Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3161 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3161 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 106, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 446, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 188, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 429, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 395, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 487, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 263, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 214, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 238, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Kidney Diseases
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.973
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 37  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0272-6386 - ISSN (Online) 1523-6838
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3161 journals]
  • Home Dialysis in the United States: A Roadmap for Increasing Peritoneal
           Dialysis Utilization
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Erin P. Flanagin, Yashodhan Chivate, Daniel E. Weiner
       
  • Ultrafiltration Rate and Residual Kidney Function Decline: Yet Another
           Good Reason to Ask About Urine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Magdalene M. Assimon, Jennifer E. Flythe
       
  • A Self-management Approach for Dietary Sodium Restriction in Patients With
           CKD: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Jelmer K. Humalda, Gerald Klaassen, Hanne de Vries, Yvette Meuleman, Lara C. Verschuur, Elisabeth J.M. Straathof, Gozewijn D. Laverman, Willem Jan W. Bos, Paul J.M. van der Boog, Karin M. Vermeulen, Olivier A. Blanson Henkemans, Wilma Otten, Martin H. de Borst, Sandra van Dijk, Gerjan J. Navis, P.J.M. van der Boog, S. van Dijk, G.J. Navis, J.K. Humalda (project coordination), G. KlaassenRationale & ObjectivePatients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are particularly sensitive to dietary sodium. We evaluated a self-management approach for dietary sodium restriction in patients with CKD.Study DesignRandomized controlled trial.Setting & ParticipantsNephrology outpatient clinics in 4 Dutch hospitals. 99 adults with CKD stages 1 to 4 or a functioning (estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥ 25 mL/min/1.73 m2) kidney transplant, hypertension, and sodium intake >130 mmol/d.InterventionRoutine care was compared with routine care plus a web-based self-management intervention including individual e-coaching and group meetings implemented over a 3-month intervention period, followed by e-coaching over a 6-month maintenance period.OutcomesPrimary outcomes were sodium excretion after the 3-month intervention and after the 6-month maintenance period. Secondary outcomes were blood pressure, proteinuria, costs, quality of life, self-management skills, and barriers and facilitators for implementation.ResultsBaseline estimated glomerular filtration rate was 55.0 ± 22.0 mL/min/1.73 m2. During the intervention period, sodium excretion decreased in the intervention group from 188 ± 8 (SE) to 148 ± 8 mmol/d (P 
       
  • Refining ESKD Risk Assessment in Living Kidney Donors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Mona D. Doshi, Raviprasenna Parasuraman
       
  • Peritoneal Dialysis–Related Infection Rates and Outcomes: Results From
           the Peritoneal Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (PDOPPS)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Jeffrey Perl, Douglas S. Fuller, Brian A. Bieber, Neil Boudville, Talerngsak Kanjanabuch, Yasuhiko Ito, Sharon J. Nessim, Beth M. Piraino, Ronald L. Pisoni, Bruce M. Robinson, Douglas E. Schaubel, Martin J. Schreiber, Isaac Teitelbaum, Graham Woodrow, Junhui Zhao, David W. JohnsonRationale & ObjectivePeritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis carries high morbidity for PD patients. Understanding the characteristics and risk factors for peritonitis can guide regional development of prevention strategies. We describe peritonitis rates and the associations of selected facility practices with peritonitis risk among countries participating in the Peritoneal Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (PDOPPS).Study DesignObservational prospective cohort study.Setting & Participants7,051 adult PD patients in 209 facilities across 7 countries (Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Japan, Thailand, United Kingdom, United States).ExposuresFacility characteristics (census count, facility age, nurse to patient ratio) and selected facility practices (use of automated PD, use of icodextrin or biocompatible PD solutions, antibiotic prophylaxis strategies, duration of PD training).OutcomesPeritonitis rate (by country, overall and variation across facilities), microbiology patterns.Analytical ApproachPoisson rate estimation, proportional rate models adjusted for selected patient case-mix variables.Results2,272 peritonitis episodes were identified in 7,051 patients (crude rate, 0.28 episodes/patient-year). Facility peritonitis rates were variable within each country and exceeded 0.50/patient-year in 10% of facilities. Overall peritonitis rates, in episodes per patient-year, were 0.40 (95% CI, 0.36-0.46) in Thailand, 0.38 (95% CI, 0.32-0.46) in the United Kingdom, 0.35 (95% CI, 0.30-0.40) in Australia/New Zealand, 0.29 (95% CI, 0.26-0.32) in Canada, 0.27 (95% CI, 0.25-0.30) in Japan, and 0.26 (95% CI, 0.24-0.27) in the United States. The microbiology of peritonitis was similar across countries, except in Thailand, where Gram-negative infections and culture-negative peritonitis were more common. Facility size was positively associated with risk for peritonitis in Japan (rate ratio [RR] per 10 patients, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04-1.09). Lower peritonitis risk was observed in facilities that had higher automated PD use (RR per 10 percentage points greater, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91-1.00), facilities that used antibiotics at catheter insertion (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69-0.99), and facilities with PD training duration of 6 or more (vs 
       
  • Hyponatremia in a Patient With Cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Nupur N. Uppal, Rimda Wanchoo, Richard Barnett, Avani Sinha, Kenar D. Jhaveri
       
  • 2019 Inductees to the AJKD Reviewer Hall of Fame
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Targeting the Gut for Early Diagnosis, Prevention, and Cure of Diabetic
           Kidney Disease: Is the Phenyl Sulfate Story Another Step Forward'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Enrico Fiaccadori, Carmela Cosola, Alice Sabatino
       
  • Early Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection Associated With
           Anti-Vimentin Antibodies: A Case Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Christie Rampersad, James Shaw, Ian W. Gibson, Chris Wiebe, David N. Rush, Peter W. Nickerson, Julie HoImproving precision in predicting alloreactivity is an important unmet need and may require individualized consideration of non-HLA antibodies. We report a 21-year-old man with kidney failure from immunoglobulin A nephropathy who met all traditional criteria for a “low-risk” transplant for immune memory. He was unsensitized and received a haplotype-matched living donor kidney transplant from his mother. There were no anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies and flow cross-match was negative. After immediate function, he developed delayed graft function on postoperative day 2. The transplant biopsy specimen was suggestive of antibody-mediated rejection and acute tubular injury with increased vimentin proximal tubular expression compared to the implantation biopsy specimen. He had a history of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and non-HLA antibody screening demonstrated preformed anti-vimentin antibody. He was successfully treated with plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, antithymocyte globulin, and methylprednisolone, with renal recovery. The follow-up biopsy specimen demonstrated decreased vimentin expression with decreased alloinflammation, and graft function remains stable at 1 year posttransplantation (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 62 mL/min/1.73 m2). We postulate that preformed anti-vimentin autoantibodies bound to vimentin expressed on apoptotic tubular epithelial cells induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury and to constitutively expressed vimentin on peritubular capillaries and podocytes. Our case is suggestive of the involvement of anti-vimentin antibody, for which the pathogenic epitopes may be exposed during ischemia-reperfusion injury.
       
  • ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: Core Curriculum 2020
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Duvuru Geetha, J. Ashley JeffersonAntineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of disorders characterized by inflammation and destruction of small- and medium-sized blood vessels and the presence of circulating ANCA. Clinical disease phenotypes include granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and renal-limited vasculitis. Serologic classification of AAV into proteinase 3–ANCA disease and myeloperoxidase-ANCA disease correlates with a number of disease characteristics. AAV has a predilection for the kidney, with>75% of patients having renal involvement characterized by rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. The cause and pathogenesis of AAV are multifactorial and influenced by genetics, environmental factors, and responses of the innate and adaptive immune system. Randomized controlled trials in the past 2 decades have refined the therapy of AAV and transformed AAV from a fatal disease to a chronic illness with relapsing course and associated morbidity. This article in AJKD’s Core Curriculum in Nephrology series provides a detailed review of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and advances in the management of AAV.
       
  • Transplanting the Untransplantable
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Courtenay M. Holscher, Kyle R. Jackson, Dorry L. SegevWith implementation of the Kidney Allocation System, the growth of kidney paired donation programs, and advances in desensitization and immunosuppression, the outlook for “untransplantable” kidney transplantation candidates has never been more promising. The Kidney Allocation System prioritized compatible matches for candidates with calculated panel-reactive antibody levels of 98%, 99%, or 100% and broadened allocation of non-A1 and non–A1-B subgroup kidneys to blood group type B candidates. Concurrently, the growth of kidney paired donation programs and use of incompatible transplantation as part of kidney paired donation to achieve “more compatible” kidney transplantation has improved options for candidates with an incompatible living donor. Finally, advances in desensitization and immunosuppression have strengthened the ability to manage donor-specific antibodies and antibody-mediated rejection. Although no patient should be labeled “untransplantable” due to blood group type or donor-specific antibody, all candidates should be provided with individualized and realistic counseling regarding their anticipated wait times for deceased donor or kidney paired donation matching, with early referral to expert centers when needed. In this Perspective, we consider blood group type ABO incompatibility, HLA antigen incompatibility, antibody-mediated rejection, kidney paired donation, and recent developments in incompatible transplantation in more depth and recommend an approach to the sensitized candidate.
       
  • The Controversy of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy With Intravenous Contrast:
           What Is the Risk'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Michael R. Rudnick, Amanda K. Leonberg-Yoo, Harold I. Litt, Raphael M. Cohen, Susan Hilton, Peter P. ReeseContrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) has long been observed in both experimental and clinical studies. However, recent observational studies have questioned the prevalence and severity of CIN following intravenous contrast exposure. Initial studies of acute kidney injury following intravenous contrast were limited by the absence of control groups or contained control groups that did not adjust for additional acute kidney injury risk factors, including prevalent chronic kidney disease, as well as accepted prophylactic strategies. More contemporary use of propensity score–adjusted models have attempted to minimize the risk for selection bias, although bias cannot be completely eliminated without a prospective randomized trial. Based on existing data, we recommend the following CIN risk classification: patients with estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) ≥ 45 mL/min/1.73 m2 are at negligible risk for CIN, while patients with eGFRs 
       
  • Nephrology in the Academic Intensive Care Unit: A Qualitative Study of
           Interdisciplinary Collaboration
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Justin T. Clapp, Sushmitha P. Diraviam, Meghan B. Lane-Fall, Julia E. Szymczak, Madhavi Muralidharan, Jamison J. Chung, Jacob T. Gutsche, Martha A.Q. Curley, Jeffrey S. Berns, Lee A. FleisherRationale & ObjectiveCollaboration between nephrology consultants and intensive care unit (ICU) teams is important in light of the high incidence of acute kidney injury in today’s ICUs. Although there is considerable debate about how nephrology consultants and ICU teams should collaborate, communicative dynamics between the 2 parties remain poorly understood. This article describes interactions between nephrology consultants and ICU teams in the academic medical setting.Study DesignFocused ethnography using semi-structured interviews and participant observation.Setting & ParticipantsPurposive sampling was used to enroll nephrologists, nephrology fellows, and ICU practitioners across several roles collaborating in 3 ICUs (a medical ICU, a surgical ICU, and a cardiothoracic surgical ICU) of a large urban US academic medical center. Participant observation (150 hours) and semi-structured interviews (35) continued until theoretical saturation.Analytical ApproachInterview and fieldnote transcripts were coded in an iterative team-based process. Explanation was developed using an abductive approach.ResultsNephrology consultants and surgical ICU teams exhibited discordant preferences about the aggressiveness of renal replacement therapy based on different understandings of physiology, goals of care, and acuity. Collaborative difficulties resulting from this discordance led to nephrology consultants often serving as dialysis proceduralists rather than diagnosticians in surgical ICUs and to consultants sometimes choosing not to express disagreements about clinical care because of the belief that doing so would not lead to changes in the course of care.LimitationsAspects of this single-site study of an academic medical center may not be generalizable to other clinical settings and samples. Surgical team perspectives would provide further detail about nephrology consultation in surgical ICUs. The effects of findings on patient care were not examined.ConclusionsDifferences in approach between internal medicine–trained nephrologists and anesthesia- and surgery-trained intensivists and surgeons led to collaborative difficulties in surgical ICUs. These findings stress the need for medical teamwork research and intervention to address issues stemming from disciplinary siloing rooted in long-term socialization to different disciplinary practices.
       
  • APOL1 Nephropathy Risk Alleles and Mortality in African American
           Adults: A Cohort Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Orlando M. Gutiérrez, Marguerite R. Irvin, Neil A. Zakai, Rakhi P. Naik, Ninad S. Chaudhary, Michelle M. Estrella, Sophie Limou, Suzanne E. Judd, Mary Cushman, Jeffrey B. Kopp, Cheryl A. WinklerRationale & ObjectiveAPOL1 nephropathy risk alleles are associated with the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in African Americans. Although CKD is an established risk factor for mortality, associations of APOL1 risk alleles with mortality are uncertain.Study DesignProspective cohort.Settings & Participants10,380 African American and 17,485 white American participants in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study.ExposuresAPOL1 nephropathy risk alleles.OutcomesAll-cause and cause-specific mortality.Analytical ApproachCox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association of APOL1 high-risk genotypes (2 risk alleles) versus APOL1 low-risk genotypes (0/1 risk allele) with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in African Americans and examine the risk for all-cause mortality in African Americans with high-risk genotypes versus African Americans with low-risk genotypes and white Americans.ResultsAPOL1 high-risk participants were younger and had a higher prevalence of albuminuria than low-risk participants. There was no statistically significant association of APOL1 high- versus low-risk genotypes with all-cause mortality in models adjusted for sociodemographic variables, comorbid conditions, and kidney function (HR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.77-1.01). After further adjustment for genetic ancestry in a subset with available data, a statistically significant association emerged (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.69-0.96). Associations differed by CKD status (Pinteraction = 0.04), with African Americans with high-risk genotypes having lower risk for mortality than those with low-risk genotypes in fully adjusted models (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.62-0.99) among those with CKD, but not those without CKD (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.66-1.05). Compared with white Americans, African Americans with high-risk genotypes had a similar rate of mortality, whereas African Americans with low-risk genotypes had a higher rate of mortality (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.00-1.14) in fully adjusted models.LimitationsLack of follow-up measures of kidney function.ConclusionsAfrican Americans with high-risk APOL1 genotypes had lower mortality than those with low-risk genotypes in multivariable-adjusted models including genetic ancestry.
       
  • An Implanted Blood Vessel Support Device for Arteriovenous Fistulas: A
           Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Nikolaos Karydis, Paul Bevis, Timothy Beckitt, Daniel Silverberg, Moshe Halak, Francis CalderRationale & ObjectiveReducing turbulent blood flow through dialysis arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and radial stretching of their venous wall may attenuate hyperplasia and stenosis and improve AVF outcomes in hemodialysis patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the VasQ implant, which intervenes on these mechanisms by physically supporting the surgical arteriovenous anastomosis.Study DesignProspective, randomized, controlled, multicenter study.Settings & Participants40 consecutive patients with kidney failure referred for creation of a brachiocephalic fistula in 4 vascular access centers in the United Kingdom and Israel.InterventionsAVF surgical creation with placement of the VasQ implant (treatment) versus AVF placement without the implant (control).OutcomesSafety assessed as percentage of severe device-related adverse events was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were efficacy assessments including: (1) AVF maturation at 3 months, defined as cephalic vein diameter ≥ 5 mm and flow ≥ 500 mL/min; (2) functional cumulative patency, defined as successful 2-needle cannulation for two-thirds or more of all dialysis runs for 1 month in study participants receiving dialysis; (3) cephalic vein diameter and blood flow; and (4) primary and cumulative patency at 6 months.ResultsNo severe device-related adverse events were observed. There was no significant difference in maturation at 3 months or primary patency at 6 months between treatment and control (85% vs 80% and 80% vs 66%). Significantly larger vein luminal diameters were observed in the treatment group versus controls at 3 and 6 months (8.27 ± 2.2 vs 6.69 ± 1.8 mm [P = 0.03] and 9.6 ± 2.5 vs 7.56 ± 2.7 mm [P = 0.03]). Functional patency at 6 months was significantly greater in the treatment group (100% vs 56% [P = 0.01]).LimitationsSmall sample size, limited power for secondary end points.ConclusionsNo safety signals were detected for the VasQ external support of brachiocephalic AVFs. Higher functional patency and vein luminal diameters were achieved with the device at 3 and 6 months. VasQ may safely intervene on mechanisms associated with the disturbed hemodynamic profile in the juxta-anastomotic region.FundingFunded by Laminate Medical Technologies Ltd.Trial RegistrationRegistered at ClinicalTrials.gov with study number NCT02112669.
       
  • Straight Versus Coiled Peritoneal Dialysis Catheters: A Randomized
           Controlled Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Kai Ming Chow, Steve Siu Man Wong, Jack Kit Chung Ng, Yuk Lun Cheng, Chi Bon Leung, Wing Fai Pang, Winston Wing Shing Fung, Cheuk Chun Szeto, Philip Kam Tao LiRationale & ObjectiveDespite a recent meta-analysis favoring straight catheters, the clinical benefits of straight versus coiled peritoneal dialysis catheters remain uncertain. We conducted a randomized controlled study to compare the complication rates associated with these 2 types of double-cuffed peritoneal dialysis catheters.Study DesignMulticenter, open-label, randomized, controlled trial.Setting & Participants308 adult continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.InterventionParticipants were randomly assigned to receive either straight or coiled catheters.OutcomesThe primary outcome was the incidence of catheter dysfunction requiring surgical intervention. Secondary outcomes included time to catheter dysfunction requiring intervention, catheter migration with dysfunction, infusion pain measured using a visual analogue scale, peritonitis, technique failure, and peritoneal catheter survival.Results153 patients were randomly assigned to straight catheters; and 155, to coiled catheters. Among randomly assigned patients who underwent peritoneal dialysis, during a mean follow-up of 21 months, the primary outcome of catheter dysfunction or drainage failure occurred in 9 (5.8%) patients who received a coiled catheter and 1 (0.7%) patient who received a straight catheter. Straight catheters had 5.1% lower risk for catheter dysfunction (95% CI, 1.2%-9.1%; P = 0.02). The HR of the primary outcome for coiled versus straight catheters was 8.69 (95% CI, 1.10-68.6; P = 0.04). Patients who received a coiled catheter had similar risk for peritonitis but reported higher infusion pain scores than those who received straight catheters.LimitationsGeneralizability to other peritoneal dialysis centers with lower volumes and other races and nationalities.ConclusionsUse of straight Tenckhoff catheters compared with coiled catheters reduced the rate of catheter dysfunction requiring surgical intervention.FundingFunded by the Chinese University of Hong Kong.Trial RegistrationRegistered at ClinicalTrials.gov with study number NCT02479295.
       
  • Sex Differences in the Progression of CKD Among Older Patients: Pooled
           Analysis of 4 Cohort Studies
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Roberto Minutolo, Francis B. Gabbai, Paolo Chiodini, Michele Provenzano, Silvio Borrelli, Carlo Garofalo, Vincenzo Bellizzi, Domenico Russo, Giuseppe Conte, Luca De Nicola, Collaborative Study Group on the Conservative Treatment of CKD of the Italian Society of NephrologyRationale & ObjectiveData for the association of sex with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression are conflicting, a relationship this study sought to examine.Study DesignPooled analysis of 4 Italian observational cohort studies.Setting & Participants1,311 older men and 1,024 older women with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 
       
  • Trends in Kidney Function Outcomes Following RAAS Inhibition in Patients
           With Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s): Wendy McCallum, Hocine Tighiouart, Elaine Ku, Deeb Salem, Mark J. SarnakRationale & ObjectiveAngiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are beneficial in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). We sought to describe longitudinal trends in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in HFrEF and how ACE-inhibitor therapy influences these changes.Study DesignPost hoc analysis of trial data.Settings & ParticipantsSymptomatic (Treatment Trial, n = 2,423) and asymptomatic (Prevention Trial, n = 4,094) patients from the Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD).ExposureEnalapril versus placebo.OutcomesEarly and long-term eGFR slope (ie, within and after the first 6 weeks) and 4 kidney end points: (1) serum creatinine level increase by ≥0.3 mg/dL, (2) >30% eGFR decline, (3) >40% eGFR decline, and (4) incident eGFR  30%; 2.60 [95% CI, 1.30-5.21] for eGFR decline > 40%; and 4.71 [95% CI, 1.78-12.50] for eGFR 
       
  • Support Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1, Supplement 1Author(s):
       
  • 2019 AJKD Editors’ Choice Awards
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 75, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Peripheral Artery Disease: Its Adverse Consequences With and Without CKD
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Mathieu Bourrier, Thomas W. Ferguson, John M. Embil, Claudio Rigatto, Paul Komenda, Navdeep TangriRationale & ObjectivesChronic kidney disease (CKD) is a potent risk factor for macrovascular disease and death. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is more common in patients with CKD and is associated with lower-limb complications and mortality. We sought to compare the prevalence of PAD in and outside the setting of kidney disease and examine how PAD affects the risk for adverse health outcomes, specifically lower-limb complications, cardiovascular events, and survival.Study DesignRetrospective cohort study.Setting & Participants453,573 adult residents of Manitoba with at least 1 serum creatinine measurement between 2007 and 2014.ExposurePAD defined by hospital discharge diagnosis codes and medical claims.OutcomesAll-cause mortality, cardiovascular events, and lower-limb complications, including foot ulcers and nontraumatic amputations.Analytical ApproachSurvival analysis using Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsThe prevalence of PAD in our study population was 4.5%, and patients with PAD were older, were more likely to be male, and had a higher burden of comorbid conditions, including diabetes and CKD. PAD was associated with higher risks for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events, and lower-limb complications in patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, those with CKD GFR categories 3 to 5 (G3-G5), and those treated by dialysis (CKD G5D). Although HRs for PAD were lower in the CKD population, event rates were higher as compared with those with eGFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. In particular, compared with patients with eGFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and without PAD, patients with CKD G5D had 10- and 12-fold higher risks for lower-limb complications, respectively (adjusted HRs of 10.36 [95% CI, 8.83-12.16] and 12.02 [95% CI, 9.58-15.08] for those without and with PAD, respectively), and an event rate of 75/1,000 patient-years.LimitationsPotential undercounting of PAD and complications using administrative codes and the limited ability to examine quality-of-care indicators for PAD.ConclusionsPAD is more common in patients with CKD G3-G5 and G5D compared with those with eGFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and frequently leads to lower-limb complications. Medical interventions and care pathways specifically designed to slow or prevent the development of lower-limb complications in this population are urgently needed.
       
  • Perceived Health and Quality of Life in Patients With CKD, Including Those
           With Kidney Failure: Findings From National Surveys in France
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Karine Legrand, Elodie Speyer, Bénédicte Stengel, Luc Frimat, Willy Ngueyon Sime, Ziad A. Massy, Denis Fouque, Maurice Laville, Christian Combe, Christian Jacquelinet, Anne Claire Durand, Stéphane Edet, Stéphanie Gentile, Serge Briançon, Carole AyavRationale & ObjectiveHealth-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a major outcome measure increasingly used in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We evaluated the association between different stages of CKD and the physical and mental health domains of HRQoL.Study DesignCross-sectional study.Setting & Participants2,693 outpatients with moderate (stage 3, estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m2) or advanced (stages 4-5, estimated glomerular filtration rate 40% of those with advanced CKD or receiving dialysis, 12% with a functioning transplant, and 3% of the general population sample. HRQoL physical scores (adjusted for age, sex, education, obesity, and diabetes) were significantly lower in patients in all CKD subgroups than in the general population. For patients receiving dialysis, the magnitude of the difference in physical score versus the general population exceeded 4.5 points, the minimal clinically important difference for this score in this study; for both kidney transplant recipients and patients with advanced CKD, the magnitude of the difference was close to this threshold. For mental score, only dialysis patients had a score that differed from that of the general population by more than the minimal clinically important difference.LimitationsCross-sectional study design for each subpopulation.ConclusionsThis study highlights the degree to which perceived physical health is lower in the setting of CKD than in the general population, even in the absence of kidney failure, and calls for greater attention to CKD-related quality of life.
       
  • Comparability of Plasma Iohexol Clearance Across Population-Based Cohorts
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Bjørn O. Eriksen, Elke Schaeffner, Toralf Melsom, Natalie Ebert, Markus van der Giet, Vilmundur Gudnason, Olafur S. Indridasson, Amy B. Karger, Andrew S. Levey, Mirjam Schuchardt, Liv K. Sørensen, Runolfur PalssonRationale & ObjectiveGlomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimation based on creatinine or cystatin C level is currently the standard method for assessing GFR in epidemiologic research and clinical trials despite several important and well-known limitations. Plasma iohexol clearance has been proposed as an inexpensive method for measuring GFR that could replace estimated GFR in many research projects. However, lack of standardization for iohexol assays and the use of different protocols such as single- and multiple-sample methods could potentially hamper comparisons across studies. We compared iohexol assays and GFR measurement protocols in 3 population-based European cohorts.Study DesignCross-sectional investigation.Setting & ParticipantsParticipants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Kidney Study (AGES-Kidney; n = 805), the Berlin Initiative Study (BIS, n = 570), and the Renal Iohexol Clearance Survey Follow-up Study (RENIS-FU; n = 1,324).Tests ComparedHigh-performance liquid chromatography analyses of iohexol. Plasma iohexol clearance calculated using single- versus multiple-sample protocols.OutcomesMeasures of agreement between methods.ResultsFrozen samples from the 3 studies were obtained and iohexol concentrations were remeasured in the laboratory at the University Hospital of North Norway. Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient ρ was >0.96 and Cb (accuracy) was >0.99 for remeasured versus original serum iohexol concentrations in all 3 cohorts, and Passing-Bablok regression did not find differences between measurements, except for a slope of 1.025 (95% CI, 1.006-1.046) for the log-transformed AGES-Kidney measurements. The multiple-sample iohexol clearance measurements in AGES-Kidney and BIS were compared with single-sample GFRs derived from the same iohexol measurements. Mean bias for multiple-sample relative to single-sample GFRs in AGES-Kidney and BIS were −0.25 and −0.15 mL/min, and 99% and 97% of absolute differences were within 10% of the multiple-sample result, respectively.LimitationsLack of comparison with an independent gold-standard method.ConclusionsAgreement between the iohexol assays and clearance protocols in the 3 investigated cohorts was substantial. Our findings indicate that plasma iohexol clearance measurements can be compared across these studies.
       
  • Peripheral Artery Disease in CKD: Anatomically Peripheral But Clinically
           Central
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Manabu Hishida, Steven Menez, Kunihiro Matsushita
       
  • Myeloperoxidase and the Risk of CKD Progression, Cardiovascular Disease,
           and Death in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Simon Correa, Jessy Korina Pena-Esparragoza, Katherine M. Scovner, Sushrut S. Waikar, Finnian R. Mc CauslandBackgroundMyeloperoxidase (MPO) catalyzes the formation of reactive nitrogen species and levels are elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although increased oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with progression of CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD), relationships between MPO concentration, CKD progression, CVD, and death remain unclear.Study DesignProspective cohort.Setting & Participants3,872 participants from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) who had MPO measured at baseline.ExposureBaseline MPO concentration.OutcomesCKD progression (kidney transplantation, dialysis initiation, or 50% decline in baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] and eGFR ≤ 15 mL/min/1.73 m2), CVD (heart failure, myocardial infarction, or stroke), and death.Analytical ApproachCox proportional hazards models.ResultsIn adjusted analyses, higher MPO level (per 1-SD increase in log-transformed MPO) was associated with 10% higher risk for CKD progression (adjusted HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01-1.19; P = 0.03), 12% higher risk for CVD (adjusted HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03-1.22; P 
       
  • Inflammation and Response to Sertraline Treatment in Patients With CKD and
           Major Depression
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): L. Parker Gregg, Thomas Carmody, Dustin Le, Robert D. Toto, Madhukar H. Trivedi, S. Susan Hedayati
       
  • Does Vitamin B12 Delay CKD Progression'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Angela Yee-Moon Wang
       
  • Chronic Microangiopathy Due to DCR-MYC, a Myc-Targeted Short Interfering
           RNA
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Aaron J. Miller, Anthony Chang, Patrick N. CunninghamThrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is an emerging complication of oncologic therapy. Cancer-related causes of renal endothelial cell damage include cytotoxic chemotherapies, radiation given for myeloablation, and direct involvement of renal vasculature by tumor cells. Another class of therapeutic agents that has been implicated in TMA is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway inhibitors, including the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab and the VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. These TMAs have been termed type II cancer drug–induced TMA and are distinguished from those associated with some cytotoxic chemotherapies (ie, type I) in that they are not dose dependent and patients are more likely to demonstrate some recovery of kidney function. Determination of the cause of TMA in oncologic patients often presents a significant challenge because patients frequently receive multiple chemotherapeutic agents simultaneously and clinicopathologic features often demonstrate substantial overlap, regardless of cause. We present a case of TMA with predominantly chronic features in a 70-year-old patient being treated for adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast with a single agent, a short interfering RNA targeted against Myc (DCR-MYC).
       
  • Moral Distress in Nephrology: Perceived Barriers to Ethical Clinical Care
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Kathryn Ducharlet, Jennifer Philip, Hilton Gock, Mark Brown, Samantha L. Gelfand, Elizabeth A. Josland, Frank BrennanMoral distress occurs when individuals are unable to act in accordance with what they believe to be ethically correct or just. It results from a discrepancy between a clinician’s perception of “the right thing to do” and what is actually happening and is perpetuated by perceived constraints that limit the individual from speaking up or enacting change. Moral distress is reported by many clinicians in caring for patients with serious illness, including chronic kidney disease and kidney failure. If left unidentified, unexpressed, or unaddressed, moral distress may cause burnout, exhaustion, detachment, and ineffectiveness. At an extreme, moral distress may lead to a desire to abandon the speciality entirely. This article offers an international perspective on moral distress in nephrology in diverse contexts and health care systems. We examine and discuss the sociocultural factors that contribute to moral distress in nephrology and offer suggestions for interventions from individual provider, facility, and health care systems perspectives to reduce the impact of moral distress on nephrology providers.
       
  • Serial Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Measurements and Risk of Requirement
           for Kidney Replacement Therapy: The CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency
           Cohort) Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Rupal Mehta, Xuan Cai, Jungwha Lee, Dawei Xie, Xue Wang, Julia Scialla, Amanda H. Anderson, Jon Taliercio, Mirela Dobre, Jing Chen, Michael Fischer, Mary Leonard, James Lash, Chi-yuan Hsu, Ian H. de Boer, Harold I. Feldman, Myles Wolf, Tamara Isakova, Lawrence J. Appel, Alan S. GoRationale & ObjectiveStudies using a single measurement of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) suggest that elevated FGF-23 levels are associated with increased risk for requirement for kidney replacement therapy (KRT) in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the data do not account for changes in FGF-23 levels as kidney disease progresses.Study DesignCase-cohort study.Setting & ParticipantsTo evaluate the association between serial FGF-23 levels and risk for requiring KRT, our primary analysis included 1,597 individuals in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study who had up to 5 annual measurements of carboxy-terminal FGF-23. There were 1,135 randomly selected individuals, of whom 266 initiated KRT, and 462 individuals who initiated KRT outside the random subcohort.ExposureSerial FGF-23 measurements and FGF-23 trajectory group membership.OutcomesIncident KRT.Analytical ApproachTo handle time-dependent confounding, our primary analysis of time-updated FGF-23 levels used time-varying inverse probability weighting in a discrete time failure model. To compare our results with prior data, we used baseline and time-updated FGF-23 values in weighted Cox regression models. To examine the association of FGF-23 trajectory subgroups with risk for incident KRT, we used weighted Cox models with FGF-23 trajectory groups derived from group-based trajectory modeling as the exposure.ResultsIn our primary analysis, the HR for the KRT outcome per 1 SD increase in the mean of natural log–transformed (ln)FGF-23 in the past was 1.94 (95% CI, 1.51-2.49). In weighted Cox models using baseline and time-updated values, elevated FGF-23 level was associated with increased risk for incident KRT (HRs per 1 SD ln[FGF-23] of 1.18 [95% CI, 1.02-1.37] for baseline and 1.66 [95% CI, 1.49-1.86] for time-updated). Membership in the slowly and rapidly increasing FGF-23 trajectory groups was associated with ∼3- and ∼21-fold higher risk for incident KRT compared to membership in the stable FGF-23 trajectory group.LimitationsResidual confounding and lack of intact FGF-23 values.ConclusionsIncreasing FGF-23 levels are independently associated with increased risk for incident KRT.
       
  • Surgeon Characteristics and Arteriovenous Fistula Maturation Success
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Thomas S. Huber
       
  • Blood Pressure Measurement: A KDOQI Perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Paul E. Drawz, Srinivasan Beddhu, Holly J. Kramer, Michael Rakotz, Michael V. Rocco, Paul K. WheltonThe majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have elevated blood pressure (BP). In patients with CKD, hypertension is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, progression of CKD, and all-cause mortality. New guidelines from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) recommend new thresholds and targets for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in patients with and without CKD. A new aspect of the guidelines is the recommendation for measurement of out-of-office BP to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension and guide therapy. In this KDOQI (Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative) perspective, we review the recommendations for accurate BP measurement in the office, at home, and with ambulatory BP monitoring. Regardless of location, validated devices and appropriate cuff sizes should be used. In the clinic and at home, proper patient preparation and positioning are critical. Patients should receive information about the importance of BP measurement techniques and be encouraged to advocate for adherence to guideline recommendations. Implementing appropriate BP measurement in routine practice is feasible and should be incorporated in system-wide efforts to improve the care of patients with hypertension. Hypertension is the number 1 chronic disease risk factor in the world; BP measurements in the office, at home, and with ambulatory BP monitoring should adhere to recommendations from the AHA.
       
  • Association Between APOL1 Genotype and Need for Kidney Replacement Therapy
           in Patients Without Diabetes: Does Age Matter'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Jenny Wei, Kirsten L. Johansen, Charles E. McCulloch, Michael Lipkowitz, Matthew Weir, Feng Lin, Vito M. Campese, Miroslaw Smogorzewski, Elaine Ku
       
  • Are Dialysis Facility Quality Incentive Program Scores Associated With
           Patient Survival'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Nupur Gupta, Jay B. Wish
       
  • Coffee Consumption and Kidney Function: A Mendelian Randomization Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Oliver J. Kennedy, Nicola Pirastu, Robin Poole, Jonathan A. Fallowfield, Peter C. Hayes, Eryk J. Grzeszkowiak, Maarten W. Taal, James F. Wilson, Julie Parkes, Paul J. RoderickRationale & ObjectiveChronic kidney disease (CKD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with limited strategies for prevention and treatment. Coffee is a complex mixture of chemicals, and consumption has been associated with mostly beneficial health outcomes. This work aimed to determine the impact of coffee consumption on kidney function.Study DesignGenome-wide association study (GWAS) and Mendelian randomization.Setting & ParticipantsUK Biobank baseline data were used for a coffee consumption GWAS and included 227,666 participants. CKDGen Consortium data were used for kidney outcomes and included 133,814 participants (12,385 cases of CKD) of mostly European ancestry across various countries.ExposureCoffee consumption.OutcomesEstimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), CKD GFR categories 3 to 5 (G3-G5; eGFR 
       
  • Ultrafiltration Rate, Residual Kidney Function, and Survival Among
           Patients Treated With Reduced-Frequency Hemodialysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Yu-Ji Lee, Yusuke Okuda, John Sy, Yong Kyu Lee, Yoshitsugu Obi, Seong Cho, Joline L.T. Chen, Anna Jin, Connie M. Rhee, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, Elani StrejaRationale & ObjectivePatients receiving twice-weekly or less-frequent hemodialysis (HD) may need to undergo higher ultrafiltration rates (UFRs) to maintain acceptable fluid balance. We hypothesized that higher UFRs are associated with faster decline in residual kidney function (RKF) and a higher rate of mortality.Study DesignRetrospective cohort study.Setting & Participants1,524 patients with kidney failure who initiated maintenance HD at a frequency of twice or less per week for at least 6 consecutive weeks at some time between 2007 and 2011 and for whom baseline data for UFR and renal urea clearance were available.PredictorAverage UFR during the first patient-quarter during less-frequent HD (
       
  • mTORC Pathway Activation and Effect of Sirolimus on Native Kidney
           Antiphospholipid Syndrome Nephropathy: A Case Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Inès Dufour, Quitterie Venot, Selda Aydin, Nathalie Demoulin, Guillaume Canaud, Johann MorelleDespite optimal anticoagulation and blood pressure control, patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) nephropathy frequently progress to kidney failure, and recurrence after transplantation is common. The mTORC (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex) pathway was recently identified as a potential intermediate and a therapeutic target in vascular lesions associated with APS nephropathy. However, these results were derived from the retrospective analysis of a small cohort of patients receiving sirolimus after kidney transplantation. Therefore, they warranted external validation and the demonstration of the potential benefit of sirolimus in native kidney APS nephropathy. We report a patient with active APS nephropathy lesions occurring on native kidneys, in which endothelial mTORC activation was substantiated at the molecular level. Treatment with sirolimus was shown on a repeat kidney biopsy to successfully inhibit the AKT/mTORC pathway and was associated with significant improvement in kidney function and lesions of vasculopathy. Drug tolerance was excellent during the entire follow-up. This case validates and extends previous observations in kidney transplant recipients and demonstrates that endothelial activation of the AKT/mTORC pathway occurs in the damaged renal vasculature of native kidneys in APS nephropathy. These findings further support the potential of precision medicine and the use of mTORC activation as a biomarker of disease activity and as therapeutic target in patients with APS nephropathy.
       
  • Screening for Asymptomatic Coronary Artery Disease in Waitlisted Kidney
           Transplant Candidates: A Cost-Utility Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Tracey Ying, Anh Tran, Angela C. Webster, Scott W. Klarenbach, John Gill, Steven Chadban, Rachael MortonRationale & ObjectiveOn account of the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with kidney failure, clinical practice guidelines recommend regular screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients on the kidney transplant waitlist. To date, the cost-effectiveness of such screening has not been evaluated. A Canadian-Australasian randomized controlled trial of screening kidney transplant candidates for CAD (CARSK) is currently is being conducted to answer this question. We conducted a cost-utility analysis to determine, before completion of the trial, the cost-effectiveness of no further screening versus regular screening for asymptomatic CAD and to evaluate potential influential variables that may affect results of the economic evaluation.Study DesignA modeled cost-utility analysis.Setting & PopulationA theoretical cohort of adult Australian and New Zealand kidney transplant candidates on the waitlist.InterventionNo further screening for asymptomatic CAD versus regular protocolized screening (annual or second yearly) for CAD after kidney transplant waitlisting.OutcomesIncremental cost-effectiveness ratio, reported as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY).Model, Perspectives, & TimeframeMarkov microsimulation model, health system perspective and over a lifetime horizon.ResultsIn the base case, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of no further screening was $11,122 per QALY gained when compared with regular screening. No further screening increased survival by 0.49 life-year or 0.35 QALY. One-way sensitivity analyses identified the costs of transplantation in the first year and CAD prevalence as the most influential variables. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses showed that 94% of the simulations were cost-effective below a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000 per QALY gained.LimitationsRates of cardiovascular events in waitlisted candidates and transplant recipients are limited in the contemporary era. The results may not be generalizable to populations outside Australia and New Zealand.ConclusionsNo further screening for CAD after waitlisting is likely to be cost-effective and may improve survival. Precision around CAD prevalence estimates and health care resource use will reduce existing uncertainty.
       
  • Adult-Diagnosed Nonsyndromic Nephronophthisis in Australian Families
           Caused by Biallelic NPHP4 Variants
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Rebecca Hudson, Chirag Patel, Carmel M. Hawley, Stacey O’Shea, Paul Snelling, Gladys Ho, Katherine Holman, Bruce Bennetts, Joanna Crawford, Leo Francis, Cas Simons, Andrew MallettThere is increasing appreciation of nephronophthisis (NPHP) as an autosomal recessive cause of kidney failure and earlier stages of chronic kidney disease among adults. We identified 2 families with presumed adult-diagnosed nonsyndromic NPHP and negative diagnostic genetic testing results from our Renal Genetics Clinic. Both had 2 affected siblings without extrarenal phenotypes. After informed consent, research whole-genome sequencing was undertaken. Biallelic NPHP4 variants were identified in trans and clinically confirmed in all 4 affected individuals, confirming a genetic diagnosis. Participant 1 of the first family (F1P1) had kidney failure diagnosed at 19 years of age. An affected younger sibling (F1P2) reached kidney failure at age 15 years after kidney biopsy suggested NPHP. Pathogenic variants detected in NPHP4 in this family were NM_015102.4:c.3766C>T (p.Gln1256*) and a 31-kb deletion affecting exons 12 to 16. In the second family, F2P3 reached kidney failure at age 27 years having undergone kidney biopsy suggesting NPHP. An affected younger sibling (F2P4) has chronic kidney disease stage 4 at age 39 years. The NPHP4 variants detected were NM_015102.4:c.1998_1999del (p.Tyr667Phefs*23) and c.3646G>T (p.Asp1216Tyr). The latter variant was initially missed in diagnostic sequencing due to inadequate NPHP4 coverage (94.3% exonic coverage). With these reports, we identify NPHP4 as an appreciable genetic cause for adult-diagnosed nonsyndromic NPHP that should be considered by adult nephrologists.
       
  • Health Outcomes and Health Care Utilization Among Obstetric Deliveries
           With Concurrent CKD in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Andrea L. Oliverio, Lindsay K. Admon, Laura H. Mariani, Tyler N.A. Winkelman, Vanessa K. Dalton
       
  • Lung Ultrasound–Guided Dry Weight Assessment and Echocardiographic
           Measures in Hypertensive Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized Controlled
           Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Charalampos Loutradis, Christodoulos E. Papadopoulos, Vassilios Sachpekidis, Robert Ekart, Barbara Krunic, Antonios Karpetas, Athanasios Bikos, Ioannis Tsouchnikas, Efstathios Mitsopoulos, Aikaterini Papagianni, Carmine Zoccali, Pantelis SarafidisRationale & ObjectiveLeft ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction are associated with adverse outcomes in hemodialysis patients. Hypertension and hypervolemia play important roles in these cardiac abnormalities. We report on the prespecified secondary outcome, echocardiographic indexes of LV function, from a previously reported study of the effect of lung ultrasound (US)-guided dry weight reduction on systolic blood pressure.Study DesignSingle-blind randomized trial.Settings & Participants71 clinically euvolemic hypertensive hemodialysis patients in Greece and Slovenia.InterventionThe active intervention group’s (n = 35) volume removal was guided by the total number of lung US B-lines observed every week before a midweek dialysis session. The usual-care group (n = 36) was treated using standard-of-care processes that did not include acquisition of US data.Outcomes2-dimensional and tissue Doppler echocardiographic indexes at baseline and study end (8 weeks) that evaluated left and right heart chamber sizes, as well as systolic and diastolic function.ResultsOverall, 19 (54%) patients in the active intervention and 5 (14%) in the usual-care group had ultrafiltration intensification (P 
       
  • Extravascular Lung Water Assessment by Ultrasound to Guide Dry Weight
           Changes: Ready for Prime Time'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Rajiv Agarwal, Robert D. Toto, Matthew R. Weir
       
  • US Renal Data System 2019 Annual Data Report: Epidemiology of Kidney
           Disease in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Rajiv Saran, Bruce Robinson, Kevin C. Abbott, Jennifer Bragg-Gresham, Xiaoying Chen, Debbie Gipson, Haoyu Gu, Richard A. Hirth, David Hutton, Yan Jin, Alissa Kapke, Vivian Kurtz, Yiting Li, Keith McCullough, Zubin Modi, Hal Morgenstern, Purna Mukhopadhyay, Jeffrey Pearson, Ronald Pisoni, Kaitlyn Repeck
       
  • US Renal Data System 2019 Annual Data Report: Epidemiology of Kidney
           Disease in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Change in Albuminuria and Estimated GFR as End Points for Clinical Trials
           in Early Stages of CKD: A Perspective From European Regulators
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Frank Holtkamp, Hrefna Gudmundsdottir, Romaldas Maciulaitis, Norbert Benda, Andrew Thomson, Thorsten Vetter
       
  • Change in Estimated GFR and Albuminuria as End Points in Clinical Trials:
           A Viewpoint From the FDA
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Aliza Thompson, Kimberly Smith, John Lawrence
       
  • Change in Estimated GFR and Albuminuria as End Points in Clinical Trials:
           A Perspective of People Living With Kidney Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Mary Baliker, Kent Bressler, Derek Forfang, Kevin J. Fowler, Amanda Grandinetti
       
 
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