jimmy Boley; Peter H. Buschang
      Pages: 614 - 615
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Jason W. Morris, Phillip M. Campbell, Larry P. Tadlock, Jimmy Boley, Peter H. Buschang


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.03.001
       
  • Residents' journal review
    • Authors: Dan Grauer
      Pages: 616 - 619
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Dan Grauer


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2018.03.002
       
  • Influence of antibiotic prophylaxis on the stability of orthodontic
           microimplants: A pilot randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Jan Łyczek; Beata Kawala; Joanna Antoszewska-Smith
      Pages: 621 - 631
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Jan Łyczek, Beata Kawala, Joanna Antoszewska-Smith
      Introduction The aims of this 2-arm parallel pilot randomized controlled trial were to investigate the influence of antibiotic prophylaxis on the stability of orthodontic microimplants and to evaluate the efficacy of systemic inflammatory marker measurements in detecting infections in tissues surrounding microscrews. Methods Orthodontic patients requiring en-masse distalization in the maxilla received antibiotics or a placebo before microimplant placement. Eligibility criteria included 13 years of age, and good general and oral health. Exclusion criteria comprised allergy to antibiotics, severe systemic allergy, heart and kidney diseases, and recent antibiotic treatment. Stability of the microimplants was the primary outcome; inflammation of the tissues surrounding the microscrews, pain related to the microimplantation, and serum levels of inflammatory markers were the secondary outcomes. Randomization in a 1:1 ratio was performed by auxilliary staff via a flip of a coin between 2 participants of the same sex and developmental stage, and the “winner” was allocated to the intervention group. Pharmaceutically prepared identical capsules with either amoxicillin (intervention) or glucose (control) given 1 hour before microimplant placement according to the allocation provided blinding of the participants. Subsequently, 1 clinician unaware of the allocation inserted the microimplants and assessed the outcomes, which simultaneously blinded the operator-assessor. Blood samples for laboratory analysis of inflammatory markers were collected a day before and 1, 3, and 7 days postoperatively. Results Out of 80 participants initially assessed for eligibility, 41 received the randomized allocation. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Eventually, data of 18 and 20 participants (mean age, 20.4 ± 5.9 years) were available for analysis in the intervention and control groups, in which 1 and 2 patients lost a microimplant, respectively, resulting in odds ratio of 0.53 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.0084-11.23; P = 1.0). The odds ratio for inflammation development was 1.22 (95% CI, 0.34-4.38), and the odds ratio for feeling milder pain was 1.174 (95% CI, 0.350-3.941) in the intervention compared with the control group, but the result was not statistically significant (P = 0.758; P = 0.795, respectively). The inflammatory marker levels did not increase due to either microimplantation (procalcitonin, P = 0.445; C-reactive protein, P = 0.4) or peri-implantitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis slightly decreased the levels of the biomarkers in the intervention group; however, the results were not statistically significant (P = 0.68; P = 0.908, respectively). No harms caused by the microimplantation procedure or drug intake were noted. Conclusions Antibiotics provided no benefit in terms of microimplant stability, inflammation of soft tissues, or postoperative pain in our pilot sample. Measurements of serum levels of inflammatory markers were inefficient in detecting soft tissue inflammations. These initial results should be interpreted with caution until validated by a large multicenter definitive trial. Registration This trial was not registered. Protocol The protocol was not published before trial commencement. Funding The trial was funded by Wroclaw Medical University; grant number pbmn91 and supported by Diagnostyka.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.025
       
  • Age-dependent biologic response to orthodontic forces
    • Authors: Mani Alikhani; Michelle Y. Chou; Edmund Khoo; Sarah Alansari; Rachel Kwal; Tali Elfersi; Abdullah Almansour; Chinapa Sangsuwon; Mohammed Al Jearah; Jeanne M. Nervina; Cristina C. Teixeira
      Pages: 632 - 644
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Mani Alikhani, Michelle Y. Chou, Edmund Khoo, Sarah Alansari, Rachel Kwal, Tali Elfersi, Abdullah Almansour, Chinapa Sangsuwon, Mohammed Al Jearah, Jeanne M. Nervina, Cristina C. Teixeira
      Introduction Orthodontic tooth movement results from increased inflammation and osteoclast activation. Since patients of all ages now routinely seek orthodontics treatment, we investigated whether age-dependent biologic responses to orthodontic force correlate with the rate of tooth movement. Methods We studied 18 healthy subjects, adolescents (11-14 years) and adults (21-45 years), with Class II Division 1 malocclusion requiring 4 first premolar extractions. Canines were retracted with a constant force of 50 cN. Gingival crevicular fluid was collected before orthodontic treatment and at days 1, 7, 14, and 28 after the canine retraction. Cytokine (IL-1β, CCL2, TNF-α) and osteoclast markers (RANKL and MMP-9) were measured using antibody-based protein assays. Pain and discomfort were monitored with a numeric rating scale. The canine retraction rate was measured from study models taken at days 28 and 56. Results Although the cytokine and osteoclast markers increased significantly in both age groups at days 1, 7, and 14, the increases were greater in adults than in adolescents. Interestingly, the rate of tooth movement in adults was significantly slower than in adolescents over the 56-day study period. Adults also reported significantly more discomfort and pain. Conclusions Age is a significant variable contributing to the biologic response to orthodontic tooth movement. Adults exhibited a significantly higher level of cytokine and osteoclasts activity but, counterintuitively, had a significantly slower rate of tooth movement.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.09.016
       
  • Gingival recession in orthodontic patients 10 to 15 years posttreatment:
           A retrospective cohort study
    • Authors: Meret Gebistorf; Marco Mijuskovic; Nikolaos Pandis; Piotr S. Fudalej; Christos Katsaros
      Pages: 645 - 655
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Meret Gebistorf, Marco Mijuskovic, Nikolaos Pandis, Piotr S. Fudalej, Christos Katsaros
      Introduction The aims of this study were to retrospectively investigate the long-term development of gingival recession in a cohort of orthodontic patients and to compare the prevalence of gingival recession in orthodontically treated patients 10 to 15 years posttreatment to that of untreated subjects with malocclusion. Methods The sample included 88 patients with mean ages of 12.1 years (SD, 2.4 years) at pretreatment, 15.1 years (SD, 2.4 years) at posttreatment, and 27.9 years (SD, 2.5 years) 10 to 15 years posttreatment. The control group comprised 102 untreated patients seeking orthodontic treatment with a mean age of 28.7 years (SD, 3.1 years). Gingival recession was evaluated on study models. Results The prevalence of both labial/buccal and lingual/palatal gingival recession increased during orthodontic treatment with further increases during the long-term posttreatment period; 98.9% of the orthodontically treated participants had at least 1 labial/buccal recession, and 85.2% of the patients had at least 1 lingual/palatal recession 10 to 15 years posttreatment. In addition, the proportion of patients with multiple labial/buccal or lingual/palatal recession sites increased considerably in the same time period. The prevalences of labial/buccal gingival recession were similar in the orthodontically treated patients 10 to 15 years posttreatment and the untreated controls. Study group patients with a crossbite before treatment showed 2.73 more recessions (95% CI, 0.28-5.17; P = 0.029) than did those without a transverse discrepancy. Untreated subjects with crowding greater than 3 mm per arch had 3.29 more recessions (95% CI, 0.73-5.68; P = 0.012) to 4.92 more recession sites (95% CI, 1.70-8.15; P = 0.003) than did those with mild or no crowding. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it seems that, in regard to the prevalence of gingival recession, orthodontically treated patients are not compromised in the long term compared with those with malocclusion that was untreated for many years.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.020
       
  • Influence of orthodontic mini-implant penetration of the maxillary sinus
           in the infrazygomatic crest region
    • Authors: Xueting Jia; Xing Chen; Xiaofeng Huang
      Pages: 656 - 661
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Xueting Jia, Xing Chen, Xiaofeng Huang
      Introduction Mini-implants are widely used for predictable tooth movements, but insertion is often restricted by anatomic structures. The aims of this study were to investigate the incidence of penetration of mini-implants into the sinus and the relationship between penetration depth and sinus tissue. Methods Data from 32 patients who received mini-implants in the infrazygomatic crest were collected from a data base. The success rate of mini-implants was determined by clinical retrospective analysis. The incidence of penetration, penetration depth, and sinus configuration were investigated and compared between cone-beam computed tomography scans obtained immediately after insertion and before mini-implant removal. Results The overall success rate of mini-implants in the infrazygomatic crest was 96.7%, and 78.3% penetrated into the sinus. In the group in which penetration exceeded 1 mm, the incidence of membrane thickening was 88.2%, and the mean value of thickening was 1.0 mm; however, the variable values of penetration in the 1-mm group were only 37.5% and 0.2 mm, respectively (P <0.05). Conclusions The incidence of penetration of infrazygomatic crest mini-implants into the sinus may be high. Penetration through double cortical bone plates with limitation of the penetration depth within 1 mm is recommended for infrazygomatic crest mini-implant anchorage.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.021
       
  • Evaluation of facial asymmetry in patients with juvenile idiopathic
           arthritis: Correlation between hard tissue and soft tissue landmarks
    • Authors: Stalo Economou; Peter Stoustrup; Kasper Dahl Kristensen; Michel Dalstra; Annelise Küseler; Troels Herlin; Thomas Klit Pedersen
      Pages: 662 - 672.e1
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Stalo Economou, Peter Stoustrup, Kasper Dahl Kristensen, Michel Dalstra, Annelise Küseler, Troels Herlin, Thomas Klit Pedersen
      Introduction The aims of this study were to assess the correlation between facial hard and soft tissue asymmetry in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, to identify valid soft tissue points for clinical examination, and to assess the smallest clinically detectable level of dentofacial asymmetry. Methods Full-face cone-beam computed tomography scans and 3-dimensional photographs were used to assess facial hard and soft tissue asymmetry in 21 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A survey was conducted to assess how asymmetry is perceived observationally based on cone-beam computed tomography scans and 3-dimensional photographs. Results Significant linear correlations were seen between the hard and soft tissue landmark deviations at both the transverse and vertical positions. Among medial soft tissue points, glabella had the smallest deviation and pogonion the largest deviation from the midsagittal plane. Professionals could identify facial asymmetry based on images beyond a cutoff threshold of 2 mm for both pogonion and gonion. Conclusions Soft tissue pogonion and gonion were identified as the most appropriate landmarks to clinically predict hard tissue facial asymmetry. Facial asymmetries are most pronounced in the lower facial third in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Professionals can accurately identify asymmetry exceeding 2 mm.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.022
       
  • Longitudinal eruptive and posteruptive tooth movements, studied on oblique
           and lateral cephalograms with implants
    • Authors: Xiaoyun Zhang; Sheldon Baumrind; Gui Chen; Huizhong Chen; Yi Liang; Tianmin Xu
      Pages: 673 - 684
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Xiaoyun Zhang, Sheldon Baumrind, Gui Chen, Huizhong Chen, Yi Liang, Tianmin Xu
      Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate the eruptive and posteruptive tooth displacements of untreated growing subjects longitudinally and the potential connections between posteruptive displacement of the maxillary and mandibular first molars and skeletal facial growth. Methods The sample comprised 11 series of right 45° oblique cephalograms and lateral cephalograms of untreated children with metallic implants of the Björk type obtained from the archives of a growth study. Cephalograms generated at approximately 2-year intervals between the ages of 8.5 and 16 years were selected and traced. Superimpositions of serial tracings of oblique cephalograms on stable intraosseous implants were made to determine the displacements of buccal segment teeth in both arches, and superimpositions of serial tracings of lateral cephalograms were used to evaluate growth of the jaws. Results Continuous mesial tipping of the maxillary molars was observed from 8.5 to 16 years of age, averaging 8.2° ± 5.5° for the first molars and 18.3°± 8.5° for the second molars. Compared with the maxillary molars, the mandibular first molars showed less change in angulation except in the later mixed dentition when more than half of the subjects had accelerated forward tipping of the first molar in the late mixed dentition associated with migration into the leeway space. Average amounts of cumulative eruption from 8.5 to 16 years of age were 12.1 ± 2.1 mm downward and 3.8 ± 1.7 mm forward for the maxillary first molar. The mandibular first molar showed 8.6 ± 2.3 mm of eruption and 4.4 ± 1.9 mm of mesial migration. Peak velocity of vertical eruption of the maxillary and mandibular first molars corresponded to the skeletal vertical growth spurt. The maxillary canines and first premolars showed remarkable and continuous uprighting migration during eruption, averaging 9.5° ± 5.0° and 10.5° ± 6.7°, respectively. However, when they erupted into the occlusion, their changes in angulation reverted to forward tipping. The same tendency was also found in the mandibular canines and first premolars. Conclusions Remarkable eruption and migration occur to the teeth of both arches during childhood and adolescence. Rates of first molar eruption during adolescence follow the general pattern of somatic growth. We infer that maintaining the original distal crown angulation of the maxillary molars may be an effective protocol for preservation of anchorage.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.023
       
  • Three-dimensional computed tomography analysis of mandibular morphology in
           patients with facial asymmetry and mandibular retrognathism
    • Authors: Kug-Ho You; Kyung-Ho Kim; Kee-Joon Lee; Hyoung-Seon Baik
      Pages: 685 - 691
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Kug-Ho You, Kyung-Ho Kim, Kee-Joon Lee, Hyoung-Seon Baik
      Introduction The purpose of this study was to analyze the morphologic features of skeletal units in the mandibles of patients with facial asymmetry and mandibular retrognathism using cone-beam computed tomography. Methods The subjects consisted of 50 adults with facial asymmetry and mandibular retrognathism, divided into the symmetry group (n = 25) and the asymmetry group (n = 25) according to the degree of menton deviation. Three-dimensional computed tomography scans were obtained with cone beam computed tomography. Landmarks were designated on the reconstructed 3-dimensional images. Linear and volumetric measurements were made on the mandibles. Results In the asymmetry group, the lengths of condylar, body, and coronoid units were shorter, and condylar width was narrower on the deviated side than on the nondeviated side (P <0.01). The lengths of angular and chin units were not significantly different between the deviated and nondeviated sides (P >0.05). Hemimandibular, ramal, and body volumes were less on the deviated side than on the nondeviated side (P <0.01). Conclusions Condylar, body, and coronoid units contribute to mandibular asymmetry in patients with facial asymmetry and mandibular retrognathism.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.024
       
  • Three-dimensional evaluation of dentofacial transverse widths of adults
           with various vertical facial patterns
    • Authors: Soonshin Hwang; Seokjin Jeong; Yoon Jeong Choi; Chooryung J. Chung; Hye Sun Lee; Kyung-Ho Kim
      Pages: 692 - 700
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Soonshin Hwang, Seokjin Jeong, Yoon Jeong Choi, Chooryung J. Chung, Hye Sun Lee, Kyung-Ho Kim
      Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate maxillomandibular transverse widths and molar inclinations of adults with hypodivergent, normodivergent, and hyperdivergent facial patterns using cone-beam computed tomography. Methods We evaluated Class I subjects (55 men, 66 women) who were divided into hypodivergent (<27°), normodivergent (28°-37°), and hyperdivergent (>38°) groups by their mandibular plane angles. Frontal and coronal views of the images were analyzed. Sex differences, vertical facial pattern differences, and related factors were assessed with independent 2-sample t tests, 1-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc Tukey tests, and Pearson correlation analysis. Results The hypodivergent group had greater maxillary alveolar widths 7 mm apically from the alveolar crest. The intermolar widths and molar inclinations showed no significant differences among the groups. As the mandibular plane angles increased, interjugular widths, transverse mandibular widths, and buccolingual maxillary alveolar widths at the midroot level decreased, whereas the maxillomandibular width differences and palatal heights increased im both sexes. Conclusions An increase in the mandibular plane angle is associated with tendencies of narrow mandibular arches, thinner maxillary alveolar bones at the midroot level, and higher palatal arches in both sexes. Intermolar widths and molar inclinations were not significantly affected by vertical facial patterns.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.026
       
  • Prediction of the occurrence and severity of mandibular incisor crowding
           in the early mixed dentition using craniofacial parameters
    • Authors: Ahmadreza Sardarian; Faezeh Ghaderi
      Pages: 701 - 707
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Ahmadreza Sardarian, Faezeh Ghaderi
      Introduction With the recent interest in esthetics at an early age, prediction of mandibular incisor crowding is of significant importance. Since dental arch development is related to craniofacial growth, we conducted a cohort study to find a regression model for mandibular incisor crowding based on various craniofacial parameters in children. Methods A total of 250 children, all in the early mixed dentition, were selected randomly by cluster sampling from primary schools. Craniofacial parameters were measured by a caliper bow, and intercanine widths were measured on dental casts. After a 12-month follow-up period, mandibular incisor crowding and intercanine width were assessed on each subject's dental cast. Discriminant and multiple regression analyses were performed separately for boys and girls. Results Of 250 children, 148 returned for the 1-year follow-up and met the inclusion criteria. Regression analyses of patients with normal occlusion showed a statistically significant correlation between anterior dental crowding and facial height and bigonial width in both sexes. A significant inverse correlation was found between initial intercanine width and incisor crowding in girls. Furthermore, using the aforementioned parameters, the occurrence of mandibular incisor crowding could be predicted with an accuracy of 92.6%. Conclusions We found that the occurrence and severity of mandibular incisor crowding in the early mixed dentition can be predicted accurately based on certain craniofacial parameters.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.025
       
  • Factors affecting treatment duration of labial inversely impacted
           maxillary central incisors
    • Authors: Chandradev Bhikoo; Jing Xu; Hao Sun; Chenrui Jin; Huixi Jiang; Rongdang Hu
      Pages: 708 - 715
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Chandradev Bhikoo, Jing Xu, Hao Sun, Chenrui Jin, Huixi Jiang, Rongdang Hu
      Introduction A labial inversely impacted maxillary central incisor is a relatively rare occurrence. The crown of the tooth is directed upward, and its palatal aspect is facing labially. This typical orientation can be the result of trauma to the deciduous incisor transmitted to the palatal side of the crown of the permanent incisor. Labial inversely impacted maxillary central incisors are most commonly combined with labial-lingual root dilacerations. The aim of this study was to examine factors that affect the surgical-orthodontic treatment duration of labial inversely impacted maxillary central incisors. Method The records of 35 consecutively treated patients were retrospectively evaluated. Cone-beam computed tomography images were taken before treatment, and factors affecting treatment time, including age, length, crown-root angle, crown height and depth, angle of inversion, rotation to axial plane, and distance and angle to midline, were measured using Dolphin Imaging software (version 11.8; Patterson Supply, St Paul, Minn). Treatment duration was evaluated for each patient, and logistic regression analyses were applied. Results The 15 boys and 20 girls had a mean age 8.36 ± 1.36 years. The mean orthodontic traction duration was 11.28 ± 3.08 months. Multiple regression analyses indicated that factors resulting in a longer duration were age (β = 0.779; P = 0.043), crown height (β = 0.344; P = 0.007), crown-root angle (β = −0.037; P = 0.018), and tooth length (β = −0.623; P = 0.038). Conclusions Surgical-orthodontic correction of labial inversely impacted maxillary incisors requires an average of 1 year. Assessments of age, crown height, root dilaceration, and length of incisor can help the orthodontist to better predict treatment duration during consultations with patients and parents.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.09.017
       
  • Asymmetric extractions in a patient with a hopeless maxillary central
           incisor, followed by treatment with mini-implant anchorage
    • Authors: Min-Ho Jung
      Pages: 716 - 729
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Min-Ho Jung
      Premolar extraction is 1 option for treatment of patients with malocclusion and severe crowding or protrusion. When the patient has missing or hopeless teeth other than premolars, it is possible to consider removal of those teeth to use the space to decrease crowding. A 15-year-old girl sought treatment for severe crowding. She had already lost her maxillary right first premolar as a result of caries 1 year previously and had a hopeless maxillary right central incisor. Her mandibular left first molar still caused discomfort even after endodontic treatment. Extractions of the maxillary right central incisor and mandibular right first premolar and left first molar were chosen to resolve the occlusion problems. Orthodontic mini-implants were placed to translocate the maxillary left central incisor across the midpalatal suture to use the space in the maxillary right quadrant to relieve the crowding. Although a different extraction option was used in each quadrant, the final occlusion was acceptable. After debonding, porcelain crowns were placed on the anterior teeth to improve esthetics. The treatment result remained stable after 2 years of retention.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2016.12.033
       
  • Orthodontic treatment of a patient with maxillary lateral incisors with
           dens invaginatus: 6-year follow-up
    • Authors: Guilherme Thiesen; Donald R. Oliver; Eustáquio A. Araújo
      Pages: 730 - 740
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Guilherme Thiesen, Donald R. Oliver, Eustáquio A. Araújo
      Introduction Dens invaginatus is an anomaly of dental development in which calcified tissues, such as enamel and dentin, are invaginated into the pulp cavity. This morphologic alteration is more frequent in maxillary permanent lateral incisors and makes them more susceptible to carious lesions and pulp alterations. Methods This case report describes a patient with maxillary lateral incisors affected by dens invaginatus. The maxillary right lateral incisor had already undergone endodontic treatment, and the maxillary left one had a periapical lesion. Additionally, the patient had a Class II Division 1 malocclusion, with anterior open bite, posterior crossbite, and an impacted mandibular left second molar. Results The orthodontic treatment involved extraction of the maxillary lateral incisors and 2 mandibular premolars, resulting in proper overjet and overbite with good arch coordination and occlusal stability. Conclusions Treatment results were stable, as evaluated in a 6-year posttreatment follow-up.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.01.030
       
  • Using a single cone-beam computed tomography scan to obtain full occlusal
           
    • Authors: Amr Ragab El-Beialy; Ayman El Nigoumi; Amgad Kaddah; Hisham Afify
      Pages: 741 - 746
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Amr Ragab El-Beialy, Ayman El Nigoumi, Amgad Kaddah, Hisham Afify
      Introduction One obstacle with the implementation of digital technology in orthodontics is the acquisition of occlusal details while maintaining the mandible in the full interdigitation position. With 1 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of the patient and 1 digital scan of the patient's dental models in occlusion, it might be possible to obtain full occlusal details and generate 2 volumes, with the mandible in centric relation and maximum intercuspation positions. The purpose of this article was to describe the technique. Methods Orthodontic models of enrolled subjects were digitized in maximum intercuspation. They wore splints that were initially 2 mm thick before CBCT imaging. On the CBCT volume, the mandible is separated from the rest of the skull, and the digitized dental model in maximum intercuspation is registered on the skull volume. The separated mandibular volume is then registered on the mandibular dentition using the tooth surfaces as a guide. Results Two CBCT volumes are rendered: original scan with teeth in minimal disclusion and the constructed one with teeth in maximum interdigitation. Conclusions Mobilizing digital technology in orthodontics allows the acquisition of crucial occlusal details while sparing patients an extra radiation dose from the CBCT.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.09.014
       
  • Three-dimensional mandibular regional superimposition in growing patients
    • Authors: Tung Nguyen; Lucia Cevidanes; Lorenzo Franchi; Antonio Ruellas; Tate Jackson
      Pages: 747 - 754
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Tung Nguyen, Lucia Cevidanes, Lorenzo Franchi, Antonio Ruellas, Tate Jackson
      Introduction The aims of this study were to identify stable mandibular structures in 3 dimensions in growing patients using a regional implant technique and to test the reproducibility of mandibular regional superimposition in 3 dimensions using the regions identified. Methods Three-dimensional voxel-based regional mandibular registrations were performed on bone plates, and screws were placed in the anterior chin and symphysis regions of 20 growing patients (mean age, 12.1 ± 1.3 years). Three-dimensional models of the resulting superimpositions were built for the chin, symphysis, and third molar crypts. Absolute mean errors were calculated for each region to evaluate stability. Longitudinal cone-beam computed tomography scans were obtained of 25 patients (mean age, 12.7 ± 1.4 years) with different skeletal malocclusions (20 Class II, 5 Class III). To evaluate reliability of mandibular registrations using the chin and symphysis regions, voxel-based superimpositions were performed independently by 2 observers. The resulting superimpositions between the 2 examiners were overlaid, and the mean difference along the entire surface of the mandible was calculated. Results The chin and symphysis regions showed high levels of precision (chin absolute mean error, 0.37 ± 0.16 mm; symphysis absolute mean error, 0.4 ± 0.15 mm). The third molar region had a high registration error (absolute mean error, 1.94 ± 0.06 mm). The voxel-based registrations using the chin and symphysis were reliable and reproducible between examiners (absolute mean error, 0.12 ± 1.1 mm). Intraclass correlation coefficient results showed a high degree of agreement between examiners. Conclusions The chin and symphysis regions are stable areas for 3-dimensional mandibular regional superimpositions.

      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.07.026
       
  • Information for readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
       
  • Orthodontic-periodontic treatment for periodontitis
    • Authors: Cao
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6
      Author(s): Li Cao


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
       
  • Erratum
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
       
  • Erratum
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
       
  • Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
       
  • Information for readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
       
  • On being human
    • Authors: Peter Greco
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 5
      Author(s): Peter M. Greco


      PubDate: 2018-05-29T10:14:49Z
       
 
 
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