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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3163 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3163 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 88, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 394, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 244, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.732, CiteScore: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 335, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 436, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)

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Journal Cover
American Journal of Infection Control
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.062
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 26  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0196-6553
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3163 journals]
  • Use of a verbal electronic audio reminder with a patient hand hygiene
           bundle to increase independent patient hand hygiene practices of older
           adults in an acute care setting
    • Authors: Shanina C. Knighton; Mary Dolansky; Curtis Donskey; Camille Warner; Herleen Rai; Patricia A. Higgins
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6
      Author(s): Shanina C. Knighton, Mary Dolansky, Curtis Donskey, Camille Warner, Herleen Rai, Patricia A. Higgins
      Background We hypothesized that the addition of a novel verbal electronic audio reminder to an educational patient hand hygiene bundle would increase performance of self-managed patient hand hygiene. Methods We conducted a 2-group comparative effectiveness study randomly assigning participants to patient hand hygiene bundle 1 (n = 41), which included a video, a handout, and a personalized verbal electronic audio reminder (EAR) that prompted hand cleansing at 3 meal times, or patient hand hygiene bundle 2 (n = 34), which included the identical video and handout, but not the EAR. The primary outcome was alcohol-based hand sanitizer use based on weighing bottles of hand sanitizer. Results Participants that received the EAR averaged significantly more use of hand sanitizer product over the 3 days of the study (mean ± SD, 29.97 ± 17.13 g) than participants with no EAR (mean ± SD, 10.88 ± 9.27 g; t 73 = 5.822; P ≤ .001). Conclusions The addition of a novel verbal EAR to a patient hand hygiene bundle resulted in a significant increase in patient hand hygiene performance. Our results suggest that simple audio technology can be used to improve patient self-management of hand hygiene. Future research is needed to determine if the technology can be used to promote other healthy behaviors, reduce infections, and improve patient-centered care without increasing the workload of health care workers.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2018.01.005
       
  • Googling your hand hygiene data: Using Google Forms, Google Sheets, and R
           to collect and automate analysis of hand hygiene compliance monitoring
    • Authors: Timothy L. Wiemken; Stephen P. Furmanek; William A. Mattingly; Janet Haas; Julio A. Ramirez; Ruth M. Carrico
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6
      Author(s): Timothy L. Wiemken, Stephen P. Furmanek, William A. Mattingly, Janet Haas, Julio A. Ramirez, Ruth M. Carrico
      Background Hand hygiene is one of the most important interventions in the quest to eliminate healthcare-associated infections, and rates in healthcare facilities are markedly low. Since hand hygiene observation and feedback are critical to improve adherence, we created an easy-to-use, platform-independent hand hygiene data collection process and an automated, on-demand reporting engine. Methods A 3-step approach was used for this project: 1) creation of a data collection form using Google Forms, 2) transfer of data from the form to a spreadsheet using Google Spreadsheets, and 3) creation of an automated, cloud-based analytics platform for report generation using R and RStudio Shiny software. Results A video tutorial of all steps in the creation and use of this free tool can be found on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch'v=uFatMR1rXqU&t. The on-demand reporting tool can be accessed at: https://crsp.louisville.edu/shiny/handhygiene. Conclusions This data collection and automated analytics engine provides an easy-to-use environment for evaluating hand hygiene data; it also provides rapid feedback to healthcare workers. By reducing some of the data management workload required of the infection preventionist, more focused interventions may be instituted to increase global hand hygiene rates and reduce infection.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2018.01.010
       
  • Asymmetric transfer efficiencies between fomites and fingers: Impact on
           model parameterization
    • Authors: Christine Greene; Nancy Hernandez Ceron; Marisa C. Eisenberg; James Koopman; Jesse D. Miller; Chuanwu Xi; Joseph N.S. Eisenberg
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6
      Author(s): Christine Greene, Nancy Hernandez Ceron, Marisa C. Eisenberg, James Koopman, Jesse D. Miller, Chuanwu Xi, Joseph N.S. Eisenberg
      Background Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) affect millions of patients every year. Pathogen transmission via fomites and healthcare workers (HCWs) contribute to the persistence of HAIs in hospitals. A critical parameter needed to assess risk of environmental transmission is the pathogen transfer efficiency between fomites and fingers. Recent studies have shown that pathogen transfer is not symmetric. In this study,we evaluated how the commonly used assumption of symmetry in transfer efficiency changes the dynamics of pathogen movement between patients and rooms and the exposures to uncolonized patients. Methods We developed and analyzed a deterministic compartmental model of Acinetobacter baumannii describing the contact-mediated process among HCWs, patients, and the environment. We compared a system using measured asymmetrical transfer efficiency to 2 symmetrical transfer efficiency systems. Results Symmetric models consistently overestimated contamination levels on fomites and underestimated contamination on patients and HCWs compared to the asymmetrical model. The magnitudes of these miscalculations can exceed 100%. Regardless of the model, relative percent reductions in contamination declined after hand hygiene compliance reached approximately 60% in the large fomite scenario and 70% in the small fomite scenario. Conclusions This study demonstrates how healthcare facility-specific data can be used for decision-making processes. We show that the incorrect use of transfer efficiency data leads to biased effectiveness estimates for intervention strategies. More accurate exposure models are needed for more informed infection prevention strategies.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2017.12.002
       
  • Determinants of urinary catheter removal practices in the pediatric
           intensive care unit: A survey
    • Authors: Karen Trudel; Samara Zavalkoff; Nicholas Winters; Caroline Quach; Jacques Lacroix; Patricia S. Fontela
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6
      Author(s): Karen Trudel, Samara Zavalkoff, Nicholas Winters, Caroline Quach, Jacques Lacroix, Patricia S. Fontela
      Background Prolonged use of indwelling catheters is associated with hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Literature is scarce about the factors influencing urinary catheter removal and maintenance in children. This study aims to describe the determinants of urinary catheter removal in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 171 physicians and nurses working at 2 tertiary PICUs in Montreal, Canada. We used focus groups and literature review to design the survey questions and 3 clinical scenarios. We analyzed our results using descriptive statistics and multivariate multinomial regression. Results There were 131 (77%) participants who answered the survey. Factors prompting urinary catheter removal (P < .01) included recent extubation, superficial sedation level, fever, and history of previous UTI. Presence of shock (P < .01) and fluid overload (P < .05) were associated with maintenance of catheters. Physicians were more likely to remove urinary catheters than nurses in all scenarios. Conclusions We identified a consistent set of variables that drive the removal of indwelling catheters in PICUs. Studies are needed to determine whether incorporating these determinants into infection control interventions will reduce urinary catheter use and catheter-associated UTIs in critically ill children.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2017.12.020
       
  • Operating room traffic in total joint arthroplasty: Identifying patterns
           and training the team to keep the door shut
    • Authors: William G. Hamilton; Colleen B. Balkam; Richard L. Purcell; Nancy L. Parks; Jill E. Holdsworth
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6
      Author(s): William G. Hamilton, Colleen B. Balkam, Richard L. Purcell, Nancy L. Parks, Jill E. Holdsworth
      Background Surgical site infections after joint arthroplasty are devastating complications and are influenced by patient, surgical, and operating room environmental factors. Methods In an effort to reduce the incidence of door openings (DOs) during total joint arthroplasty cases, this prospective observational study consisted of 3 phases. Phase 1 determined the baseline incidence of DOs, followed by installation of a mechanical door counter (phase 2). Finally, an educational seminar was presented to all personnel (phase 3) regarding the implications frequent DOs have on patient and surgical outcomes. Results The average openings per case (OPC) for each of the 3 phases were 33.5, 34.2, and 27.7, respectively. There was a 17% reduction in OPC between phases 1 and 3 (P = .02). There were no significant differences between knee and hip arthroplasty cases during the 3 phases (P = .21, P = .46, and P = .81, respectively). There was a strong correlation between length of surgery and OPC, with a Pearson coefficient of r = 0.87 during phase 3. To account for differences in average operative time between phases, data were normalized for the length of surgery with the ratio of door openings per minute determined (0.36, 0.34, and 0.32 for each phase, respectively). Conclusions We were able to show that simply monitoring door openings during joint arthroplasty was not effective in reducing the occurrences. However, after a novel educational seminar given to all personnel, we were able to significantly reduce the incidence of operating room door openings, reducing a potential risk factor for surgical site infections.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2017.12.019
       
  • Sex bias of Acinetobacter baumannii nosocomial infection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Wen-Li Yuan, Yan-Jun Shen, De-Yao Deng


      PubDate: 2018-06-18T18:52:06Z
       
  • To check or not to check. Rectal ESBL colonization in hospitalized elderly
           patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Galina Goltsman, Yehuda Baumohl, Gilad Gal, Zvi Buckman, Valery Proshkin, Emily Lubart
      Background The worldwide spread of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria has affected health care. ESBL confers resistance to the majority of beta-lactam antibiotics. Materials and Methods We intended to quantify the rates of rectal ESBL-positive and negative patients that eventually developed fever and urinary tract infection (UTI). All rectal ESBL-positive patients were to be initially treated with the conventional antibiotics that have anti-ESBL activity (amikacin or ertapenem), while ESBL-negative patients were given ceftriaxone. Results Most patients were rectal ESBL-positive (60.7%). Fever was in 51% patients; 67.8% of them developed signs and symptoms of UTI. Most patients with UTI were urinary ESBL-positive (79%), most rectal ESBL-negative patients were urinary ESBL-negative (75%), (χ2 = 18.5, df = 1, P < .001). Overall mortality was higher in the febrile group (39, 34.8%) versus the afebrile (1, 0.9%) (χ2 = 42, df = 1, P < .001). The mortality rate in the febrile group was significantly higher in the rectal ESBL-positive patients (χ2 = 7.5, df = 1, P = .006). Discussion The direct correlation of rectal ESBL-positive and negative and respectively urinary ESBL-positive and negative patients' advocate for the use of antibiotics with anti-ESBL activity as an empiric treatment of rectal ESBL-positive patients with suspected UTI. Conclusion In our opinion, it is worthwhile to identify rectal ESBL-positivity on hospital admission.

      PubDate: 2018-06-18T18:52:06Z
       
  • Factors for compliance with infection control practices in home
           healthcare: findings from a survey of nurses' knowledge and attitudes
           toward infection control
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): David Russell, Dawn W. Dowding, Margaret V. McDonald, Victoria Adams, Robert J. Rosati, Elaine L. Larson, Jingjing Shang
      Background Infection is a leading cause of hospitalization among home healthcare patients. Nurses play an important role in reducing infection among home healthcare patients by complying with infection control procedures. However, few studies have examined the compliance of home healthcare nurses with infection control practices or the range of sociocultural and organizational factors that may be associated with compliance. Methods This study analyzed survey responses from nurses at 2 large, certified home healthcare agencies (n = 359), to explore levels of compliance with infection control practices and identify associated demographic, knowledge, and attitudinal correlates. Results Nurses reported a high level of infection control compliance (mean = 0.89, standard deviation [SD] = 0.16), correct knowledge (mean = 0.85, SD = 0.09), and favorable attitudes (mean = 0.81, SD = 0.14). Multivariate mixed regression analyses revealed significant positive associations of attitudinal scores with reported level of compliance (P < .001). However, knowledge of inflection control practices was not associated with compliance. Older (P < .05) and non-Hispanic black (P < .001) nurses reported higher compliance with infection control practices than younger and white non-Hispanic nurses. Conclusion These findings suggest that efforts to improve compliance with infection control practices in home healthcare should focus on strategies to alter perceptions about infection risk and other attitudinal factors.

      PubDate: 2018-06-18T18:52:06Z
       
  • A new frontier: Central line–associated bloodstream infection
           surveillance in home infusion therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Sara C. Keller, Deborah Williams, Clare Rock, Shiv Deol, Polly Trexler, Sara E. Cosgrove


      PubDate: 2018-06-18T18:52:06Z
       
  • High-risk Staphylococcus aureus transmission in the operating room: A call
           for widespread improvements in perioperative hand hygiene and patient
           decolonization practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Randy W. Loftus, Franklin Dexter, Alysha D.M. Robinson
      Background Increased awareness of the epidemiology of transmission of pathogenic bacterial strain characteristics may help to improve compliance with intraoperative infection control measures. Our aim was to characterize the epidemiology of intraoperative transmission of high-risk Staphylococcus aureus sequence types (STs). Methods S aureus isolates collected from 3 academic medical centers underwent whole cell genome analysis, analytical profile indexing, and biofilm absorbance. Transmission dynamics for hypertransmissible, strong biofilm-forming, antibiotic-resistant, and virulent STs were assessed. Results S aureus ST 5 was associated with increased risk of transmission (adjusted incidence risk ratio, 6.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.82-24.41; P = .0008), greater biofilm absorbance (ST 5 median absorbance ± SD, 3.08 ± 0.642 vs other ST median absorbance ± SD, 2.38 ± 1.01; corrected P = .021), multidrug resistance (odds ratio, 7.82; 95% CI, 2.19-27.95; P = .002), and infection (6/38 ST 5 vs 6/140 STs; relative risk, 3.68; 95% CI, 1.26-10.78; P = .022). Provider hands (n = 3) and patients (n = 4) were confirmed sources of ST 5 transmission. Transmission locations included provider hands (n = 3), patient skin sites (n = 4), and environmental surfaces (n = 2). All observed transmission stories involved the within-case mode of transmission. Two of the ST 5 transmission events were directly linked to infection. Conclusions Intraoperative S aureus ST 5 isolates are hypertransmissible and pathogenic. Improved compliance with hand hygiene and patient decolonization may help to control the spread of these dangerous pathogens.

      PubDate: 2018-06-12T18:35:53Z
       
  • Patient- and hospital-level predictors of vancomycin-resistant
           Enterococcus (VRE) bacteremia in Ontario, Canada
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Jennie Johnstone, Cynthia Chen, Laura Rosella, Kwaku Adomako, Michelle E. Policarpio, Freda Lam, Chatura Prematunge, Gary Garber
      Background Data are limited on risk factors for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) bacteremia. Methods All patients with a confirmed VRE bacteremia in Ontario, Canada, between January 2009 and December 2013 were linked to provincial healthcare administrative data sources and frequency matched to 3 controls based on age, sex, and aggregated diagnosis group. Associations between predictors and VRE bacteremia were estimated by generalized estimating equations and summarized using odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results In total, 217 cases and 651 controls were examined. In adjusted analyses, patient-level predictors included bone marrow transplant (OR 106.99 [95% CI 12.19–939.26]); solid organ transplant (OR 17.17 [95% CI 4.95–59.54]); any cancer (OR 8.64 [95% CI 3.88–19.21]); intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR 6.81 [95% CI 3.53–13.13]); heart disease (OR 5.27 [95% CI 2.00–13.90]); and longer length of stay (OR 1.07 per day [95% CI 1.06–1.09]). Hospital-level predictors included hospital size (per increase in 100 beds (OR 1.26 [95% CI 1.07–1.48]) and teaching hospitals (OR 3.87 [95% CI 1.85–8.08]). Conclusions Patients with a bone marrow transplant, solid organ transplant, cancer, or who are admitted to the ICU are at highest risk of VRE bacteremia, particularly at large hospitals and teaching hospitals.

      PubDate: 2018-06-12T18:35:53Z
       
  • State health department validations of central line–associated
           bloodstream infection events reported via the National Healthcare Safety
           Network
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Suparna Bagchi, Jennifer Watkins, Daniel A. Pollock, Jonathan R. Edwards, Katherine Allen-Bridson
      Background Numerous state health departments (SHDs) have validated central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) data, and results from these studies provide important insights into the accuracy of CLABSI reporting to the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) and remediable shortcomings in adherence to the CLABSI definition and criteria. Methods State CLABSI validation results were obtained from peer-reviewed publications, reports on SHD Web sites, and via personal communications with the SHD health care–associated infections coordinator. Data accuracy measures included pooled mean sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Total CLABSI error rate was computed as the proportion of mismatches among total records reviewed. When available, reasons for CLABSI misclassification reported by SHDs were reviewed. Results At least 23 SHDs that have completed CLABSI validations indicated sensitivity (pooled mean, 82.9%), specificity (pooled mean, 98.5%), positive predictive value (pooled mean, 94.1%), and negative predictive value (pooled mean, 95.9%) of CLABSI reporting. The pooled error rate of CLABSI reporting was 4.4%. Reasons for CLABSI misclassification included incorrect secondary bloodstream infection attribution, misapplication of CLABSI definition, missed case finding, applying clinical over surveillance definitions, misapplication of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection 2 definition, and misapplication of general NHSN definitions. Conclusions CLABSI underreporting remains a major concern; validations conducted by SHDs provide an important impetus for improved reporting. SHDs are uniquely positioned to engage facilities in collaborative validation reviews that allow transparency, education, and relationship building.

      PubDate: 2018-06-12T18:35:53Z
       
  • Creation of a competency-based professional development program for
           infection preventionists guided by the APIC Competency Model: steps in the
           process
    • Authors: Heather Bernard; Diana Hackbarth; Russell N. Olmsted; Denise Murphy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Heather Bernard, Diana Hackbarth, Russell N. Olmsted, Denise Murphy
      Background Infection Preventionists have varying levels of educational preparation. Many have no prior experience in IP. The diversity makes design of professional development programs challenging. Recent surveys suggest that only about half of practicing IPs are board certified. There is an urgent need to employ competent IP’s to drive improvement in patient outcomes. Methods This is a project that utilized the APIC Competency Model to create a professional development program characterizing three career stages. Methods included a review of literature on professional development; a survey of IP competence; an assessment of job descriptions and performance evaluations; and a crosswalk of IP competencies. Results The professional development program includes competency - based IP job descriptions and performance evaluations for each career stage; a professional portfolio; and a toolkit for supervisors. Discussion Participants agreed that application of the model resulted in tools which are more closely aligned with current roles for IPs; and increased satisfaction and motivation with the new program. Conclusion Competent and knowledgeable IP's are crucial to optimizing efficacy of IPC programs. A professional development program has the potential to guide staff orientation, improve satisfaction and retention, improve patient outcomes and promote a positive trajectory in advancing practice.

      PubDate: 2018-06-09T18:34:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2018.04.225
       
  • Exploring the use of entertainment-education YouTube videos focused on
           infection prevention and control
    • Authors: Kathryn Lim; Claire Kilpatrick Julie Storr Holly Seale
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Kathryn Lim, Claire Kilpatrick, Julie Storr, Holly Seale
      Background As a communications strategy, education entertainment has been used to inform, influence, and shift societal and individual behaviors. Recently, there has been an increasing number of entertainment-education YouTube videos focused on hand hygiene. However, there is currently no understanding about the quality of these videos; therefore, this study aimed to explore the social media content and user engagement with these videos. Methods The search terms “hand hygiene” and “hand hygiene education” were used to query YouTube. Video content had to be directed at a health care professional audience. Using author designed checklists, each video was systematically evaluated and grouped according to educational usefulness and was subsequently evaluated against the categories of attractiveness, comprehension, and persuasiveness. Results A total of 400 videos were screened, with 70 videos retained for analysis. Of these, 55.7% (n = 39) were categorized as educationally useful. Overall, educationally useful videos scored higher than noneducationally useful videos across the categories of attractiveness, comprehension, and persuasiveness. Miscommunication of the concept of My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene was observed in several of the YouTube videos. Conclusions The availability of educationally useful videos in relation to hand hygiene is evident; however, it is clear that there are opportunities for contributors using this medium to strengthen their alignment with social media best practice principles to maximize the effectiveness, reach, and sustainability of their content.

      PubDate: 2018-06-06T18:29:45Z
       
  • Oscar-nominated movies and the epidemiology of tuberculosis in the past 90
           years
    • Authors: Gabriele Rovello; Adelaide Andriani Sara Brambilla Danae Bossi Michele Augusto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Gabriele Rovello, Adelaide Andriani, Sara Brambilla, Danae Bossi, Michele Augusto Riva


      PubDate: 2018-06-06T18:29:45Z
       
  • Efficacy and safety of a novel skin cleansing formulation versus
           chlorhexidine gluconate
    • Authors: Daryl Paulson; Robert Topp Robert Boykin Gregory Schultz Qingping Yang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Daryl S. Paulson, Robert Topp, Robert E. Boykin, Gregory Schultz, Qingping Yang
      Background This study evaluated whether a multi-ingredient surfactant colloidal silver technology was noninferior to a 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) antiseptic on immediate and persistent antimicrobial activity. Methods The inguinal regions of 81 healthy adults were demarcated into 4 quadrants, and 3 were used for testing each product at baseline, 10 minutes, and 6 hours postapplication. The log of the number of colony forming units was obtained using a cylinder sampling technique. The 95% confidence interval of the test product to the control product with a margin of 0.65 was established as the upper limit of noninferiority. Results A total of 81 individuals were enrolled. The colloidal silver product was found to be noninferior to 4% CHG at both 10 minutes and 6 hours postapplication. Conclusions The colloidal silver-based product was noninferior to the 4% CHG product at 10 minutes and 6 hours postapplication.

      PubDate: 2018-06-06T18:29:45Z
       
  • Severe sepsis 3-hour bundle compliance and mortality
    • Authors: Nancy Lynn; Chhavi Gupta Mark Vaaler Jeffrey Held Linda Leon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Nancy B. Lynn, Chhavi Gupta, Mark Vaaler, Jeffrey Held, Linda Leon
      Severe sepsis is a major cause of mortality among hospitalized patients. We tracked severe sepsis 3-hour bundle compliance and mortality over time. Those patients with severe sepsis who received the entire bundle had improved in-hospital survivability over those patients who did not receive the bundle.

      PubDate: 2018-06-06T18:29:45Z
       
  • What variables are associated with the public's willingness to take
           measures to maintain a hygienic hospital environment'
    • Authors: Anat Gesser-Edelsburg; Mina Zemach; Ricky Cohen; Asher Salmon; Lior Lowenstein; Dan Shteinberg
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Anat Gesser-Edelsburg, Mina Zemach, Ricky Cohen, Asher Salmon, Lior Lowenstein, Dan Shteinberg
      Background Most of the studies on hospital infections have focused on the perceptions and reported behavior of the medical personnel. This research explore the practices undertaken both by Israeli patients and visitors, in order to maintain a hygienic hospital environment, and to locate the variables that are associated with them. Methods An online survey of national representative sample of Israeli hospital's visitors and patients adult population, who were hospitalized in the five years before the interview (n=209), and who visited patients in hospitals in the three years before the interview (n=454). Results Only a minority of patients (24%) comment to medical personnel about maintaining hygiene, while a majority (67%-69%) took active steps to maintain a hygienic environment. The main variables that were found to be associated with patients' making comments were level of religiousness and gender, whereas priorities, namely whether hospital infections were a high priority, and the frequency of the patient's visits to hospital outpatient clinics, were associated with self-initiated action. Conclusions In order to reduce barriers to commenting to hospital personnel, we propose framing the subject of hospital hygiene as a matter of health literacy and a subject of public discourse, rather than a sole medical issue

      PubDate: 2018-06-06T18:29:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2018.05.008
       
  • Needleless connector drying time—how long does it take'
    • Authors: Karen Slater; Fiona Fullerton; Marie Cooke; Simone Snell; Claire M. Rickard
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control
      Author(s): Karen Slater, Fiona Fullerton, Marie Cooke, Simone Snell, Claire M. Rickard
      Allowing needleless connectors (NCs) on vascular catheters adequate drying time after cleaning with antiseptic is essential. Drying time instructions on antiseptic pads/wipes relate to skin use, not inanimate objects. Needleless connector drying times after a 15-second scrub with isopropyl-alcohol, isopropyl-alcohol/chlorhexidine, or povidone-iodine varied from 5 seconds to >6 minutes.

      PubDate: 2018-06-06T18:29:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2018.05.007
       
  • Award Winners
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • APIC Masthead
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number AS-R01 Are Contact Precautions Necessary to Reduce
           Transmission in Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Positive Patients'
    • Authors: Peggy Thompson; Jonathan Teter Kimberly Atrubin
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Peggy Thompson, Jonathan Teter, Kimberly E. Atrubin


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number ASR-02 Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Healthcare
           Associated Infections in Critically Ill Patients in a Tertiary Care
           Teaching Hospital in Nepal
    • Authors: Sailesh Kumar; Shrestha Pradeep Krishna Shrestha
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Sailesh Kumar Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna Shrestha


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number ADS03 Contamination of Reusable Electroencephalography
           Electrodes, a Multicenter Study
    • Authors: Nancy Albert; James Bena Jack Runner Shannon Morrison Charlotte Ciudad
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Nancy M. Albert, James Bena, Jack Runner, Shannon Morrison, Charlotte Ciudad, Karen Rice, Nowai Keleekai, Ellen Slifcak


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Information for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number ADS04 Use of an Electronic Tool that Drives Quality
           Improvement in Endoscope Reprocessing
    • Authors: Eman Chami; Rebecca Washburn
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Eman Chami, Rebecca Washburn


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • APIC membership keeps you at the forefront of infection prevention
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number COC05 Safe Injection Practices: Opportunities for
           Improvement in Ambulatory Care
    • Authors: Naomi Kuznets; Belle Lerner Jan Davidson
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Naomi Kuznets, Belle Lerner, Jan Davidson


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number DSV06 Risk Factors Associated with Non-Mucosal Barrier
           Injury Central line Associated Blood Stream Infections in an Oncology
           Population
    • Authors: Kay Sams; Stacy Martin Amy Patterson Stephanie Carraway Anna Spanolios
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Kay Sams, Stacy Martin, Amy Patterson, Stephanie Carraway, Anna Spanolios, Margaret Wagnerowski, Kelly Morris, Susan Hartranft, Richard Reich


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number DSV07 Creating Consensus: Ensuring Inter-Rater
           Reliability for Reporting Infections Using NHSN Surveillance Criteria
    • Authors: Lauren Farrell; Katie Williams Lauren Satchell
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Lauren Farrell, Katie Williams, Lauren Satchell


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number DSV08 Post-Discharge Surveillance of SSI in Bariatric
           Surgery
    • Authors: Cristiane Schmitt; Lais Silva Icaro Boszczowski Maria Clara Padoveze Ligia
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Cristiane Schmitt, Lais Silva, Icaro Boszczowski, Maria Clara Padoveze, Ligia Abraao, Marcia Baraldi


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number EC-09 Moving the Science Forward: A Writers/Research
           Forum at the Chapter Level
    • Authors: Jeanette Harris; Patty Montgomery Sara Podczervinski
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Jeanette Harris, Patty Montgomery, Sara Podczervinski


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number EC-10 Implementing Standard Infection Prevention
           Practices in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory
    • Authors: Katherine Yohnke; Erik Dubberke Ashleigh Goris
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Katherine Yohnke, Erik Dubberke, Ashleigh J. Goris


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number EC-11 Identifying Opportunities for Targeted
           Interventions: Gaps in Endocavity Probe High-Level Disinfection Practices
           Across Healthcare Settings in Illinois
    • Authors: Ruth Belflower; Beverly Burt Deb Patterson Burdsall Diane Cullen Elisa
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Ruth Belflower, Beverly Burt, Deb Patterson Burdsall, Diane Cullen, Elisa Hill, Gayatri Sanku, Julia Howland, Karen Trimberger, Mary Alice Lavin, Rose Marie Semar, Erica Runningdeer, Chinyere Alu, Massimo Pacilli, Stephanie Black, Rachel Stricof


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number EOC-12 Firestorm! Restoration of an Acute Care
           Hospital and Medical Offices Post Evacuation and Closure Due to Wildfire
    • Authors: Laura Hormel; Heather Titilah
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Laura Hormel, Heather Titilah


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number WSOH-13 Environmental and Personal Protective
           Equipment Contamination During Simulated Healthcare Activities
    • Authors: Rachel Weber; Linh Phan Osayuwamen Edomwande Charissa Fritzen-Pedicini Susan Bleasdale
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Rachel T. Weber, Linh T. Phan, Osayuwamen Edomwande, Charissa M. Fritzen-Pedicini, Susan C. Bleasdale, Rachael Jones


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
  • Presentation Number WSOH-14 Adherence to Protocols by Healthcare Workers
           and Self-Contamination During Doffing of Personal Protective Equipment
    • Authors: Myeong-a Lee; Kyungmin Huh Jongsuk Jeong Eunsil Choi Jong Rim
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 46, Issue 6, Supplement
      Author(s): Myeong-a Lee, Kyungmin Huh, Jongsuk Jeong, Eunsil Choi, Jong Rim Choi, Sun Young Cho, Doo Ryeon Chung


      PubDate: 2018-05-28T18:09:32Z
       
 
 
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