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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3182 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3182 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 102, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 439, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 314, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 66, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 422, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 477, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 66, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 209, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 225, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.289
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0889-5406
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3182 journals]
  • Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s):
       
  • The clinician's handbook for dental sleep medicine
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Greg Huang
       
  • October 2019:156(4)
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Allen H. Moffitt
       
  • When something bad causes something good
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Laurance Jerrold
       
  • Accuracy and reliability of the expected root position setup on clinical
           decision making of root position at midtreatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Robert J. Lee, Jaemin Ko, Justyn Park, Sarah Pi, Denise Devgon, Gerald Nelson, David Hatcher, Snehlata OberoiIntroductionAccurate root position is imperative for successful orthodontic treatment that is stable and functional. Current methods to monitor root position are either inaccurate or use relatively high levels of radiation. A method to generate an expected root position (ERP) setup has been reported to have the potential to accurately evaluate root position with minimal radiation. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of the clinical decisions made on root position using the ERP setup.MethodsThis retrospective study included 10 subjects who had pretreatment and midtreatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and study models. An ERP setup was generated for all patients at midtreatment. Four examiners assessed both the CBCT scan and ERP setup and made clinical decisions regarding the root position with each method. Cohen's kappa was determined to assess intraoperator and intermethod reliability. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated to determine the accuracy of the ERP setup.ResultsThe kappa values for intraoperator reliability for both the CBCT scan and ERP setup fell within the 0.61-0.80 range. The kappa values for intermethod reliability between the CBCT scan and ERP setup fell within the 0.61-0.80 range for all tooth groups. The sensitivity of the ERP setup ranged from 0.72 to 0.90, specificity ranged from 0.89 to 0.97, positive predictive value ranged from 0.57 to 0.85, and negative predictive value ranged from 0.93 to 0.99.ConclusionsThis study demonstrated that the ERP setup, when compared with the gold standard CBCT scan, was accurate and reliable in making clinical decisions regarding root position at midtreatment.
       
  • Anterior open bite due to idiopathic condylar resorption during
           orthodontic retention of a Class II Division 1 malocclusion
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Jae Hyun Park, Jung Joo Park, Michael Papademetriou, Sunjay SuriA common dilemma when treating anterior open bite is understanding its etiology. Idiopathic condylar resorption (ICR) can cause open bite in affected individuals. Although it is prudent to not treat patients with ICR until active resorption has ceased, orthodontists may begin treating them because anterior open bite from ICR may not appear before or during their orthodontic treatment. This article reports a 12-year-old female who was diagnosed with ICR 10 months after completion of her orthodontic treatment for a Class II Division 1 malocclusion. When a young patient with a high mandibular angle and previous skeletal or dental Class II malocclusion returns with an open bite during the retention phase, the patient's condyles must be carefully examined to determine whether any temporomandibular joint disorder, such as ICR, is present. Currently, the controversy over the cause and the cure for ICR is continuing to challenge orthodontists in diagnoses and treatments. Orthodontists should closely monitor and offer informed treatment options to patients with risk factors for ICR or signs of its pathology that might develop at any stage of orthodontic treatment, including the retention period.
       
  • Treatment of a Class II Division 1 malocclusion with the combination of a
           myofunctional trainer and fixed appliances
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Xiaowei Li, Hongmei Wang, Song Li, Yuxing BaiThis case report describes the combined use of a myofunctional Trainer for Braces and fixed appliances to treat a 10-year-old girl with a Class II Division 1 malocclusion that featured severe maxillary incisor protrusion, a large overjet, and a V-shaped maxillary arch. She had a convex profile with an underdeveloped mandible. The superiority of myofunctional training in the case was to eliminate mouth breathing and lip sucking habits, train the oral musculature, stimulate mandibular growth, and make braces work more efficiently. The posttreatment facial photographs show improvement in the facial profile. Proper occlusion and facial balance were created, which were quite stable as demonstrated by the patient's 4-year follow-up records.
       
  • Progressive idiopathic condylar resorption: Three case reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Sylvain ChamberlandProgressive condylar resorption, also known as idiopathic condylar resorption, is an uncommon, aggressive, degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) seen mostly in adolescent girls and young women. This condition leads to loss of condylar bone mass, decrease of mandibular ramal height, steep mandibular and occlusal plane angles, and an anterior open bite. In 3 case reports, we review the pathogenesis of TMJ degenerative disease and the clinical management of TMJ arthrosis. We emphasize that TMJ arthritic disease should be discussed in dental circles as a pathologic entity in the same way that orthodontists discuss arthritic disease in orthopedic circles. Regarding the degenerative pathology of the TMJ, treatment goals include restored function and pain reduction. The treatment methods used to achieve these goals can range from noninvasive therapy to minimally invasive and invasive surgery. Most patients can be treated noninvasively, and the importance of disease prevention and conservative management in the overall treatment of TMJ disease must be acknowledged. The decision to manage TMJ osteoarthrosis surgically must be based on evaluation of the patient's response to noninvasive treatments, mandibular form and function, and effect of the condition on his or her quality of life.
       
  • Characteristics of an excellent orthodontic residency program
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Veerasathpurush Allareddy, Kyungsup Shin, Steven D. Marshall, Thomas E. SouthardIntroductionAlthough unquantifiable features, such as faculty passion and dedication to teaching, play a vital role in defining the quality of residency education, determinable features that are fundamental to the definition of a “top tier” orthodontic residency program also exist. The objective of this study was to identify those features.MethodsA survey with 32 items was developed and validated to assess the features of an excellent orthodontic program based on the following 3 major domains: faculty, education, and resident/graduate student/alumni. The survey was sent to 62 orthodontic residency programs in the United States.ResultsThirty-nine programs (63%) completed the survey. Recurring attributes that were identified in what constitutes an excellent program included the following: an adequate number of full-time clinical orthodontic faculty, with each member providing 1 day per week clinic coverage. The average of all respondents was 4, and the range was 1-6; a healthy mix of part-time faculty members with ≥1 full-time faculty member who monitors every clinical session; 80% full-time faculty members who are American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) certified; a craniofacial faculty member; 4 residents/graduate students per each faculty member who covers a clinical session; resident/graduate student exposure to a wide range of treatment modalities and appliances; approximately 70 new case starts per resident/graduate student (50%-60% of patients who are started are debonded by the starting resident/graduate student); patients with craniofacial anomalies and orthognathic surgery patients should be started by each resident/graduate student; 1.5 operatory chairs per resident or graduate student; 1 dental assistant per 4 residents/graduate students; 1 laboratory person; 1 receptionist/secretary per 4 residents; 100% of residents/graduate students successfully completing ABO written examination upon graduation; 60% of residents/graduate students obtaining ABO certification within 5 years of graduation; 50% of residents/graduate students presenting at national meetings would be ideal; and 50% of living alumni contributing financially to the department during the past 5 years.ConclusionsBased on the responses from the majority of the US orthodontic residency programs, this study has identified certain features that educators feel are ideal for an excellent orthodontic program.
       
  • Canine substitution of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors in
           Class I and Class III malocclusions by using skeletal anchorage
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Elie William Amm, Joanna Antoszewska-Smith, Jim BoleyIntroductionThis prospective cohort study aimed to evaluate canine substitution supported by skeletal anchorage as a viable treatment protocol for patients with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) and skeletal Class I or Class III.MethodsPatients (n = 30) who met the following criteria were recruited: (1) bilateral MLIA or unilateral MLIA with a riziform contralateral incisor with a planned extraction; (2) skeletal Class I or Class III; and (3) dentoalveolar discrepancy in the mandible 
       
  • Ethnic differences in craniofacial and upper spine morphology between
           European and Asian children with skeletal Class III malocclusion
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Eunhye Oh, Sug-Joon Ahn, Liselotte SonnesenIntroductionThe aims of this study were to analyze differences in craniofacial and upper cervical spine morphology, including posterior cranial fossa and growth prediction signs between European and Asian skeletal Class III children, and to analyze associations between morphologic deviations in the upper cervical spine and craniofacial characteristics.MethodsA total of 60 skeletal Class III children, 19 Danes and 41 Koreans, were included. Upper spine morphology, Atlas dimensions, and craniofacial morphology, including posterior cranial fossa and growth prediction signs, were assessed on lateral cephalograms. Differences and associations were analyzed by multiple linear and logistic regression analyses adjusted for age and gender.ResultsIn the craniofacial morphology, the inclination of the maxilla (NSL/NL, P 
       
  • Analysis of dental compensation in patients with facial asymmetry using
           cone-beam computed tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Ho-Jin Kim, Mihee Hong, Hyo-Sang ParkIntroductionThe purpose of this research was to evaluate dental compensation in facial asymmetry and its correlation with skeletal variables using cone-beam computed tomography.MethodsSixty adult patients were retrospectively divided into asymmetry (mean age, 21.8 ± 5.4 years) and symmetry groups (mean age, 28.1 ± 4.1 years); both groups comprised 30 patients. Independent and paired t tests were used for comparisons between the asymmetry and symmetry groups and between deviated (Dv) and nondeviated (NDv) sides of the asymmetry group, respectively. Pearson correlation between dental and skeletal variables was performed.ResultsThe mean value of menton deviation was 9.4 mm in the asymmetry group. Compared with the symmetry group, the direction and amount of dental compensation of the asymmetry group were as follows: 2.5-mm extrusion of the maxillary first molar (UM6) at NDv (P 
       
  • Does the vertical position of maxillary central incisors in men influence
           smile esthetics perception'
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Diana Simões, Gabriela Meyge de Brito, Maria Cristina Teixeira Cangussu, Andre Wilson MachadoIntroductionThe aim of this study was to investigate whether there is any influence on the perception of smile esthetics among orthodontists and laypersons, with regard to different vertical positions of the maxillary central incisors.MethodsFrontal smile photographs digitally altered at full-face view and close-up view of 2 adult men aged between 20 and 30 years were used. Six vertical positions of the central incisors were created, with changes of 0.5 mm. The images were randomly assembled in an album that was presented to 53 orthodontists and 53 laypersons, who evaluated the attractiveness of the images by using visual analog scales. Comparison among the images was performed using 1-way analysis of variance, with Tukey post-hoc test. To compare the distribution of the mean scores between the full-face and close-up smile views, and between orthodontists and laypersons, the Student t test was used. The level of significance was established at 5%.ResultsThe best evaluations presented the following: (a) the gingival margins of the central incisors corresponded to, or were up to, 1 mm below the line of the canine gingival margins, and (b) the incisal step between the central and lateral incisors was from 1.0 to 2.0 mm. The smiles considered least attractive showed (a) the central incisor gingival margins were 1.0 mm above or 1.5 mm below the canine gingival margins, and (b) no step, or a step of 2.5 mm, between the central and lateral incisors.ConclusionsThe results of this study suggested that, in men, slightly extruded central incisors were esthetically more attractive than intruded incisors.
       
  • Knowledge and beliefs regarding temporomandibular disorders among
           orthodontists
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Felipe Porto, Ricky Harrell, Roland Fulcher, Theresa GonzalesIntroductionThis project was undertaken to accomplish 2 objectives: (1) to identify whether there is a discrepancy between orthodontists and experts in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) related to diagnosis and treatment of TMD patients, and (2) to influence the manner in which TMD curricula are taught in orthodontic residency programs, better preparing future orthodontic specialists to diagnose and treat (and refer) patients with TMD.MethodsA survey invitation was e-mailed to 8870 members of the American Association of Orthodontists. Items were answered on a 6-point scale (0 = I don't know; 1 = strongly disagree; 2 = disagree; 3 = neutral; 4 = agree; 5 = strongly agree). A group consensus was attributed when more than 50% of the orthodontists supported a response. Previously published responses of TMD experts were used as a reference to evaluate the orthodontists' responses. Comparisons between the responses from the 2 groups were assessed using a z-test.ResultsAmong the participants who responded to the questionnaire, 148 were residents, 1132 were private practitioners, and 61 were full-time faculty. Sixty-two percent of the participants did not think they received enough training in TMD during their orthodontic residency. Although 62% of participants indicated that they feel comfortable diagnosing TMD patients, 50.2% do not feel comfortable treating TMD patients. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups' responses under one-third of the questions.ConclusionsIt is clear that orthodontic residencies in the U.S. need to improve methods of teaching TMD concepts. Although most orthodontists feel comfortable diagnosing TMD patients, less than half feel comfortable treating those patients, and the difference in responses with the TMD expert group was significant in 71% of the questions.
       
  • The effect of dental and background facial attractiveness on facial
           attractiveness and perceived integrity and social and intellectual
           qualities
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Melissa A. Papio, Henry W. Fields, F. Michael Beck, Allen R. Firestone, Stephen F. RosenstielIntroductionThe purposes of this study were to assess the role of dental attractiveness in background facial attractiveness and to evaluate how facial and dental attractiveness influenced raters' opinions of the integrity, social attractiveness, and intellectual attractiveness of the models.MethodsPhotographs of male and female individuals rated by peers as unattractive, average, and attractive were combined with oral images of 4 different levels of dental attractiveness (Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need [IOTN] 1, 5, 7, and 10). Sixty-seven participants meeting the inclusion criteria were recruited as raters. Raters viewed closed-lip smile and open-lip, posed smile of 24 models and rated them for facial attractiveness and integrity and multiple social/intellectual attractiveness dimensions using a Visual Analog Scale.ResultsIntrarater reliability was fair to excellent. Analysis of variance showed significant 3-way interactions (P 
       
  • Orthodontic treatment with removal of one mandibular incisor: Outcome data
           and the importance of extraction site preparation
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Gísli Vilhjálmsson, John P. Zermeno, William R. ProffitIntroductionExtraction of one mandibular incisor in adolescents and adults can simplify orthodontic treatment in 2 major circumstances: (1) severe crowding of the mandibular but not the maxillary incisors, and (2) mild anterior crossbite with good alignment in both arches. Despite its potential advantages, this method has had limited use in most practices. There have been 3 major objections: (1) the possibility of unsightly black triangles because of loss of interdental papilla height, (2) a possible tooth size discrepancy that would affect occlusal relationships, and (3) patient concerns about a visible extraction site. All 3 objections now can be overcome.MethodsFor 37 consecutively treated single-incisor-extraction patients, preparation of the extraction site for the tooth to be extracted was done by tipping it lingually while simultaneously closing the space in front of it. Treatment outcomes and the effect of age at the time of treatment were evaluated.ResultsIn patients below age 20, this approach eliminated post-treatment black triangles and almost eliminated partial loss of the interdental papilla. It reduced the previously reported prevalence of these problems in patients aged 20-40 years and did not seem to be helpful in those aged over 40 years. This positive effect was achieved because of maintenance of alveolar crest height that supports the interdental papillae. Tooth size discrepancy caused by incisor extraction was largely compensated by the different labio-lingual orientation of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. The extraction space quickly disappeared during extraction site preparation.ConclusionsThe new procedure of extraction site preparation described in this paper offers more favorable outcomes for post-treatment prevalence of black triangles in younger patients but shows limited efficacy in older patients. Camouflage of a mild skeletal Class III problem is the major indication for this extraction pattern. About 3% of Icelandic orthodontic patients appear to be good candidates for this treatment, and this finding should be reasonably generalizable to other populations of European descent.
       
  • Promises, promises
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Peter M. Greco
       
  • Authors' response
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Mubassar Fida, Adeel Tahir Kamal
       
  • Cervical spine posture and Twin-block treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Michael J. Trenouth
       
  • Authors' response
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Qian Jiang, Li Mei, Huang Li
       
  • What seems to be the latest will never replace the need to apply sound
           biomechanics
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Ulrich Kritzler
       
  • Case reports display the finest type of orthodontics
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s): Lawrence R. Voss
       
  • Information for readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 4Author(s):
       
  • Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s):
       
  • September 2019:156(3)
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Allen H. Moffitt
       
  • The ortho-perio patient: Clinical evidence and therapeutic guidelines
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Greg Huang
       
  • Putting something to rest
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Laurance Jerrold
       
  • Accuracy of Dental Monitoring 3D digital dental models using photograph
           and video mode
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Ryan S. Morris, Lauren N. Hoye, Mohammed H. Elnagar, Phimon Atsawasuwan, Maria Therese Galang-Boquiren, Jennifer Caplin, Grace Costa Viana, Ales Obrez, Budi KusnotoIntroductionThis study aimed to test the accuracy of the 3-dimensional (3D) digital dental models generated by the Dental Monitoring (DM) smartphone application in both photograph and video modes over successive DM examinations in comparison with 3D digital dental models generated by the iTero Element intraoral scanner.MethodsTen typodonts with setups of class I malocclusion and comparable severity of anterior crowding were used in the study. iTero Element scans along with DM examination in photograph and video modes were performed before tooth movement and after each set of 10 Invisalign aligners for each typodont. Stereolithography (STL) files generated from the DM examinations in photograph and video modes were superimposed with the STL files from the iTero scans using GOM Inspect software to determine the accuracy of both photograph and video modes of DM technology.ResultsNo clinically significant differences, according to the American Board of Orthodontics–determined standards, were found. Mean global deviations for the maxillary arch ranged from 0.00149 to 0.02756 mm in photograph mode and from 0.0148 to 0.0256 mm in video mode. Mean global deviations for the mandibular arch ranged from 0.0164 to 0.0275 mm in photograph mode and from 0.0150 to 0.0264 mm in video mode. Statistically significant differences were found between the 3D models generated by the iTero and the DM application in photograph and video modes over successive DM examinations.Conclusions3D digital dental models generated by the DM smartphone application in photograph and video modes are accurate enough to be used for clinical applications.
       
  • Presurgical nasoalveolar molding with 3D printing for a patient with
           unilateral cleft lip, alveolus, and palate
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Jie Zheng, Hong He, Wenying Kuang, Wenjun YuanAn 8-day-old male infant with unilateral cleft lip, alveolus, and palate had a wide alveolar defect, soft tissue deformity, and a markedly sunken nasal wing at the cleft side. The patient was treated with a series of 3D-printed molding plates and synchronously with a nasal hook. The cleft edges moved closer by 9 mm at the alveolar ridge and the nasal wing was lifted considerably. Split-type 3D printing of presurgical nasoalveolar molding helped to reduce the cleft gap, improve the arch form, approximate lip segments, and distinctly improve the morphology of the nose by correcting the flattened nasal wings.
       
  • Multidisciplinary treatment with a customized lingual appliance for an
           adult patient with severe Class III malocclusion and multiple missing
           teeth
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Mariano Gallone, Massimo Robiony, Daniele Bordonali, Giovanni Bruno, Alberto De Stefani, Antonio GraccoA 24-year-old man presented with a severe skeletal class III malocclusion, associated with an anterior and posterior crossbite in the left side, upper and lower lip eversion, skeletal asymmetry, midline discrepancy, diastemas in the maxillary and mandibular dental arches, and agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors and canines with retained deciduous teeth. Treatment was performed with the use of the Win Lingual System. When the 0.016 × 0.022-inch NiTi archiwire was applied, the deciduous teeth were extracted and replaced with temporary crowns connected to the appliance. After the aligning, leveling, and diastema closure phases, a modified Le Fort II osteotomy, a mandibular setback with a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and a genioplasty were performed. Implants were placed in the canine site through a flapless guided surgery, and cantilevered temporary bridges were delivered. Final prosthetic rehabilitation included veneers for the central incisors and zirconia-ceramic cantilevered bridges for the canine and lateral incisors. After 36 months of active treatment, the patient showed an Angle Class I molar and canine relationship and an ideal overbite and overjet. His profile had improved, lips were competent, and gingival levels were acceptable. The lateral radiograph and cephalometric analysis showed a good balance of the skeletal pattern, a good profile of the soft tissue, and proper inclinations of the maxillary and mandibular incisors in relation to maxilla and mandible. After 2 years of follow-up, the patient had a pleasant smile and no relapse, or joint or muscular pain.
       
  • Influence of maxillary canine impaction characteristics and factors
           associated with orthodontic treatment on the duration of active
           orthodontic traction
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Luis Ernesto Arriola-Guillén, Aron Aliaga–Del Castillo, Gustavo Armando Ruíz-Mora, Yalil Augusto Rodríguez-Cárdenas, Heraldo Luis Dias–Da SilveiraIntroductionOrthodontic traction of a maxillary impacted canine (MIC) increases the orthodontic treatment time. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of MIC characteristics and factors associated with orthodontic treatment on the duration of active orthodontic traction.MethodsThis follow-up and retrospective study included 45 MICs orthodontically tractioned into the occlusal plane with the use of a standardized protocol. MIC characteristics, including type, sector, side, location, height, and complexity of impaction, as well as α and β angles and canine root length and area were measured. Likewise, factors associated with orthodontic treatment, including sex, age, malocclusion, premolar extractions, previous incisor root resorption, ANB, APDI, and SNA angles, and PNS-ANS distance were also evaluated. The statistical analysis included multiple linear regressions to estimate the influence of all variables on the duration of traction (α = 0.05).ResultsSex had significant influence (P = 0.027) on the time of traction; in female patients, the time was 2.05 months more than in male patients. Bilateral impaction treatment increased the time by 2.74 months compared with unilateral cases (P = 0.001). Traction of bicortically centered impacted canines increased the duration of traction by 2.85 months (P = 0.001). Finally, the traction time increased in 2.35 months (P = 0.046) when the impaction sectors were 4 or 5 (close to the midline).ConclusionsThe duration of active orthodontic traction of MIC is mainly influenced by sex, bilateral type, bicortically centered location, or when MIC is located in sector 4 or 5 close to midline, increasing the traction time by some months.
       
  • A longitudinal comparison of body height growth of orthodontically treated
           Class I and Class III adolescents compared with the general population
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Soonshin Hwang, Woowon Jang, Yoon Jeong Choi, Chooryung J. Chung, Kyung-Ho KimIntroductionThe aim of this study was to evaluate the height growth of Class I and III orthodontic patients according to the Fishman skeletal maturation index (SMI) and to compare it with that of a general population.MethodsThe study sample included 81 Class I and 71 Class III adolescents who had height measurements and hand-wrist radiographs taken annually and categorized according to SMI. Height completion rate, residual height, height increase per sequential SMI stage, and height velocity were analyzed. Sex differences were evaluated and comparisons between Class I and Class III groups were made. In addition, the height of orthodontic patients was indirectly compared with that of the general population.ResultsIn boys and girls, height completion rate was >90% at SMI 6, residual height was fewer than 10 cm at SMI 7, and height increase per sequential SMI stage was greatest from SMI 6 to SMI 7. Height velocity was greatest from SMI 5 to SMI 6 in boys and from SMI 4 to SMI 5 in girls.ConclusionsThere was no significant difference in body height parameters for all SMI stages between Class I and Class III adolescents. Adolescents who had orthodontic treatment were not shorter in stature at growth completion compared with the general population.
       
  • Outcomes of early versus late treatment of severe Class II high-angle
           patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Jung-Yul Cha, David B. Kennedy, Patrick K. Turley, Donald R. Joondeph, Hyung-Seon Baik, Chung-Ju Hwang, Peter M. SinclairIntroductionThe aim of this work was to compare the skeletal and dental outcomes of 1- versus 2-phase treatment in Class II subjects with difficult-to-treat high-angle severe Class II malocclusions.MethodsThe sample of 120 cases was collected from the private offices of 3 experienced clinicians. The following selection criteria were used: (1) ANB ≥6°, (2) SN-GoGn ≥37° or mandibular plane to Frankfort horizontal plane ≥30°; and (3) overjet ≥6 mm. Patients were classified into either the early or the late treatment group according to dental age (early Tx: ≥5 primary teeth; late Tx: otherwise). Thirty-four angular, linear, and proportional measurements were determined for each patient. Statistical significance was assessed with the use of a 2-tailed t test, analysis of covariance test, and chi-square test.ResultsThe results showed that early 2-phase treatment for severe Class II high-angle patients offered no skeletal anteroposterior advantages over late 1-phase treatment. Severe high-angle Class II patients also showed similar dental anteroposterior outcomes with the use of both approaches. Vertically there was a higher frequency of increased mandibular plane angles and extrusion of upper incisors and lower molars in the late treatment group.ConclusionsEarly 2-phase treatment for severe Class II high-angle patients offered no skeletal or dental advantage over late 1-phase treatment.
       
  • The 3-dimensional zone of the center of resistance of the mandibular
           posterior teeth segment
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Moon-Bee Oh, Sung-Seo Mo, Chung-Ju Hwang, Chooryung Chung, Ju-Man Kang, Kee-Joon LeeIntroductionWe sought the 3-dimensional (3D) zone of the center of resistance (ZCR) of mandibular posterior teeth groups (group 1: first molar; group 2: both molars; group 3: both molars and second premolar; group 4: both molars and both premolars) with the use of 3D finite element analysis.Methods3D finite element models comprised the mandibular posterior teeth, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. In the symmetric bilateral model, a 100-g midline force was applied on a median sagittal plane at 0.1-mm intervals to determine the anteroposterior and vertical positions of the ZCR (where the applied force induced translation). The most reliable buccolingual position of the ZCR was then determined in the unilateral model. The combination of the anteroposterior, vertical, and buccolingual positions was defined as the ZCR.ResultsThe ZCRs of groups 1-4 were, respectively, 0.48, 0.46, 0.50, and 0.53 of the mandibular first molar root length from the alveolar crest level and located slightly distobuccally at anteroposterior ratios of 2:3.0, 2:2.3, 2:2.4, and 2:2.5 to each sectional arch length and at buccolingual ratios of 2:1.5, 2:1.1, 2:1.6, and 2:2.4 to the first molar's buccolingual width.ConclusionsThe ZCR can be a useful reference for 3D movement planning of mandibular posterior teeth or segments.
       
  • First and second permanent molars with failed or delayed eruption:
           Clinical and statistical analyses
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Gerardo la Monaca, Maria Paola Cristalli, Nicola Pranno, Gabriella Galluccio, Susanna Annibali, Roberto PippiIntroductionThe aim of this work was to analyze data of patients with failed or delayed eruption of first and second permanent molars, to assess the effectiveness of the treatment methods used.MethodsEpidemiologic and clinical data of 125 patients (mean age 14.08 ± 4.04 years) with 197 affected molars (30 first and 167 second molars) were retrospectively analyzed. The treatment outcome was known in 161 molars after patient drop-out (20 patients with 36 molars). The cases were categorized into 8 groups according to the choice of treatment: orthodontic uprighting, surgical-orthodontic uprighting, surgical uprighting, surgical repositioning, surgical exposure, first or second molar extraction, third molar extraction, or removal of pathologic conditions.ResultsThe overall treatment outcome was positive in 141 molars (87.6%). It was positive in all cases treated with orthodontic uprighting (7 molars), surgical exposure (10 molars), surgical uprighting (38 molars), and surgical repositioning (8 molars), but it was significantly lower for surgical-orthodontic uprighting (34/48 molars, 70.8%). The positive outcome was significantly lower for inclusion (52/68 molars, 76.5%) than for early-diagnosed condition (11/11 molars, 100%) and retention (78/82 molars, 95.1%), and for total bone crown coverage (21/28 molars, 75.0%) than for osteomucosal or mucosal crown coverage (120/133 molars, 90.2%).ConclusionsThis study demonstrates that an early diagnosis results in a better outcome regardless of the treatment used, with the number of cases with a positive outcome being higher in younger patients.
       
  • Is there an ideal insertion angle and position for orthodontic
           mini-implants in the anterior palate' A CBCT study in humans
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Kathrin Becker, Justine Unland, Benedict Wilmes, Nour Eldin Tarraf, Dieter DrescherIntroductionOrthodontic mini-implants are frequently used to provide additional anchorage for orthodontic appliances. The anterior palate is frequently used owing to sufficient bone quality and low risk of iatrogenic trauma to adjacent anatomical structures. Even though the success rates in this site are high, failure of an implant will result in anchorage loss. Therefore, implants should be placed in areas with sufficient bone quality. The aim of the present study was to identify an optimal insertion angle and position for orthodontic mini-implants in the anterior palate.MethodsMaxillary cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scans from 30 patients (8 male, 22 female, age 18.6 ± 12.0 years) were analyzed. To assess the maximum possible length of an implant, a 25-reference-point grid was defined: 5 sagittal slices were extracted along the median plane and bilaterally at 3 mm and 6 mm distances, respectively. Within each slice, 5 dental reference points were projected to the palatal curvature at the contact point between the cuspid (C) and first bicuspid (PM1), midpoint of PM1, between PM1 and PM2, midpoint of PM2, and between PM2 and the first molar (M1). Measurements were conducted at −30°, −20°, −10°, 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30° to a vector placed perpendicular to the local palatal curvature. Statistical analysis was conducted with the use of R using a random-effects mixed linear model and a Tukey post hoc test with Holm correction.ResultsHigh interindividual variability was detected. Maximum effective bone heights were detected within a T-shaped area at the midpoint of PM1 and contact point PM1-PM2 (P 
       
  • Three-dimensional cephalometric analysis of the maxilla: Analysis of new
           landmarks
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Michael D. Han, Mohmedvasim R. Momin, Alexander M. Munaretto, Shuai HaoIntroductionClinical evaluation of the midface including the paranasal and upper lip regions is highly subjective and complex. Traditional and 3-dimensional cephalometrics were not developed with the clinical appearance of these midfacial areas in mind and are therefore inappropriate surrogates for the clinical appearance of the midface, making them unsuitable as aids in diagnosing dentofacial deformities. The aim of this study was to evaluate traditional as well as newly defined landmarks and measurements and their correlation with clinical appearance of the midface.MethodsFifty-two subjects who underwent full-field cone-beam computed tomography were recruited for this study. A single examiner assessed each subject's midfacial region (paranasal and upper lip), and a second examiner obtained traditional and newly defined cephalometric measurements for each subject. Both examiners were blinded to each other's data throughout the study. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the correlations of the traditional and novel cephalometric measurements with clinical midfacial findings. The impact of the soft tissue thickness in the paranasal region was also analyzed. The performance of any classification derived from statistically significant variables was analyzed with the use of micro-F scores and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC).ResultsBoth traditional (SNA) and newly defined measurements (SNANS, SNPR, SNNP, SNh) had no statistically significant correlation with clinical paranasal diagnosis. However, in the absence of upper lip procumbency or protrusion, SNNP and SNh had statistically significant correlations with clinical paranasal diagnosis (P = 0.047 and P = 0.003, respectively). For upper lip analysis, both traditional (SNA) and newly defined measurements (SNCEJ) had strong correlations with clinical upper lip diagnosis (P 
       
  • Two distalization methods compared in a novel patient-specific finite
           element analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Makram J. Ammoury, Samir Mustapha, Paul C. Dechow, Joseph G. GhafariIntroductionOrthodontic mini-implants aid in the correction of distocclusions via direct anchorage (pull from mini-implant to teeth) and indirect anchorage (teeth pulled against other teeth anchored by the mini-implant). The aim of this study was to compare stress levels on the periodontal ligament (PDL) of maxillary buccal teeth in direct and indirect distalization against orthodontic mini-implants and accounting for individual variation in maxillary anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the compact bone.MethodsA 3D model of the maxilla containing the different components (teeth, PDL, trabecular and cortical bones) was generated from a computed tomographic scan. Cortical bone was divided into several areas according to previously defined zones. Bone stiffness and thickness data, obtained from 11 and 12 cadavers, respectively, were incorporated into the initial model to simulate the individual cortical bone variation at the different locations. Subsequently, a finite element analysis was used to simulate the distalization modalities.ResultsStresses at the buccal, palatal, mesial, and distal surfaces were significantly different between adjacent teeth under stiffness but not thickness variation. In both distalization modalities, low or no significant correlations were found between stress values and corresponding cortical bone thicknesses. High significant and inverted correlations were observed at the first molar between stress amounts and cortical bone stiffness (direct modality: −0.68 
       
  • Oral health–related quality of life of children before, during, and
           after anterior open bite correction: A single-blinded randomized
           controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Matheus Melo Pithon, Marcela Baraúna Magno, Raildo da Silva Coqueiro, Saul Martins de Paiva, Leandro Silva Marques, Luiz Renato Paranhus, Orlando Motohiro Tanaka, Lucianne Cople MaiaIntroductionOne of the goals of malocclusion treatment is to improve the oral health–related quality of life (OHRQoL) of patients. The aim of this trial was to assess the OHRQoL of children before, during, and after anterior open bite (AOB) correction, compared with nontreated children, in a 2-arm parallel single-blind randomized controlled trial.MethodsEighty children with AOB aged 8-10 years were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n = 40 each): a group treated with the use of fixed palatal crib (FPC; TG) and a control group (nontreated; CG). Randomization was performed with the use of BioEstat software. The outcome (OHRQoL) was assessed with the use of the validated Brazilian Portuguese version of the Child Perceptions Questionnaire (CPQ8-10) applied before (baseline, phase 1), 3 months after FPC placement (phase 2), and 1 month after FPC removal (phase 3) in the TG. In the CG, CPQ8-10 was applied at baseline (phase 1), 3 months (phase 2), and 12 months (phase 3). Data were analyzed by means of a blinded statistic with the use of Friedman, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05).ResultsAll participants finished the RCT, and demographic characteristics were similar between groups. In phase 1, the TG had lower scores for the “social well-being” domain (P = 0.02). In phase 2, the CG had higher scores than the TG for the “emotional well-being” and “social well-being” domains, but the opposite was observed for “oral symptoms” and “functional limitations” (P 
       
  • Take the heat
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Peter M. Greco
       
  • Erratum
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s):
       
  • Authors' response
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Kyung-Yen Nahm, Seong-Hun Kim
       
  • Autotransplantation and healing
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Ewa Monika Czochrowska, Pawel Plakwicz
       
  • Author’s response
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Mona A. Montasser
       
  • Craniofacial growth spurt in Class I subjects: Data vs conclusions
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Giuseppe Perinetti
       
  • Authors' response
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Pratik K. Sharma, Padhriag S. Fleming
       
  • Part-time vs full-time wear of Twin-block appliance: Can we rejoice'
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): Elbe Peter, J. Monisha, R.M. Baiju, Vivek Narayan, Suja Ani
       
  • Twin Blocks designed for 24-hour wear
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s): William J. Clark
       
  • Information for readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 3Author(s):
       
 
 
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