for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3162 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1201 - 1400 of 3162 Journals sorted alphabetically
Growth Factors and Cytokines in Health and Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Growth Hormone & IGF Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.059, CiteScore: 2)
Gynecologic Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.339, CiteScore: 4)
Gynecologic Oncology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Habitat Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.336, CiteScore: 3)
Hand Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.556, CiteScore: 1)
Hand Surgery and Rehabilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Handai Nanophotonics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Adhesives and Sealants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Agricultural Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Algebra     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Analytical Separations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Biological Physics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Chemical Neuroanatomy     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Clinical Neurology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of Clinical Neurophysiology     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Complex Analysis     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Computational Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 4.16, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of Defense Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Development Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Handbook of Differential Equations: Evolutionary Equations     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Differential Equations: Ordinary Differential Equations     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Differential Equations: Stationary Partial Differential Equations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Differential Geometry     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Dynamical Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Econometrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Handbook of Economic Forecasting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Economic Growth     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Environmental Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Experimental Economics Results     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Handbook of Exploration and Environmental Geochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Exploration Geochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Ferromagnetic Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Game Theory with Economic Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Geophysical Exploration: Seismic Exploration     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Handbook of Immunohistochemistry and in Situ Hybridization of Human Carcinomas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Income Distribution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Industrial Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Intl. Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Labor Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Handbook of Law and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Handbook of Macroeconomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of Magnetic Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.467, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of Mathematical Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Mathematical Fluid Dynamics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Metal Physics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Monetary Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Handbook of Natural Resource and Energy Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Numerical Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Handbook of Perception and Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Petroleum Exploration and Production     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of Population and Family Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Powder Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Handbook of Public Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Sensors and Actuators     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Handbook of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Handbook of Surface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Handbook of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of the Economics of Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0, CiteScore: 2)
Handbook of the Economics of Finance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Handbook of the Economics of Giving, Altruism and Reciprocity     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook of the Geometry of Banach Spaces     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of the History of Logic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Handbook of Thermal Conductivity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Handbook of Vapor Pressure     Full-text available via subscription  
Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 3)
Handbooks of Management Accounting Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
HardwareX     Open Access  
Harmful Algae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 4)
HBRC J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.506, CiteScore: 3)
Health Outcomes Research in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
Health Policy and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.322, CiteScore: 1)
Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Healthcare : The J. of Delivery Science and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Hearing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.35, CiteScore: 3)
Heart & Lung: The J. of Acute and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 2)
Heart Failure Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 2)
Heart Rhythm     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.231, CiteScore: 4)
Heart, Lung and Circulation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
HeartRhythm Case Reports     Open Access   (SJR: 0.232, CiteScore: 0)
Heliyon     Open Access   (SJR: 0.355, CiteScore: 1)
Hellenic J. of Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.479, CiteScore: 1)
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, CiteScore: 1)
Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.282, CiteScore: 3)
Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.711, CiteScore: 2)
High Energy Density Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.933, CiteScore: 2)
Hipertensión y Riesgo Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Historia Mathematica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
History of CERN     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
History of Neuroscience in Autobiography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV & AIDS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.134, CiteScore: 0)
Homeopathy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.678, CiteScore: 1)
HOMO - J. of Comparative Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.335, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.137, CiteScore: 0)
Hong Kong J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong Physiotherapy J.     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
Hormigón y Acero     Full-text available via subscription  
Hormones and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.638, CiteScore: 4)
Horticultural Plant J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hospital Medicine Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, CiteScore: 0)
Human Factors in Information Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Human Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Human Movement Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.756, CiteScore: 2)
Human Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.304, CiteScore: 3)
Human Pathology : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.136, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 1.675, CiteScore: 4)
Hydrometallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.208, CiteScore: 3)
IATSS Research     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Icarus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73, SJR: 2.037, CiteScore: 3)
ICT Express     Open Access   (SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
IDCases     Open Access   (SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
IERI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IFAC-PapersOnLine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
IIMB Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
IJC Heart & Vessels     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJC Heart & Vasculature     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.342, CiteScore: 1)
IJC Metabolic & Endocrine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Image and Vision Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 3)
Imagen Diagnóstica     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Imagerie de la Femme     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.124, CiteScore: 0)
Immunity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 13.393, CiteScore: 16)
Immuno-analyse & Biologie Spécialisée     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Immunobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.1, CiteScore: 3)
Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.132, CiteScore: 3)
Immunology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.168, CiteScore: 3)
Immunotoxicology of Drugs and Chemicals: an Experimental and Clinical Approach     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Implantodontie     Full-text available via subscription  
Indagationes Mathematicae     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 1)
Indian Heart J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Specialities     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Tuberculosis     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Indian Pacing and Electrophysiology J.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.273, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial Chemistry Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Industrial Crops and Products     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.091, CiteScore: 4)
Industrial Marketing Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.663, CiteScore: 4)
Industrial Safety Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Infant Behavior and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.784, CiteScore: 2)
Infectio     Open Access   (SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Infection, Disease & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 1)
Infection, Genetics and Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.278, CiteScore: 3)
Infectious Disease Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.359, CiteScore: 5)
Informatics in Medicine Unlocked     Open Access   (SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Information & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.628, CiteScore: 5)
Information and Computation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Information and Organization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.202, CiteScore: 3)
Information and Software Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.581, CiteScore: 4)
Information Economics and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 1)
Information Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.832, CiteScore: 7)
Information Processing & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 282, SJR: 0.92, CiteScore: 4)
Information Processing in Agriculture     Open Access   (SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 2)
Information Processing Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Information Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 335, SJR: 1.635, CiteScore: 5)
Information Security Technical Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.805, CiteScore: 4)
Infosecurity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Infrared Physics & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.54, CiteScore: 2)
Injury     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.99, CiteScore: 2)
Injury Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Inmunología     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Innovative Food Science & Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.201, CiteScore: 3)
Inorganic Chemistry Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.43, CiteScore: 2)
Inorganica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.485, CiteScore: 2)
Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.912, CiteScore: 4)
Instabilities in Silicon Devices     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Insulin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Insurance: Mathematics and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.083, CiteScore: 2)
Integration, the VLSI J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 1)
Integrative Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intellectual Economics     Open Access  
Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.633, CiteScore: 3)
Intensive and Critical Care Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.611, CiteScore: 2)
Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.164, CiteScore: 0)
Interface Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Intermetallics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.568, CiteScore: 4)
Internet Interventions : The application of information technology in mental and behavioural health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.962, CiteScore: 4)
Interventional Cardiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. Biodeterioration & Biodegradation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.086, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.012, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.553, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. Comparative Jurisprudence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. Dairy J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.051, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Emergency Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Immunopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.051, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. for Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.638, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. for Parasitology : Drugs and Drug Resistance     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.556, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.455, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Accounting Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 2)

  First | 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
International Business Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.012
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0969-5931
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3162 journals]
  • A comparative study of the application of systems thinking in achieving
           organizational effectiveness in Malaysian and Pakistani banks
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Ch. Shoaib Akhtar, Sajid Hussain Awan, Shaheryar Naveed, Kamariah Ismail The present work is a comparative study of the banking industry of Malaysia and Pakistan. The paper aims to measure the impact of individual systems thinking on the overall organizational effectiveness. Skilled individuals are considered as an asset of the organization especially when these individuals exhibit systems thinking capabilities that helps in achieving effectiveness. The sample consisted of 368 respondents belonging to lower and middle tier levels in the banking sector of both countries. The results indicate that Malaysian banking employees are ahead of their counterparts in Pakistan while applying systems thinking. The study is significant in enhancing the understanding of the importance of systems thinking for organizational effectiveness. The study has managerial implications for the top management of banks.
       
  • Integrating embeddedness with dynamic capabilities in the
           internationalisation of fashion retailers
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Marta Frasquet, John Dawson, Haydeé Calderón, Teresa Fayos The paper presents an integration of the theoretical approaches of embeddedness and dynamic capabilities. Based on in-depth interviews with key informants of international fashion retail companies we show that dynamic capabilities enhance different types of embeddedness at different levels. Generic dynamic capabilities of adaptability and knowledge management play a role as they affect retailer-specific capabilities and societal, network and territorial forms of embeddedness. Integrating the two theoretical approaches provides new and deeper understanding of the nature of retail internationalization.
       
  • Internationalisation and its determinants:A hierarchical approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Tianchen Li This study builds a hierarchical model to examine how country-level institutional dimensions impact the individual-level factors on the internationalisation by early stage entrepreneurial firms. Drawing on multiple datasets, cross-level analysis is used to explicate the influence of a country’s institution on the effects of the individual-level determinants on the internationalisation by early stage entrepreneurial firms, and this method enables the study of country-level specific effects. The results of the empirical research confirm the role of resource-based explanatory variables (i.e. innovative competence, business scale, technological commitment, and technological newness) in predicting internationalisation and also identifiy the positive moderating effects of institutions on this association.
       
  • Market performance implications of modularization: Evidence from global
           auto firms operating in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Belay Seyoum, Yunshan Lian Auto firms play an increasingly important role in national economies. However, their internationalization strategies, especially the trend towards modularization has been underexplored in the international business literature. Drawing on the resource based theory, we develop hypotheses on the link between modularization and market performance. Analyzing a sample of 262 auto parts suppliers in China, the study shows the positive influence of modularization on firm performance and the moderating role of knowledge sharing tools and physical proximity in this relationship. In addition, these relationships are channeled by firms’ strategic actions to maintain superior business performance against competitors (firm positional advantage).
       
  • Strategic orientations, joint learning, and innovation generation in
           international customer-supplier relationships
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Ruey-Jer "Bryan" Jean, Daekwan Kim, Jyh-She Chiou, Roger Calantone While innovations generated by international supply channel relationships, as opposed to individual partners, are playing an increasingly important role in the success of all international supply chain partnerships, research on how international supply chain relationships cultivate the process of such innovation generation, particularly for contracting suppliers firms, remains scant. This study explores how supplier joint learning capability can play a role in developing both incremental and radical innovations. The empirical test, which used a sample of 204 Taiwanese executives in electronic suppliers, supports most of the hypotheses in the study. The results demonstrate that different strategic orientations can drive various types of innovation through different paths by the mediating effect of joint learning capability. Specifically, we find that long-term orientation influences only incremental innovation, whereas radical innovation is driven by electronic integration and proactive customer orientation by joint learning. Furthermore, environmental uncertainties such as technological uncertainty and demand uncertainty are found to be moderating the impacts of joint learning capability on radical innovations. Some implications of the results are discussed at the end.
       
  • General Purpose Technologies and local knowledge accumulation — A study
           on MNC subunits and local innovation centers
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Ranfeng Qiu, John Cantwell This research looks into the innovative activities of subunits of large non-U.S firms in the U.S from 1969 to 1995, suggesting that the innovations in the subunits of multinational corporations are closely linked to their specializations in General Purpose Technologies (GPTs). GPTs enable recombining knowledge from different domains on an international scale, and that the specialization of innovations in GPT fields within a subunit is positively associated with the innovative capacity at large, along with the degree of technological diversification of that specific subunit. As firms expand geographically to tap into local innovation centers to develop new growth alternatives, specialization of GPTs in these firms actually facilitates further geographical dispersion of innovative activities across locations. Lastly, additional specializations of innovations in GPT fields within the host innovation centers does help in attracting innovation activities of firms from a wider range of industries.
       
  • Uncovering the role of cross-border strategic alliances and expertise
           decision centralization in enhancing product-service innovation in MMNEs
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Ferran Vendrell-Herrero, Emanuel Gomes, Oscar F. Bustinza, Kamel Mellahi Research is needed on effective servitization by multinational enterprises. This study examines whether Manufacturing Multinational Enterprises (MMNEs) can obtain better servitization outcomes by partnering with Knowledge Intensive Business Service (KIBS) firms and or by internationalizing their service function. In addition, the paper analyses the centralization of management decisions of human resources as an organizational mechanism to overcome coordination failure between product and service units. Our primary research data contain survey responses from 285 MMNEs collected in cooperation with an industry partner. Results show that cross-border strategic alliances and expertise decision centralization are critical to enhance product-service innovation.
       
  • Place, space, and foreign direct investment into peripheral cities
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Conor McDonald, Peter J. Buckley, Hinrich Voss, Adam R. Cross, Liang Chen Perspectives drawn from the economic geography literature are increasingly used to generate insights into locational issues in international business. In this paper, we seek to integrate these literatures further by investigating the locational determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) into peripheral cities within an emerging economy. Peripheral cities in emerging economies are attracting a growing proportion of global FDI flows, but the international business literature lacks a framework for understanding subnational determinants of FDI, particularly into non-core locations. We draw on the core-periphery model to build and test theory on how spatial interdependencies between subnational locations impact on the distribution of FDI inflows into a large and heterogeneous country China. Our results show that whilst peripheral cities tend to have a negative effect on FDI, this effect is positively moderated by proximity to core cities. The results highlight the importance of considering interactions between place and space when investigating locational issues in international business.
       
  • Cross sectoral FDI spillovers and their impact on manufacturing
           productivity
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Edvard Orlic, Iraj Hashi, Mehtap Hisarciklilar This paper explores the relationship between FDI spillovers and productivity in manufacturing firms in five European transition countries. The novelty of our approach lies in exploring different mechanisms of horizontal spillovers and disentangling the impact of backward and forward vertical spillovers from services and manufacturing sectors. We rely on firm level data obtained from the Amadeus database and annual input-output tables. The results from dynamic panel model estimations reveal that local manufacturing firms benefit from the presence of foreign firms in upstream services, especially in the knowledge intensive services, and in downstream manufacturing sector. Demonstration effect is found to be negatively associated with domestic firms’ productivity, while worker mobility and increased competition appear to be the main channels of horizontal knowledge diffusion. The firms’ productivity is also influenced positively by human capital and intangible assets. Finally, we show that the direction and intensity of both vertical and horizontal spillovers depend on the absorptive capacity of domestic firms.
       
  • Managerial learning from social capital during internationalization
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): June Borge Doornich This study explores managerial learning from social capital during internationalization. Its two research questions are these: (1) how different managers perceive, interpret, and respond to foreign-market institutions, and (2) how connections, relations, and cognition enhance managerial learning. Using an interpretive approach, the study analyzes patterns of internationalization and strategic decision-making in four contrasting Norwegian case companies that internationalize to the Russian oil and gas market. The findings show that the managers of the case companies hold similar perceptions about foreign-market institutions, but that they interpret and respond to those institutions from various levels of learning, resulting in different enactment on institutions. Managers learning at a “higher” level adapt patterns and decisions to ensure institutional conformity, while those at a “lower” level makes minor adjustments in patterns and behavior only when necessary and therefore maintain institutional conflict. Further, the findings show that all three dimensions of social capital have a vital role in enhancing managerial learning, but that the various forms that the dimensions can appear as, affects the learning process. Furthermore, the findings show that managers who share cognitive frame of reference with few embedded relationships are better equipped to interpret and respond to institutions. This study contributes fresh insight about managerial enactment on foreign-market institutions, and reconciles our understanding about social capital as embraced by the structural, relational, and cognitive dimensions. This study also contributes to a greater understanding about how the three dimensions of social capital ought to be formed to enhance managerial learning.
       
  • The emotions of top managers and key persons in cross-border M&As:
           Evidence from a longitudinal case study
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Melanie E. Hassett, Noelia-Sarah Reynolds, Birgitta Sandberg Building on prior research on emotions in M&A, this paper analyses the post-M&A emotions of top managers and key persons from the acquired company by examining what triggers emotions during the post-acquisition integration stage, and what the consequences of those emotions are. This study applies cognitive appraisal and affective event theories with empirical evidence based on a longitudinal, single case study of an Indian–Finnish acquisition. The main findings imply that M&As are very emotional for top managers and key persons. Our findings reveal that they experience a wide range of positive and negative emotions triggered by individual and company-level triggers. Interestingly various triggers can have different and opposite appraisal outcomes in the short and long-term. In addition, top managers and key persons are often restricted in the range of behavioural outcomes caused by emotions.
       
  • The evolution of the domestic network configuration as a driver of
           international relationships in SMEs
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 4Author(s): Angeles Montoro-Sanchez, Isabel Diez-Vial, Jose Antonio Belso-Martinez The objective of this research is to study the influence of the evolution of the domestic clustered network on the development of the international relationships of firms. Building on international business theory and the dynamic geographically bounded networks approach, and using a social network analysis methodology, we analyse how increasing the number of contacts and the betweenness role of the firm, as well as the diversity and density of the domestic network, can allow firms to more easily establish international links.
       
  • A tactical retreat' Conceptualising the dynamics of European grocery
           retail divestment from East Asia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Steve Burt, Neil M. Coe, Keri Davies The internationalisation of the firm is a highly dynamic process, in which periods of investment and expansion intermingle with periods of divestment and retrenchment. Academic research to date has focused on identifying the reasons for and the processes of divestment. Empirical studies either evidence generic pressures or provide case studies of specific incidents. There few longitudinal studies of international divestment, consequently the dynamic interactions between host market, home market and firm level factors, and how the institutional context changes over time is underplayed. This paper seeks to rectify this gap in our understanding.We explore the rationale and evolving dynamics of European grocery retail divestment in East Asia over a thirty year period. Taking an inductive approach and drawing on analysis of contemporary narratives drawn from company documentation, trade journals, newsfeeds and market reports, three phases can be identified characterised by specific factors and combinations of factors which intersect to provide the key pressures and stimuli for divestment. We conclude that at different time periods, different internal and external contextual influences manifest themselves through different priorities within the firm’s strategy – marked by a switch from local (host) market, to regional, to global firm-centric considerations. Longitudinal analyses allow a greater recognition of this dynamic interplay of factors, and the changes in these relationships, and provides a more nuanced understanding of the international divestment process.
       
  • Purchasing behaviour of ethnicities: Are they different'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Giang Trinh, Huda Khan, Larry Lockshin This paper investigates actual purchasing behaviour of different ethnicities. Using a national representative sample of Chinese and Malay households in Malaysia, with their continuous purchases of toothpaste, body wash, packaged tea and plain sweet biscuits recorded over a two-year period of 2011–2012, we found that overall there is significant difference between purchasing frequency distributions of the two ethnic groups. However, after controlling for household size, we found mostly no significant differences between the two groups at small and medium household size, but a significant difference at large household size. We also found that the purchasing frequency distributions of the two ethnic groups are accurately modelled by the negative binomial distribution (NBD). The NBD also accurately predicts future purchasing behaviour of the different ethnic groups, highlighting a new application of Conditional Trend Analysis (CTA) in this context. Since both ethnic groups fit these models well, we suggest they follow the same underlying pattern of buying behaviour in consumer good categories and do not differ due to ethnicity.
       
  • The effect of internationalization on firm capital structure: A
           meta-analysis and exploration of institutional contingencies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Thomas Lindner, Florian Klein, Stefan Schmidt Despite extensive research on the relationship between internationalization and firm capital structure, findings in this research area remain inconclusive. In this paper, we review the literature on the internationalization–capital structure relationship and investigate its direction, effect size, and multiple contingencies through a meta-analysis of 31 studies with a grand total of 223,658 firm observations and at least two separate samples each. Our cumulative evidence indicates lower debt ratios of multinational corporations compared to domestic corporations, in line with arguments of increased risk and agency costs in international operations. We extend our analysis to institutional characteristics in firmsö home countries and find that much of the existing variation in study findings can be explained using theory arguments on firm risk in internationalization. We contribute to an integration of international business and finance literature and point to directions for future research on determinants of the internationalization–capital structure relationship and its multiple contingencies.
       
  • Establishment modes and network relationships of foreign subsidiaries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Alfredo Valentino, Matteo Caroli, Ulrike Mayrhofer This research examines the effects of the establishment mode of foreign subsidiaries (greenfield vs acquisition) on the type of network relationships (social vs business) they develop in local markets. The authors use the network approach to better understand the role played by local subsidiaries for the development of networks in multinational enterprises. The empirical study is based on a dataset covering 120 foreign-owned subsidiaries in Italy. The findings show that acquired subsidiaries are more directly involved in business relationships, whereas greenfield subsidiaries pay more attention to social relationships before building business networks. The establishment mode thus affects the type of network relationships developed by local subsidiaries, which can help them to overcome the liabilities of foreignness and outsidership.
       
  • Optimal vs satisfactory transparency: The impact of global macroeconomic
           fluctuations on corporate competitiveness
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Lars Oxelheim Being able to separate temporary global macroeconomic influences – caused by fluctuations in exchange rates, interest rates and inflation – from intrinsic performance – related to a superior product, production process or management – is crucial to assessing the development of a firm’s competiveness. Against that background, this paper analyzes institutions’ role in making firms supply outside shareholders with relevant information corresponding to satisfactory transparency from the shareholder perspective. Based on a sample of the 100 largest public European firms, it is found that no firm provided information to a level deemed satisfactory by the outside shareholder. One explanation may be that optimal transparency for the firm does not equal satisfactory transparency for the outside shareholder. However, the implementation of IFRS/IAS 1 in the EU as of 2005 and a company’s international cross-listing activities exhibit associations with a better supply of information and a narrowing of the gap. Shareholders in the Anglo-Saxon corporate governance system are provided with more relevant information than those in other corporate governance systems. The paper adds to the literature on the role of institutions in international corporate governance, with a particular focus on information asymmetries in an international business context.
       
  • Trust, perception, and managerial use of market information
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Tamara Keszey This study aims to enrich international business theory and practice by being the first study to investigate how both inter- and intra-organizational managerial trust in the source of market information contributes to its’ perception and use and by examining the contingent role of structural fluctuations and market turbulence. Structural equation modelling of cross-sectional survey data of 158 firms in Hungary shows that trust is an important driver of utilization of market information. Perceived information quality mediates the effect of trust on information use partially when it derives from intra- and fully when from inter-organizational source. When unpredictable changes occur due to structural fluctuations of the firm, the role of trust in quality perception of market information becomes more prominent. However, changes in the environment due to market turbulence do not moderate the effect of trust on perceived quality of information from inside, only from outside the firm.
       
  • Value chain integration of base of the pyramid consumers: An empirical
           study of drivers and performance outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Eugenia Rosca, Julia C. Bendul The seminal works on Base of the Pyramid (BOP) markets encourage companies to explore untapped low-income markets and to alleviate poverty by providing affordable products and services. The transition to second generation BOP strategies has centred on the integration of local consumers across value chain activities. This integration presents challenges both for firms and for low-income consumers due to the nature of informal BOP markets, severe institutional voids and lack of local knowledge of firms. In this context, little is known about the motivational drivers of firms to integrate BOP consumers in value creation activities and the impact on different performance dimensions, namely economic, social and ecological. This study adopts the perspective of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) and investigates drivers and performance outcomes of BOP consumer integration. For this purpose, we develop a theoretical framework and test it empirically by employing a unique dataset of 142 enterprises which provide basic products and services to low-income markets. Our findings provide empirical support for the claim that BOP consumer integration enhances economic, social and ecological performance. MSMEs in our sample engage consumers mainly due to a strong intrinsic motivation to drive social impact rather than a pragmatic motivation to overcome information asymmetries. While studies of multinationals entering BOP markets almost exclusively report the need for cross-sector partner collaboration, our findings suggest that this may not be the case for MSMEs.
       
  • National culture, managerial preferences, and takeover performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Wolfgang Breuer, Bushra Ghufran, Astrid Juliane Salzmann
       
  • The antecedents of early internationalization: A configurational
           perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Luciano Ciravegna, Olli Kuivalainen, Sumit K. Kundu, Luis E. Lopez The literature on international business and international entrepreneurship provides multiple explanations for early internationalization. Using fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis, this study examines the antecedents of early internationalization for small firms based in a small economy, focusing on entrepreneurs’ attitudes toward the economic opportunities available in their domestic market, the risk of internationalizing, and the profitability of entering foreign markets. Three additional antecedents are examined: unsolicited orders, existence of underutilized capacity, and the behavior of competitors. The study uncovers three distinct combinations of antecedents that are equifinally linked to the early internationalization of small enterprises, and contributes to the literature through a multi-causal, configurational approach.
       
  • Strategic resource decisions to enhance the performance of global
           engineering services
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Yufeng Zhang, Zhibo Yang, Tao Zhang This paper extends our understanding of the internationalisation and firm performance (I-FP) relationship of service firms by considering the influence of strategic decisions on three types of slack resources. The research focusses on an important type of service operations − global engineering services, which are a major part of the global economy and represent a distinctive business model in the contemporary business environment. In doing so, we theorise the I-FP relationship by addressing the knowledge-intensive, project-based and people-centric features of engineering service firms (ESFs); and test the relationship with a carefully assembled dataset containing 12 years’ data from 242 ESFs. We identify a negative overall I-FP relationship, i.e. ESFs’ international expansion leads to worse financial performance in general. The presence of slack resources explains why such a result exists. Our findings have significant implications, both for future research on internationalisation and performance and for firms to effectively deploy their resources to support global service operations in a strategic manner.
       
  • Business model innovation: How the international retailers rebuild their
           core business logic in a new host country
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Lanlan Cao, Jyoti Navare, Zhongqi Jin Although research into the business model has received increasing attention, few studies have so far been conducted on business model innovation in an international context. The purpose of the study is to identify different patterns of business model innovation which enables international retailers to rebuild their core business logic in new host countries. On the basis of comparing and contrasting the business model changes of 15 international retailers from various home countries to one single host country (China), our study provides an in-depth understanding of business model innovation in the context of international business. By looking at the firms’ capabilities in rebuilding their core logic in the setting of a host country, we reveal six routes of retail business model innovation. Utilizing the lens of organizational learning theory and internationalization, we identify three patterns of resource deployment by international companies in the process of developing business model innovations. Our study, therefore, provides insights and guidance for multinational companies in general, international retailers in particular, as for how to successfully adapt their business model from home country to host country.
       
  • The investment-divestment relationship: Resource shifts and
           intersubsidiary competition within MNEs
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Vivien D. Procher, Dirk Engel This paper examines the interdependencies between MNE investment and divestment decisions. We derive a conceptual framework of “segmented intersubsidiary competition” and hypothesize that the competitive pressure of new investments on existing subsidiaries varies by regional dimension. Based on a database of 3524 French MNEs, we analyse intersubsidiary competition and intertemporal adjustment processes of the investment-divestment relationship between 2002 and 2010. Our empirical findings support the theoretical notion of segmented intersubsidiary competition within MNEs: Foreign investments create competitive pressure for foreign subsidiaries to be divested in subsequent periods, where domestic investments spur divestment at home. Inversely, foreign divestments are more likely to create new investment opportunities in the foreign than in the domestic arena. Our differentiations between investments/divestments in EU countries and in non-EU countries shows that the competitive pressure of new investments on existing subsidiaries is mainly limited to the same region.
       
  • How does R&D internationalization in multinational firms affect their
           innovative performance' The moderating role of international
           collaboration in the energy industry
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Nuria E. Hurtado-Torres, J. Alberto Aragón-Correa, Natalia Ortiz-de-Mandojana This paper examines the effects of the degree and geographic diversification of a firm’s R&D internationalization on its innovative performance. We use an unbalanced panel dataset of 401 observations from 110 multinational firms operating in the energy industry over a period of six years to support the argument that both the degree and the geographic diversification of a firm’s R&D internationalization have an inverted U-shaped relationship with a firm’s innovative performance. Our results also show that collaboration among R&D units located in different countries moderates this relationship by reducing both the positive effects and the challenges of the degree of R&D internationalization. This paper extends the emerging innovation focus in the headquarters–subsidiary literature by contributing to our understanding of the implications of the international R&D activities of firms and supports the utilization of social exchange theory in order to identify the moderating influence of the collaboration among a firm’s R&D units located in different countries.
       
  • Who rides the tide of regionalization: Examining the effect of the
           China-ASEAN Free Trade Area on the exports of Chinese firms
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Lin Zhang, Lin Cui, Sali Li, Jiangyong Lu This study draws on the institutional economics and the resource-based view to examine the impact of regional institutional changes on firm exports. Specifically, we utilize the establishment of the China-ASEAN Free Trade Area as our research context. Our difference-in-difference analysis of a four-year panel of 700 Chinese listed firms lends support to our arguments that (1) regional institutional changes aimed at increasing economic incentives for intraregional business exchanges will stimulate firm exports in the regional market and that (2) private firms, more technologically competent firms, and firms with richer regional exporting experience are affected more strongly by this institutional influence.
       
  • How foreign knowledge spillovers by returnee managers occur at domestic
           firms: An institutional theory perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Cheng-Hua Tzeng Instead of treating the spillover process as a black box, this paper conducts a qualitative study of foreign knowledge spillovers by returnee managers at Chinese firms. Unlike mainstream spillover studies which adopt economics approaches, this paper uses an institutional theory perspective and regards returnee managers as boundary spanners. Results show that returnee managers' boundary-spanning activities in the form of social interaction, including building relationships with colleagues and transforming their identities from outsiders to insiders, help gain legitimacy for their new roles. Their boundary-spanning activities in the form of grafting foreign knowledge, including understanding existing knowledge resources, introducing foreign knowledge to colleagues, and integrating foreign knowledge with domestic firms, help gain legitimacy for foreign knowledge. Foreign knowledge' contributions in new product development at product, process, and cultural perspective levels reinforce its institutionalization at domestic firms. Absorptive barriers include domestic firms' administrative heritage and returnee managers' arduous relationship with others.
       
  • International strategy’s effects on retailers’ local
           implementation and performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Bernhard Swoboda, Lukas Morbe, Johannes Hirschmann Retailers dynamically expand abroad and strategically seek local performance because their business is local. However, knowledge of the contribution of retail firms’ international strategies to subsidiaries’ local performance is limited. Based on the prominent I/R strategy framework, the authors conceptualize integration/responsiveness as the transfer/local generation of firm-specific advantages and analyze (direct and indirect) paths of varying degrees of I/R via local implementation decisions to performance. Because retailers’ firm-specific advantages have a limited geographic reach, different successful paths are expected in close and distant countries. Empirically, a survey based on face-to-face-interviews with 126 retail CEOs and expansion managers, partial least squares structural equation modelling and bootstrapping-based mediation analyses were conducted. The results reveal only indirect paths of international strategy to local performance through local standardization/centralization. Unique insights into the paths of firmś strategy to subsidiary performance emerge, such as important tradeoffs between superior paths in close countries.
       
  • Institutional origins of WOFS formal contracting: A judicial arbitrariness
           perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): George O. White, Thomas Hemphill, Thomas Weber, Kaveh Moghaddam In drawing from neo-institutional theory and the institution-based view, this study provides new insights concerning how home and host country norms influence wholly owned foreign subsidiary (WOFS) formal contract utilization. Our analysis of 171 WOFSs operating in the Philippines suggests that parent home country uncertainty avoidance, as an institutionalized organizational practice, is positively related to WOFS utilization of formal contracts in governing interorganizational relationships. Our results also reveal that managerial perceptions of local judicial arbitrariness directly influence formal contract utilization, and moderate the positive relationship between parent home country uncertainty avoidance and WOFS formal contract utilization. Furthermore, when compared to managerial perceptions of national judicial arbitrariness, perceived local judicial arbitrariness will exhibit a stronger negative direct and indirect influence on WOFS formal contract utilization. Implications and future research directions are discussed.
       
  • Bridging what we know: The effect of cognitive distance on
           knowledge-intensive business services produced offshore
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Michael J. Mol, Kristin Brandl The rise of offshoring of knowledge-intensive business services (KIBS), causing a physical separation between clients and service providers in co-created services, is a major trend in practice but challenges existing theories. International business literature has addressed many types of distance that may affect (service) offshoring, such as cultural or geographic distance. However, limited emphasis has been placed on the implications of differing cognitions of individuals that produce a cognitive distance (CD). We address this gap and ask how increased CD through offshoring affects KIBS production processes. This conceptual paper focuses on how CD interacts with the modularity of different process stages in service production and what effect CD has on repeated production processes. In order to do so we first predict what stages of KIBS production processes can be offshored and what implications offshoring has on these services. We contribute to literature by deepening the understanding of CD and providing a process perspective on KIBS offshoring that looks at modularity within services, rather than firms as bundles of modular production, and on the impact repeated production processes have on service characteristics.
       
  • Resolving post-formation challenges in shared IJVs: The impact of shared
           IJV structure on inter-partner relationships
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Martin Owens, Elaine Ramsey, Sharon Loane The “50/50”, or the shared management international joint venture (shared IJV) remains a popular and yet challenging control structure to govern IJVs. The purpose of this study is to understand the post-formation management of shared IJVs, specifically the relationship between shared structure, relational conditions and management of post-formation challenges. Our evidence is based on 26 in-depth interviews across four cases of shared IJVs between British multinationals and Asian companies. Our findings indicate that the highly integrative nature of shared IJVs, including high operational interdependence and shared decision-making, encourages partners to work closely together, communicate frequently and intensely and exchange personnel. Although share management can lead to inter-partner conflicts, the equal investment and mutual responsibility partly provides partners with motivation and opportunities to learn about each other, to better implement the control structure, to build trust, and to commit to the venture and partner. These relational conditions facilitated the successful management of post-formation challenges such as diversity related conflicts and macro volatility.
       
  • Knowledge-oriented leadership and open innovation: Role of knowledge
           management capability in France-based multinationals
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): M. Muzamil Naqshbandi, Sajjad M. Jasimuddin This paper discusses the links between knowledge-oriented leadership, open innovation and knowledge management in the international business context. Open innovation has become crucial for an increasing number of multinational enterprises (MNEs) to gain and maintain competitive advantage and become a market leader. Despite the recent proliferation of papers dealing with open innovation practices of MNEs, there is limited work investigating the role of knowledge management (KM) capability on the relationship between knowledge-oriented leadership and open innovation. Given MNEs’ growing interest in open innovation, the lack of research on knowledge-oriented leadership and KM capability in the open innovation context is a significant research gap in our knowledge. In response, we conducted a study on the mediating role of KM capability in the linkage between knowledge-oriented leadership and open innovation (inbound and outbound), using data collected from 172 subsidiaries of MNEs based in France. A structural equation modelling approach is employed to study the impact of the latent variables associated with knowledge-oriented leadership and KM capability on open innovation. The results indicate that higher levels of knowledge-oriented leadership can lead to enhanced KM capability and improved open innovation outcomes. That is, knowledge-oriented leadership has a direct, positive impact on KM capability and open innovation. Also, KM capability is found to mediate the linkage between knowledge-oriented leadership and open innovation. This study provides useful insights for managers who wish to enhance open innovation activities in MNEs, and offers useful guidance to international business scholars, encouraging further research in this area.
       
  • Maturing born globals and their acquisitive behaviour
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Stine Øyna, Tamar Almor, B. Elango, Shlomo Y. Tarba Born globals are becoming more common in our interconnected world. While a body of knowledge exists regarding the establishment and early growth of born globals, we know less about how these companies develop. Arguing that acquiring new knowledge, technologies, and products will enable companies to survive beyond their initial success, the current study specifically aims to explore the value of technology-motivated acquisitions, and their effect on performance. To this end, the study employs a hybrid methodology; statistically studying 108 acquisitions conducted by 45 maturing, technology-based born globals in Israel over a period of 10 years, and further substantiate the findings with an in-depth case analysis of four sample companies. The results indicate that technology-motivated acquisitions are valuable in terms of both financial performance and independent survival, but that there likely exists an optimal threshold, indicating that such a strategy, though beneficial, should be carefully managed.
       
  • Examining cross-cultural compatibility of high performance work practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Sadia Nadeem, Mishal Raza, Neelab Kayani, Amna Aziz, Dure Nayab This paper examines the relationship between high performance work practices (HPWPs) and cross-cultural dimensions to debate the effectiveness of HPWPs in cross-cultural settings. Using systematic review, 140 articles were identified on HPWPs and cross-cultural human resource management. Synthesizing the two literature areas results in four key findings. Many HR practices labelled as HPWPs are affected by national cultural dimensions. Also, several practices labelled as HPWPs have not been a part of the cross-cultural HR literature, and that limited studies in both area focus on the impact of cultural compatibility on outcomes. Finally, a few selected cultural dimensions have dominated the cross-cultural HR literature. Thus, more work is needed to: understand the role of national culture on effectiveness of HPWPs; increase coverage of HPWPs in the cross-cultural HR literature; understand the impact of cultural compatibility of HR practices and HPWPs on outcomes; and, incorporate additional cultural dimensions in future work.
       
  • Needed B2B marketing capabilities: Insights from the USA and emerging
           Latin America
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: International Business Review, Volume 27, Issue 3Author(s): Roberto Mora Cortez, Wesley J. Johnston Firms from all parts of the world are expanding operations globally in a turbulent economic context, requiring the understanding of nontraditional markets. Much attention has been focused on China and India, but researchers have neglected Latin America, a region economically as important as Germany, India, Japan, and South Korea. Latin America, as is true of many developed and emerging markets, has a strong presence of industrial − or business to business (B2B) − transactions. The configuration and convergence-divergence of marketing capabilities are relevant for the understanding of the globalization phenomenon. This study aims to examine B2B marketing capabilities of firms in Chile, Mexico and Peru (as Latin American countries), seeking conceptual issues in order to comprehend their business perspectives and contribute to the almost nonexistent body of research in this region. How do the results from Latin America compare with the USA' While the study shows directional convergence between Chile and Peru, there also is interesting divergence between all Latin American countries and the USA. The findings offer a portfolio of marketing topics that we believe are worthy of practitioner and academic consideration. We propose a model of convergence-divergence of B2B marketing capabilities across nations and state propositions for hypothesis testing.
       
  • Strategic group influence on entry mode choices in foreign markets
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 May 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Francisco J. Mas-Ruiz, Enar Ruiz-Conde, Aurora Calderón-Martínez This study examines imitation behavior in the foreign entry mode of the members of a strategic group within the industry. Following the institutionalist perspective, we argue that legitimating actors (trade associations, training institutions and investors, among others) can exert pressure on strategic group members to conform to institutionalized organizational practices and structures. We hypothesize that a company’s choice of foreign entry mode is determined by the previous choices of other companies within the strategic reference group. Thus, the probability of entry with a wholly owned subsidiary (versus shared-control entry) increases when the number of wholly-owned subsidiaries established by companies within the strategic reference group of the home-country is higher. We analyze 351 foreign direct investments of 30 Spanish banks in 55 countries between 1986 and 2008. Our results reveal imitation behavior between members of the strategic group and highlight the important role of the strategic group in strategic thinking.
       
  • Corporate social responsibility in international joint ventures: Empirical
           examinations in South Korea
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Byung Il Park, Adam H. Cave This study aims to investigate organizational characteristics and develop a framework relating to corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of international joint ventures (IJVs) established in the South Korean market. Based on institutional and stakeholder theories, regression analyses produced a framework facilitating a better understanding and identification of factors that drive CSR in local markets. Consumers, competitors, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) were discovered to be primary determinants of responsible behaviors. Additionally, some significant differences were found with respect to CSR related to IJV’s formative characteristics. This study contributes to furthering knowledge of IJVs and CSR, as well by providing some practical implications for organizations pursuing international markets.
       
  • Corporate ownership and the theory of the multinational enterprise
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 May 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Roger Strange This paper makes a contribution to the theory of the multinational enterprise (MNE) and, in particular, to why firms undertake foreign direct investment (FDI) rather than alternative strategies. We argue that FDI and its strategic alternatives involve different patterns of costs and returns over time, and hence different levels of risk and uncertainty. Traditional theories of the MNE conceptualize the firm as a risk-neutral decision-making entity with short-term efficiency objectives, and hence do not take these issues into account. This may be reasonable for firms with passive professional managers and widely-dispersed shareholders, operating in countries with the Anglo-American system of corporate governance. But many firms operate under quite different systems of corporate governance where concentrated shareholdings are commonplace and markets for corporate control are weak or non-existent. In these cases, shareholders exert considerable influence on all aspects of firm strategy including FDI. Furthermore, different groups of shareholders (State, family, institutions) are likely to have different objectives, different attitudes towards risk, and different decision-making time horizons. We thus suggest that the traditional theories of the MNE need to be extended to embrace consideration of corporate ownership (and other governance dimensions).
       
  • Does the sequencing of related and unrelated export diversification
           matter' Evidence from Colombian exporters
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Dirk Boehe, Alfredo Jiménez How does related or unrelated geographic diversification affect future related or unrelated product diversification of exporting firms, and vice-versa' This question addresses an unresolved debate, and it is important for firms in developing countries that seek to expand their product and geographical markets. Our study contributes to a current debate by highlighting the relevance of the temporal sequence and the relatedness of international diversification. Expanding the classic transaction costs and the resource-based explanations, we argue that organizational learning as well as organizational and sales (in-)efficiencies (notably through resource and product cannibalization, negative transfer and coordination costs) affect the interrelationships between product and geographic diversification. Using a panel dataset of over 14,000 firm-year observations from exporters based in Colombia, we find that (1) related geographic diversification tends to increase future product diversification; (2) related product diversification tends to decrease future geographic diversification; and (3) unrelated product diversification tends to increase future geographic diversification.
       
  • Emerging market multinationals and internalisation theory
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Mark Casson, Nigel Wadeson There is ongoing debate about the applicability of internalisation theory to Emerging Market Multinationals (EMNEs). Internalisation theory normally describes multinationals exploiting superior knowledge directly abroad rather than licensing its use to foreign firms. We argue that EMNEs can be explained readily in terms of internalisation theory. This involves internalisation in the opposite direction: knowledge is internalised by EMNEs which then exploit it utilising home-country cost advantages. However, this is normally achieved by means that avoid the licensing of key technologies from leading firms. This clarifies the theoretical basis of EMNE strategic asset seeking investment. Market-seeking investments are also linked to technology-seeking investments through fixed costs. A model formalises the arguments, establishing conditions leading to different types of equilibria when an advanced-economy firm competes with an emerging-economy firm. The range of factors that it incorporates means that it is also compatible with other theories of the EMNE.
       
  • Five decades of research on export barriers: Review and future directions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Eldrede T. Kahiya Although research on export barriers spans five decades, no single prior study has systematically reviewed findings in this field. This study enriches the discourse on internationalization through a systematic review of the factors associated with export barriers, the theories underpinning this, and the exact nature of the relationships. Findings indicate the bulk of empirical studies focus on drivers of export barriers. The study identifies thirty-six such variables, falling in the categories of firm demographics, export venture characteristics, managerial factors, environmental and operational factors, and international trading environment. Smaller sub-streams of research investigate export barriers as predictors, mediators, and moderators. A vote counting approach dissects the associations (i.e. positive, negative, and weak) between the various factors and export barriers. Moreover, the study identifies four explicit (i.e. resource-based view, incremental internationalization, network, and institutional theories) and two implicit (i.e. attribution and rationalization) theories underlying the associations. Concerning research design and methodology, the study highlights the underrepresentation of emerging markets, longitudinal studies, cross-national comparisons, and advanced multivariate analytical tools. Finally, the study draws key implications for managers, policymakers, and educators, before setting an agenda for future research.
       
  • Business values dimensions: A cross-culturally developed measure of
           workforce values
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 May 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): David A. Ralston, Craig J. Russell, Carolyn P. Egri Using a stratified random sample drawn from 11,709 business professionals’ survey responses across 26 societies, we investigated and failed to find support for the construct validity of the Schwartz Values Survey’s (SVS) a priori 10-factor circumplex model of human values, originally developed from student and teacher responses. Subsequent exploratory factor analysis estimated an initial five-factor solution, the Business Value Dimensions (BVD) model. In turn, CFA supported the cross-cultural validity of this alternative configuration of values for business professionals. Internal consistency reliabilities for these five values factors are reported for the 26 societies plus an additional 25 societies that did not meet sample size criteria to be included in the analyses. As a result, findings are provided for a total of 51 societies (14,724 business professionals). We present the five-factor BVD model for use in future international research with business professional populations.
       
  • Additive manufacturing and the global factory: Disruptive technologies and
           the location of international business
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 May 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Martin Hannibal, Gary Knight Additive manufacturing (AM) is an emergent technology that is shifting the nature of production, sourcing, and other value-chain activities. AM has the potential to substantially disrupt the structure and operations of international business. In this paper, we leverage the global factory concept (e.g., Buckley & Ghauri, 2004) to frame our discussion of the likely impact of AM on global production. We identify and conceptualize specific variables and relationships to offer a nuanced explanation that highlights the potential re-distribution of global production at four levels of analysis – global, country, local area, and household. We propose how key variables – Intellectual Property Status, Industrial Standards, Branding, Aesthetics, Authenticity, Material Type, Complexity, Customization, Size, Logistical Complexity, Delivery Timeliness, Demand, Access, and Technical Competence – likely will impact localization of production. We examine industries and production activities likely to be most affected by AM. We conclude with a discussion of managerial and practical implications and identify avenues for further research.
       
  • Effect of market orientation, network capability and entrepreneurial
           orientation on international performance of small and medium enterprises
           (SMEs)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 May 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Alexandra Solano Acosta, Ángel Herrero Crespo, Jesús Collado Agudo This study contributes to literature on the internationalization of SMEs by analysing the influence of International Market Orientation, Network Capability, and International Entrepreneurial Orientation on the International Performance of this kind of businesses. Particularly, both the direct effects of explanatory variables of International Performance and interdependence relations between them are analysed. Results obtained from a sample of 161 Mexican SMEs using SEM-PLS analysis show that the International Performance of this kind of businesses is favourably influenced by their Network Capability and International Entrepreneurial Orientation, but not by their International Market Orientation. Similarly, it is verified that interdependence relations exist among the explanatory variables of International Performance of SMEs, where positive impact of International Entrepreneurial Orientation is observed on Network Capability and the International Market Orientation of SMEs.
       
  • Analysing corporate political activity in MNC subsidiaries through the
           integration-responsiveness framework
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 April 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Shantanu Banerjee, Sunil Venaik, Paul Brewer Our study applies the well-known, market-strategy focussed integration-responsiveness (IR) framework and extends it to incorporate the non-market corporate political strategies of MNC subsidiaries. We find government regulation and the market strategies of integration and innovation have positive relationships with MNC subsidiary political activities. Interestingly, whereas the market strategy of innovation has a positive effect on subsidiary performance (but not on legitimacy), the non-market corporate political activities undertaken by MNC subsidiaries enhance subsidiary legitimacy (but not subsidiary performance). In addition, both market innovation and non-market subsidiary political activities are useful tools to gain favourable government decisions. Overall, our study incorporates both market and non-market strategies within a single overarching IR framework, and highlights their complementary role in achieving the twin goals of performance and legitimacy respectively.
       
  • The development of IB as a scientific field
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 April 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Lars Engwall, Cecilia Pahlberg, Olle Persson International business (IB) is today an established field in business studies with two professional associations and numerous academic publications. However, it is much younger than many other fields in the management area. Although economists were focusing on international issues even before, it was not until after the Second World War that IB started to emerge as a scientific field. The purpose of this paper is to analyse this development from the early days up to the present time. In so doing, using a theoretical framework, it focuses on the organizing of the field, i.e. how early informal contacts eventually led to the formation of formal organizations, the launching of journals, and with the passage of time the publishing of handbooks. The paper provides empirical evidence of all these steps. In this way it presents data on significant contributions to the field.
       
  • Impact of institutional reforms and industry structural factors on market
           returns of emerging market rivals during acquisitions by foreign firms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 April 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): B. Elango, Karthik Dhandapani, Claudio Giachetti This paper seeks to understand the joint impact of institutional reforms and industry structural factors on market returns earned by rivals in an emerging market during foreign acquisitions. We use a sample of 238 foreign acquisitions in India during the period 2004–2013 and find empirical evidence to support the notion that institutional reforms, foreign competition and business group competition positively impact the market returns of the rivals of acquired firms. Additionally, we find that the effects of foreign competition and business group competition on rivals’ market returns are shaped by the degree of institutional reforms in the industry, indicating that firms’ market returns in emerging markets during foreign acquisitions can be better understood through the incorporation of the joint role of industry structural factors and institutional reforms.
       
  • The double helix effect: Catch-up and local-foreign co-evolution in the
           Indian and Chinese automotive industries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 April 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Haritha Saranga, Andreas P.J. Schotter, Ram Mudambi The rapid development of emerging market firms and their foray into global value chains has attracted significant attention. In this perspectives paper, we draw on case studies from the automotive industries in India and China, to describe the coevolution of domestic firms and advanced economy multinational enterprises (AMNE) entrants. We first show that domestic firms that used catch-up strategies such as capability upgradation, investments into internal R&D and globalization through mergers & acquisitions have managed to succeed in local markets as well as climb into global value chains. We next illustrate that the strategy adopted by the most successful AMNEs involves combining the formation of vertical partnerships with local sub-assembly suppliers and horizontal collaborations with local network orchestrators. Simultaneously weaving together embeddedness in these two cortical sides of the local business eco-system on the one hand and within its global corporate value chain networks on the other – generates a “double helix” effect, whereby its local and global capabilities reinforce each other. The double helix improves cost competitiveness and pushes the product innovative envelope in both local and global markets.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Economic geography and emerging market clusters: A co-evolutionary study
           of local and non-local networks in Bangalore
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 April 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Florian A. Täube, Amit Karna, Petra Sonderegger The presence of network ties within location plays a significant role in organization and evolution of clusters. This has proven to be particularly true for clusters specializing in knowledge intensive industries, where the organization of resources – people and technology – has been a primary driver for firm and regional performance. With the help of a longitudinal case study of the Bangalore IT cluster in India, we investigate the effect of local and non-local network ties on its evolution. We argue that networks – both local and non-local – play an important role in the development of cluster. We propose a non-linear relationship between cluster evolution phases and the type of network ties most prominent. Our study also outlines the role that embedding, expansion, and extension of ties plays in transitioning cluster from one phase to the other. The consideration of non-local ties is rather nascent in the cluster literature and promises to enhance the understanding of how clusters develop at both levels – policy as well as firm.
       
  • The effect of matching on perceived export barriers and performance in an
           era of globalization discontents: Empirical evidence from UK SMEs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Rudolf R. Sinkovics, Yusuf Kurt, Noemi Sinkovics In this study we examine the effect of matching, a comprehensive networking concept, on the perceived export barriers and export performance of small exporting firms. We introduce matching as a moderating variable affecting the link of perceived internal/external export barriers to export performance. Using a sample of 106 UK-based exporting small and medium enterprises (SMEs), we find that matching alleviates the negative impact of perceived internal export barriers on export performance. Furthermore, the empirical results show that export experience and export commitment reduce managers' perceived internal and external export barriers. The study shows that matching, as a networking-tool at multiple levels, can help to overcome export barriers, thus providing a mechanism to offset challenges opened up through nationalistic policies.
       
  • Organizational slack as an enabler of internationalization: The case of
           large Brazilian firms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Jorge Carneiro, Vassiliki Bamiatzi, S. Tamer Cavusgil In this paper, we address an empirical puzzle. We note that a deliberate and serious drive to internationalize has occurred rather late in the evolution of large Brazilian firms. Meanwhile, and despite their late internationalization, these Brazilian firms expanded rapidly and intently. Despite the rich literature on Emerging Market Multinational Enterprises (EMNEs), there is still much contention on what drives rapid EMNE internationalization, particularly for the less explored firms from Latin America. Using an inductive case study of five leading Brazilian MNEs, we bring new insights on this neglected question. We unveil that the existence of organizational slack (of operational, managerial, and financial nature) can indeed facilitate rapid internationalization, particularly when triggered by unique home country conditions (e.g., regulation; rising cost of doing business at home; exhaustion of profitable growth opportunities in the domestic market).
       
  • Competing to be innovative: Foreign competition and imitative innovation
           of emerging economy firms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): N. Nuruzzaman, Deeksha Singh, Chinmay Pattnaik We examine the effect of increased competitive pressures within and outside the home market on the innovation of local firms. We argue that the relationship between exposure to foreign competition in domestic and international markets and firm innovation is better captured by imitative innovation than by radical innovation. We hypothesize that exposure to foreign competition inside and outside the home country is positively associated with local firms’ imitative innovation. Further, we argue that this relationship is contingent on institutional factors, including the role of the government, the legal system, and natural resource endowment. Using a dataset of 949 firm-year observations in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, we find empirical support for the positive impact of competitive pressure on imitative innovation.
       
  • Internationalization pattern of creative-cultural events: Two cases from
           Canada
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Hamid Etemad, Hamed Motaghi This paper characterizes the internationalization of creative-cultural events through in-depth, longitudinal and ethnographic case-studies of two typical events. It develops four families of propositions based on the extant theory and tests them against their corresponding aspects of the two case-studies. This comparative examination indicates varying levels of supports; and also points to significant differences from traditional patterns of internationalizations processes. This paper’s contributions are in identifying differences in such events’ internationalization pattern and suggesting theoretical explanation for them. A combination of firm-specific advantage (e.g., creative and cultural) and the event’s home location-specific advantages offer a theoretical approach as they attract both the viewers and creative service-providers from the rest of the world to the home of these events. The paper explores the implication for further theoretical research, management of such events and public policy formulations.
       
  • International entrepreneurial marketing strategies of MNCs: Bricolage as
           practiced by marketing managers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Man Yang The extant research lacks information on entrepreneurial marketing in large international firms. This study explores the international entrepreneurial marketing strategies of multinational corporations (MNCs), and its results reveal that MNC marketing managers use bricolage to develop international entrepreneurial marketing. A novel finding of the study is that the international entrepreneurial marketing strategies of MNCs include co-innovation, accelerating customer value, and international expansion based on regional market leadership. Marketing managers use both parallel and selective bricolage in their international entrepreneurial marketing. Environmental uncertainty and entrepreneurship culture are important drivers of the implementation of bricolage to develop international entrepreneurial marketing. The research findings can inform MNC management of the options available to utilize corporate venturing to facilitate bricolage and in turn to realize international entrepreneurial marketing strategies.
       
  • Service quality delivery in a cross-national context
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Ying Zhu, Susan Freeman, S. Tamer Cavusgil Consumption of a broad range of services ranging from tourism to hospitality by an increasingly global mix of customers, especially from the new millennium of the emerging middle class, is creating an interesting challenge for service providers. What are the macro-environmental (cultural, historical, economic, political etc.) influences on service culture and on service quality delivery' Drawing on the expectancy-disconfirmation theory, this qualitative study provides insights on profound macro-environmental drivers of attitudes towards service quality delivery from a cross-national context. Based on comparative, country-based industry insights that highlight employee attitudes from advanced and emerging markets, we discuss the impact from a cross-national service quality delivery perspective. By examining comparative country contexts in growing service sectors, as in hospitality and tourism, we develop and present a conceptual model of cross-national service quality delivery.
       
  • Venture capital as an innovation ecosystem engineer in an emerging market
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Sunny Li Sun, Victor Z. Chen, Sanwar A. Sunny, Jie Chen How can venture capital (VC) firms transform a weak innovation ecosystem into a productive and robust one' While the literature has found VC firms’ catalyst role in innovation in developed markets, we know little about whether and how they affect innovation in an emerging market, where formal institutions (e.g., regulations and markets) and informal institutions (e.g., professional networks) to enable VC firms’ catalyst role are relatively lacking. First, we argue that VC firms play a different and more proactive role in these markets as an “ecosystem engineer” through governing the resource flow and selecting deviation, which drive regional innovation performance. Second, such effects are further positively moderated by the presence of multinational enterprises (MNEs) in a region. Lastly, over time, while the direct effects of VC firms persist and increase, the moderating effects of MNE presence decline. Empirically, we examined a Chinese provincial-level panel data of VC activities (1999–2009) and patent applications (2000–2010) and found supportive evidence. Implications are discussed.
       
  • Resources, home institutional context and SMEs’ exporting: Direct
           relationships and contingency effects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Dimitris Manolopoulos, Erifili Chatzopoulou, Constantina Kottaridi Research highlights the role of resources in SMEs’ exporting but is less forthcoming with respect to entrepreneurial perceptions of home institutional quality. Drawing on institution-based lenses, we distinguish among formal, informal, and regulatory institutions, which in concert with firm resources are expected to influence SMEs’ export behavior. Our predictions are tested on a sample of 150 firms located in Greece. The analysis of direct relationships shows that formal and informal institutional dimensions affect significantly, but differently, SMEs’ export activity. The analysis of interaction effects demonstrates that resource decisions for exporting are contingent upon entrepreneurial perceptions of the home institutional context, such that SMEs respond to formal and informal domestic institutional weaknesses by intensifying resource allocations to fuel export sales. In an opposite direction, export regulatory complexity reverses the positive resources-exporting link. These findings suggest the importance of home institutions in the exporting field.
       
  • Stakeholder pressures, EMS implementation, and green innovation in MNC
           overseas subsidiaries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Norifumi Kawai, Roger Strange, Antonella Zucchella In this paper, we address the issue of green innovation by the overseas subsidiaries of multinational corporations (MNCs). Drawing upon stakeholder theory and institutional theory, we propose a conceptual model to explain how stakeholder pressures in host countries prompt MNC subsidiaries to undertake green product and process innovations. Our findings indicate that MNC subsidiaries need to meet market stakeholders’ pressures in order to achieve social legitimacy in host countries, and that the implementation of formal environmental management systems (EMS) is an important mechanism translating these pressures into green innovation initiatives. Furthermore, we find that the positive relationship between market stakeholder pressures and EMS implementation is reinforced by global ‘green’ institutional pressures in the different host countries.
       
  • Interactive effects of information exchange, relationship capital and
           environmental uncertainty on international joint venture (IJV)
           performance: An emerging markets perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Francis Kwok, Piyush Sharma, Sanjaya Singh Gaur, Akiko Ueno Prior research on the role of international joint ventures (IJV) in the emerging markets generally ignores the impact of information exchange on IJV performance as well as the mediating role of relationship capital (a key measure of competitive dynamics and co-evolution) and the moderating impact of environmental uncertainty in this process. This paper addresses these important research gaps by exploring the direct effect of information exchange on IJV performance as well as indirect (mediated) effect through mutual trust and reciprocal commitment, two key components of relationship capital. In addition, this paper investigates the role of environmental uncertainty as a moderator of these mediating effects. Results from a study of 205 contractual IJVs in China, a highly competitive and dynamic emerging market, show that foreign and local partners collaborate and co-evolve through regular information exchange that helps them build relationship capital with each other in the form of mutual trust and reciprocal commitment, which in turn leads to better IJV performance. In addition, environmental uncertainty negatively moderates (weakens) the positive effects of information exchange on mutual trust and reciprocal commitment but not their impact on IJV performance. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for future research on the role of relationship capital in the successful formation and management of IJVs in the emerging markets.
       
  • National culture and environmental responsibility research revisited
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Johan Graafland, Niels Noorderhaven
       
  • How does ownership influence business growth' A competitive dynamics
           perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Wei Yang, Klaus E. Meyer Firms engage in competitive actions to gain market share and hence to grow their revenues. However, not all firms are equally able to use competitive actions to drive growth. We argue that the ability to translate competitive actions to revenue growth depends on the ownership of the firm. Drawing on principal-agent and principal-principal perspectives, we argue that: (1) private owners (both foreign and local) are better able to employ aggressive actions to grow their business than state owners; (2) firms with multiple owners (especially international joint ventures) are less able to implement actions that drive business growth than full ownership. We find support for these arguments in empirical tests on survey-based data of 106 firms in China. Results show that in an emerging market the principal-principal perspective can better explain governance and competition than the principal-agent perspective.
       
  • Person-environment fit and emotional control: Assigned expatriates vs.
           self-initiated expatriates
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 February 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Jakob Lauring, Jan Selmer Studies exploring the difference of assigned expatriates (AEs) and self-initiated expatriates (SIEs) have recently started to emerge. However, so far few results have been connected to theory developed in this area. In the current study, we use responses from 324 business expatriates in China and take departure in the two elements of the person-environment fit theory, supplementary fit and complementary fit. We use the supplementary fit element of this theory to explain why emotional control (low dispositional anger and high self-control) increases performance and satisfaction in China. We rely on the complementary element of person-environment fit theory for understanding why this effect may vary between AEs and SIEs. Our argument is that as opposed to SIEs, AEs could add contact and knowledge from the parent company to the local organization thus complementing it. Our findings, with regard to supplementary fit, show that self-control has a positive association with both job performance and job satisfaction while trait anger has a negative effect on job satisfaction. In relation to complementary fit, also as expected, we found a buffering moderation effect of being AE, meaning that the negative effect of their trait anger on job satisfaction was diminished for this group.
       
  • Subsidiary knowledge creation in co-evolving contexts
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2018Source: International Business ReviewAuthor(s): Paul Ryan, Majella Giblin, Ulf Andersson, Johanna Clancy In this paper we explore how the MNE subsidiary’s role internally within its corporation evolves through knowledge creation in accordance with an evolving external local knowledge network, and the extent to which the interwoven coevolving context matters for, and may be guided by the subsidiary. We conducted a qualitative investigation of purposely selected subsidiaries as case studies and longitudinally tracked the interwoven co-evolving contexts of their internal corporate role and external knowledge network. We show why role evolution may be differential and illustrate how competence-creating subsidiaries can balance and simultaneously manage the guided co-evolution of both contexts to advance their roles for knowledge creation. We develop a dynamic framework of subsidiary role evolution at the nexus of these interwoven co-evolving contexts. This advances theory on the dual embedded subsidiary as previous studies have predominantly been cross-sectional and static rather than evolutionary.
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.235.48.106
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-