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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3123 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3120 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 378, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 140, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 371, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 338, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 433, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 176, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)

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Journal Cover American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
  [SJR: 1.249]   [H-I: 88]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0889-5406
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3123 journals]
  • Odontogenic keratocyst: the pitfalls of uncoordinated multidisciplinary
           care
    • Authors: Esma J. Doğramacı; Giampiero Rossi-Fedele
      First page: 167
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Esma J. Doğramacı, Giampiero Rossi-Fedele


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.019
       
  • Authors' response
    • Authors: Raphaela Silva Leandro Santos; Flávia Maria de Moraes Ramos-Perez; Gleyson Kleber do Amaral Silva; André Caroli Rocha; José Divaldo Prado; Danyel Elias da Cruz Perez
      Pages: 167 - 168
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Raphaela Silva Leandro Santos, Flávia Maria de Moraes Ramos-Perez, Gleyson Kleber do Amaral Silva, André Caroli Rocha, José Divaldo Prado, Danyel Elias da Cruz Perez


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.003
       
  • Surgery-first approach vs traditional approach
    • Authors: Sivakumar Arunachalam; Jitendra Sharan
      Pages: 168 - 169
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sivakumar Arunachalam, Jitendra Sharan


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.013
       
  • Authors' response
    • Authors: Sandro Pelo; Romeo Patini; Gianmarco Saponaro
      First page: 169
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sandro Pelo, Romeo Patini, Gianmarco Saponaro


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.014
       
  • Residents' journal review
    • Authors: Dan Grauer
      Pages: 170 - 173
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Dan Grauer


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.012
       
  • A friend in need
    • Authors: Peter M. Greco
      First page: 174
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Peter M. Greco


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.017
       
  • Which orthodontic appliance is best for oral hygiene' A randomized
           clinical trial
    • Authors: Aditya Chhibber; Sachin Agarwal; Sumit Yadav; Chia-Ling Kuo; Madhur Upadhyay
      Pages: 175 - 183
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Aditya Chhibber, Sachin Agarwal, Sumit Yadav, Chia-Ling Kuo, Madhur Upadhyay
      Introduction Clear aligners and to a lesser extent self-ligated brackets are considered to facilitate better oral hygiene than traditional fixed orthodontic appliances. This 3-arm parallel-group prospective randomized clinical trial compared the long-term and short-term effects of clear aligners, self-ligated brackets, and conventional (elastomeric-ligated) brackets on patients' oral hygiene during active orthodontic treatment. Methods Seventy-one participants (41 boys, 30 girls; mean age, 15.6 years) undergoing orthodontic treatment were randomly allocated through a computer-generated randomization schedule to one of the groups based on the choice of intervention: Clear Aligners (CLA) (Align Technology, San Jose, Calif) (n = 27), preadjusted edgewise fixed appliance with self-ligated brackets (SLB) (Carriere, Carlsbad, Calif (n = 22), or preadjusted edgewise fixed appliance with elastomeric ligated brackets (ELB) (Ortho Organizers Inc., Carlsbad, CA) (n = 22). For each participant, the primary outcome, plaque index (PI), and secondary outcomes, gingival Index (GI) and periodontal bleeding index (PBI), were measured at baseline (T0), after 9 months of treatment (T1), and after 18 months of treatment (T2). Blinding of the clinicians and the patients to the intervention was impossible. It was only done for outcome assessment and for the statistician. Ten participants did not receive the allocated intervention for various reasons. Results The means and standard deviations of PI at T0 (CLA, 0.50 ± 0.51; SLB, 0.65 ± 0.49; ELB, 0.70 ± 0.73), T1 (CLA, 0.83 ± 0.48; SLB, 1.38 ± 0.72; ELB, 1.32 ± 0.67), and T2 (CLA, 0.92 ± 0.58; SLB, 1.07 ± 0.59; ELB, 1.32 ± 0.67) were similar. The odds ratio (OR) for plaque index (0 or ≥1) comparing SLB or CLA to ELB was not significant. OR for SLB vs ELB = 1.54 at T0 (95% CI, 0.39-6.27), 0.88 at T1 (95% CI, 0.03-24.69), and 0.83 at T2 (95% CI, 0.02-27.70); OR for CLA vs ELB = 1.07 at T0 (95% CI, 0.30-3.88), 0.24 at T1 (95% CI, 0.01-1.98), and 0.17 at T2 (95% CI, 0.01-1.71). However, the odds ratios comparing CLA with ELB for GI (OR = 0.14; P = 0.015) and PBI (OR = 0.10; P = 0.012) were statistically significant at T1. Conclusions In this prospective randomized clinical trial, we found no evidence of differences in oral hygiene levels among clear aligners, self-ligated brackets, and conventional elastomeric ligated brackets after 18 months of active orthodontic treatment. Registration The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02745626). Protocol The protocol was not published before trial commencement.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.009
       
  • Identification and appraisal of outcome measures used to evaluate
           hypodontia care: A systematic review
    • Authors: Sophy Barber; Hilary L. Bekker; David Meads; Sue Pavitt; Balvinder Khambay
      Pages: 184 - 194.e18
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sophy Barber, Hilary L. Bekker, David Meads, Sue Pavitt, Balvinder Khambay
      Introduction Identification and appraisal of the outcome measures that have been used to evaluate hypodontia treatment and deliver services are essential for improving care. A lack of alignment between outcomes and patient values can limit the scope for patient-centered care. Our objectives were to identify and appraise the outcomes selected to evaluate hypodontia care. Methods Data sources included 10 electronic databases and grey literature, searched using terms for hypodontia and its treatment methods. Study eligibility included mixed study designs to ensure comprehensive identification of outcomes, excluding case reports and case series with fewer than 10 participants and nonsystematic reviews. Participants and interventions involved people with hypodontia receiving any dental treatment to manage their hypodontia. Simulated treatment, purely laboratory-based interventions, and future treatments still in development were excluded. Research outcomes were identified and synthesised into 4 categories: clinical indicators, and patient-reported, clinician-reported, and lay-reported outcomes. No synthesis of efficacy data was planned, and consequently no methodologic quality appraisal of the studies was undertaken. Results The search identified 497 abstracts, from which 106 eligible articles were retrieved in full. Fifty-six studies and 8 quality-improvement reports were included. Clinical indicators were reported in 49 studies (88%) including appearance, function, dental health, treatment longevity, treatment success and service delivery. Patient-reported outcomes were given in 22 studies (39%) including oral health-related quality of life, appearance, function, symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction, and patient experience. Clinician-reported outcomes were limited to appearance. Variability was seen in the tools used for measuring outcomes. Conclusions There is a lack of rationale and consistency in the selection of outcome measures used to evaluate hypodontia care. Outcomes are largely clinician and researcher-driven with little evidence of their relevance to patients. There was a paucity of outcomes measuring access to care, quality of care, and cost. Evidence from hypodontia research is clinician-focused and likely to have limited value to support patients during decision making. Attempts to synthesise the evidence base for translation into practice will be challenging. There is a need for a core outcomes set with a patient-centric approach to drive improvements in health services.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.010
       
  • Predictable method to deliver physiologic force for extrusion of palatally
           impacted maxillary canines
    • Authors: Michele Tepedino; Claudio Chimenti; Francesco Masedu; Maciej Iancu Potrubacz
      Pages: 195 - 203
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Michele Tepedino, Claudio Chimenti, Francesco Masedu, Maciej Iancu Potrubacz
      Introduction Orthodontic treatment of palatally impacted maxillary canines raises many difficulties; to minimize complications, careful planning of orthodontic extrusion and the use of physiologic force are crucial. The aim of this study was to quantitatively evaluate a simple and reproducible system for orthodontic extrusion of impacted canines that can provide the correct amount of force. Methods Ten specimens were constructed, consisting of a cantilever made with a 0.6-mm or 0.7-mm stainless steel wire modeled around a transpalatal bar with 3, 5, or 7 loops in the shape of a helical torsion spring. A mechanical testing machine was used to measure the force produced by the cantilever at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 mm of activation. Results The force values ranged from 1.24 ± 0.13 N for the 0.7-mm wire with 3 loops to 0.48 ± 0.04 N for the 0.6-mm wire with 7 loops. The forces measured for the 0.6-mm wire with 3 loops and the 0.7-mm wire with 7 loops were similar at 15 mm of deflection. Conclusions The proposed system has a simple and robust design, is easy to construct and manage, and can provide the desired amount of force by changing the wire diameter and number of loops.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.05.035
       
  • Physical properties of root cementum: Part 26. Effects of
           micro-osteoperforations on orthodontic root resorption: A microcomputed
           tomography study
    • Authors: Emmanuel Chan; Oyku Dalci; Peter Petocz; Alexandra K. Papadopoulou; M. Ali Darendeliler
      Pages: 204 - 213
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Emmanuel Chan, Oyku Dalci, Peter Petocz, Alexandra K. Papadopoulou, M. Ali Darendeliler
      Introduction Studies have demonstrated the potential efficacy of micro-osteoperforations in accelerating tooth movement by amplifying the expression of inflammatory markers. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of micro-osteoperforations on orthodontic root resorption with microcomputed tomography. Methods This prospective controlled clinical trial involved 20 subjects requiring extraction of the maxillary first premolars as part of their orthodontic treatment. A buccal tipping force of 150 g was applied to both premolars. Using the Propel appliance (Propel Orthodontics, San Jose, Calif), micro-osteoperforations were applied at a depth of 5 mm on the mesial and distal aspects in the midroot region of the experimental side of the first premolar root; the contralateral side served as the control. After 28 days, both premolars were extracted. The teeth were scanned under microcomputed tomography, and the volumes of root resorption craters were calculated and compared. Results Premolars treated with micro-osteoperforation exhibited significantly greater average total amounts of root resorption than did the control teeth (0.576 vs 0.406 mm3). The total average volumetric root loss of premolars treated with micro-osteoperforation was 42% greater than that of the control teeth. Conclusions This 28-day trial showed that micro-osteoperforations resulted in greater orthodontic root resorption. However, these results should be verified in patients who are undergoing full-length orthodontic treatment.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.05.036
       
  • No association between types of unilateral mandibular condylar
           abnormalities and facial asymmetry in orthopedic-treated patients with
           juvenile idiopathic arthritis
    • Authors: Peter Bangsgaard Stoustrup; Nicole Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Lehn; Kasper Dahl Kristensen; Linda Z. Arvidsson; Marinka Twilt; Paolo M. Cattaneo; Annelise Küseler; Anne Estmann Christensen; Troels Herlin; Thomas Klit Pedersen
      Pages: 214 - 223
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Peter Bangsgaard Stoustrup, Nicole Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Lehn, Kasper Dahl Kristensen, Linda Z. Arvidsson, Marinka Twilt, Paolo M. Cattaneo, Annelise Küseler, Anne Estmann Christensen, Troels Herlin, Thomas Klit Pedersen
      Introduction Dentofacial asymmetries are often observed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvements. The aim of this split-face study was to associate types of radiologic TMJ abnormalities with the degree of dentofacial asymmetry in patients with unilateral TMJ involvements assessed with cone-beam computed tomography. Methods Forty-seven JIA patients and 19 nonarthritic control subjects were included in the study. Normal condylar radiologic cone-beam computed tomography appearance in at least 1 TMJ was the inclusion criterion for all patients with JIA. The contralateral TMJ was thereafter scored as either “normal,” “deformed,” or “erosive,” consistent with predefined criteria. Based on the bilateral radiologic TMJ appearances, 3 JIA groups were assigned: normal/normal, normal/deformed, and normal/erosive. The severity of the dentofacial asymmetry was compared between the JIA groups and control subjects. Dentofacial asymmetry was expressed as interside ratios and angular measurements. Results Eighty-seven percent of the JIA patients were being treated or had previously received treatment with a functional orthopedic appliance at the time of the cone-beam computed tomography. Significantly greater dentofacial asymmetries were observed in the 2 groups of JIA patients with unilateral condylar abnormalities (deformation or erosion) than in the other groups. A similar degree of dentofacial asymmetry was observed in JIA patients with bilateral normal TMJs and in the nonarthritic control group. Conclusions JIA patients with unilateral condylar abnormalities (deformation or erosion) exhibited significantly more severe dentofacial asymmetries than did the JIA patients without condylar abnormalities and the control subjects. We found the same degree of dentofacial asymmetry when dividing patients with condylar abnormalities into deformation and erosion groups.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.05.037
       
  • Long-term changes in oral health-related quality of life of standard,
           cleft, and surgery patients after orthodontic treatment: A longitudinal
           study
    • Authors: Grace A.L. Nichols; Joseph S. Antoun; Peter V. Fowler; Azza H. Al-Ani; Mauro Farella
      Pages: 224 - 231
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Grace A.L. Nichols, Joseph S. Antoun, Peter V. Fowler, Azza H. Al-Ani, Mauro Farella
      Introduction The aim of this study was to assess long-term changes and describe the trajectories of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in a cohort of cleft, surgery, and standard patients who received orthodontic treatment. Methods Standard (n = 16), cleft (n = 19), and orthognathic surgery (n = 22) patients completed the short-form of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) before treatment, immediately posttreatment, and approximately 5 years posttreatment. Results An overall reduction in OHIP-14 scores (improvement in OHRQoL) occurred after orthodontic treatment; however, this was only significant for the surgery and standard groups (P <0.05). The total OHIP-14 score increased significantly from posttreatment to 5 years follow-up for all 3 study groups (P <0.05). Relative to pretreatment, however, there were significant reductions in total OHIP-14 scores at 5 years posttreatment in the surgery group (−57.4%; P <0.05), but not in the standard sample (−24.2%; P >0.05). By contrast, the OHIP-14 score in the cleft group increased but not significantly (40.2%; P >0.05). Using a mixed model analysis, a significant interaction was detected between patient group and time (ie, study time point) (F = 6.0; P <0.0001), after adjusting for age and sex. Conclusions Distinct patient groups showed different OHRQoL trajectories after orthodontic treatment. Treatment-related improvements in OHRQoL are maintained over time for surgery patients, but not for those with standard malocclusions and orofacial clefts.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.06.018
       
  • Clinical effectiveness of 2 orthodontic retainer wires on mandibular arch
           retention
    • Authors: Firdevs Gunay; Abdullah Alper Oz
      Pages: 232 - 238
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Firdevs Gunay, Abdullah Alper Oz
      Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical success of 2 lingual retainer wires. Methods The 120 patients included in the study were divided into 2 groups randomly. In group 1, 0.0175-in 6-strand stainless steel wire (Ortho Technology, Lutz, Fla) was used, the lingual retainers were fabricated on plaster models, and a silicon transfer key was used. In group 2, 0.0195-in dead-soft coaxial wire (Respond; Ormco, Orange, Calif) was used, and the lingual retainers were fabricated directly in the patient's mandibular arch without a study model. Pretreatment, posttreatment, and posttreatment 3-month, 6-month, 9-month, and 12-month 3-dimensional orthodontic models were evaluated. Failure rates, mandibular arch irregularity values, intercanine distances, and arch lengths were compared. Results The clinical bond failure rates were 13.2% for the 0.0175-in 6-strand stainless steel wire and 18.9% for the 0.0195-in dead-soft wire. The difference in bond failures between the 2 groups was not statistically significant. There was a statistically significant increase in mandibular arch irregularity in both groups during the 12-month follow-up. However, the increase was significantly higher in the second group than in the first one. Furthermore, the intercanine distance decreased over time in the second group. Conclusions Our findings regarding mandibular arch measurements indicate that fabrication of lingual retainers can be more safely accomplished with 0.0175-in 6-strand stainless steel wire than with 0.0195-in dead-soft coaxial wire.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.06.019
       
  • A novel approach for treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion:
           Miniplates-based skeletal anchorage
    • Authors: Abdullsalam Abdulqawi Al-Dumaini; Esam Halboub; Maged Sultan Alhammadi; Ramy Abdul Rahman Ishaq; Mohamed Youssef
      Pages: 239 - 247
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Abdullsalam Abdulqawi Al-Dumaini, Esam Halboub, Maged Sultan Alhammadi, Ramy Abdul Rahman Ishaq, Mohamed Youssef
      Introduction The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new approach—bimaxillary miniplates-based skeletal anchorage—in the treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion compared with untreated subjects. Methods The study (miniplates) group comprised 28 patients (14 boys, 14 girls) with skeletal Class II malocclusion due to mandibular retrusion, with a mean age of 11.83 years. After 0.017 × 0.025-in stainless steel archwires were placed in both arches, 4 miniplates were fixed bilaterally, 2 in the maxillary anterior areas and 2 in the mandibular posterior areas, and used for skeletal treatment with elastics. Twenty-four Class II untreated subjects (11 boys, 13 girls), with a mean age of 11.75 years, were included as controls. Skeletal and dental changes were evaluated using pretreatment and posttreatment or observational lateral cephalometric radiographs. The treatment changes were compared with the growth changes observed in the control group using independent t tests. Results Compared with the minimal changes induced by growth in the control group, the skeletal changes induced by miniplates were more obvious. The mandibular length increased significantly (3 mm), and the mandible moved forward, with a significant restraint in the sagittal position of the maxilla (P <0.001). The overjet correction (−4.26 mm) was found to be a net result of skeletal changes (A-Y-axis = −1.18 mm and B-Y-axis = 3.83 mm). The mandibular plane was significantly decreased by 2.75° (P <0.001). Conclusions This new technique, bimaxillary miniplates-based skeletal anchorage, is an effective method for treating patients with skeletal Class II malocclusions through obvious skeletal, but minimal dentoalveolar, changes.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.06.020
       
  • Monomer release from orthodontic retentions: An in vitro study
    • Authors: Chloé Pelourde; Raoul Bationo; Marie-José Boileau; Jacques Colat-Parros; Fabienne Jordana
      Pages: 248 - 254
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Chloé Pelourde, Raoul Bationo, Marie-José Boileau, Jacques Colat-Parros, Fabienne Jordana
      Introduction The adhesives used to bond orthodontic retentions are low-loaded composite resins with a resinous matrix containing bisphenol A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate synthesized from bisphenol A (BPA), fluidizers such as triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and hydrophilic polymers such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate. BPA disrupts the endocrine balance, and TEGDMA has high risks for human health: eg, allergies and cytotoxicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the release of monomers from orthodontic bonded retentions. Methods A reproducible model of bonded retentions was carried out using calibrated molds. We analyzed the release of monomers by gas phase chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Results This model allowed us to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the in-vitro release of monomers from orthodontic adhesives. The quantitative and qualitative analyses showed no BPA release above the 0.02 ppm detection limit. A greater release of TEGDMA was observed with Transbond LR (31.7 μg/mL) than with Transbond XT (13.12 μg/mL) (both, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). Other toxic components (iodobenzene, iodobiphenyl, triphenyl stibine, and so on) were also identified. Conclusions Toxic and carcinogenic molecules not mentioned in the material safety data sheets were identified.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.06.021
       
  • Relationship between matrilin-1 gene polymorphisms and mandibular
           retrognathism
    • Authors: Pranita B. Balkhande; Bhaskar V.K.S. Lakkakula; Arun B. Chitharanjan
      Pages: 255 - 261.e1
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Pranita B. Balkhande, Bhaskar V.K.S. Lakkakula, Arun B. Chitharanjan
      Introduction Mandibular retrognathism is a type of malocclusion that refers to an abnormal posterior position of the mandible as a result of a developmental abnormality. From the literature, it is evident that the mandibular growth pattern is determined by the intramembranous ossification of the mandibular body and endochondral ossification of the condyle. Matrilin-1 is a cartilage extracellular matrix protein, and matrilin-1 gene (MATN1) polymorphisms have been found to be involved in dental malocclusions of humans. In this study, we aimed to examine the association between MATN1 polymorphisms and the risk of mandibular retrognathism, in a case-control study with a South Indian population. Methods Eighty-one patients with mandibular retrognathism (SNB, <78°) and 71 controls having an orthognathic mandible (SNB, 80° ± 2°) were recruited. In both the patient and control groups, subjects with an orthognathic maxilla (SNA, 82° ± 2°) were included. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms of the MATN1 gene (rs1149048, rs1149042, and rs1065755) were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The statistical association analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Pair-wise linkage disequilibrium was computed, and haplotypes were compared between subjects and controls. Nonparametric tests were used to compare cephalometric measurements between groups. Results No polymorphic site deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the controls. The rs1149042 genotypes and alleles were found to be associated with reduced risk of mandibular retrognathism. Furthermore, rs1149042 genotypes were associated with mandibular measurements (SNB and ANB). There was no strong and consistent linkage disequilibrium linkage disequilibrium across two different single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes were not associated with mandibular retrognathism. Conclusions The results of our study suggest an association between the MATN1 gene polymorphisms and mandibular retrognathism.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.06.023
       
  • Skeletal and dentoalveolar effects of hybrid rapid palatal expansion and
           facemask treatment in growing skeletal Class III patients
    • Authors: Giuliano Maino; Ylenia Turci; Angela Arreghini; Emanuele Paoletto; Giuseppe Siciliani; Luca Lombardo
      Pages: 262 - 268
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Giuliano Maino, Ylenia Turci, Angela Arreghini, Emanuele Paoletto, Giuseppe Siciliani, Luca Lombardo
      Introduction The purpose of this study was to describe the skeletal and dentoalveolar changes in a group of growing skeletal Class III patients treated with hybrid rapid palatal expansion and facemask. Methods Twenty-eight growing patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were treated using a rapid maxillary expander with hybrid anchorage according to the ALT-Ramec protocol (SKAR III; E.P.), followed by 4 months of facemask therapy. Palatal miniscrew placement was accomplished via digital planning and the construction of a high-precision, individualized surgical guide. Pretreatment and posttreatment cephalometric tracings were analyzed, comparing dental and skeletal measurements. Results Point A advanced by a mean of 3.4 mm with respect to the reference plane Vert-T. The mandibular plane rotated clockwise, improving the ANB (+3.41°) and the Wits appraisal (+4.92 mm). The maxillary molar had slight extrusion (0.42 mm) and mesialization (0.87 mm). Conclusions The use of a hybrid-anchorage expander followed by 4 months of facemask treatment improves the skeletal Class III relationship with minimal dental effects, even in older patients (mean age, 11 years 4 months, ± 2.5 years).

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.06.022
       
  • Role of cone-beam computed tomography with a large field of view in
           Goldenhar syndrome
    • Authors: Cosimo Nardi; Luisa De Falco; Valeria Selvi; Chiara Lorini; Linda Calistri; Stefano Colagrande
      Pages: 269 - 277
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Cosimo Nardi, Luisa De Falco, Valeria Selvi, Chiara Lorini, Linda Calistri, Stefano Colagrande
      Introduction Goldenhar syndrome is a rare disease with hemifacial microsomia and craniofacial disorders originating from the first and second branchial arches, such as ocular, auricular, and vertebral anomalies. The complexity and variety of the ways in which the disease presents itself usually need several examinations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate both craniofacial and vertebral skeletal anomalies and asymmetries between the nonaffected and affected sides in patients with Goldenhar syndrome by using cone-beam computed tomography. Methods Ten patients (7-14 years old; 6 boys, 4 girls) were evaluated via NewTom 5G cone-beam computed tomography (QR srl, Verona, Italy) with a large field of view (18 × 16 cm). Ten anatomic facial landmarks were identified to measure the following distances bilaterally: sella turcica (ST)-mandibular angle, ST-condyle, ST-mastoid, ST-mental foramen, ST-fronto zygomatic suture, ST-zygomatic temporal suture, ST-zygomatic facial foramen, ST-sphenopalatine fossa, mandibular angle-mandibular symphysis, and mandibular angle-condyle. The following 6 volumes were calculated bilaterally: orbit, maxillary sinus, condyle, external ear canal, middle ear, and internal auditory canal. These measurements were performed to assess skeletal asymmetries to compare the nonaffected side with the affected side by the Wilcoxon test. Cervical spine anomalies were classified into fusion anomalies and posterior arch deficiencies. Results All patients showed a deficit of skeletal development on the affected side. Statistically significant differences (0.001 ≤ P value ≤ 0.043) between the nonaffected and affected sides were recorded for all measurements, except for ST-frontozygomatic suture, mandibular angle-mandibular symphysis, and maxillary sinus volume. Vertebral fusion anomalies and posterior arch deficiencies were found in 7 and 4 patients, respectively. Conclusions Cone-beam computed tomography with a large field of view was able to accurately identify craniofacial and vertebral skeletal anomalies, and to quantify asymmetries between the nonaffected and affected sides for an efficient maxillofacial treatment planning.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.06.024
       
  • Interdisciplinary treatment of a patient with multiple missing teeth and
           periodontitis
    • Authors: Jae-Chan Ahn; Jae-Hong Lee; Joon-Ho Yoon; Ji-Yeon Lee; Jung-Hoon Kim
      Pages: 278 - 289
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Jae-Chan Ahn, Jae-Hong Lee, Joon-Ho Yoon, Ji-Yeon Lee, Jung-Hoon Kim
      A 49-year-old woman with several missing and periodontically compromised teeth was referred to the orthodontic department of National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital by the periodontic department for interdisciplinary treatment. Multiple posterior teeth had been extracted 10 days earlier. Her chief complaint was crowding of the anterior teeth, and she wanted to improve both esthetics and function. Orthodontic, periodontic, and prosthodontic treatments were undertaken in the proper timing and sequence with an interdisciplinary approach. As a result, improved periodontal health and a stable occlusion and vertical dimension were achieved. Although there were limited teeth and alveolar bone for anchorage, good esthetic and functional treatment results were obtained through the application of temporary anchorage devices and proper biomechanics.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2016.10.043
       
  • Bone-anchored maxillary protraction in a patient with complete cleft lip
           and palate: A case report
    • Authors: Daniela Garib; Marília Yatabe; Renato André de Souza Faco; Leonardo Gregório; Lucia Cevidanes; Hugo de Clerck
      Pages: 290 - 297
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Daniela Garib, Marília Yatabe, Renato André de Souza Faco, Leonardo Gregório, Lucia Cevidanes, Hugo de Clerck
      Sagittal maxillary deficiency is frequently observed in patients with operated unilateral complete cleft of the lip and palate. Treatment for moderate to severe Class III malocclusion usually relies on LeFort I surgery for maxillary advancement after the end of growth. This case report describes bone-anchored maxillary protraction in a 10-year-old white boy with unilateral complete cleft of the lip and palate. His interarch relationship was diagnosed as GOSLON index 5 before treatment with a negative overjet of 3.2 mm. The orthopedic traction was started 4 months after secondary alveolar bone graft surgery and before comprehensive orthodontic treatment. Class III elastics were used full time for 18 months. After treatment, the interarch relationship was GOSLON index 1 with a positive overjet. The SNA angle increased by 6.50° and A-Na Perp increased by 3.8 mm, leading to marked improvement in facial convexity (+14.6°). No posterior rotation of the mandible occurred with a slight closure of the gonial angle. Visualization of 3-dimensional color-coded maps showed an overall forward maxillary displacement. The bone-anchored maxillary protraction results for this patient are a promising orthopedic therapy for patients with unilateral complete cleft of the lip and palate, with the advantage of achieving much earlier improvement of facial esthetics and functional occlusion, compared with LeFort I surgery at skeletal maturity.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2016.10.044
       
  • Accuracy of bracket positions with a CAD/CAM indirect bonding system in
           posterior teeth with different cusp heights
    • Authors: Jiyeon Kim; Youn-Sic Chun; Minji Kim
      Pages: 298 - 307
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Jiyeon Kim, Youn-Sic Chun, Minji Kim
      Introduction Our objective was to evaluate the effect of cusp height of posterior teeth (first premolar, second premolar, first molar) on the accuracy of the computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) indirect bonding system. Material Five kinds of maxillary arch models, without attrition, were divided into 2 groups: control group (with 0.5 mm of grinding) and experimental group (with the addition of 0.5 mm of wax to the cusp tip). Rapid prototype models were printed for both groups. Transfer jigs of the individual tooth brackets were designed using a digital model. 3-dimensional program to evaluate the differences between the intended digital bracket position and actual bracket position after indirect bonding. The differences were measured in the linear (mesiodistal, buccolingual, vertical) and angular (angulation, rotation, torque) dimensions. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for statistical analyses; significance was defined as P <0.05. Results Both groups had similar frequencies of errors between the intended and actual bracket positions. The frequencies of vertical errors over 0.5 mm were 3.3% and 6.7% in the control and experimental groups, respectively. The frequencies of angulation, rotation, and torque errors over 1° were 53.3%, 43.3%, and 60%, respectively, for the control group; and 60%, 60%, and 73.3%, respectively, for the experimental group. Conclusions A difference in cusp height of maxillary posterior teeth did not produce a statistically significant difference in the linear and angular dimensions of bracket placement with the CAD/CAM indirect bonding system. However, given the tendency for a higher frequency in bracket placement errors in posterior teeth with larger cusp tips, cusp height should be considered when using a CAD/CAM indirect bonding system.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.06.017
       
  • Reliability of different radiographic methods for the localization of
           displaced maxillary canines
    • Authors: Apostolos I. Tsolakis; Michael Kalavritinos; Elias Bitsanis; Mattheos Sanoudos; Vassiliki Benetou; Konstantina Alexiou; Konstantinos Tsiklakis
      Pages: 308 - 314
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Apostolos I. Tsolakis, Michael Kalavritinos, Elias Bitsanis, Mattheos Sanoudos, Vassiliki Benetou, Konstantina Alexiou, Konstantinos Tsiklakis
      Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the radiographic images of the main conventional x-ray techniques compared with the information from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods Twenty patients with unilateral or bilateral impaction of the maxillary canines had radiographic examinations by means of periapical x-rays, occlusal x-rays, panoramic x-rays, and CBCT scans. Three experienced orthodontists examined all x-rays from each patient and evaluated the radiographic images of the impacted canines. The examiners were asked to detect resorption in adjacent teeth and the buccal-palatal position of the impacted canines. Agreement between examiners was statistically tested. Results Different diagnoses were produced by the 3 examiners regarding localization of the impacted canines and the presence or absence of root resorption of the adjacent teeth in conventional radiographic images. It appears that whereas panoramic x-ray is more sensitive in detecting resorption and tooth position, occlusal and periapical imaging have higher specificity and positive predictive value. The examiners were in good or excellent agreement when occlusal and periapicals were used for the definite diagnosis of resorption and tooth position. There was no disagreement of the examiners in CBCT images, which were used as the gold standard. Conclusions Conventional radiographic methods demonstrated a more subjective diagnostic procedure compared with CBCT images. CBCT is a more accurate and precise examination method compared with conventional radiography for the localization of impacted teeth and root resorption of the adjacent teeth.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.06.026
       
  • I don't really feel comfortable doing that
    • Authors: Laurance Jerrold
      Pages: 315 - 316
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Laurance Jerrold


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.015
       
  • Statistical testing against baseline
    • Authors: Despina Koletsi; Nikolaos Pandis
      First page: 317
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Despina Koletsi, Nikolaos Pandis


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.016
       
  • February 2018:153(2)
    • Authors: Allen H. Moffitt
      Pages: 318.e1 - 318.e2
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Allen H. Moffitt


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.12.001
       
  • Lifetime Achievement Award for Orthodontic Research, 2018
    • Authors: Rolf G. Behrents
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Rolf G. Behrents


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.008
       
  • Rapid canine retraction by dentoalveolar distraction osteogenesis
    • Authors: T.P. Chaturvedi; Ajit V. Parihar; Ashish Agrawal; Sadhana Swaraj
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): T.P. Chaturvedi, Ajit V. Parihar, Ashish Agrawal, Sadhana Swaraj


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.013
       
  • Authors' response
    • Authors: Gökmen Kurt; Haluk İşeri; Reha Kişnişçi; Özkan Özkaynak
      First page: 4
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Gökmen Kurt, Haluk İşeri, Reha Kişnişçi, Özkan Özkaynak


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.014
       
  • Alveolar cortical bone
    • Authors: Maria Perpétua Mota Freitas
      First page: 4
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Maria Perpétua Mota Freitas


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.012
       
  • Authors' response
    • Authors: Henry Ohiomoba; Andrew Sonis; Bernard Friedland
      First page: 5
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Henry Ohiomoba, Andrew Sonis, Bernard Friedland


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.10.011
       
  • External apical root resorption
    • Authors: Naphtali Brezniak; Atalia Wasserstein
      Pages: 5 - 6
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Naphtali Brezniak, Atalia Wasserstein


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.005
       
  • Authors' response
    • Authors: Feifei Jiang; Jie Chen; Katherine Kula; Huiying Gu; Yansheng Du; George Eckert
      First page: 6
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Feifei Jiang, Jie Chen, Katherine Kula, Huiying Gu, Yansheng Du, George Eckert


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.004
       
  • Assessment of the rate of premolar extraction space closure in the
           maxillary arch with the AcceleDent Aura appliance vs no appliance in
           adolescents: A single-blind randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Peter Miles; Elizabeth Fisher; Nikolaos Pandis
      Pages: 8 - 14
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Peter Miles, Elizabeth Fisher, Nikolaos Pandis
      Introduction The purpose of this 2-arm parallel trial was to assess the effect of the AcceleDent Aura appliance (OrthoAccel Technologies, Houston, Tex) on the rate of maxillary premolar extraction space closure in adolescent patients. Methods Forty Class II adolescents treated with full fixed appliances and maxillary premolar extractions participated in this randomized clinical trial. They were recruited in a private practice and treated by 1 clinician. Randomization was accomplished in blocks of 10 patients assigned to either a no-appliance group or the AcceleDent Aura appliance group with the allocations concealed in opaque, sealed envelopes. Both the operator and the outcome assessor were blinded; however, it was not feasible to blind the patients. Models were taken of the maxillary arch at the start of space closure and just before complete space closure. The space was measured parallel to the occlusal plane from the cusp tips of the teeth mesial and distal to the extraction spaces. Results There was no clinically (0.05 mm per month; 95% confidence interval [CI], –0.24, 0.34) or statistically significant difference in the rate of space closure (P = 0.74). In both the univariable and multivariable analyses, the mean rate of tooth movement was slower by 0.13 mm per month (95% CI, –.26, .005) on the left side compared with the right side, but this was not statistically significant (P = 0.06). Conclusions The AcceleDent Aura appliance had no effect on the rate of maxillary premolar extraction space closure. Only a few participants were considered to be good compliers with the appliance. However, the rate of space closure in the good compliers was similar to the overall group and did not appear to influence the result. Registration This trial was not registered. Protocol The protocol was not published before trial commencement.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.007
       
  • Craniofacial morphology of HIV-positive children and adolescents
           undergoing antiretroviral therapy: A pilot study
    • Authors: Maria Luiza Veloso de Almeida Watanabe; Adriana Oliveira Lira Ortega; Catalina Riera Costa; Emiko Saito Arita; Karem L. Ortega
      Pages: 26 - 35
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Maria Luiza Veloso de Almeida Watanabe, Adriana Oliveira Lira Ortega, Catalina Riera Costa, Emiko Saito Arita, Karem L. Ortega
      Introduction In this study, we aimed to analyze craniofacial morphology by assessing the skeletal cephalometric profiles of HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Methods For this study, 21 HIV-positive patients aged between 6 and 17 years (study group) were selected and compared with 21 normoreactive patients (control group), paired by sex and age. The patients were also divided into 3 age ranges (6-8, 9-12, and 13-17 years) considering the pubertal growth spurt as the central event. Eighteen (linear and angular) measurements were traced on teleradiographs by using 2 methodologies. The mean values of each measurement were compared between the study and control groups by age range. Results The majority of the measurements checked in the HIV-positive children and adolescents for the 13-to-17 year age range were diminished, but not enough to generate a statistically significant difference in craniofacial growth. Statistically significant differences (P <0.05) were found only in the inclination of the palatal plane (6-8 years) and the position of the maxilla in the anteroposterior direction (13-17 years). Conclusions These results led us to conclude that some cephalometric measurements of HIV-positive children and adolescents may be similar to those of normoreactive subjects.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.05.027
       
  • Craniofacial morphology in women with Class I occlusion and severe
           maxillary anterior crowding
    • Authors: Misa Ikoma; Kazuhito Arai
      Pages: 36 - 45
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Misa Ikoma, Kazuhito Arai
      Introduction Our objective was to investigate craniofacial morphology in women with Class I occlusion and maxillary anterior crowding (MxAC) with bilateral palatal displacement of the lateral incisors and facial displacement of the canines. Methods Thirty-three women with normal occlusion (mean age, 20.7 ± 2.3 years) were selected as the control group, and 33 women with severe MxAC (mean age, 23.3 ± 3.8 years) with bilateral palatal and facial displacement of the lateral incisors and canines, respectively, were selected as the MxAC group. Mesiodistal tooth crown diameter, arch length discrepancy, facial-palatal displacement of lateral incisors and canines, and dental arch dimensions were measured. Fourteen skeletal and 10 dental cephalometric measurements were made. Medians, interquartile ranges, means, and standard deviations were calculated for each parameter, and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test (P <0.05) was used to compare the 2 groups. Results Compared with the control group, the MxAC group showed a significantly wider angle (P <0.05) and shorter length (P <0.01) in the cranial base, a smaller sagittal maxillary base (P <0.01), and a hyperdivergent skeletal pattern (P <0.01 and P <0.05). Conclusions Women with Class I occlusion and severe MxAC exhibited a significantly wider angle and shorter length in the cranial base, a smaller sagittal maxillary base, and a hyperdivergent skeletal pattern. These skeletal and dental characteristics and cranial base dysmorphology may be helpful as potential indicators for orthodontic treatment with extractions.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.05.026
       
  • Pharyngeal airway evaluation after isolated mandibular setback surgery
           using cone-beam computed tomography
    • Authors: Shireen K. Irani; Donald R. Oliver; Reza Movahed; Yong-Il Kim; Guilherme Thiesen; Ki Beom Kim
      Pages: 46 - 53
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Shireen K. Irani, Donald R. Oliver, Reza Movahed, Yong-Il Kim, Guilherme Thiesen, Ki Beom Kim
      Introduction In this study, we investigated volumetric and dimensional changes to the pharyngeal airway space after isolated mandibular setback surgery for patients with Class III skeletal dysplasia. Methods Records of 28 patients who had undergone combined orthodontic and mandibular setback surgery were obtained. The sample comprised 17 men and 11 women. Their mean age was 23.88 ± 6.57 years (range, 18-52 years). Cone-beam computed tomography scans were obtained at 3 time points: before surgery, average of 6 months after surgery, and average of 1 year after surgery. Oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, and total volumes were calculated. The lateral surface and anteroposterior dimensions at the minimal axial areas for oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal volumes and mean mandibular setback were determined. Results The mean mandibular setback was 9.93 ± 5.26 mm. Repeated measures analysis of variance determined an overall significant decrease between the means for 6 months and up to 1 year after surgery for oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal volumes, anteroposterior at oropharyngeal, lateral surface at oropharyngeal, and anteroposterior at hypopharyngeal. No strong correlation between mandibular setback surgery and pharyngeal airway volumes or dimensions was determined. Conclusions After mandibular setback surgery, pharyngeal airway volume, and transverse and anteroposterior dimensions were decreased. Patients undergoing mandibular setback surgery should be evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea and the proposed treatment plan modified according to the risk for potential airway compromise.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.05.031
       
  • Stability of secondarily inserted orthodontic miniscrews after failure of
           the primary insertion for maxillary anchorage: Maxillary buccal area vs
           midpalatal suture area
    • Authors: Shunsuke Uesugi; Satoshi Kokai; Zuisei Kanno; Takashi Ono
      Pages: 54 - 60
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Shunsuke Uesugi, Satoshi Kokai, Zuisei Kanno, Takashi Ono
      Introduction Few studies have examined the secondary insertion of orthodontic miniscrews after failure of the first insertion. We investigated both the primary and secondary success rates of miniscrews used for maxillary anchorage and compared the stability of the maxillary buccal area (MB) and the midpalatal suture area (MP). Methods In total, 387 miniscrews were primarily inserted into the MB (between the second premolar and first molar); of these, 81 (20.9%) miniscrews lacked stability and were reinserted into the MB (same position or more distal position) or the MP. Additionally, 84 miniscrews were primarily inserted into the MP; 13 (15.5%) of those lacked stability and were reinserted into the MP. We calculated and compared the primary and secondary success rates in each area. Moreover, we investigated the factors affecting clinical success. Results Although the success rate of the secondary insertion was significantly lower than that of the primary insertion into the MB, miniscrews inserted into the MP were stable in both primary and secondary insertions. The screw length was significantly associated with the stability of miniscrews inserted into the MB. Conclusions For secondary insertions, miniscrews placed in the MP may be more stable than those inserted in the MB.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.05.024
       
  • Plane-to-plane analysis of mandibular misalignment in patients with facial
           asymmetry
    • Authors: Tung-Yiu Wong; Jia-Kuang Liu; Tung-Chin Wu; Yi-Hsuan Tu; Ken-Chung Chen; Jing-Jing Fang; Ke-Hsin Cheng; Jing-Wei Lee
      Pages: 70 - 80
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tung-Yiu Wong, Jia-Kuang Liu, Tung-Chin Wu, Yi-Hsuan Tu, Ken-Chung Chen, Jing-Jing Fang, Ke-Hsin Cheng, Jing-Wei Lee
      Introduction Little is known regarding how the mandible rotates in facial asymmetry. The purpose of this study was to study mandibular misalignment with a new plane-to-plane analysis method in patients with facial asymmetry. Methods Optimal symmetry planes (OSPs) were generated by computing the greatest count of paired voxels on opposing sides of the computerized tomography image of the structure. The mandibular OSP was measured against the midfacial OSP for its alignment. The deviation angle formed by the 2 OSPs was broken down into a y-axis component (frontal deviation angle) and a z-axis component (horizontal deviation angle). Fifty-nine patients who sought correction for facial asymmetry were included for study. Results The new analysis method was feasible. Fifty patients (83%) had significant mandibular misalignment (deviation, ≥4° or 4 mm). The locations of the rotational axes exhibited significant variations that could explain the varied features of the asymmetry. The frontal deviation angle (mean, 3.80° ± 3.89°) was significantly larger than the horizontal deviation angle (mean, 2.77° ± 1.71°). There was no significant correlation between the horizontal deviation angle and the anterior deviation distance or the posterior deviation distance. Conclusions Proper mandibular realignment was suggested to be the primary aim in surgical correction of most jawbone asymmetries. Because of the greatly varied rotational axes and the obscure z-axis rotation, realignment could be difficult with the traditional approach. The OSP-based analysis is advocated to guide planning.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.05.032
       
  • Information for readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
       
  • The way it was, the way it ought to be, the way it is, and the way it will
           be
    • Authors: Marc Ackerman; Benjamin Burris
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2
      Author(s): Marc Ackerman, Benjamin Burris


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
       
  • Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
       
  • Information for readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
       
  • Correction
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
       
  • One shoe doesn't fit all
    • Authors: Peter Greco
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 153, Issue 1
      Author(s): Peter M. Greco


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T16:40:24Z
       
 
 
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