Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3147 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3147 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 106, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 447, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 325, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 432, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 490, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 266, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 216, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.7
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 266  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0002-9378 - ISSN (Online) 1097-6868
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3147 journals]
  • Guideline for perioperative obstetrical care highlights evidence gap
           related to timing of urinary catheter removal after elective cesarean
           delivery
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): G. Nelson, R.D. Wilson, G.A. Macones
       
  • Understanding gestational surrogacy in the United States: a primer for
           obstetricians/gynecologists
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Kate Swanson, Nina K. Ayala, Randall B. Barnes, Nidhi Desai, Marcy Miller, Lynn M. YeeAbstractAs gestational surrogacy (a process by which intended parents contract with a woman to carry a fetus that the intended parents will raise) increases across the United States (US), it is imperative that obstetrician/gynecologists understand the unique nuances of caring for patients who are gestational surrogates. Gestational surrogacy offers a route to parenthood for individuals and families who may otherwise have limited options. Understanding surrogacy requires multiple ethical considerations about the potential medical and psychosocial effects on gestational surrogates as well as the families built through surrogacy. There is a dearth of research on the subject, particularly in the US and other countries that practice compensated surrogacy. Here we seek to review the process of gestational surrogacy in the US including the legal landscape, current trends in gestational surrogacy utilization, and what is known about the medical and social effects of this process on all participants. We also aim to highlight the limitations of available data and identify topics for future research to provide optimal evidence-based and just care for these patients.
       
  • Cesarean radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer in the United States: A
           national study of surgical outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Koji Matsuo, Rachel S. Mandelbaum, Shinya Matsuzaki, Ernesto Licon, Maximilian Klar, Brendan H. Grubbs, Lynda D. Roman
       
  • Post-operative urinary catheter removal for Enhanced Recovery After
           Cesarean protocols
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Alex F. Peahl, Joanna Kountanis, Roger D. Smith
       
  • How long is too long' Application of acetic acid during colposcopy: A
           prospective study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Ziad Hilal, Clemens B. Tempfer, Lucie Burgard, Sadia Rehman, Günther A. RezniczekAbstractBackgroundApplying acetic acid (AA) to the cervix followed by colposcopic assessment with or without colposcopically directed biopsy is the standard test used to detect dysplastic lesions of the cervix. However, there is no evidence-based common standard defining how to exactly perform this test.ObjectiveTo prospectively define the optimal timing for the colposcopic assessment of acetowhite lesions.MethodsConsecutive women referred to our colposcopy unit were recruited. Using a standardized colposcopy protocol, we recorded the most severe colposcopic lesion (MSCL) 1, 3, and 5 minutes after application of AA (primary study end point). The time to first appearance of the MSCL, highest staining intensity, and fading of MSCL were video-documented (secondary study end points, assessed independently by three raters). Results were compared using parametric and nonparametric tests.Results300 women were included. After 1 minute, 290/300 (96.7%) of patients were diagnosed with the MSCL. This proportion did not improve after 3 minutes (290/300 [96.7%]) nor after 5 minutes (233/264 [88.3%]). The proportion of minor and major changes continuously declined over time from 142/300 (47.3%; 1 minute) to 107/264 (40.5%; 5 minutes) and from 110/300 (36.7%) to 91/264 (34.5%), respectively. The median time until the first appearance of the MSCL was 13.5 (interquartile range [IQR] 3 to 27.25) seconds and was significantly lower in HSIL (7 [IQR 1 to 20] seconds) compared to LSIL (19 [IQR 9 to 39.5] seconds; p
       
  • A Low-Cost Approach to Salpingectomy at Cesarean Delivery
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Xiaoyue Mona Guo, Evelyn F. Hall, Liza Mazzullo, Miroslav DjordjevicAbstractThere is increasing adoption of opportunistic salpingectomy for ovarian cancer prevention at the time of gynecologic surgery, including the postpartum period. However, there is no consensus on an ideal surgical approach for the parturient vasculature. We describe a safe, low-cost and accessible approach for bilateral salpingectomy during cesarean section that we call the “Mesosalpinx Isolation Salpingectomy Technique” (MIST) which can guide institutions to standardize their postpartum salpingectomy procedures when advanced vessel-sealing devices are not available. In the MIST technique, avascular windows are created within the mesosalpinx close to the tubal vessels. The vasculature is thus fully skeletonized and isolated from the adjacent mesosalpinx prior to suture ligation, ensuring security of the free-tie to the individual vessels and avoiding sharp injury to the mesosalpinx. Not using vessel-sealing devices also eliminates the risk of thermal injury to the adjacent ovarian tissue and vasculature, and potentially achieves a cost savings for the hospital and patient. MIST has been performed in 141 cesarean deliveries in the past four years. There were no noted bleeding complications during the salpingectomy procedure, blood transfusions, or instances of postoperative surgical re-exploration. In our experience, a surgeon new to the procedure takes approximately 15 minutes to complete a bilateral salpingectomy. Those experienced in MIST need only 5 minutes. A video is included demonstrating the technique.
       
  • Quality of periconceptional dietary intake and maternal and neonatal
           outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Lynn M. Yee, Robert M. Silver, David M. Haas, Samuel Parry, Brian M. Mercer, Jay Iams, Deborah Wing, Corette B. Parker, Uma M. Reddy, Ronald J. Wapner, William A. GrobmanBackgroundPericonceptional diet quality is commonly suboptimal and sociodemographic disparities in diet quality exist. However, it is unknown whether individual periconceptional diet quality is associated with obstetric outcomes.ObjectiveOur objective was to assess differences in maternal and neonatal outcomes according to maternal periconceptional diet quality.Study DesignThis is a secondary analysis of a large, multicenter prospective cohort study of 10,038 nulliparous women receiving obstetrical care at 8 United States centers. Women underwent three antenatal study visits and had detailed maternal and neonatal data abstracted by trained research personnel. In the first trimester (between 6 and 13 weeks), women completed the modified Block 2005 Food Frequency Questionnaire, a semiquantitative assessment of usual dietary intake for the 3 months around conception. Responses were scored using the Healthy Eating Index-2010, which assesses adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Higher scores on the Healthy Eating Index represent better adherence. Healthy Eating Index scores were analyzed by quartile; quartile 4 represents the highest dietary quality. Bivariable and multivariable analyses were performed to assess associations between diet quality and outcomes. A sensitivity analysis in which markers of socioeconomic status were included in the multivariable Poisson regression models was performed.ResultsIn the cohort of 8,259 women with Healthy Eating Index data, the mean Healthy Eating Index score was 63 (± 13) of 100. Women with the lowest quartile Healthy Eating Index scores were more likely to be younger, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic, publicly insured, low income, and tobacco users. They were more likely to have comorbidities (obesity, chronic hypertension, pregestational diabetes, mental health disorders), a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index, and less education. Women with lowest quartile scores experienced less frequent major perineal lacerations and more frequent postpartum hemorrhage requiring transfusion and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, which persisted on multivariable analyses (controlling for age, body mass index, tobacco use, chronic hypertension, pregestational diabetes mellitus, and mental health disorders) comparing women in each quartile to quartile 4. Additionally, women in quartiles 1 and 2 experienced greater adjusted relative risk of cesarean delivery compared to women in quartile 4. Neonatal outcomes also differed by dietary quartile, with women in the lowest Healthy Eating Index quartile experiencing greater adjusted relative risk of preterm birth, neonatal intensive care unit admission, small for gestational age infant, and low birthweight, and lower risk of macrosomia; all neonatal findings also persisted in multivariable analyses. The sensitivity analysis with inclusion of markers of socioeconomic status (race/ethnicity, insurance status, marital status) in the multivariable models supported these findings.ConclusionsPericonceptional diet quality among women in the United States is poor. Poorer periconceptional dietary quality is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes even after controlling for potential comorbidities and body mass index, suggesting periconceptional diet may be an important social or biological determinant of health underlying existing health disparities.
       
  • Evolving Ethical Issues with Advances in Uterus Transplantation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Ruth M. Farrell, Liza Johannesson, Rebecca Flyckt, Elliott G. Richards, Giuliano Testa, Andreas Tzakis, Tommaso FalconeAbstractWhile uterus transplantation was once considered only a theoretical possibility for patients with uterine factor infertility, researchers have now developed methods of transplantation that have led to successful pregnancies with multiple children born to date. Because of the unique and significant nature of this type of research, it has been undertaken with collaboration not only with scientists and physicians but also with bioethicists, who paved the initial path for research of uterus transplantation to take place. As the science of uterus transplantation continues to advance, so too must the public dialogue among obstetrician/gynecologists, transplant surgeons, bioethicists, and other key stakeholders in defining the continued direction of research in addition to planning for the clinical implementation of uterus transplantation as a therapeutic option. Given the rapid advances in this field, the time has come to revisit the fundamental questions raised at the inception of uterus transplantation and, looking forward, determine the future of this approach given emerging data on the procedure’s impact on individuals, families, and society.
       
  • Characteristics and Outcomes of Placenta Accreta Spectrum in Twins versus
           Singletons: A Study from the Pan American Society for Placenta Accreta
           Spectrum (PAS2)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Alireza A. SHAMSHIRSAZ, Daniela CARUSI, Scott A. SHAINKER, Brett EINERSON, Meena KHANDELWAL, Hadi ERFANI, Amir A. SHAMSHIRSAZ, Anna M. MODEST, Soroush AALIPOUR, Karin A. FOX, Deirdre J. LYELL, Michael A. BELFORT, Robert M. SILVER
       
  • “Preeclampsia: the role of persistent endothelial cells in
           uteroplacental arteries.” Brosens I, Brosens JJ, Muter J, Puttemans P,
           Benagiano G. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2019 Sep;221(3):219-226.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): W. Gyselaers, C. Lees, H. Valensise, B. Thilaganathan
       
  • Ultrasound appearance of endometrial bone metaplasia mimics an
           intrauterine device
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Luca Giannella, Maria Carolina Gelli, Giovanni D’Ippolito, Andrea Ciavattini
       
  • Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) Consult Series #49: Cesarean
           scar pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM), Russell Miller, Ilan E. Timor, Cynthia Gyamfi-BannermanAbstractCesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) is a complication in which an early pregnancy implants in the scar from a prior cesarean delivery. This condition presents a substantial risk for severe maternal morbidity due to challenges in securing a timely diagnosis, as well as uncertainty regarding optimal treatment once identified. Ultrasound is the primary imaging modality for CSP diagnosis, although a correct and timely determination can be difficult. Surgical, medical, and minimally invasive therapies have been described for CSP management, but the optimal treatment is not known. Women who decline treatment of a CSP should be counseled regarding the risk for severe morbidity. The following are Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) recommendations: We recommend against expectant management of cesarean scar pregnancy (GRADE 1B); we suggest operative resection (with transvaginal or laparoscopic approaches when possible) or ultrasound-guided vacuum aspiration be considered for the surgical management of CSP and that sharp curettage (D&C) alone should be avoided (GRADE 2C); we suggest intragestational methotrexate (MTX) for medical treatment of CSP, with or without other treatment modalities (GRADE 2C); we recommend that systemic MTX alone should not be used for the treatment of CSP (GRADE 1C); in women who choose expectant management and continuation of a CSP, we recommend repeat cesarean delivery between 34 0/7 and 35 6/7 weeks of gestation (GRADE 1C); we recommend that women with a CSP be advised of the risks of another pregnancy and counseled regarding effective contraceptive methods, including long-acting reversible contraception and permanent contraception (GRADE 1C).
       
  • Prior Authorization and its Impact on Access to Obstetric Ultrasound
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Vanita D. Jain, Fadi A. Bsat, Michael S. Ruma, Anthony C. Sciscione, Brian K. IriyeAbstractPrior authorization is a process requiring healthcare providers to obtain advance approval from a payer before a patient undergoes a procedure in order for the study to be covered. Prior authorization was introduced to decrease overutilization of ultrasound procedures. However it has led to unanticipated consequences such as impeding access to obstetric imaging, increased administrative overhead without reimbursement, and contribution to physician frustration and burnout. Payers often use intermediary radiology benefit management companies without providing specialty-specific review in a timely manner as is requisite when practicing high-risk obstetrics. This article proposes a number of potential solutions to this problem: (1) Consider alternative means to monitor overutilization; (2) Create and evaluate data regarding providers in the highest utilization; (3) Continue to support and grow the educational efforts of speciality societies to publish clinical guidelines; and (4) Emphasize the importance of practicing evidence-based medicine. Understanding that not all health plans may be willing or able to collaborate with healthcare providers we encourage physicians to advocate for policies and legislation to limit the implementation of prior authorization within their own states.
       
  • Fragmentation of Postpartum Readmissions in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Timothy Wen, Nicole M. Krenitsky, Mark A. Clapp, Mary E. D’Alton, Jason D. Wright, Frank Attenello, William J. Mack, Alexander M. FriedmanAbstractBackgroundFragmentation of care, wherein a patient is readmitted to a hospital different from the initial point of care, has been shown to be associated with worse patient outcomes in other medical specialties. However, postpartum fragmentation of care has not been well characterized in obstetrics.ObjectiveTo characterize risk for and outcomes associated with fragmentation of postpartum readmissions wherein the readmitting hospital is different than the delivery hospital.MethodsThe 2010 to 2014 Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) was used for this retrospective cohort study. Postpartum readmissions within 60-days of delivery hospitalization discharge for women aged 15-54 years were identified. The primary outcome, fragmentation, was defined as readmission to a different hospital than the delivery hospital. Hospital, demographic, medical, and obstetric factors associated with fragmented readmission were analyzed. Adjusted log-linear models were performed to analyze risk for readmission with adjusted risk ratios (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as the measures of effect. The associations between fragmentation and secondary outcomes including (i) length of stay>90th percentile, (ii) hospitalization costs>90th percentile, and (iii) severe maternal morbidity were determined. Whether specific indications for readmission such as hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, wound complications, and other conditions were associated with higher or lower risk for fragmentation was analyzed.ResultsFrom 2010-2014, 141,276 60-day postpartum readmissions were identified of which 15% of readmissions (n=21,789) occurred at a hospital different from where the delivery occurred. Evaluating individual readmission indications, fragmentation was less likely for hypertension (11.1%), wound complications (10.7%), and uterine infections (11.0%), and more likely for heart failure (28.6%), thromboembolism (28.4%), and upper respiratory infections (33.9%) (p90th percentile (relative risk 1.48, 95% CI 1.42-1.54) and hospitalization costs>90th percentile (aRR 1.74, 95% CI 1.67, 1.81).ConclusionThis study of nationwide estimates of postpartum fragmentation found discontinuity of postpartum care was associated for increased risk for severe morbidity, high costs, and long length of stay. Reduction of fragmentation may represent an important goal in overall efforts to improve postpartum care.
       
  • A comparison of international prenatal care guidelines for low-risk women
           to inform high-value care
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Alex Friedman Peahl, Michele Heisler, Lydia K. Essenmacher, Vanessa K. Dalton, Vineet Chopra, Lindsay K. Admon, Michelle H. Moniz
       
  • Guidelines for Labor Assessment: Failure to Progress'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Wayne R. Cohen, Emanuel A. FriedmanAbstractThe ongoing debate about what models of cervical dilatation and fetal descent should guide clinical decision-making has sown uncertainty among obstetric practitioners. We previously argued that the adoption of recently published labor assessment guidelines promoted by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine may have been premature. Before accepting any new clinical approaches as the standard of care, their underlying hypotheses should be thoroughly tested to ensure they are at least equivalent (or, preferably, superior) to existing management paradigms. Some of the apparent urgency to subscribe to new clinical tactics has been fueled by legitimate concerns about the rise in the cesarean delivery rate over the past several decades. A major contributor to this change in practice patterns is that more cesarean deliveries are being done for diagnoses that fall under the rubric of dystocia than ever before. As a consequence, traditional labor curves--fundamental for assessing labor progress—and the practice paradigms associated with them have received intense scrutiny as a possible contributor to this delivery trend. Moreover, the recent proposal of new labor curves and accompanying management guidelines has, understandably, fed the appetite to correct a perceived problem. However, the cesarean delivery rate rose most rapidly during decades when there was no major change in traditional labor curves or in the guidelines for their interpretation. Also, during the years since the new guidelines were first published, there has been no major fall in cesarean delivery frequency. This raises the question of whether there was truly a fundamental flaw in the traditional labor management paradigms or whether their proper interpretation and use had been somehow forgotten, ignored, or corrupted. More important, existing studies have shown that application of the new guidelines often (but not always) results in a modest fall in the cesarean delivery rate, but that this change may be accompanied by significant increases in maternal and neonatal morbidity. These results strongly suggest more caution in the adoption of the ACOG/SMFM labor assessment recommendations. They are based on a hypothesis that has yet to undergo thorough evaluation of its risks and benefits.
       
  • International gestational age-specific centiles for umbilical artery
           Doppler indices: a longitudinal prospective cohort study of the
           INTERGROWTH-21st Project
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Lior DRUKKER, Eleonora STAINES-URIAS, José VILLAR, Fernando C. BARROS, Maria CARVALHO, Shama MUNIM, Rose MCGREADY, Francois NOSTEN, James A. BERKLEY, Shane A. NORRIS, Ricardo UAUY, Stephen H. KENNEDY, Aris T. PAPAGEORGHIOUAbstractBackgroundReference values for umbilical artery Doppler indices are used clinically to assess fetal wellbeing. However, many studies that have produced reference charts have important methodological limitations, and these result in significant heterogeneity of reported reference ranges.ObjectivesTo produce international gestational age-specific centiles for umbilical artery Doppler indices based on longitudinal data and the same rigorous methodology used in the original Fetal Growth Longitudinal Study (FGLS) of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project.Study designIn Phase II of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project (the INTERBIO-21st Study), we prospectively continued enrolling pregnant women according to the same protocol from three of the original populations in Pelotas (Brazil), Nairobi (Kenya) and Oxford (UK) that had participated in FGLS. Women with a singleton pregnancy were recruited at
       
  • Horses and Zebras: Probabilities, Uncertainty and Cognitive Bias in
           Clinical Diagnosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Emmet Hirsch
       
  • Challenging the definition of hypertension in pregnancy: A retrospective
           cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Maya Reddy, Daniel Lorber Rolnik, Katrina Harris, Wentao LI, Ben Willem Mol, Fabricio DA. Silva Costa, Euan M. Wallace, Kirsten PalmerAbstractBackgroundIn routine antenatal care, blood pressure is used as a screening tool for preeclampsia and its associated adverse outcomes. As such women with a blood pressure greater than 140/90 mmHg undergo further investigation and closer follow up, whereas those with lower blood pressures receive no additional care. In the non-pregnant setting, the American College of Cardiology now endorses lower hypertensive thresholds and it remains unclear whether these lower thresholds should also be considered in pregnancy.Objective1) To examine the association between lower blood pressure thresholds (as per the American College of Cardiology guidelines) and pregnancy outcomes. 2) To determine if there is a continuous relationship between blood pressure and pregnancy outcomes and identify the point of a change at which blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of such outcomes.Study DesignThis was a retrospective study of singleton pregnancies at Monash Health, Australia. Data was obtained with regards to maternal characteristics and blood pressure measurements at varying gestational ages. Blood pressures were then categorized as 1) mean arterial pressure and 2) normal, elevated, stage one and stage two hypertension, as per the American College of Cardiology guidelines. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to identify associations between blood pressure categories and pregnancy outcomes.ResultsThis study included 18,243 singleton pregnancies. We demonstrated a positive dose response relationship between mean arterial pressure and the development of preeclampsia in later pregnancy. Across all gestational ages, the risk of preeclampsia was higher in those with “elevated blood pressure” and “stage one hypertension” in comparison to the normotensive group (ARR 2.52, 95%CI 1.78, 3.55 and ARR 6.47, 95%CI 4.86, 8.61 respectively at 34-36 weeks’ gestation). There was also an association between stage one hypertension, preterm birth, and adverse perinatal outcomes.ConclusionThis study demonstrated that preeclampsia and the associated adverse outcomes are not exclusive to those with blood pressures greater than 140/90 mmHg. As such, those with prehypertensive blood pressures may also benefit from closer monitoring. Further research is essential to determine whether lowering the blood pressure threshold in pregnancy would improve detection and outcomes.
       
  • Risk of Pelvic Organ Prolapse Treatment Based on Extended Family History
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Kristina ALLEN-BRADY, Peggy A. NORTON, Audra Jolyn HILL, Lisa A. CANNON-ALBRIGHTAbstractBackgroundFamily history of pelvic organ prolapse among first-degree relatives is an established risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse; however, consideration of the constellation of family history extending to distant relationships allows for more accurate determination of risk and may improve pelvic organ prolapse risk prediction estimates.ObjectiveTo assess risk for pelvic organ prolapse treatment based on varying family histories of pelvic organ prolapse, including number and types of affected relatives, ages of relatives at POP treatment, and whether the family history is of maternal or paternal origin.Study DesignThis is a retrospective, population-based study that involves the Utah Population Database: a population resource that includes extensive genealogy information linked to medical records. The study population included 453,522 total females, 4,628 females with a diagnosis of treated (surgical or pessary) pelvic organ prolapse and their 15,530 first-degree relatives (FDR), 33,782 second-degree relatives, and 66,469 third-degree relatives. We estimated relative risk (RR) of treated pelvic organ prolapse based on specific family history constellations.ResultsRelative risk estimates increased with a family history of increasing numbers of treated first-degree relatives with pelvic organ prolapse (FDR≥1: RR=2.36, 95% CI (2.15-2.58); FDR≥2: RR=3.79 (2.65-5.24); and FDR≥3: RR=6.26 (1.29-18.30). Having a family history of three or more affected third-degree relatives (e.g. first cousins) and no affected first- or second-degree relatives was similar in risk to having one affected first-degree relative. Relative risk estimates decreased with increasing age of treatment for first-degree family members. Risks in individuals with a positive maternal family history for pelvic organ prolapse were consistently higher than risks in individuals with equivalent paternal family history, but paternal inheritance still played a role. Approximately 4% of the total, studied female population was found to have a greater than 2-fold risk of being treated for pelvic organ prolapse, and is considered high-risk based on their family history.ConclusionsWe provide estimates for treated pelvic organ prolapse based on an extensive family history of pelvic organ prolapse using a large population-based sample. Risk for treated pelvic organ prolapse increased with increasing numbers of affected close and distant female relatives, earlier age of pelvic organ prolapse treatment in relatives, and maternal inheritance. These risk estimates may be useful for genetic studies and investigation of risk reduction strategies in those at highest risk for pelvic organ prolapse.
       
  • Caseating Necrosis in Cervical Tuberculosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Amenda Ann Davis
       
  • Undetectable equals untransmittable (U = U): implications for
           preconception counseling for human immunodeficiency virus serodiscordant
           couples
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1Author(s): Shweta J. Bhatt, Nataki DouglasAlthough limited by society guidelines from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the past, many human immunodeficiency virus serodiscordant American couples who desired future childbearing were referred to reproductive endocrinology and infertility specialists for in vitro fertilization. The access to and cost of assisted reproductive technology created a significant barrier to reproductive care in this patient population. New evidence-based guidelines by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, however, endorse condomless intercourse timed to ovulation for human immunodeficiency virus serodiscordant couples with undetectable viral loads on antiretroviral therapy. In parallel, the Prevention Access Campaign’s undetectable equals untransmittable initiative advocates increasing awareness of the favorable prognosis of persons living with human immunodeficiency virus to remove the associated stigma of the disease and promote the safety of condomless intercourse in the setting of undetectable viral loads. With these new guidelines, human immunodeficiency virus serodiscordant couples may not require an automatic referral to the reproductive endocrinology and infertility specialist. Rather, providers of preconception care could recommend timed intercourse for these couples after confirmation of an undetectable viral load and discussion with the interdisciplinary team of health care professionals caring for persons living with human immunodeficiency virus.
       
  • Amniotic fluid embolism: principles of early clinical management
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1Author(s): Luis D. Pacheco, Steven L. Clark, Miranda Klassen, Gary D.V. HankinsAmniotic fluid embolism is an uncommon, but potentially lethal, complication of pregnancy. Because amniotic fluid embolism usually is seen with cardiac arrest, the initial immediate response should be to provide high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We describe key features of initial treatment of patients with amniotic fluid embolism. Where available, we recommend performing transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography as soon as possible because this is an easy and reliable method of identifying a failing right ventricle. If such failure is identified, treatment that is tailored at improving right ventricular performance should be initiated with the use of inotropic agents and pulmonary vasodilators. Blood pressure support with vasopressors is preferred over fluid infusion in the setting of severe right ventricular compromise. Amniotic fluid embolism–related coagulopathy should be managed with hemostatic resuscitation with the use of a 1:1:1 ratio of packed red cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets (with cryoprecipitate as needed to maintain a serum fibrinogen of>150–200 mg/dL). In cases that require prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation or, after arrest, severe ventricular dysfunction refractory to medical management, consideration for venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation should be given.
       
  • The physiology of intrapartum fetal compromise at term
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1Author(s): Jessica M. Turner, Murray D. Mitchell, Sailesh S. KumarUterine contractions in labor result in a 60% reduction in uteroplacental perfusion, causing transient fetal and placental hypoxia. A healthy term fetus with a normally developed placenta is able to accommodate this transient hypoxia by activation of the peripheral chemoreflex, resulting in a reduction in oxygen consumption and a centralization of oxygenated blood to critical organs, namely the heart, brain, and adrenals. Providing there is adequate time for placental and fetal reperfusion between contractions, these fetuses will be able to withstand prolonged periods of intermittent hypoxia and avoid severe hypoxic injury. However, there exists a cohort of fetuses in whom abnormal placental development in the first half of pregnancy results in failure of endovascular invasion of the spiral arteries by the cytotrophoblastic cells and inadequate placental angiogenesis. This produces a high-resistance, low-flow circulation predisposing to hypoperfusion, hypoxia, reperfusion injury, and oxidative stress within the placenta. Furthermore, this renders the placenta susceptible to fluctuations and reduction in uteroplacental perfusion in response to external compression and stimuli (as occurs in labor), further reducing fetal capillary perfusion, placing the fetus at risk of inadequate gas/nutrient exchange. This placental dysfunction predisposes the fetus to intrapartum fetal compromise. In the absence of a rare catastrophic event, intrapartum fetal compromise occurs as a gradual process when there is an inability of the fetal heart to respond to the peripheral chemoreflex to maintain cardiac output. This may arise as a consequence of placental dysfunction reducing pre-labor myocardial glycogen stores necessary for anaerobic metabolism or due to an inadequate placental perfusion between contractions to restore fetal oxygen and nutrient exchange. If the hypoxic insult is severe enough and long enough, profound multiorgan injury and even death may occur. This review provides a detailed synopsis of the events that can result in placental dysfunction, how this may predispose to intrapartum fetal hypoxia, and what protective mechanisms are in place to avoid hypoxic injury.
       
  • Evolution of the human pelvis and obstructed labor: new explanations of an
           old obstetrical dilemma
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1Author(s): Mihaela Pavličev, Roberto Romero, Philipp MitteroeckerWithout cesarean delivery, obstructed labor can result in maternal and fetal injuries or even death given a disproportion in size between the fetus and the maternal birth canal. The precise frequency of obstructed labor is difficult to estimate because of the widespread use of cesarean delivery for indications other than proven cephalopelvic disproportion, but it has been estimated that at least 1 million mothers per year are affected by this disorder worldwide. Why is the fit between the fetus and the maternal pelvis so tight' Why did evolution not lead to a greater safety margin, as in other primates' Here we review current research and suggest new hypotheses on the evolution of human childbirth and pelvic morphology. In 1960, Washburn suggested that this obstetrical dilemma arose because the human pelvis is an evolutionary compromise between two functions, bipedal gait and childbirth. However, recent biomechanical and kinematic studies indicate that pelvic width does not considerably affect the efficiency of bipedal gait and thus is unlikely to have constrained the evolution of a wider birth canal. Instead, bipedalism may have primarily constrained the flexibility of the pubic symphysis during pregnancy, which opens much wider in most mammals with large fetuses than in humans. We argue that the birth canal is mainly constrained by the trade-off between 2 pregnancy-related functions: while a narrow pelvis is disadvantageous for childbirth, it offers better support for the weight exerted by the viscera and the large human fetus during the long gestation period. We discuss the implications of this hypothesis for understanding pelvic floor dysfunction. Furthermore, we propose that selection for a narrow pelvis has also acted in males because of the role of pelvic floor musculature in erectile function. Finally, we review the cliff-edge model of obstetric selection to explain why evolution cannot completely eliminate cephalopelvic disproportion. This model also predicts that the regular application of life-saving cesarean delivery has evolutionarily increased rates of cephalopelvic disproportion already. We address how evolutionary models contribute to understanding and decision making in obstetrics and gynecology as well as in devising health care policies.
       
  • Naltrexone use in pregnancy: a time for change
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1Author(s): Steve N. Caritis, Raman Venkataramanan
       
  • AJOG MFM Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Institutional Index
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s):
       
  • LB 4: Furosemide for Accelerated Recovery of Blood Pressure Postpartum: a
           randomized placebo controlled trial (FoR BP)
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Joana Lopes Perdigao, Jennifer Lewey, Adi Hirshberg, Nathanael C. Koepler, Sindhu K. Srinivas, Michal A. Elovitz, Lisa D. Levine
       
  • LB 3: Outpatient Foley catheter for induction of labor in nulliparous
           women: a randomized-controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Elizabeth B. Ausbeck, Victoria C. Jauk, Yumo Xue, Pamela Files, Spencer Kuper, Akila Subramaniam, Brian M. Casey, Jeff M. Szychowski, Lorie M. Harper, Alan T. Tita
       
  • Late Breaking Divider Page 3-4
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s):
       
  • LB 2: Study To Reduce Infection Prior to Elective Cesarean Sections
           (STRIPES): Double blind RCT using CHG cloths
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Joanne Stone, Angela Bianco, Johanna Monro, Jessica Overbey, Julie Cadet, Katie Hyewon Choi, Juan Pena, Brittany N. Robles, Maria T. Mella, Kathy C. Matthews, Stephanie Factor
       
  • LB 1: Randomized controlled trial: Arabin pessary to prevent preterm birth
           in twin pregnancies with short cervix
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jane E. Norman, John Norrie, Graeme MacLennan, David Cooper, Sonia Whyte, Sue Chowdhry, Sarah Cunningham-Burley, Xue Mei, Joel Smith, Andrew Shennan, Stephen Robson, Steven Thornton, Mark Kilby, Neil Marlow, Sarah J. Stock, Phillip Bennett, Jane Denton
       
  • Late Breaking Divider Page 1-2
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s):
       
  • 1226: Pregnancy outcomes with specialist care after bariatric surgery
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rachel Harrison, Katarzyna Wlodarczyk, Emilie Braun, Kia Semons-Booker, Karen Thompson, Kathleen Lak, Meredith Cruz
       
  • 1225: Grand multiparity is protective against risk for postpartum
           depression
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Sarah Smithson, James Mirocha, Sarah Kilpatrick, Rebecca Horgan, Robert Graebe, Robert Massaro, Eynav Accortt
       
  • 1224: Co-occurrence of psychiatric conditions and substance use disorders
           and effect on maternal and neonatal outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jennifer McKinney, Sarah Detlefs, Bahram Salmanian, Haleh Sangi-Haghpeykar, Kjersti M. Aagaard
       
  • 1223: Do provider characteristics affect nuchal translucency
           variation' Nuchal Translucency Quality Review program: 5 million
           results
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Loralei L. Thornburg, Bryann Bromley, Lawrence D. Platt, Lorraine Dugoff, Karin Fuchs, Gregory J. Toland, Jennifer McIntosh, Howard Cuckle
       
  • 1222: Healthcare provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to
           care for low-income pregnant women with diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Lynn M. Yee, Karolina Leziak, Jenise Jackson, Charlotte M. Niznik, Melissa Simon
       
  • 1221: Standardized order set of multi-modal combination analgesics
           dramatically reduces opioid usage after cesarean delivery
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Eran Bornstein, Amos Grunebaum, Erez Lenchner, Jamie Hirsch, Frank A. Chervenak, Tess Gadomski, Cristina Zottola, Sarah Warner, Greg Husk
       
  • 1220: PCR vs Karyotype for CVS and Amniocentesis – Should we
           wait'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Catherine Finnegan, Suzanne Smyth, Karen Flood, Fionnuala M. Breathnach, Fergal D. Malone
       
  • 1219: Gestational weight gain and perinatal outcomes in adolescent births
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ashley E. Skeith, Aaron B. Caughey
       
  • 1217: Attitudes towards substance use disorder in pregnancy differs
           whether providers work with women or infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Margaret A. Williams, Suzanne Muir, Lauren Padalino, Brian M. Casey, William M. Perez, Sara Mazzoni, Lorie M. Harper
       
  • 1216: Critically short telomeres are increased in human gestational tissue
           compared to fetal cord blood
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Paula K. Edelson, Michala Sawyer, Jasmine Lee, Kathryn J. Gray, David E. Cantonwine, Thomas F. McElrath, Mark Phillippe
       
  • 1215: The impact of early pregnancy weight gain on ultrasound growth
           parameters and birth weight category
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Christina Scifres, William A. Grobman, Hyagriv Simhan, Uma M. Reddy, Brian M. Mercer, Robert M. Silver, Judith H. Chung, Surya Sruthi Bhamidipalli, David Guise, David M. Haas
       
  • 1214: Neonatal neuronal exosomes: A novel testing strategy for predicting
           therapeutic response to controlled hypothermia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Beth Pineles, Arunmani Mani, Livia Sura, Candace Rossignol, Michael D. Weiss, Laura Goetzl
       
  • 1213: Disruptions in Npas2 expression in the fetal liver alters the gut
           microbiome at light/dark timepoints
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Derek O'Neil, Michael Jochum, Danielle Goodspeed, Pablo gonzalez-rodriguez, Min Hu, Cynthia Shope, Kjersti M. Aagaard
       
  • 1212: Predicting outcome and time to delivery in suspected late-preterm
           preeclampsia: Comparing biomarker to standard evaluation
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rebecca Adami, Emily Ngan, Hilary Roeder, Aishwarya Vuppala, Morgan Meads, Carolina Martinez, John Rodrigo, Nam Tran, Gladys Ramos, Jerasimos Ballas, Louise C. Laurent
       
  • 1211: Placental high-grade villitis and risk of developmental delay at one
           year
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Madeleine Caplan, Alexa Freedman, Lauren Keenan-Devlin, Matthew Pellerite, Linda Ernst, Gregory Miller, Ann Borders
       
  • 1210: Association between placental syndrome and child adiposity, obesity,
           and hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Maged M. Costantine
       
  • Early amniotomy for induction of labor: a trial sequential analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1Author(s): Li-Ping Feng, Hong-Lin Chen
       
  • 1208: Twin Anaemia Polycyth aemia Syndrome (TAPS): A secondary analysis of
           the ESPRi T Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Sarah C. McDonnell, Sean Daly, Fionnuala M. Breathnach, Fionnuala M. Mcauliffe, Michael P. Geary, John R. Higgins, John Morrison, Gerard Burke, Shane Higgins, Patrick Dicker, Fergal D. Malone
       
  • 1207: The impact of food insecurity on fetal growth restriction for women
           in Ohio food deserts
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Annabelle Gordon, Juliana Madzia, Emily DeFranco
       
  • 1206: Gestational length variation at term by maternal race-ethnicity
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jessica M. Page, Amanda A. Allshouse, Michelle P. Debbink, Hyagriv Simhan, William A. Grobman, Uma M. Reddy, Brian M. Mercer, Ronald J. Wapner, Judith H. Chung, George R. Saade, David M. Haas, Robert M. Silver
       
  • 1205: Pregnancy outcomes among class 3 obese women with normal and
           pre-diabetic early hemoglobin A1C
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Courtney J. Mitchell, Tressa Ellett, Jacquelyn Dillon, Anne M. Siegel, Anna DeNoble, Sarah Dotters-Katz
       
  • 1204: NSAID use and adverse outcomes among postpartum women with
           preeclampsia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ashish Premkumar, Nina K. Ayala, Corrine H. Miller, William A. Grobman, Emily S. Miller
       
  • 1203: The relationship between perioperative use of cefazolin and
           indomethacin for exam-indicated cerclages and gestational latency
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ashish Premkumar, Nikita Sinha, Emily S. Miller, Alan M. Peaceman
       
  • 1202: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) and disparities in pain
           management for scheduled cesarean deliveries
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rochanda D. Mitchell
       
  • 1201: Effect of antepartum perineal massage on perineal tears during first
           vaginal delivery
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Inna Bleicher, Lena Sagi-Dain, Rabia Bahous, Shlomi Sagi
       
  • 1200: Lithium use during pregnancy for bipolar disorder: a
           cost-effectiveness analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Tanya Saito, Ryan Boone, Alyssa R. Hersh, Aaron B. Caughey
       
  • 1199: Prenatal test predicting respiratory morbidity at birth among growth
           restricted infants: a prospective observational study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Laura Sanapo, Ashley M. Lucke, Laura Hitchings, Joanna Marroquin, Augustine Eze, Stephanie Russo, Reva Persaud, Alfred Khoury, George L. Maxwell, Robin Baker, Adre J. du Plessis, Luis M. Gomez
       
  • 1198: Cytogenomic analysis of molar pregnancies as a frequent cause of
           sporadic and recurrent pregnancy loss
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Trilochan Sahoo, Natasa Dzidic, Jenna Guiltinan, Jeannine Oldzej, Rima Slim, Swaroop Aradhya, Karine Hovanes
       
  • 1197: Perinatal outcomes following a history of ectopic pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Melanie Shanie Roitman, Gali Pariente, Tamar Wainstock, Eyal Sheiner
       
  • 1196: Is maternal weight gain correlated to successful vaginal birth after
           cesarean (VBAC) rate'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Daniel Roshan, John Migotsky, Ariel Roshan, Michael Abrahams, Marjon Mobasseri, Ira Jaffe
       
  • 1195: Severe newborn morbidity in the second stage of labor
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Sarah E. Little, Mark A. Clapp, Sarah Lassey, Radek Bukowski, William Barth, Julian N. Robinson
       
  • 1194: Atypical response to glucose challenge test in pregnancy is
           associated with small-for-gestational age birth weight
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Tabitha M. Quebedeaux, Lucille Martin, Emad Elsamadicy, Andrea Desai, Jerome Kopelman, Sarah Crimmins
       
  • 1193: The combined influence of multiple maternal medical conditions on
           incidence of primary cesarean section
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Robert fresch, Kendal K. Stephens, Emily DeFranco
       
  • 1192: Placental transfer of HSV-specific antibodies from mothers to
           newborns
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Aakash Mahant, Fatima A. Estrada Trejo, Anayeli Correa, Lip Loh, Benjamin Galen, Betsy C. Herold
       
  • 1191: Maternal and neonatal outcomes among pregnant women with Hepatitis C
           in Utah, 2009-2017
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Marcela Smid, Nicole Stone, Laurie Baksh, Amelia Prebish, Bree Barbeau
       
  • 1190: Suture vs. staples for cesarean skin closure in class III obesity: A
           randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rachel L. Rodel, Trevor Quiner, Kendra M. Gray, Ana Bodea Braescu, Richard Gerkin, Jordan H. Perlow
       
  • 1189: Effect of body mass index on oxytocin required to achieve vaginal
           birth
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Megan Trostle, Adina Schwartz, Bianca Falcone, Patrick Hilden, Margaret Dziadosz
       
  • 1188: Outcomes of term pregnancies in spontaneous labour
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Gillian Corbett, Roisin Daly, Patrick Dicker, Sean Daly
       
  • 1187: Immediate postpartum long-acting reversible contraception in women
           with heart disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Julia Maier, Christina T. Blanchard, Jeff M. Szychowski, Sara Mazzoni, Indranee Rajapreyar, Alexia Novara, Macie L. Champion, Alice Goepfert, Marc Cribbs, Margaret Boozer, Lorie M. Harper, Alan T. Tita, Rachel Sinkey
       
  • 1186: Placental abruption in nulliparous women
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Amir Lueth, Nathan R. Blue, Robert M. Silver, William A. Grobman, Hyagriv Simhan, Uma M. Reddy, David M. Haas
       
  • 1185: Racial disparities in acquired cardiac disease during postpartum
           readmissions
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Aleha Aziz, Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman, Lisa D. Levine, Junyuan Zhang, Mary E. D'Alton, Alexander M. Friedman
       
  • 1184: Do physician working hours affect cesarean section rates in low risk
           women'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Daniel Kane, Ita Shanahan, Patrick Dicker, Fergal D. Malone, Michael P. Geary, Etaoin Kent, Naomi Burke
       
  • 1183: YouTube as a source of patient information regarding placenta
           accreta spectrum
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jayme Castillo, Katherine Zhu, Lauren Gray, Sydney Sachse, Alexandra Berra, Michael A. Belfort, Kjersti M. Aagaard, Alireza A. Shamshirsaz
       
  • 1182: The prediction of gestational diabetes mellitus utilizing universal
           Hemoglobin A1c screening
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Whitney Bender, Clare McCarthy, Jesse Chittams, Michal A. Elovitz, Samuel Parry, Celeste Durnwald
       
  • 1181: Factors associated with attendance at the postpartum blood pressure
           visit in pregnancies complicated by hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Matthew P. Romagano, Devika Sachdev, Matthew Flint, Shauna F. Williams, Joseph J. Apuzzio, Lisa Gittens-Williams
       
  • 1180: Development of an obstetric hemorrhage response intervention: The
           postpartum hemorrhage cart
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Benjamin K. Kogutt, Susan Will, Janis Ferrell, Jeanne S. Sheffield
       
  • 1179: Latency after prophylactic antibiotics in twin versus singleton
           pregnancies with preterm premature rupture of membranes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Helen B. Gomez, Kelly Ruhstaller, Hoffman Matthew, Cecelia Harrison, Anthony Sciscione
       
  • 1178: A novel text-based mobile app alleviates racial disparities and
           improves detection of type II diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Helen B. Gomez, Philip Shlossman, Hoffman Matthew, Richard Caplan, Anthony Sciscione
       
  • 1177: Risks Of failed trial of labor and pre-labor cesarean delivery:
           Associations with large-for-gestational age births
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Justin S. Brandt, Jennifer M. Hill, Todd J. Rosen, Cande V. Ananth
       
  • 1176: Lidocaine 5% patch for acute post-operative pain after cesarean
           delivery: a retrospective cohort
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Alison Bauer, Angela Dao, Gabriel Labbad, Sara Myers, Kelly Gibson
       
  • 1175: Mortality in hospitalizations for gun shot wounds in pregnancy: a
           retrospective cohort
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 222, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Alison Bauer, Manesha Putra, David Hackney, Justin Lappen, David Sheyn
       
 
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