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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3177 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3177 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 105, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 446, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 431, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 486, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 271, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 215, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 229, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.289
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0889-5406
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3177 journals]
  • Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s):
       
  • December 2019
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Allen H. Moffitt
       
  • Insulation from liability' Maybe
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Laurance Jerrold
       
  • Can 3D imaging and digital software increase the ability to predict dental
           arch form after orthodontic treatment'
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Sahar Hadadpour, Mohammad Noruzian, Amir H. Abdi, Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban, Mahtab NouriIntroductionThis study aimed to evaluate the ability of dental clinicians to predict posttreatment dental arch forms in patients with malocclusion with the aid of 3D imaging and digital software in comparison with a conventional method.MethodsPretreatment and posttreatment dental plaster casts of 100 patients (200 maxillary models and 200 mandibular models) were selected. Three orthodontists selected the best-fitted archwires among 5 commercially available preformed nickel-titanium archwires using 2 methods. In the conventional method, they fit the archwires to pretreatment casts, and in the digital method, they fit the scanned wire to a 3D digital model, using Ortho-Aid, a locally developed 3D software, using clinical bracket points as reference for wire fitness. The predicted posttreatment archwire in each method was compared with the best-fit archwire on the actual posttreatment model of each patient in both methods, and the level of agreement was calculated. The interobserver agreement between the 3 orthodontists in each method was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient and the Dahlberg formula.ResultsOrthodontists predicted the final treatment outcome in 50% of cases using the conventional method and 58% using the digital method. However, the range of method error was significantly higher in the conventional method (0.425-3.853 mm for the conventional vs 0.451-0.584 mm for the digital).ConclusionsAlthough the clinicians' ability to predict the final dental arch form after orthodontic treatment and the agreement between clinicians increased by the use of digital equipment, orthodontists can predict the final arch form in about 60% of patients.
       
  • Adult skeletal Class III correction with camouflage orthodontic treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Jae Hyun Park, Morvarid Emamy, Somang Hope LeeA 19-year-old woman with a skeletal Class III pattern, anterior and posterior crossbites, and a low mandibular plane angle was treated with nonextraction camouflage treatment. The total active treatment time was 17 months. After treatment, her occlusion, smile esthetics, and soft tissue profile were significantly improved.
       
  • Selective osteotomy-assisted molar uprighting and simultaneous ridge
           augmentation for implant site development
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Jing Zhou, Xin She, Preston D. Miller, Hai YaoOrthodontic treatment to upright an inclined molar adjacent to an edentulous space is often necessary before implant placement. The implant site may also require a ridge augmentation if the bony volume is not sufficient. The time required for both treatment steps can be lengthy and can discourage patients from accepting dental implants. This case report presents a novel interdisciplinary approach to implant site development. Selective osteotomy and simultaneous ridge augmentation were performed on the bilateral mesially inclined second molars before orthodontic uprighting. The severely inclined second molars were uprighted in 5 months, and the enhanced implant sites were ready for implant placement without complications. A finite element analysis revealed that the osteotomy partially affected the biomechanical responses of the dentoalveolar structures during molar uprighting.
       
  • Association between snoring and deciduous dental development and soft
           tissue profile in 3-year-old children
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Pekka Niemi, Saara Markkanen, Mika Helminen, Markus Rautiainen, Maija Kristiina Katila, Outi Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Timo PeltomäkiIntroductionThe aim was to study the association between snoring and development of occlusion, maxillary dental arch, and soft tissue profile in children with newly completed deciduous dentition.MethodsThirty-two (18 female, 14 male) parent-reported snorers (snoring ≥3 nights/week) and 19 (14 female, 6 male) nonsnorers were recruited. Breathing preference (nose or mouth) was assessed at the mean age of 27 months by otorhinolaryngologist. At the mean age of 33 months, an orthodontic examination was performed, including sagittal relationship of second deciduous molars, overjet, overbite, and occurrence of crowding and lateral crossbite. Bite index was obtained to measure maxillary dental arch dimensions (intercanine and intermolar width, arch length). A profile photograph was obtained to measure facial convexity.ResultsNo significant differences were found between nonsnorers and snorers in any of the studied occlusal characteristics or in measurements of maxillary dental arch dimensions. Snorers were found to have a more convex profile than nonsnorers. Occurrence of mouth breathing was more common among snorers.ConclusionsParent-reported snoring (≥3 nights/week) does not seem to be associated with an adverse effect on the early development of deciduous dentition, but snoring children seem to have more convex profile than nonsnorers. Snoring is a mild sign of sleep-disordered breathing, and in the present study its short time lapse may not have had adequate functional impact on occlusion.
       
  • Treatment stability after total maxillary arch distalization with modified
           C-palatal plates in adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Ahmed M. Shoaib, Jae Hyun Park, Mohamed Bayome, Noha H. Abbas, Mohammed Alfaifi, Yoon-Ah KookIntroductionThe purpose of this study was to evaluate skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue changes at 3 years posttreatment in patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated with modified C-palatal plates (MCPPs).MethodsThe sample consisted of 69 lateral cephalograms of 23 patients Class II Division 1 malocclusion (9 men, 14 women; average age, 20.1 years) who underwent bilateral distalization of their maxillary dentition. The lateral cephalograms were taken immediately before the placement of the MCPPs (T1); at the end of orthodontic fixed appliance therapy (T2); and at the posttreatment observation period (3 years posttreatment; T3). Twenty-three variables were measured. Repeated measures ANOVA followed by post hoc analysis using Bonferroni test was used to identify significant differences between time points.ResultsMaxillary first molars showed a distal movement of 3.44 ± 1.08 mm (P 
       
  • Accuracy of computer-aided prediction in soft tissue changes after
           orthodontic treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Xu Zhang, Li Mei, Xinyu Yan, Jieya Wei, Yanxi Li, Hanshi Li, Zhengzheng Li, Wei Zheng, Yu LiIntroductionAn accurate prediction in the soft tissue changes is of great importance for orthodontic treatment planning. Previous studies on the accuracy of the Dolphin visual treatment objective (VTO) in predicting treatment results were mainly focused on orthognathic treatment. The accuracy of Dolphin VTO prediction for orthodontic treatment is, however, poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Dolphin VTO prediction in soft tissue changes after orthodontic treatment by comparing the changes between predicted and actual values.MethodsA total of 157 patients were screened for eligibility, and 34 young adult patients (8 males, 26 females; mean age 24.8 ± 3.9 years) were finally included in the study based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The landmarks and parameters of the Holdaway soft tissue analysis were used for the cephalometric analyses. The cephalometric tracings of the actual treatment result and the Dolphin predicted treatment outcome were superimposed to calculate the prediction errors. Paired t test was used to compare the statistical differences between the predicted and actual treatment outcomes of the parameters used in the Holdaway soft tissue analysis.ResultsThere were significant differences between the predicted and actual values in parameters of the Holdaway soft tissue analysis (P 
       
  • Exploring the perception of orthodontic treatment need using the Dental
           Aesthetic Index and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Silvia A.S. Vedovello, Patrícia R. dos Santos, Ana Letícia Mello de Carvalho, Mario Vedovello Filho, Glaucia M.B. Ambrosano, Antonio C. Pereira, Marcelo de C. MeneghimIntroductionThis study aimed to explore the perception of orthodontic treatment need by using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) and the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN).MethodsA cross-sectional study was conducted on a representative random sample (N = 248) of adolescents aged 12 years. The DAI and both components of IOTN were used to evaluate malocclusion. The association between the Dental Health Component of the IOTN with gender and ethnic group were analyzed by chi-square test. The concordances between the indexes were analyzed by the kappa statistic, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).ResultsThe prevalence of adolescents with high severity and orthodontic treatment need was 10.5% (95% CI, 6.7-14.3), 36.5% (95% CI, 32.3-44.3), and 73.4% (95% CI, 67.9-78.9) for the Aesthetic Component of the IOTN, Dental Health Component of the IOTN, and DAI, respectively. The indexes showed high agreement for the cases with low treatment need, whereas low concordance was observed for the cases with high treatment need.ConclusionsThe perception of orthodontic treatment need was assessed differently using DAI and IOTN.
       
  • Factors affecting forced eruption duration of impacted and labially
           displaced canines
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Hyeonseo Shin, Mira Park, Jong-Moon Chae, Jun Lee, Hun Jun Lim, Bong Chul KimIntroductionPatients with impacted maxillary canines typically endure long treatment time, and reliable pretreatment estimates of orthodontic treatment duration would be beneficial to patients and clinicians. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that affect the duration of forced eruption for impacted maxillary canines.MethodsData from treatment records and radiographic scans of 27 patients with 29 impacted and labially displaced maxillary canines (25 unilateral, 2 bilateral) were collected. The patients underwent surgical and orthodontic interventions to bring the canine into the dental arch. Linear and angular measurements between the cusp tip and various reference planes were made on 3-dimensional images. Measurements associated with dental follicle, bone density, and canine root length were also obtained. Data were analyzed using simple linear regression and stepwise regression analysis.ResultsA total of 29 treated canines moved into the arch over a period of 13.0 ± 8.3 months (range, 5-33 months). Simple regression analysis showed that the only significant factor, with duration of traction as the dependent factor, was pretreatment inclination of the canines toward the midsagittal plane; stepwise regression analysis indicated a strong direct correlation between the duration of traction and this factor. The other variables were not significantly associated with the duration of traction.ConclusionsThe inclination of canines toward the midsagittal plane was found to be a reliable predictor of the duration of forced eruption for impacted maxillary canines.
       
  • The thickness of posterior buccal attached gingiva at common miniscrew
           insertion sites in subjects with different facial types
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Özer Alkan, Yeşim KayaIntroductionThe purpose of this study was to assess the thicknesses of maxillary and mandibular posterior buccal approximal attached gingiva at common miniscrew insertion sites, which has critical importance in determining miniscrew length, in subjects with different facial types.MethodsOne hundred seventy-four subjects with no transversal skeletal discrepancy were included in this study. The facial types of these subjects were evaluated in the sagittal and vertical directions. In the sagittal direction, the subjects were assigned into 3 groups: skeletal Class I, II, and III. Also, each of these groups was divided into subgroups in the vertical direction: low angle, norm, and high angle. Transgingival probing was used to measure the thickness of the buccal attached gingiva.ResultsThe thickness of the buccal attached gingiva between the second premolar-first molar ranged from 1.18 ± 0.33 to 1.46 ± 0.28 mm and from 1.28 ± 0.30 to 1.58 ± 0.37 mm in the maxilla and mandible, respectively. The thickness of the buccal attached gingiva between the first-second molars ranged from 1.31 ± 0.41 to 1.60 ± 0.62 mm and from 1.36 ± 0.43 to 1.72 ± 0.52 mm in the maxilla and mandible, respectively. In terms of the thicknesses of the buccal attached gingiva of second premolar-first molar and first-second molars, no statistically significant difference was found between subjects with different facial types.ConclusionsIt was determined that the thicknesses of maxillary and mandibular posterior buccal approximal attached gingiva varied between 1.18-1.72. At this point, the insertion of miniscrews of 7-8 mm in length was recommended for maxillary and mandibular posterior buccal regions, in order to obtain adequate insertion depth.
       
  • Maxillomandibular and occlusal relationships in preadolescent patients
           with syndromic craniosynostosis treated by LeFort III distraction
           osteogenesis: 10-year surgical and phenotypic stability
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Travis L. Gibson, Barry H. Grayson, Joseph G. McCarthy, Pradip R. ShetyeIntroductionLeFort III distraction osteogenesis may be indicated in the treatment of syndromic craniosynostosis with severe midface retrusion. This study investigates long-term changes in patients undergoing distraction as children, and compares outcomes to an unaffected, untreated control.MethodsFifteen patients (9 males, 6 females) with syndromic craniosynostosis treated by LeFort III distraction at an average age of 4.9 ± 1.5 years were identified. Lateral cephalograms at predistraction, immediate, 1-, 5-, and 10-year postdistraction were superimposed using the best-fit of cranial base details. An untreated, unaffected matched control was obtained from the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation Legacy Collection. Differences in landmark location and cephalometric relationships were assessed between time points and between treatment and control groups.ResultsLeFort III distraction produced an average advancement of 14.86 ± 5.14 mm at A-point and 10.54 ± 3.78 mm at orbitale. This advancement produced overcorrection of anteroposterior occlusal relationships and phenotypic correction of midface position. Surgical stability over a 10-year follow-up was excellent. Posttreatment growth was characterized by absent anteroposterior maxillary growth, preservation of dentoalveolar development and maxillary remodeling, and delayed mandibular growth. Subsequent growth resulted in a long-term phenotypic relapse of pretreatment Class III maxillomandibular relationship and negative overjet.ConclusionsLeFort III distraction osteogenesis produces stable advancement of the midface. Overcorrection is required for long-term phenotypic stability because of deficient postdistraction sagittal midface growth. Late mandibular growth contributes to underestimation of the amount of distraction required to produce long-term phenotypic correction.
       
  • Changes in maxillary incisor inclination and position after traction of
           unilateral vs bilateral maxillary impacted canines in nonextraction
           treatment: A cone-beam computed tomography study
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Claudia Chávez-Alvarez, Luis Ernesto Arriola-Guillén, Yalil Augusto Rodríguez-Cárdenas, Gustavo Armando Ruíz-Mora, Gustavo Fiori-Chincaro, Heraldo Luis Dias-Da Silveira, Aron Aliaga-Del CastilloIntroductionThe aim of this study was to compare the inclination and position changes of maxillary incisors after traction of unilateral vs bilateral maxillary impacted canines in nonextraction orthodontic treatment.MethodsThis longitudinal and retrospective study evaluated 24 patients with impacted maxillary canines; 12 with unilateral impaction and 12 with bilateral impaction. All subjects had Angle Class I malocclusion and were orthodontically treated with a standardized traction protocol that did not include premolar extractions. Cone-beam computed tomographies were obtained before and after canine traction and the inclination and position of both maxillary central incisors were measured. Furthermore, dental arch, skeletal, and canine impaction characteristics were evaluated. Paired and independent t tests were used for intra and inter group comparisons, respectively. Multiple linear regressions were also used.ResultsAfter canine traction, a significant incisor labial inclination was observed in the bilateral group (10.41° right side, P = 0.008 and 12.79° left side, P = 0.001), while in the unilateral group, this was observed only on the nonaffected side (6.67°, P = 0.008). Furthermore, a significant protrusion of incisors was observed in the bilateral group (2.66 mm right side, P = 0.006, and 3.15 mm left side, P = 0.001) and in the nonaffected side of the unilateral group (1.74 mm, P = 0.022). Intergroup comparisons showed greater values of incisor labial inclination for the bilateral group when compared with the unilateral group, independently of the sides.ConclusionsTraction of maxillary impacted canines, in nonextraction treatment, produces greater labial inclination of maxillary incisors in bilateral cases and similar protrusion in both unilateral and bilateral cases. Unilateral impaction cases showed significant incisor inclination and protrusion in the nonaffected side. These treatment effects should be considered by clinicians.
       
  • Influence of orthodontic appliance design on employment hiring preferences
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Victor França Didier, Renata Rodrigues Almeida-Pedrin, Paula Vanessa Pedron Oltramari, Thaís Maria Freire Fernandes, Lucineide Lima dos Santos, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira ContiIntroductionThe objective of this study was to evaluate the extent to which different types of orthodontic appliances influence the hiring process of an individual applying for a customer service position.MethodsA total of 7 images were created for 2 adult models: 1 male and 1 female. One image was produced without orthodontic appliances, and 6 simulated the use of orthodontic appliances, including a conventional metallic appliance with a gray elastic ligature, a conventional metallic appliance with blue elastic ligature, a conventional appliance with a transparent elastic ligature, a self-ligating metal appliance, a self-ligating esthetic appliance, and a clear aligner. A photo album was designed for each model and delivered, along with a questionnaire, to individuals in charge of job interviews and hiring. These evaluators included 236 individuals, divided into 4 groups according to age and gender: males between 18-35 years (M), males over 35 years (M > 35), females between 18-35 years (F), and females over 35 years (F > 35). The evaluators quantified the chance of hiring the models using a Visual Analogue Scale. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the evaluators according to gender and age. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare the models according to gender. The Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn post hoc tests were used to compare the appliances according to design. A 5% significance level was used for all tests.ResultsThe clear aligner group showed the highest likelihood of being hired, followed by the group without orthodontic appliances, the groups with esthetic appliances (ie, conventional appliance with a transparent elastic ligature, and self-ligating esthetic appliance), and the groups with metallic appliances (ie, self-ligating metal appliance, conventional metallic appliance with gray elastic ligature, and conventional metallic appliance with blue elastic ligature).ConclusionsAssuming all other qualifications of the applicants are equivalent, the use of an orthodontic appliance may influence job interviews. The better the esthetics of the appliance, the higher the likelihood of the individual being hired.
       
  • Deformation of the zygomaticomaxillary and nasofrontal sutures during
           bone-anchored maxillary protraction and reverse-pull headgear treatments:
           An ex-vivo study
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Ayman Al Dayeh, Richard A. Williams, Terry M. Trojan, Wanda I. ClaroIntroductionBone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) is an emerging treatment that involves applying a protraction load to the maxillary bone. Although it is believed that such an approach results in better sutural separation, this has not been investigated. This study aimed to assess and compare the deformation of 1 circumaxillary suture (zygomaticomaxillary suture [ZMS]) and 1 facial suture (nasofrontal suture [NFS]) during BAMP and reverse-pull headgear (RPHG) treatment.MethodsThe study was performed ex vivo on 15 pig heads. Miniplates were placed in the maxillary bone and the body of the mandible. A molar tube was bonded to the maxillary first molars. Six single-element strain gauges and 3 differential variable reluctance transducers were installed across the ZMS and NFS bilaterally. Each head underwent BAMP and RPHG unilaterally and bilaterally.ResultsIn unilateral experiments, both BAMP and RPHG resulted in tension on the ipsilateral ZMS and NFS and compression on the contralateral side, with higher magnitude in the BAMP group. In bilateral experiments, both modalities resulted in tension at the ZMS, with higher magnitude in the BAMP group. Deformation of the NFS was different between the 2 groups: tension in majority of the BAMP and compression in most of the RPHG heads.ConclusionsOur study shows a higher magnitude of sutural separation in BAMP than in RPHG. The pattern of sutural deformation is consistent with a forward displacement of the midface in BAMP compared with an upward and backward rotation in the RPHG. Rotation of the maxilla was also present in some of the subjects who underwent BAMP.
       
  • Qualitative and quantitative changes in the oral bacterial flora occur
           shortly after implementation of fixed orthodontic appliances
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Elisabeth Reichardt, Jennifer Geraci, Svea Sachse, Jürgen Rödel, Wolfgang Pfister, Bettina Löffler, Yvonne Wagner, Martin Eigenthaler, Michael WolfIntroductionIn this pilot study, we aimed to determine qualitative and quantitative microbiological changes after the implementation of orthodontic appliances.MethodsA total of 10 healthy patients aged 12-15 years were recruited who needed to undergo orthodontic treatment with buccal fixed appliances. Gingival conditions were assessed by the Gingival Index, Periodontal Screening Index, and Sulcus Bleeding Index. Microbiological samples were collected before and 1 week after the start of therapy at premolars and molars of the right upper quadrant. Bacterial species were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.ResultsThe total number of bacteria increased. Six bacterial species were identified that are involved in the development of caries and other infectious processes. The bacteria selectively adapted more efficiently to the new oral milieu compared with the general oral microbial background. There was a significant increase in Streptococcus spp at the premolars and molars. In all individuals, symptoms of inflammation and gingivitis were detected as a response to the bacterial challenge.ConclusionsOrthodontic treatment induces significant changes in the oral microbial flora associated with gingivitis and an enhanced risk for cariogenic reactions within the first days of orthodontic treatment. To prevent or reduce infectious side effects, oral hygiene instructions and control of patients are necessary before and during the beginning of the therapy.
       
  • The influence of labiolingual and mesiodistal anterior tooth dimensions on
           interarch relationships: A modified anterior Bolton analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Yelena Akselrod Beygelman, Roozbeh Khosravi, Mohamed Masoud, David Turpin, Anne-Marie BollenIntroductionTooth size and morphology of anterior teeth influence interarch relationships. The Bolton analysis uses tooth width to calculate a sum of mandibular to maxillary tooth width ratios necessary for proper occlusion. Several parameters not factored in the Bolton analysis influence occlusion, such as tooth thickness. This study sought to use 3D modeling to develop and assess a tooth size analysis that encompasses labioligual thickness as well as mesiodistal width of anterior teeth.MethodsThe role of tooth thickness in interarch relationships was studied using simulations in a 3D modeling software (Suresmile). To develop a new chart of interarch ratios based on tooth thickness, a series of simulations were produced with varying tooth thicknesses and widths. The new ratios were evaluated on records from 50 patients.ResultsFindings from the simulations suggest that the ideal tooth thickness remains approximately 2 mm if the overall tooth width of the dentition increases and the interarch anterior ratio is maintained. The thickness-adjusted anterior mandibular to maxillary tooth ratio ranges from 0.70-0.79 depending on the tooth thickness. This thickness-adjusted ratio provides a superior prediction for the sum of anterior tooth width compared with the Bolton analysis.ConclusionTooth thickness affects interarch tooth width ratios and anterior occlusion. A thickness-adjusted ratio can be used to more accurately predict anterior tooth dimensions necessary to achieve proper occlusion.
       
  • Objective evaluation of compliance after orthodontic treatment using
           Hawley or vacuum-formed retainers: A 2-center randomized controlled trial
           over a 3-month period
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Georgia Vagdouti, Effimia Karvouni, Elias Bitsanis, Despina KoletsiIntroductionThe aim of this 2-arm parallel trial was to assess patient compliance objectively with Hawley or vacuum-formed retainers in the maxillary arch in a 3-month period after active orthodontic treatment through the use of the thermosensitive microsensor TheraMon.MethodsPatients who had just completed orthodontic treatment in the Postgraduate Orthodontic Clinic, School of Dentistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and in a private orthodontic practice were randomly allocated to either the Hawley or vacuum-formed group for retention. Eligibility criteria included patients aged 12-18 years who had undergone orthodontic treatment in both arches for ≤ 5 years. The main outcome was the average objective daily difference in compliance measured with TheraMon between patients receiving either Hawley or vacuum-formed retainers in the maxillary arch for 3 months. Secondary outcomes pertained to the average objective difference in compliance between the 2 retainers for the first month in retention and the association between objective measurements of compliance and diary-reported duration of wear for both the first and 3- month periods. Randomization was implemented with a computer-generated randomization list; allocation was concealed in sequentially numbered, sealed, opaque envelopes. Blinding to the study protocol was not feasible either for the patient or orthodontist. Patients were instructed to wear the retainer full-time. Data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics and linear regression with standard errors based on the bootstrap method.ResultsSeventy-seven patients (median age 14.8 years; interquartile range 1.5; range 12.1-17.6) were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either a Hawley or vacuum-formed retainer. Baseline characteristics did not present significant differences between groups. One patient from the Hawley group was excluded from 3 months' follow-up owing to a microsensor fault. Objectively assessed median daily wear time for the Hawley group was 15.3 hours (interquartile range 6.8), whereas for the vacuum-formed group it was 18.3 hours (interquartile range 4.6) for the 3-month interval. Patients allocated to vacuum-formed retainers had higher wearing values of 2.10 h/d compared with the Hawley group, after adjusting for trial settings (mean difference 2.10; 95% confidence interval 0.32-3.89; P = 0.02). Patients from private orthodontic practice had an increased potential for compliance of 2.16 h/d compared with university settings after adjusting for type of appliance (mean difference 2.16; 95% confidence interval 0.34-3.97; P = 0.02). A significant correlation was detected between objective assessment and self-reported compliance for both retention protocols in the first and 3-month intervals. No harm was observed during follow-up.ConclusionsThis study found relatively high compliance in the short-term retention phase for both appliances. Vacuum-formed retainers were better accepted by adolescent patients, whereas those proceeding to private orthodontic practice were more compliant. There was a positive and statistically significant correlation between objective and subjective measures of compliance.RegistrationThis trial was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03683862.FundingNo funding or conflict of interest to be declared.ProtocolThe protocol was not published before trial commencement.
       
  • Hold your tongue
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Peter M. Greco
       
  • Residents' journal review
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Ricky E. Harrell, John W. Stockstill
       
  • Authors' response
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Fatma Deniz Uzuner, Belma Isik Aslan, Mufide Dincer
       
  • Dentoskeletal morphology in Class I and Class II malocclusion with
           increased overbite
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): S.S. Karthickeyan
       
  • Author response
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Ufuk Tatli
       
  • Mini-implant anchorage: Much is still unknown
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s): Wen Liao, Xue Jiang
       
  • Information for readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 6Author(s):
       
  • Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s):
       
  • November 2019:156(4)
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Allen H. Moffitt
       
  • I don't have to tell you that
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Laurance Jerrold
       
  • Mechanical and geometric properties of thermoformed and 3D printed clear
           dental aligners
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Prashant Jindal, Mamta Juneja, Francesco Luke Siena, Divya Bajaj, Philip BreedonIntroductionThe aim of this research was to compare compressive mechanical properties and geometric inaccuracies between conventionally manufactured thermoformed Duran clear dental aligners and 3D printed Dental Long Term (LT) resin-based clear aligners using 3D modeling and printing techniques.MethodsImpressions of the patient's dentition were scanned and using 3D modeling software, dental models were designed and 3D printed. These printed models then underwent vacuum thermoforming to thermoform a clear Duran thermoplastic sheet of 0.75-mm thickness into clear dental aligners of the same thickness of 0.75 mm. For the same dental model, aligners were also designed and 3D printed to 0.75-mm thickness creating biocompatible clear dental aligners using Dental LT resin utilizing a Formlabs 3D printing machine for direct usage by the patients. Five observers calculated teeth height for both types of aligners for evaluation of geometric deviations. Both types of aligners were subjected to compression loading of 1000 N to evaluate their load vs displacement behavior.Results3D printed cured clear dental aligners were found to be geometrically more accurate with an average relative difference in tooth height of 2.55% in comparison with thermoformed aligners (4.41%). Low standard deviations (0.03-0.09 mm) were observed for tooth height measurements taken by all the observers for both types of aligners. 3D printed aligners could resist a maximum load of nearly 662 N for a low displacement of 2.93 mm; whereas, thermoformed aligners could resist a load on only 105 N for 2.93-mm displacement. Thermoformed aligners deformed plastically and irreversibly for large displacements; whereas, 3D printed aligners deformed elastically with reversibility for lower displacements.Conclusions3D printed and suitably cured Dental LT resin-based clear dental aligners are suggested to be more suitable for patient use as they are geometrically more accurate; this presents an opportunity to make processing time savings while ensuring an aligner is mechanically stronger and elastic in comparison with the conventionally produced thermoplastic-based thermoformed clear dental aligners.
       
  • Virtual surgical planning: Balancing esthetics, practicality, and
           anticipated stability in a complex Class III patient
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Éva Veiszenbacher, Jue Wang, Matthew Davis, Peter D. Waite, Peter Borbély, Chung H. KauThe treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion with anterior open bite is a complex and challenging aspect of orthodontics. Facial esthetic factors, practicality and the anticipated stability of a provisional surgical plan must all be factored into the final decision of the actual orthodontic-orthognathic treatment. This case report presents the multidisciplinary treatment of a 39-year-old female patient with skeletal Class III, severe open bite with first dental contact being on the second molars, lateral crossbite, and crowding in both arches. The nonextraction treatment started with aligning and leveling of the teeth in both arches followed by an initial surgical plan based on the clinical evaluation of the smile esthetics. Precise surgical planning information was imported into the Virtual Surgica (VSP Orthognathics) workflow to visualize the direction and amount of movement necessary. The final plan was adjusted because of anticipated practical limitations of the surgery as well as to insure the stability. LeFort I, bilateral sagittal split osteotomies, and setback genioplasty were thus performed. After the surgery, the treatment concluded with the fine adjustment of the occlusion. In the end, good esthetic and functional outcomes with long-term stability were achieved as a result of this delicate multidisciplinary approach.
       
  • Retreatment of a patient: Orthognathic surgery-first approach with
           customized lingual appliances combined with miniplate anchorage
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Graziane Olímpio Pereira, Wilana Moura, Guilherme Janson, José Fernando Castanha Henriques, Carlos Henrique Guimarães Jr, Ravindra NandaOrthognathic surgery is necessary when a patient's major complaints include skeletal discrepancies that cannot be corrected with orthodontic treatment alone. Currently, orthognathic surgery can be performed through conventional and surgery-first approaches. Some advantages are attributed to the surgery-first approach, such as shortened treatment time and immediate esthetic improvement. The aim of this case report is to present the retreatment of a patient presenting with a skeletal Class III malocclusion, with maxillary retrusion and mandibular protrusion, who was successfully treated with the surgery-first approach and customized lingual appliances, combined with miniplate anchorage in the postoperative orthodontic treatment. The total orthodontic treatment time was 8 months.
       
  • Three-dimensional changes of the zygomaticomaxillary complex after
           mini-implant assisted rapid maxillary expansion
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Kyeong-Tae Song, Jae Hyun Park, Won Moon, Jong-Moon Chae, Kyung-Hwa KangIntroductionThe aim of this study was to investigate 3-dimensional changes of the zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC) after mini-implant assisted rapid maxillary expansion (MARME).MethodsA total of 15 pairs of cone-beam computed tomography 3-dimensional images taken before expansion (T0) and after expansion (T1) were analyzed by measuring changes in the coordinates of the landmarks of the ZMC.ResultsChanges in the x coordinates of the landmarks showed significant expansion (P 
       
  • Contribution of the mandible position to the facial profile perception of
           a female facial profile: An eye-tracking study
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Peishan Huang, Bin Cai, Chen Zhou, Weicai Wang, Xi Wang, Dingguo Gao, Baicheng BaoIntroductionStudies concerning the visual attention of laypersons viewing the soft tissue facial profile of men and women with malocclusion are lacking. This study aimed to determine the visual attention to the facial profile of patients with different levels of mandibular protrusion and facial background attractiveness using an eye-tracking device.MethodsThe scanning paths of 54 Chinese laypersons (50% female, 50% male, aged 18-23 years) were recorded by an eye-tracking device when they observed composite female facial profile images (n = 24), which were combinations of different degrees of mandibular protrusion (normal, slight, moderate, and severe) and different levels of facial background attractiveness (attractive, average, and unattractive). Dependent variables (fixation duration and first fixation time) were analyzed using repeated-measures factorial analysis of variance.ResultsFor normal mandibular profiles, the fixation duration of the eyes was significantly higher than that of other facial features (P 
       
  • Alterations of the oral microbiome in patients treated with the Invisalign
           system or with fixed appliances
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Qian Wang, Jin-bao Ma, Bo Wang, Xue Zhang, Yu-ling Yin, Hua BaiIntroductionAlthough the Invisalign system has been used widely in recent years, the influences of this treatment on the oral microbiome and whether or not this influence is different from that of fixed appliances is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the changes in the oral microbiome in patients treated with the Invisalign system or with fixed appliances.MethodsFifteen subjects were enrolled, comprising 5 fixed appliance patients, 5 Invisalign patient, and 5 healthy controls. Saliva samples were collected, and high-throughput pyrosequencing was performed based on the 16S rRNA gene.ResultsBoth fixed and Invisalign orthodontic treatments resulted in dysbiosis of the oral microbiome. Firmicutes and TM7 at the phyla level and Neisseria at the genus level displayed statistically significant differences between the 2 orthodontic groups. The effect of these changes with microbiome on oral health was inconsistent. The inferred microbial function of the Invisalign group suggested this group was more predisposed to periodontal diseases.ConclusionThe influence of the Invisalign system on the oral microbiome was no better for oral health compared with fixed appliances. The convenience of maintaining oral hygiene rather than changes in the oral microbiome may be the underlying reason for the performance of the Invisalign system on oral health.
       
  • Diagnostic testing of cervical vertebral maturation staging: An
           independent assessment
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Kara M. Morris, Henry W. Fields, F. Michael Beck, Do-Gyoon KimIntroductionThe reliability of the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method has been questioned. The objective of this research was to evaluate the diagnostic reliability of the CVM method to diagnose the mandibular growth spurt using longitudinal records from an alternative database (Iowa Facial Growth Study [IFGS]) using established diagnostic testing methods.MethodsCephalometric films from 43 subjects (males = 20, females = 23) with Class I or Class II skeletal pattern from the IFGS were scanned, digitized, and adjusted for magnification. At least 5 consecutive, annual films were digitized. For each subject, mandibular length (Co-Gn) was measured for each film, and the growth increment between films was calculated. The largest growth increment was the growth spurt. For each subject, the film displaying CVM stage 3 was identified by a blinded examiner viewing the films in random order. Interrater and intrarater repeatability for Co-Gn (intraclass correlation) and CVM staging (weighted kappa) were calculated. Diagnostic tests, including sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were carried out. The present data were compared with data previously derived from samples of the University of Michigan, Oregon, and Burlington Growth studies (UMGS, OGS, and BGS, respectively). A multilevel logistic regression analysis was also run with the mandibular growth peak as the response variable.ResultsInterrater repeatability for mandibular measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.91) and CVM staging (k = 0.88) were excellent. Intrarater repeatability for mandibular measurements (ICC = 0.98) and CVM staging (kw = 0.55) were excellent to moderate. The UMGS data demonstrated higher sensitivity with comparable specificity. Accuracy was largely similar. Their PPV and NPV had larger ranges. The OGS and BGS data, compared with the IFGS data, showed that our sensitivity and PPVs were higher, that their specificity was higher, and that the NPV and accuracy were very similar. The regression analysis was applied to age groups 10-11 years through 13-14 years. Only chronological age was significant (P = 0.04).ConclusionsAgreement between CVM stage 3 and the maximum mandibular growth spurt is inconsistent. The diagnostic capability of CVM for the mandibular growth spurt is questionable.
       
  • Herbst appliance anchored to miniscrews in the upper and lower arches vs
           standard Herbst: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Antonio Manni, Marco Migliorati, Chiara Calzolari, Armando Silvestrini-BiavatiIntroductionThe aim of this pilot study was to present the preliminary results of Class II malocclusion treatment using a skeletally anchored Herbst appliance with miniscrews inserted in the maxillary and mandibular arches to improve anchorage control and skeletal effects.MethodsThe treatment group (TG) consisted of 13 patients (10 males [M], 3 females [F]; mean age of 12.8 years) with Class II Division 1 malocclusion who were treated with the Herbst appliance and miniscrews inserted in the maxillary and mandibular arches. They were compared with a control group (CG) of 13 patients (10 F, 3 M, mean age of 12.2 years) with Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated with the standard Herbst appliance without miniscrews. Lateral cephalograms were taken before and after Herbst treatment, and cephalometric analysis was performed.ResultsIn the TG group SNB (°) increased by 2.9°, whereas in CG group SNB (°) increased by 1.1° (P = 0.017). ANB (°) decreased in both groups: −3.3° in the TG group vs −1.3° in the CG group (P = 0.014). Pg-OLp distance increased in both groups: 5.70 mm in the TG group and 0.8 mm in the CG group (P = 0.022). Mandibular incisors proclined 1.6° in the TG group and 3.7° in the CG group.ConclusionsHerbst treatment reinforced with 4 miniscrews (2 in each arch) increased the orthopedic effect of treatment in growing patients with Class II malocclusion.
       
  • Comparative analysis of microorganism adhesion on coated, partially
           coated, and uncoated orthodontic archwires: A prospective clinical study
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Kleist Christian Costa Lima, Marco Aurélio Benini Paschoal, Júlio de Araújo Gurgel, Karina Maria Salvatore Freitas, Célia Regina Maio Pinzan-VercelinoIntroductionThis study aimed to compare the microorganism adhesion on coated, partially coated, and uncoated orthodontic archwires after clinical use. The correlation between surface roughness (SR) and bacterial colonization was also evaluated.MethodsA total of 48 archwire segments (0.016 × 0.022-in) were equally divided into 4 groups: nickel-titanium coated, nickel-titanium partially coated, uncoated stainless steel, and uncoated nickel-titanium. The archwires were randomly inserted in a split-mouth study design. After 4 weeks of clinical use, the total number of microorganisms adhering to the archwire was quantified and transformed into colony-forming units. SR was evaluated using a profilometer. A one-way and two-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey test, paired-samples t test, and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis.ResultsAll the archwires presented microorganism adhesion, with the nickel-titanium–coated group demonstrating the highest value (P 
       
  • A comparative study of initial changes in pulpal blood flow between clear
           aligners and fixed orthodontic appliances
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Elham S.J. Abu Alhaija, Sawsan Y. Al-Abdallah, Nessrin A. TahaIntroductionThe objective of this study is to evaluate and compare the initial changes of pulpal blood flow (PBF) using clear aligner and fixed orthodontic treatment.MethodsA total of 45 subjects were subdivided into 2 groups: group 1; 25 subjects treated with preadjusted edgewise fixed appliance with 0.014″ nickel titanium as the alignment archwire and group 2; 20 subjects treated using clear aligner. In both groups, PBF was measured for the maxillary right and mandibular left teeth using Laser Doppler flowmetry at different time intervals (20 minutes, 48 hours, 72 hours, and 1 month) after the fitting of the nickel titanium archwire in group 1 and after the delivery of the second aligner in group 2. A repeated-measures analysis of variance and a Bonferroni post-hoc comparison test were applied to determine differences at the various time intervals.ResultsThe PBF decreased in both types of appliances after force application. The maximum reduction in PBF was reached after 72 hours. It returned to its normal values within 1 month. The differences in PBF between the 2 groups did not reach any statistical significance.ConclusionsPBF in orthodontically treated teeth decreased 20 minutes after orthodontic force application in both fixed and clear aligner appliances. In both treatment groups, most changes occurred within 48 hours of force application. PBF returned to its normal values within 1 month. Changes in PBF in both treatment groups were comparable.
       
  • X-ray beam angulation can compromise 2-dimensional diagnosis of
           interradicular space for mini-implants
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Sérgio Estelita Barros, Matilde Abella, Guilherme Janson, Kelly ChiquetoIntroductionThe aim of this research was to evaluate the influence of x-ray projection geometry on interradicular space of the posterior maxillary arch.MethodsCone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of 32 patients (16.85 ± 4.93 years) who met the selection criteria were enrolled. One hundred ninety-two interradicular sites of the posterior maxillary arch were evaluated. Before measurements, each side of the maxillary arch was orientated in all 3 planes of space to obtain CBCT synthesized periapical radiographs with 0° projection geometry (orthogonal x-ray beam—orthogonal X-ray angulation [OX]). Standardized CBCT axial rotations (10°, 20°, –10°, and –20°) were used to simulate periapical radiographs taken with mesial and distal angulation of the x-ray beam (mesial x-ray angulation [MX] and distal x-ray angulation [DX]). Interradicular space widths were measured on OX, MX, and DX CBCT synthesized periapical radiographs. Measurements were performed parallel to the occlusal plane at 3 mm and 6 mm apical to the midpoint of the alveolar crest. Interradicular distances were statistically compared (P 
       
  • Could have fooled me
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Peter M. Greco
       
  • Authors' response
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Menghan Zhang, Haiping Lu
       
  • Induced ankylosis of primary canines
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s): Diane Johnson
       
  • Information for readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Volume 156, Issue 5Author(s):
       
 
 
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