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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3160 journals)

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Showing 1201 - 1400 of 3160 Journals sorted alphabetically
Graphical Models     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
Groundwater for Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.329, CiteScore: 1)
Growth Factors and Cytokines in Health and Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Growth Hormone & IGF Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.059, CiteScore: 2)
Gynecologic Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.339, CiteScore: 4)
Gynecologic Oncology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Habitat Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.336, CiteScore: 3)
Hand Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.556, CiteScore: 1)
Hand Surgery and Rehabilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Handai Nanophotonics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Adhesives and Sealants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Agricultural Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Algebra     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Analytical Separations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Biological Physics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Chemical Neuroanatomy     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Clinical Neurology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of Clinical Neurophysiology     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Complex Analysis     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Computational Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 4.16, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of Defense Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Development Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Handbook of Differential Equations: Evolutionary Equations     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Differential Equations: Ordinary Differential Equations     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Differential Equations: Stationary Partial Differential Equations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Differential Geometry     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Dynamical Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Econometrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Handbook of Economic Forecasting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Handbook of Economic Growth     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Environmental Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Experimental Economics Results     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Handbook of Exploration and Environmental Geochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Exploration Geochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Ferromagnetic Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Game Theory with Economic Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Geophysical Exploration: Seismic Exploration     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Handbook of Immunohistochemistry and in Situ Hybridization of Human Carcinomas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Income Distribution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Handbook of Industrial Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Handbook of Intl. Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Labor Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Handbook of Law and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Handbook of Macroeconomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of Magnetic Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.467, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of Mathematical Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Mathematical Fluid Dynamics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Metal Physics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Monetary Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Handbook of Natural Resource and Energy Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Handbook of Numerical Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Handbook of Perception and Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Petroleum Exploration and Production     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Population and Family Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Handbook of Powder Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Handbook of Public Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Sensors and Actuators     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Handbook of Surface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Handbook of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of the Economics of Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of the Economics of Finance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Handbook of the Economics of Giving, Altruism and Reciprocity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of the Geometry of Banach Spaces     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of the History of Logic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Thermal Conductivity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Handbook of Vapor Pressure     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 3)
Handbooks of Management Accounting Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
HardwareX     Open Access  
Harmful Algae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 4)
HBRC J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.506, CiteScore: 3)
Health Outcomes Research in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
Health Policy and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.322, CiteScore: 1)
Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Healthcare : The J. of Delivery Science and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Hearing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.35, CiteScore: 3)
Heart & Lung: The J. of Acute and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 2)
Heart Failure Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 2)
Heart Rhythm     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.231, CiteScore: 4)
Heart, Lung and Circulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
HeartRhythm Case Reports     Open Access   (SJR: 0.232, CiteScore: 0)
Heliyon     Open Access   (SJR: 0.355, CiteScore: 1)
Hellenic J. of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.479, CiteScore: 1)
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, CiteScore: 1)
Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.282, CiteScore: 3)
Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.711, CiteScore: 2)
High Energy Density Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.933, CiteScore: 2)
Hipertensión y Riesgo Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Historia Mathematica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
History of CERN     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
History of Neuroscience in Autobiography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV & AIDS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.134, CiteScore: 0)
Homeopathy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.678, CiteScore: 1)
HOMO - J. of Comparative Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.335, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.137, CiteScore: 0)
Hong Kong J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong Physiotherapy J.     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
Hormigón y Acero     Full-text available via subscription  
Hormones and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.638, CiteScore: 4)
Horticultural Plant J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hospital Medicine Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, CiteScore: 0)
Human Factors in Information Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Human Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Human Movement Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.756, CiteScore: 2)
Human Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.304, CiteScore: 3)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.675, CiteScore: 4)
Hydrometallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.208, CiteScore: 3)
IATSS Research     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Icarus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75, SJR: 2.037, CiteScore: 3)
ICT Express     Open Access   (SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
IDCases     Open Access   (SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
IERI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IFAC-PapersOnLine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
IIMB Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
IJC Heart & Vessels     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Heart & Vasculature     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.342, CiteScore: 1)
IJC Metabolic & Endocrine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Image and Vision Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 3)
Imagen Diagnóstica     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Imagerie de la Femme     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.124, CiteScore: 0)
Immunity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57, SJR: 13.393, CiteScore: 16)
Immuno-analyse & Biologie Spécialisée     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Immunobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.1, CiteScore: 3)
Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.132, CiteScore: 3)
Immunology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.168, CiteScore: 3)
Immunotoxicology of Drugs and Chemicals: an Experimental and Clinical Approach     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Implantodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
Indagationes Mathematicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 1)
Indian Heart J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Specialities     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Tuberculosis     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.273, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial Chemistry Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Industrial Crops and Products     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.091, CiteScore: 4)
Industrial Marketing Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.663, CiteScore: 4)
Industrial Safety Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Infant Behavior and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.784, CiteScore: 2)
Infectio     Open Access   (SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Infection, Disease & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 1)
Infection, Genetics and Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.278, CiteScore: 3)
Infectious Disease Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.359, CiteScore: 5)
Informatics in Medicine Unlocked     Open Access   (SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Information & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.628, CiteScore: 5)
Information and Computation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Information and Organization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.202, CiteScore: 3)
Information and Software Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.581, CiteScore: 4)
Information Economics and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 1)
Information Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.832, CiteScore: 7)
Information Processing & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 471, SJR: 0.92, CiteScore: 4)
Information Processing in Agriculture     Open Access   (SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 2)
Information Processing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Information Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 537, SJR: 1.635, CiteScore: 5)
Information Security Technical Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.805, CiteScore: 4)
Infosecurity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Infrared Physics & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.54, CiteScore: 2)
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.99, CiteScore: 2)
Injury Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Inmunología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Innovative Food Science & Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.201, CiteScore: 3)
Inorganic Chemistry Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.43, CiteScore: 2)
Inorganica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.485, CiteScore: 2)
Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.912, CiteScore: 4)
Instabilities in Silicon Devices     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Insulin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Insurance: Mathematics and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.083, CiteScore: 2)
Integration, the VLSI J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 1)
Integrative Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intellectual Economics     Open Access  
Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.633, CiteScore: 3)
Intensive and Critical Care Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.611, CiteScore: 2)
Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.164, CiteScore: 0)
Interface Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Intermetallics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.568, CiteScore: 4)
Internet Interventions : The application of information technology in mental and behavioural health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.962, CiteScore: 4)
Interventional Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. Biodeterioration & Biodegradation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.086, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.012, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.553, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. Comparative Jurisprudence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. Dairy J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.051, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Emergency Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Immunopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.051, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. for Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.638, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. for Parasitology : Drugs and Drug Resistance     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.556, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.455, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Dairy Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.051
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0958-6946
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3160 journals]
  • The effect of commonly used dairy processing techniques and unit
           operations on the equol content of dairy products
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Adeline Lefevre, Frédéric Daems, Michel Focant, Justine Peeters, Véronique Ninane, Yvan Larondelle, Eric Froidmont Since a large portion of the milk consumed by human is processed, the aim of this study was to determine possible changes in equol content upon processing milk. Individual milks with different levels of equol content were collected from the morning milking to make skimmed milk and cream, as well as pasteurised and sterilised full fat milks. Pasteurised milk was further processed into yoghurt, kefir, cottage cheese and whey. Yoghurt and kefir were also produced from sterilised milk. Equol content was not affected by either pasteurisation or sterilisation. Compared with raw milk, a higher concentration of equol was measured in skimmed milk, but equol content in cream was lower. The concentration of equol remained unchanged after yoghurt production but was reduced by more than 50% after kefir production. The equol content in whey was low compared with that of raw milk, while it increased sharply in cottage cheese.
       
  • Development and validation of a front-face fluorescence spectroscopy-based
           method to determine casein in raw milk
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Yizhou B. Ma, Inès Birlouez-Aragon, Jayendra K. Amamcharla A front-face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS)-based method for measuring casein in raw milk was developed and validated. Calibration samples (ncal = 20) with different casein contents (0.36–3.7%) were prepared by mixing ultrafiltered retentate (2 × concentrate) and permeate at different ratios. A principal component regression model was developed using the calibration fluorescence spectra, showing a useful prediction power based on a residual prediction deviation of 3.1. The calibration model was independently validated using 20 raw milk samples. The FFFS-based method showed a root mean square error of prediction of 0.15% and 6.7% relative prediction error. A larger sample size should be included in the future to further validate the method and potentially implement it for routine measurement of casein levels in raw milk.
       
  • Optimising water activity for storage of high lipid and high protein
           infant formula milk powder using multivariate analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Hong Cheng, Henriette Erichsen, John Soerensen, Mikael Agerlin Petersen, Leif H. Skibsted High lipid and high protein infant formula milk powders were stored at water activity of 0.11, 0.33 and 0.53 for up to fourteen weeks at 40 °C to investigate the effect of storage water activity on physicochemical properties and formation of volatiles to thereby recommend optimal storage water activity conditions. Water activity of the powders was determined during storage together with surface colour, glass transition temperature combined with dynamic headspace sampling followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the optimal water activity for storage of high lipid infant formula milk powder, for which lipid oxidation was found to be the critical quality parameter, is aw = 0.33 with lowest lipid oxidation, while for high protein infant formula milk powder, for which protein degradation was found to be the critical quality parameter, aw = 0.11 is optimal to limit formation of Maillard reaction products.
       
  • Influence of unit operations on immunoglobulins and thermal stability of
           colostrum fractions
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): S.G. Borad, A.K. Singh, S. Kapila, P. Behare, S. Arora, L. Sabikhi Colostrum-based ingredients are gaining significance in the global nutraceutical market as dietary supplements, but compositional variation, bioactive heat sensitivity and lack of appropriate preservation technologies hamper commercial colostrum processing. The effect of commonly employed unit operations on the physicochemical and nutraceutical components of skim colostrum was determined, and effects of membrane processing on its thermal gelation temperature, key to further liquid processing, were monitored. Homogenisation and high-shear mixing did not alter immunoglobulin content. However, commercial thermal pasteurisation (72 °C, 15 s) and batch pasteurisation (63 °C, 30 min) led to 56.4% and 24.6% denaturation of IgG, respectively. Microfiltration eliminated microbial load of diluted skim colostrum to render it practically sterile, while ultrafiltration concentrated the proteins of colostrum fractions. Concentration of protein, particularly immunoglobulins, resulted in lowering of thermal gelation temperature. Skim colostrum and colostrum whey can, therefore, be preserved by employing microfiltration and concentrated with simultaneous purification by ultrafiltration.
       
  • A feasibility study on the pilot scale manufacture of fresh cheese from
           skim milk retentates without acid whey production: Effect of calcium
           content on bitterness and texture
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Johannes Schäfer, Karin Sebald, Andreas Dunkel, Thomas Hofmann, Ines Rosenthal, Regina Schuster, Zeynep Atamer, Jörg Hinrichs The sensory and structural properties of fresh cheeses (8.0%, w/w, protein) made from fermented skim milk retentates [concentrated-fermented (CoF) fresh cheese] with different calcium-protein ratios (Ca:Prot; 15.9–36.6 mg g−1) by means of pilot plant scale microfiltration (MF) and MF in the diafiltration (DF) mode without acid whey (AW) production were characterised. Calcium reduction reduced the bitterness level significantly (by 53.4%) and the bitter peptide content (by ≈33%) of the CoF fresh cheese after ≤ 1 week of storage; however, storage for ≥ 2 weeks resulted in an increase of both bitterness and bitter peptide content, and quantitatively changed the peptide pattern, possibly due to lack of thermisation. Fresh cheese with a lower bitterness level can be successfully manufactured, while avoiding AW production, if the Ca:Prot of the milk retentate is decreased to ≤15.9 mg g−1 (calcium content = 1240 mg kg−1 at 7.81%, w/w, protein) prior to fermentation.
       
  • Effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on the sonocrystallisation and physical
           properties of anhydrous milk fat
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Tuyen Truong, Martin Palmer, Nidhi Bansal, Bhesh Bhandari The effects of dissolved CO2 (0–2000 ppm) coupled with ultrasound (US; 20 kHz) on the physical properties of anhydrous milk fat (AMF) were examined. Carbonated AMF was sonicated at 28 °C for 5 s at various amplitudes and subjected to isothermal (28 °C) and non-isothermal (cooling from 28 to 5 °C) crystallisation conditions. AMF microstructure, thermal properties and hardness were evaluated after 48 h of storage. In general, carbonated AMF samples treated with the same US amplitude exhibited a slight decrease in endset-melting temperature, smaller fat crystals with denser fat crystal network. Dissolved CO2 caused harder texture of sonicated AMF at 25 °C. However, when carbonated + sonicated AMF samples was stored at 5 °C, their texture appeared to be softer than that of the control sample. A protective effect of CO2 against formation of primary oxidative products during 90 days of storage was evidenced in both non-sonicated and sonicated AMF.
       
  • Effect of Greek-style yoghurt manufacturing processes on starter
           and probiotic bacteria populations during storage
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Andréanne Moineau-Jean, Claude P. Champagne, Denis Roy, Yves Raymond, Gisèle LaPointe This study compared viable counts of Streptococcus thermophilus (starter) and Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 (probiotic), as a function of two manufacturing processes of Greek-style (GS) yoghurt: centrifugation of a curd (GS-CF process) or ultrafiltration of milk prior to fermentation (GS-UF process). Fresh GS-UF and GS-CF yoghurts had between 3 and 7 times higher counts of Lb. helveticus R0052 and S. thermophilus than the regular stirred yoghurt (Control). Strain R0052 was three times more stable in the GS-CF yoghurt than in the Control over the 44 d storage period. The highest lactose content (44 g L−1) was obtained in the Control, while 60% less was obtained in the GS-UF yoghurt; the opposite trend was observed for lactic acid and galactose. Free amino acid levels were 33% higher in the GS products. GS yoghurt can be 10 times better than traditional yoghurt to deliver probiotic bacteria, as a function of the process used.
       
  • Influence of feed temperature to biofouling of ultrafiltration membrane
           during skim milk processing
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Julien Chamberland, Thomas Messier, Eric Dugat-Bony, Marie-Hélène Lessard, Steve Labrie, Alain Doyen, Yves Pouliot The temperature of the feed is known to be an important factor affecting the formation and the growth rates of bacterial communities on dairy filtration membranes. However, decades after the integration of filtration processes in the dairy industry, there is still questioning whether filtration should be performed at cold (48 °C) temperature. A biofilm reactor designed to mimic a filtration system was used to provide answers to this question. Bacteria adhering and growing on ultrafiltration membranes in contact with pasteurised skim milk were characterised at 15 °C and 50 °C through a metabarcoding approach. Our results suggested that the processing time should be limited to 10 h at 50 °C to avoid the exponential growth of thermophilic spore-former bacteria, while the use of 15 °C combined with daily cleaning procedures appeared the best way to retard the formation of biofilms on membranes.
       
  • Fermentative properties of starter culture during manufacture of kefir
           with new prebiotics derived from lactulose
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Paloma Delgado-Fernández, Nieves Corzo, Silvia Lizasoain, Agustín Olano, F. Javier Moreno The fermentation properties of a starter culture during kefir manufacture was studied with the inclusion of one emerging lactulose-derived oligosaccharide prebiotic and with the well-recognised galactooligosaccharide and lactulose prebiotics at different doses (2 and 4%). Microbial growth, glycerol, lactic and citric acids and short-chain fatty acids and carbohydrate utilisation during fermentation and cold storage of control and prebiotic supplemented kefirs were determined. Prebiotic levels remained unaltered during fermentation (24 h) and storage (28 days), with the exception of a decrease (7.3%) of lactulose in kefir with 4% prebiotic. Consequently, the viability of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts, as well as the pH or level of fermentation metabolites was similar for all kefirs. Therefore, our data highlight the suitability of kefir as a matrix for the consumption of a variety of prebiotics, including that of novel synthesis as lactulose-derived oligosaccharides, widening their potential food uses and applications.
       
  • Species-specific real-time PCR assay for enumeration of Anoxybacillus
           flavithermus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores in dairy products
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Yoshiaki Ohkubo, Kenji Uchida, Hidemasa Motoshima, Naoya Katano The thermophilic spore-forming bacteria, Anoxybacillus flavithermus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, grow readily, especially on milk-powder processing lines, and are important for processing-plant hygiene management. We developed a real-time PCR assay using SYBR Green I to monitor the spores of these species in dairy products. We designed new primer pairs specific for each species from the nucleotide sequences of the stage 0 sporulation gene A (spo0A). Ethidium monoazide treatment enabled us to quantify only spores. In dairy products with high protein content, treatment with proteinase K allowed precise quantification of spores. This assay was superior for counting spores, having high linearity (r2 = 0.99) and a wide quantification range (101 to 106 spores mL−1). This new method can be applied to quantification of spores in samples of milk, skimmed milk, and cream.
       
  • Enzyme inactivation and drying technologies influencing the vasorelaxant
           activity of a whey protein hydrolysate in semi-pilot scale
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Luísa Ozorio, Nariana R. Pereira, José E. da Silva-Santos, Ana I.S. Brígida, Caroline Mellinger-Silva, Lourdes M.C. Cabral A vasorelaxant whey hydrolysate at semi-pilot scale was generated, assessing the influence between two different enzyme inactivation conditions (pH and temperature) and drying technologies (freeze- and spray-drying). Hydrolysis was performed with 1.25% (w/v) whey protein concentrate solution and 1.91% (w/w) pepsin (pH 2, 3 h, 37 °C). Reactions were stopped either by increasing the pH to 7 (5 m NaOH) or by heating the solution at 80 °C for 5 min. Thermally inactivated samples induced a vascular relaxation ex vivo above 70%, while the chemically inactivated ones reached only 20%. Both drying technologies were effective in maintaining the bioactivity of the hydrolysate. These results brought the possibility of developing a whey-based product with high vasorelaxant potential in semi-pilot scale; thermal treatment followed by spray drying seemed to be the more affordable alternative for food and nutraceutical industries to generate this bioactive product.
       
  • Fractionation of casein micelles and minor proteins by microfiltration in
           diafiltration mode. Study of the transmission and yield of the
           immunoglobulins IgG, IgA and IgM
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Hans-Jürgen Heidebrecht, Ulrich Kulozik There is little information concerning the fractionation by microfiltration (MF) of casein micelles and immunoglobulins plus other minor whey proteins with ceramic gradient membranes. The order of transmission was α-lactalbumin (α-La, 2.3 nm)> β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg; 4.2 nm)>IgG (10.7 nm)> lactoperoxidase (8.2 nm)> IgA (18.1 nm)> IgM (23.8 nm)> lactoferrine > blood serum albumin (7.8 nm), irrespective of the applied transmembrane pressure (0.6–3 bar) and equal to 55% > 50%> 47% > 41%>39% > 32%> 22% > 19%. Including preconcentration, it was possible to obtain 90% of the initial IgG, IgA and IgM within 85, 119, and 160 min, based on 1 m2 of membrane area and 50 L of skim milk volume. The long-term process exposure at 50 °C did not affect α-La and IgG but β-Lg (3–5% denaturation), which, however, was selectively retained by the MF. In conclusion, MF is not only suitable for fractionation of the major whey proteins and caseins, but also for the minor and far bigger immunoglobulins.
       
  • Science and technology of cultured cream products: A review
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Judith A. Narvhus, Nina Østby, Roger K. Abrahamsen Cultured cream, produced by fermentation, has several culinary uses requiring different properties, and this may necessitate using different production technologies. Products with reduced fat content are increasingly popular, but compromised sensory properties are not desired. Here, the technology for the production of cultured cream and the influence of various parameters on its properties are reviewed; the effect of homogenisation on cream of varying fat content and the subsequent fermentation of this cream is given special focus. The structure of low fat (10–15%) cultured cream is dominated by a milk protein acid gel; high fat (≥30%) cultured cream is dominated by a gel structure consisting of coagulated protein-covered fat globules. Cultured cream with approximately 20% fat has neither a dense protein acid gel nor a high density of coagulated protein-covered fat globules. Quality challenges presented by the latter products may be mitigated by addition of milk protein.
       
  • Influence of salts on hydrolysis of β-lactoglobulin by free and
           immobilised trypsin
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 93Author(s): Yuhong Mao, Maria Krischke, Claudia Hengst, Ulrich Kulozik Immobilised trypsin is an alternative to free trypsin for producing protein hydrolysates with increased functionalities. However, the influence of hydrolytic conditions on this process remains unclear. The influence of salts on β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) hydrolysis by free and immobilised trypsin was compared. For both forms of trypsin, 0.1 m Tris accelerated the release of most final peptides except f (71–75), and had no significant effects on the hydrolysis of intact β-Lg. Increasing NaCl concentrations from 0 to 0.02 m increased the degree of hydrolysis (DH) by 22.4% for free trypsin versus 62.1% for immobilised trypsin. The presence of 0.1 or 0.5 m NaCl hindered the release of peptides associated with the breakdown of intact protein. This led to 2–4 fold decreases in depleting intact β-Lg and DH, except immobilised trypsin at 0.1 m NaCl (DH increased by 44.3% versus without NaCl). Potential mechanisms underlying the effects of salts are discussed.
       
  • Relating transformation process, eco-design, composition and sensory
           quality in cheeses using PO2 ontology
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 92Author(s): Caroline Pénicaud, Liliana Ibanescu, Thomas Allard, Fernanda Fonseca, Stéphane Dervaux, Bruno Perret, Hervé Guillemin, Solange Buchin, Christian Salles, Juliette Dibie, Elisabeth Guichard To provide answers to sustainability challenges, a database called BaGaTel, guided by the PO2 ontology, has been built to integrate data to reformulate dairy products taking into account nutritional and sensory properties together with environmental concerns. In this paper, BaGaTel was queried to address questions dealing with the eco-design of hard cheese processing, in relation to composition, sensory quality and rheological properties. For the formulation of hard cheese, BaGaTel made it possible to estimate missing data in a dataset supposing that samples have common characteristics. For environmental concerns, BaGaTel gave hints about relevant data that need to be acquired and made possible the estimation of missing data. The common vocabulary and structure provided by the PO2 ontology allowed combining and integrating into BaGaTel data from different projects, giving relevant answers to different questions, and therefore proving its suitability as a support tool for multi-criteria assessment of food systems.
       
  • Production of low-dosage lactose milk using lactase immobilised in
           hydrogel
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 92Author(s): Mariane Wolf, Laurence Alphonso Belfiore, Elias Basile Tambourgi, Alexandre Tadeu Paulino A hydrogel based on chitosan was employed for the immobilisation of lactase with the aim of hydrolysing lactose and producing low-dosage lactose milk. The degree of swelling of the hydrogel was affected by the type of aqueous solution, pH and temperature. The lactase immobilisation capacities at pH 4.0 and pH 7.0 were 257.12 ± 3.18 and 157.87 ± 1.96 mg enzyme per g dried hydrogel, respectively, after 1440 min at room temperature. The activity of immobilised lactase ranged from 97.91 to 56.04 and 97.91 to 71.80% from the first to the tenth cycle of hydrolysis of standard lactose and lactose contained in UHT milk, respectively. Immobilised lactase in hydrogel could be applied for the production of low-dosage lactose milk for at least ten successive hydrolysis cycles. Moreover, hydrogels containing immobilised lactase could also be useful for the enzyme release in individuals with lactose intolerance.
       
  • Effect of reducing daily herbage allowance during early lactation on
           composition and processing characteristics of milk from spring-calved
           herds
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 92Author(s): Arunima Gulati, Norann Galvin, Emer Kennedy, Eva Lewis, Jennifer J. McManus, Mark A. Fenelon, Timothy P. Guinee The study investigated the effects of reducing daily herbage allowance (DHA) from 15.0 to 11.8 kg dry matter per cow (>3.5 cm post grazing sward height) to a spring-calved herd during early lactation on the composition, rennet coagulability and heat stability characteristics of milk during early lactation (EL, 29–70 days in milk, DIM), mid lactation (ML, 78–183 DIM), and late lactation (LL, 205–267 DIM). Samples of milk were taken at approximate 10 d intervals during EL and at 1–3 week intervals during ML and LL. Reducing DHA led to reductions in milk yield, milk solids yield, and concentrations of protein (∼0.22%, w/w) and casein (0.13%, w/w) during EL. Otherwise, it had little effect on milk composition or on the selected processing characteristics in ML, LL or overall lactation. Stage of lactation resulted in comparatively large changes in most compositional parameters, rennet gelation and heat stability.
       
  • Effect of transglutaminase and acidification temperature on the gelation
           of reconstituted skim milk
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 92Author(s): Elisa Lam, Don Otter, Thom Huppertz, Peng Zhou, Yacine Hemar Effects of transglutaminase (TG), acidification temperature and total milk solids level on the acid gelation of skim milk were investigated. Despite similar acidification kinetics, TG-treated milk acidified at ≥35 °C showed differences in elastic modulus (Gʹ) with acidification time, particularly by inhibiting the formation of the peculiar shoulder (Gʹshoulder) observed at an early stage of gelation in the control milk. Regardless of the milk solids content, the G'shoulder was absent in both types of milk at 30 °C. However, control milk above 2.5% (w/w) milk solids showed the G'shoulder at 45 °C. G'shoulder is proposed as the transition from the first increase in Gʹ, due to aggregation of soluble protein complexes at the early stage of acidification, to the second, due to further aggregation of casein micelles (and aggregated soluble complexes) as acidification progresses. The G'shoulder was absent in acidified TG-treated milk due to the lack of soluble protein complexes containing caseins.
       
  • Application of NIR spectroscopy and image analysis for the
           characterisation of grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 92Author(s): Marcello Alinovi, Germano Mucchetti, Flavio Tidona Grated Parmigiano–Reggiano cheese holds a valuable market segment and its quality strictly depends on the amount of rind, size, shape of cheese particles and original cheese properties. Textural properties of the rind and inner part of the cheese significantly affect size and shape of grated particles. Rind produces a higher amount of finer and less circular particles than the inner region. Rind content established by European regulation (maximum 18%) is a major issue and could be successfully predicted by multivariate models developed on near-infrared (NIR) spectra. Image analysis (IA) was a suitable method to estimate rind percentage that was found positively correlated to number of particles, total surface covered by particles and circularity. IA and NIR spectroscopy enabled characterisation of the distribution of the particle in dimensional classes and could be used to control the maximum limit of 25% of particles finer than 0.5 mm provided by European regulation.
       
  • Comparison of bovine milk fat and vegetable fat for infant formula:
           Implications for infant health
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 92Author(s): Jeske H.J. Hageman, Marianne Danielsen, Arie G. Nieuwenhuizen, Anouk L. Feitsma, Trine K. Dalsgaard Fat is an important component of human milk and infant formula (IF), delivering half of the energy a baby needs. Nowadays, mostly vegetable fats are used in IFs; however, the use of bovine milk fat in formulas is currently increasing. Bovine milk fat contains a composition of fatty acids and lipid components different from those of vegetable fats. We have compared the lipid profile of human and bovine milk with infant formulas with different fat sources. Furthermore, current knowledge of how infant digestion, absorption, metabolic responses, gut immunity, microbiota and/or cognition is affected by dietary fat is reviewed. The possible opportunities and drawbacks of the application of bovine milk fat in infant nutrition are described. Future perspectives for the development of IF containing bovine milk fat and future research directions are highlighted.
       
  • Controlled whey protein aggregates to modulate the texture of fat-free
           set-type yoghurts
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 92Author(s): Hanna Lesme, Cécile Rannou, Catherine Loisel, Marie-Hélène Famelart, Saïd Bouhallab, Carole Prost The impact of nanoparticulated whey protein aggregates on the texture of fat-free set-type yoghurts was investigated. Monodisperse (MFA) and polydisperse (PFA) fractal aggregates obtained from heated whey protein isolate (WPI) were added to skimmed milk for yoghurt manufacture at four different concentrations (0.2%–1.5%, w/w). The impact of the concentration and the polydispersity of the aggregates on fat-free set-type yoghurts were studied by instrumental measurements (rheology, penetrometry, syneresis and microscopy) and sensory analysis. Yoghurt gel strength and firmness increased with the concentration of WPI, MFA and PFA. However, yoghurts enriched with PFA clearly differed from the yoghurts enriched with WPI. Indeed, yoghurts enriched with PFA were characterised by a weak gel, a low firmness and a low-density of the protein network. Sensory analysis confirmed the results obtained by instrumental measurements. The whey protein aggregates studied are thus promising tools to modulate fat-free yoghurt texture while using milk-derived ingredients.
       
  • Physically and chemically modified starches as texturisers of low-fat milk
           gels
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 92Author(s): Ángela Bravo-Núñez, Valentín Pando, Manuel Gómez In reduced fat-milk gels, lack of fat globules results in undesirable texture changes. The application of chemically modified (E-1412, E-1414, E-1422, E-1442), pregelatinised (PG), and both pregelatinised and chemically modified (PGE-1414) starches as fat replacers was evaluated. Skimmed milk was substituted with 2% of each starch. The pH and rheological evolution during the acidification process, viscosity of the stirred gels, texture of the set gels and syneresis of all gels were measured. Skimmed and full-fat milk gels were included as controls. All starches had lower or higher pH values than skimmed or full fat milk gels during acidification. Gelation time was reduced for all starches compared with the skimmed milk gel. For both stirred and set milk gels with PG, PGE-1414, E-1422 and E-1442, viscosity/texture values were similar to or higher than those found for full fat milk gel. E-1412 had drastically increased syneresis values when compared with both controls.
       
  • Disruption treatments on two strains of Streptococcus thermophilus: Levels
           of lysis/permeabilisation of the cultures, and influence of treated
           cultures on the ripening profiles of Cremoso cheese
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: International Dairy Journal, Volume 92Author(s): Guillermo H. Peralta, Carina V. Bergamini, Erica R. Hynes The influence of several disruption treatments on the viability and the release of intracellular enzymes of two strains of Streptococcus thermophilus (St1 and St2) was studied. In addition, the impact of the incorporation of disrupted cultures of St2 in Cremoso cheese was investigated. Enzymatic (mutanolysin) and mechanical treatments (bead mill and ultrasound) were the most effective for lysis, while chemical methods (ethanol and SDS) were effective as permeabilising agents. Physical methods (freeze and heat shock) were not suitable for disruption. The application of disrupted cultures of St2 in Cremoso cheese led to slight changes on the ripening profiles: decrease in lactose level, and increase in total free amino acids and acetic acid. This work demonstrated that certain types of disrupted St2 cultures could be suitable as source of key enzymes for the production of food with improved properties, such as lactose-hydrolysed dairy products or cheeses with higher proteolysis.
       
  • Behaviour of water in different types of goats’ cheese
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Jolanta Tomaszewska-Gras, Dorota Cais-Sokolińska, Paulina Bierzuńska, Łukasz K. Kaczyński, Katarzyna Walkowiak, Hanna M. Baranowska Semi-hard, hard, and extra-hard goats’ cheeses were analysed for water mobility by nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry (NMR) and thermal properties by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In extra-hard cheese, the amount of bulk water as a proportion of the total water was the lowest, which indicated that the water was strongly entrapped in the proteolipidic network and bound by the water-soluble substances arising after increased proteolysis. The bulk water fraction is mainly a component of water-in-fat emulsions. The increase in H+ ion concentration limits the mobility of bound water protons. Both the peak temperature and enthalpy progressively decreased with the lowering of moisture. A strong correlation was found between the NMR parameter T1 (spin-lattice relaxation time) and the DSC freezable water content.
       
  • Selective biotechnological fractionation of goat milk carbohydrates
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Andrea Martín-Ortiz, Francisco Javier Moreno, Ana Isabel Ruiz-Matute, María Luz Sanz Goat colostrum is a rich source of carbohydrates, mainly constituted by lactose, although several minor bioactive oligosaccharides are also present. Analysis of these caprine milk oligosaccharides (COS) is not straightforward, and usually requires a previous fractionation step to remove lactose. In this work, a biotechnological fractionation methodology based on the use of a β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis was optimised (pH, incubation time, goat milk:enzyme volume ratio) to hydrolyse lactose, preserving the COS profile. Best results were obtained after 15 min of enzymatic treatment using 0.68 U mL-1 of enzyme at 37 °C and pH 7. Efficient removal of resulting monosaccharides was finally carried out by the incubation of these samples with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (37 °C, 24 h). Fractionation of these carbohydrates could help to better determine COS structures and to expand the applications of the purified COS in the food and pharmaceutical industries.
       
  • Impact of extended refrigerated storage and freezing/thawing storage
           combination on physicochemical and microstructural characteristics of raw
           whole and skimmed sheep milk
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Alline Artigiani Lima Tribst, Luiza Toledo Piza Falcade, Luma Rossi Ribeiro, Bruno Ricardo de Castro Leite Júnior, Miguel Meirelles de Oliveira The impact of freezing (1 month+thawing at 7 or 25 °C) and extended refrigeration (4 days, 7 °C) on physicochemical and microstructural characteristics of raw whole and skimmed sheep milk were assessed. Refrigerated storage resulted in higher sedimentation and creaming (whole milk), possibly due to proteases and agglutinins. Freezing/thawing processes in whole milk increased the particle size and creaming when samples were thawed at 7 °C. Skimmed milk showed an increase in buffering capacity and a reduction in soluble calcium immediately after thawing at 25 °C, suggesting that although the changes in fat are the main alterations caused by slow freezing of sheep milk, minor changes in saline balance can occur. An evaluation of the results showed that frozen and thawed milk in domestic equipment (commonly found in smallholdings) alter the milk microstructure, and it is therefore preferable to use extended refrigeration to accumulate the milk before dairy production.
       
  • Zinc supplementation of dairy cows: effects on chemical composition,
           nutritional quality and volatile profile of Giuncata cheese
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Andrea Ianni, Marco Iannaccone, Camillo Martino, Denise Innosa, Lisa Grotta, Francesca Bennato, Giuseppe Martino The effects of dietary zinc supplementation on chemical composition, nutritional quality and volatile profile of Giuncata cheese were investigated. Dietary zinc addition did not influence milk yield and composition, but induced a marked reduction of somatic cell count. Both in milk and cheese the experimental samples were characterised by a lower concentration of saturated fatty acids and an increase in oleic, vaccenic and rumenic acids. The volatile profile of Giuncata cheese samples was also affected by dietary zinc intake, with an increase in concentration of butanoic acid, hexanoic acid and hexanal. The present results suggest a positive role of zinc in improving animal health and nutraceutical properties of milk and corresponding cheese. Such findings could contribute to the production of cheeses with interesting properties, although further evaluations should be performed to confirm the consumer acceptability of these changes.
       
  • Prevalence of Yersinia enterocolitica in milk and dairy products and the
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Heba A. Ahmed, Asmaa B.M.B. Tahoun, Rasha M.M. Abou Elez, Marwa I. Abd El-Hamid, Samah S. Abd Ellatif Yersinia enterocolitica was isolated from raw milk and dairy products from 10% of examined samples. The highest isolation rate was 22%, from raw milk, followed by 12%, 4% and 2% from fermented milk (Rayeb), pasteurised milk and ripened salted cheese, respectively. The virulence-associated genes ail and yst were detected in 30% and 10% of the isolates, respectively, while these genes were present simultaneously in 10% of the isolates. All the isolates showed susceptibility to gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol, while only two of the isolates exhibited multidrug resistance. Storage of inoculated pasteurised milk at refrigeration (4 °C), freezing (–20 °C) and room (25 °C) temperatures revealed significant differences in Y. enterocolitica counts and relative expression of the two virulence genes. The isolation of potentially pathogenic Y. enterocolitica isolates from retail dairy products indicates risk to consumers; screening of prevalence, pathogenicity potential and antibiotic resistance is essential to implement control measures.
       
  • Influence of different cleaning and sanitisation procedures on the removal
           of adhered Bacillus cereus spores
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Maria Cecília E. Ribeiro, Meg da Silva Fernandes, Arnaldo Yoshiteru Kuaye, Mirna L. Gigante The effectiveness of nine different sanitation procedures for the removal and control of adhered Bacillus cereus spores isolated from the dairy industry was evaluated. Four sets of experiments were produced by varying the conditioning matrix (water and UHT whole milk) and the inoculation medium of the pool of B. cereus spores (water and UHT whole milk), resulting in Ewater/water, Ewater/milk, Emilk/water, and Emilk/milk. The experiments were repeated three times and evaluated by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Sanitisation with sodium hypochlorite was more effective than peracetic acid for removal of adhesion, especially when associated with a cleaning procedure, with counts below the limit of detection (
       
  • Spreadable ricotta cheese with hydrocolloids: Effect on physicochemical
           and rheological properties
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Irene A. Rubel, Carolina Iraporda, Alicia Gallo, Guillermo D. Manrique, Diego B. Genovese Ricotta cheese was selected to develop a novel food product. Ricotta is easily obtained from the precipitation of whey and milk proteins, through the application of heat and acidification. This product is characterised by its compact, finely granulated and crumbly mass of limited shelf life. Unlike the conventional methods for ricotta elaboration, a novel processing step was introduced to improve spreadability. The effect of hydrocolloids addition on physicochemical, mechanical and rheological properties was evaluated during storage. Hydrocolloids had a positive effect on the cheese matrix regarding microstructure and rheological properties. Samples showed acceptable physicochemical properties (compared with the control) during storage. Addition of hydrocolloids attenuated syneresis. Preliminary results showed that the best formulation was ricotta cheese containing high gelification capacity gelatin. Results of this study may contribute to the development of a novel dairy product.
       
  • Effects of cross-linked inulin with different polymerisation degrees on
           physicochemical and sensory properties of set-style yoghurt
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Yao Li, Kinyoro Ibrahim Shabani, Xiaoli Qin, Rong Yang, Xuedong Jin, Xiaohan Ma, Xiong Liu This work investigated effects of cross-linked inulin with different degrees of polymerisation (DP, average = 7 and 15) on physicochemical and sensory properties of set-style yoghurt. Compared with set-style yoghurt made with native inulin (average DP = 4 and 11), yoghurts with cross-linked inulin had higher acidity and lower syneresis values, with a shelf-life of 14 days. Supplementation of cross-linked inulin with higher DP resulted in enhanced firmness and adhesiveness of yoghurts. In addition, bacterial counts showed that yoghurts with cross-linked inulin exhibited longer retention of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus cell viability than that with native inulin. Sensory evaluation indicated that yoghurt with cross-linked long-chain inulin received higher scores for overall acceptability than other samples. However, different types of inulin did not significantly affect odour and colour of set-style yoghurt. Consequently, cross-linked inulin prepared can be exploited as a prebiotic to prolong shelf-life of yoghurt.
       
  • Quantification of major milk oligosaccharides in a range of formulated
           milk powder products using high performance liquid chromatography-multi
           reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Lin Ma, Paul McJarrow, Bertram Y. Fong In formulated milks for infants and children, oligosaccharides such as galacto-oligosaccharides and/or fructo-oligosaccharides are commonly added. This paper, however, discusses the determination of the concentration in infant and follow-on formulations of the major acidic oligosaccharides: 3’-sialylactose (3’SL), 6’-sialylactose (6’SL), 6’-sialyllactosamine (6’SLN) and disialyllactose (DSL) that are endogenous to bovine milk. These oligosaccharides were measured in infant, follow-on and growing up formulas purchased in the Chinese and Malaysian markets. Of these oligosaccharides, 3’SL was the most abundant, followed by 6’SL and 6’SLN, but DSL was not quantifiable due to its concentration being lower than the limit of quantitation in most samples. We observed little or no differences in the levels of 3’SL or 6’SL in Malaysian and Chinese formulas, but the levels of 6’SLN in all Malaysian samples were found to be higher than those in the samples from China.
       
  • Partition and digestive stability of α-tocopherol and
           resveratrol/naringenin in whey protein isolate emulsions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Zheng Fang, Wusigale, Huayan Bao, Yingzhou Ni, Narangerel Choijilsuren, Li Liang Co-encapsulation of multiple bioactive components is an emerging field that shows promise as an approach to develop functional foods. Hydrophobic components are generally dissolved in the inner oil phase of protein-stabilised emulsions. Some components may co-adsorb to oil droplet surfaces, due to the ligand-binding properties of proteins. In this study, α-tocopherol and resveratrol/naringenin were co-encapsulated in emulsions stabilised by whey protein isolate (WPI). α-Tocopherol was totally encapsulated and its partitioning inside oil droplets was about 3.3 times that bound by free WPI in the aqueous phase. The total encapsulation efficiency for resveratrol or naringenin was 52% and 58%, respectively. Addition of resveratrol improved digestive stability of α-tocopherol, but naringenin did not. Co-encapsulation with α-tocopherol had no significant influence on the digestive stability of resveratrol/naringenin. The data gathered here should be useful for the delivery of bioactive components with different solubilities.
       
  • Fortification aspects of vitamin D in dairy products: A review study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Malihe Zahedirad, Sepideh Asadzadeh, Bahareh Nikooyeh, Tirang R. Neyestani, Nasim Khorshidian, Mojtaba Yousefi, Amir Mohammad Mortazavian There is a higher demand for calorie-reduced foods. In the dairy industry, fat is separated to produce low-calorie products and fat-soluble vitamins such as A and D are also removed along with them. There are different factors leading to a significant decrease in people’s sun exposure, which has a substantial role in isomerisation of 7-dehydrocholesterol to vitamin D. It seems logical to add vitamin D to dairy products and potentially restore their nutritional value or fortify them to improve vitamin D intakes. The main biological function of vitamin D is to control the absorption, transport and deposition of calcium and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus, which are important in bone mineralisation. Dairy products are the ideal candidates for vitamin D fortification. This article reviews the vitamin D fortification of dairy products including the concepts, fortification methods, sensory properties of final products and storage stability.
       
  • Protein profile of dairy products: Simultaneous quantification of twenty
           bovine milk proteins
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2019Source: International Dairy JournalAuthor(s): Cornelia Bär, Déborah Mathis, Patrick Neuhaus, Desirée Dürr, Walter Bisig, Lotti Egger, Reto Portmann While proteomic techniques allow the identification and relative quantification of thousands of proteins in a single run, methods for absolute quantification remain laborious. In this study, a newly developed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) that enables the simultaneous quantification of twenty key milk proteins is presented. The selected proteins comprise all individual caseins, the major whey proteins and most well-known milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins. For validation, the twenty milk proteins in raw milk, raw cream, raw milk Emmental cheese and whey, were quantified as well as in eighteen commercial heat-treated dairy products. The method presented is ideally suited for various applications, for example, the comparison of the protein patterns in raw milk of cows at different stages of lactation or of different breeds.
       
 
 
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