for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3123 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3120 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 378, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 140, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 371, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 338, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 433, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 176, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Alcohol
  [SJR: 0.922]   [H-I: 66]   [11 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0741-8329
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3123 journals]
  • QTc prolongation, increased NT-proBNP and pre-clinical myocardial wall
           remodeling in excessive alcohol consumers: The SABPA study
    • Authors: Annemarie Wentzel; Leoné Malan; Jacobus D. Scheepers; Nicolaas T. Malan
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 68
      Author(s): Annemarie Wentzel, Leoné Malan, Jacobus D. Scheepers, Nicolaas T. Malan
      Alcohol contributes greatly to vascular and structural modifications. Due to differences in the metabolism and tolerance of alcohol between ethnic groups, the manner of these modifications may differ. We investigated the association between alcohol consumption – measured via ethnic-specific gamma glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) cut-points – and markers of cardiac perfusion, electrical activity, and pre-clinical structural alterations. A South African target population study was performed in a bi-ethnic cohort (n = 405). Alcohol consumption was determined according to previously defined ethnic-specific γ-GT cut-points, where γ-GT ≥ 19.5 U/L and γ-GT ≥ 55 U/L indicated excessive alcohol consumption in Caucasians and Africans, respectively. Ambulatory 24-h blood pressure and electrocardiograms (ECG), 10-lead ECG left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), ischemic events, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and QTc prolongation were assessed. Fasting blood samples were obtained. A poorer cardio-metabolic profile and mean 24-h hypertensive and ECG-LVH values were evident in high γ-GT groups of both ethnicities, when compared to their low counterparts. The African high γ-GT group reported a higher intake of alcohol and presented significant increases in NT-proBNP (p < 0.001), QTc prolongation (p = 0.008), and ischemic events (p = 0.013). Regression analyses revealed associations between ECG-LVH and NT-proBNP, QTc prolongation, ischemic events, and SBP, in the African high γ-GT group exclusively. High alcohol consumers presented delayed electrical conduction in the heart accompanied by ECG-LVH, ischemic events, and increased vaso-responsiveness, predominantly in Africans. Ultimately, increased left ventricular distension on a pre-clinical level may elevate the risk for future cardiovascular events in this population.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T10:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.09.001
      Issue No: Vol. 68 (2018)
       
  • Maternal hair testing to disclose self-misreporting in drinking and
           smoking behavior during pregnancy
    • Authors: Maria Dolores Gomez-Roig; Emilia Marchei; Sally Sabra; Francesco Paolo Busardò; Luisa Mastrobattista; Simona Pichini; Eduard Gratacós; Oscar Garcia-Algar
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 67
      Author(s): Maria Dolores Gomez-Roig, Emilia Marchei, Sally Sabra, Francesco Paolo Busardò, Luisa Mastrobattista, Simona Pichini, Eduard Gratacós, Oscar Garcia-Algar
      This study aimed to objectively verify smoking and drinking behavior during pregnancy and to disclose self-misreporting through maternal hair analysis. A total of 153 women attending a university hospital in Barcelona (Spain) were selected and interviewed after delivery, on their smoking and drinking habits during pregnancy. A 9-cm hair strand was collected and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the presence of nicotine (NIC) and ethyl glucuronide (EtG) as biomarkers of tobacco and alcohol consumption, respectively. Concentrations of EtG <7 pg/mg hair and ≥30 pg/mg hair in the 0–3-cm hair segment have been used to assess, respectively, total abstinence and chronic excessive consumption in the previous 3 months, with repetitive moderate drinking lying in the interval 7–30 pg EtG per mg hair. Hair NIC less than 1 ng/mg hair indicates non-exposure to tobacco smoke while hair NIC indicates daily active smoking. In the interview, 28.1% of women declared to have smoked occasionally during gestation, while only 2.6% stated to have consumed alcohol on more than one occasion during pregnancy. Hair testing of smoking biomarkers disclosed that 7.2% of women remained active smokers during the whole pregnancy (hair NIC: 3.21–56.98 ng/mg hair), 16.3% were passive non-smokers or occasional smokers (hair NIC: 1.04–2.99 ng/mg hair), while 76.5% were not exposed to any cigarette smoke (hair NIC < limit of quantification – 0.91 ng/mg hair). Conversely, alcohol hair biomarkers showed that only 35.3% of women were totally abstinent during gestation (hair EtG: 3.89–6.73 pg/mg hair), while 62.7% drank a non-negligible amount of alcohol during pregnancy (hair EtG: 7.06–26.57 pg/mg hair), and 2% were chronic excessive drinkers (hair EtG: 35.33–47.52 pg/mg hair). Maternal hair analysis has shown to be significantly more sensitive than interviews in revealing an alarming misreported prevalence of alcohol use during pregnancy. These findings stress the need to use objective measures to assess alcohol exposure and to consider the inclusion of targeted actions to reduce alcohol consumption in maternal-child health policies.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T10:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.08.010
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of a novel method for the analysis of alcohol biomarkers: Ethyl
           glucuronide, ethyl sulfate and phosphatidylethanol
    • Authors: Van Long Nguyen; Phillip Paull; Paul S. Haber; Kate Chitty; Devanshi Seth
      Pages: 7 - 13
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 67
      Author(s): Van Long Nguyen, Phillip Paull, Paul S. Haber, Kate Chitty, Devanshi Seth
      Currently available markers and methods to evaluate alcohol consumption are indirect and suboptimal, or rely on self-report, which have inherent problems. Direct metabolites of alcohol, phosphatidylethanol (PEth), ethyl sulfate (EtS), and ethyl glucuronide (EtG), are known to improve diagnostic accuracy. In this study, methods were established for the identification of PEth in erythrocytes and EtG and EtS in serum using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The three biomarkers were tested and validated in volunteer teetotalers (n = 4) and drinkers (n = 10), and applied in patients (n = 8) hospitalized with alcohol-related problems. Linearity of each assay was demonstrated from 22.5 to 900 nM for EtG, 40–3175 nM for EtS, and 21–750 nM for PEth. The methods were highly selective, precise (<5% coefficient of variation), and had optimal accuracy (within 10% of the nominal value) for all three analytes. Recovery for all three compounds exceeded 90%. A preliminary investigation into the window of detection of these biomarkers after a single occasion of moderate alcohol consumption revealed that EtG and EtS could be detected and quantified over the short term (days) and PEth over the long term (weeks). All three biomarkers showed high sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing between abstinence and any alcohol use at the cut-off values of 22.5 nM for EtG, 40 nM for EtS, and 21 nM for PEth. We have established simultaneous assays for EtG, EtS, and PEth for routine clinical use in confirming abstinence and exposure, and detecting under-reporting of alcohol use, relevant in clinical and non-clinical settings.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T10:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.08.009
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2018)
       
  • Differential COMT expression and behavioral effects of COMT inhibition in
           male and female Wistar and alcohol preferring rats
    • Authors: Aqilah M. McCane; Michael J. DeLory; Maureen M. Timm; Sarine S. Janetsian-Fritz; Christopher C. Lapish; Cristine L. Czachowski
      Pages: 15 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 67
      Author(s): Aqilah M. McCane, Michael J. DeLory, Maureen M. Timm, Sarine S. Janetsian-Fritz, Christopher C. Lapish, Cristine L. Czachowski
      Polymorphisms of the catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) gene have been associated with alcoholism, suggesting that alterations in the metabolism of catecholamines may be a critical component of the neuropathology of alcoholism. In the current experiments, the COMT inhibitor tolcapone was utilized in an operant behavioral model of reinforcer-seeking and drinking to determine if this compound was capable of remediating the excessive seeking and drinking phenotype of the alcohol-preferring P rat. Tolcapone was administered to male and female alcohol-reinforced P and Wistar rats. Additionally, tolcapone was administered to male sucrose-reinforced P and Wistar rats to determine if its effects also extended to a natural reinforcer. Animals were trained to make an operant response that resulted in 20 min uninterrupted access to the reinforcer solutions. Tolcapone had no effect in female rats on either seeking or consumption of ethanol. However, reductions of both reinforcer seeking and consumption were observed in male P rats, but only of seeking in Wistars. In separate experiments, using reinforcer naïve male and female animals, COMT expression was assessed via Western Blot analysis. Sex differences in COMT expression were also observed, where male P rats exhibited a marked reduction in protein expression relative to females in the PFC. Sex differences were not observed for Wistars or in the striatum and hippocampus. These data complement our previous findings in which tolcapone reduced cue-evoked responses in P rats and further suggest clinical utility of COMT inhibitors in the treatment of addiction disorders, specifically in male high drinkers.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T10:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.08.007
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2018)
       
  • Challenges of diagnosing fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in foster and
           adopted children
    • Authors: Ludmila N. Bakhireva; Laura Garrison; Shikhar Shrestha; Janet Sharkis; Rajesh Miranda; Karen Rogers
      Pages: 37 - 43
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 67
      Author(s): Ludmila N. Bakhireva, Laura Garrison, Shikhar Shrestha, Janet Sharkis, Rajesh Miranda, Karen Rogers
      Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) might be 10–15 times more prevalent among foster/adopted children compared to the general population; however, many of these children remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. The lack of confirmed prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) may be a key barrier to diagnosis. Our sample included 681 patients evaluated for FASD, according to the University of Washington 4-Digit Diagnostic Code, at a pediatric specialty clinic. Guardianship status and other patient characteristics were evaluated by multinomial logistic regression as potential predictors of being classified into one of the following FASD groups: 1) full or partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS/pFAS; n = 97); 2) Static Encephalopathy/Alcohol-Exposed (SE/AE) or Neurobehavioral Disorder/Alcohol-Exposed (ND/AE) (n = 135); and 3) some features of FASD (equivalent to pFAS, SE/AE or ND/AE phenotypes) but unknown PAE (n = 449). Median age at assessment was 7.0 years, non-Hispanic White constituted the predominant racial/ethnic group (49.5%), and the majority (81.8%) lacked involvement from a biological parent/relative. Many patients (66.0%) had some features of FASD but lacked reliable PAE information. Children classified into the ‘some features/unknown PAE’ group had higher median age of assessment (8 years) compared to other groups (6 years; p < 0.001). No association was observed between race/ethnicity or child's sex and FASD outcomes (p > 0.05). Adopted/foster children were 2.8 times as likely (95% CI: 1.6; 4.8) to be classified into the ‘some features/unknown PAE’ group compared to children living with a parent/relative after adjusting for covariates. This study's findings indicate that adopted/foster children are more likely to have unknown PAE and not receive a FASD diagnosis, potentially denying them access to specialized services, treatment, and rehabilitation.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T10:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.05.004
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2018)
       
  • CRF modulation of central monoaminergic function: Implications for sex
           differences in alcohol drinking and anxiety
    • Authors: Kristen Elizabeth Pleil; Mary Jane Skelly
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Alcohol
      Author(s): Kristen Elizabeth Pleil, Mary Jane Skelly
      Decades of research have described the importance of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling in alcohol addiction, as well as in commonly co-expressed neuropsychiatric diseases including anxiety and mood disorders. However, CRF signaling can also acutely regulate binge alcohol consumption, anxiety, and affect in non-dependent animals, possibly via modulation of central monoaminergic signaling. We hypothesize that basal CRF tone is particularly high in animals and humans with an inherent propensity for high anxiety and alcohol consumption, and thus these individuals are at increased risk for the development of alcohol use disorder and comorbid neuropsychiatric diseases. The current review focuses on extrahypothalamic CRF circuits, particularly those stemming from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), found to play a role in basal phenotypes and examines whether the intrinsic hyperactivity of these circuits is sufficient to escalate the expression of these behaviors and steepen the trajectory of development of disease states. We focus our efforts on describing CRF modulation of biogenic amine neuron populations that have widespread projections to the forebrain to modulate behaviors including alcohol and drug intake, stress reactivity, and anxiety. Further, we review the known sex differences and estradiol modulation of these neuron populations and CRF signaling at their synapses to address the question of whether females are more susceptible to the development of comorbid addiction and stress-related neuropsychiatric diseases because of hyperactive extrahypothalamic CRF circuits compared to males.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T10:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2018.01.007
       
  • Forced ethanol ingestion by Wistar rats from a juvenile age increased
           voluntary alcohol consumption in adulthood, with the involvement of
           orexin-A
    • Authors: Luis-Gabriel Mendoza-Ruiz; Priscila Vázquez-León; Lucía Martínez-Mota; Eduardo Ramírez San Juan; Abraham Miranda-Páez
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Alcohol
      Author(s): Luis-Gabriel Mendoza-Ruiz, Priscila Vázquez-León, Lucía Martínez-Mota, Eduardo Ramírez San Juan, Abraham Miranda-Páez
      Human adolescents who drink alcohol are more likely to become alcoholics in adulthood. Alcohol administration (intraperitoneally) or drinking (in a 2-bottle free choice paradigm) during the juvenile/adolescent age of rats promotes voluntary alcohol consumption in adulthood. On the other hand, there is growing evidence that the orexinergic system plays a role in several rewarded behaviors, including alcohol ingestion. Since it is unknown what effect is exerted in adulthood by forced oral ethanol intake and/or administration of orexin-A (OX-A) in juvenile rats. The present study aimed to evaluate this question. A group of male Wistar rats was forced to drink ethanol (10% v/v) as the only liquid in the diet from weaning (postnatal day 21) to postnatal day 67 (46 days), followed by a forced withdrawal period. An age-matched group was raised drinking tap water (control). OX-A or its vehicle was microinjected intracerebroventricularly (icv) (1 nmol/0.6 μL) to explore its effect as well. Locomotor activity and voluntary ethanol consumption were later assessed in all groups. The rats forced to consume ethanol early in life showed an elevated level of ambulation and alcohol ingestion in adulthood. A single injection of OX-A increased locomotor activity and acute ethanol intake in rats with or without prior exposure to alcohol at the juvenile stage. In conclusion, forced ethanol consumption in juvenile rats led to increased voluntary alcohol drinking behavior during adulthood, an effect likely facilitated by OX-A.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T10:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2018.01.008
       
  • Differential cognitive profiles of intimate partner violence perpetrators
           based on alcohol consumption
    • Authors: Sara Vitoria-Estruch; Angel Romero-Martínez; Marisol Lila Murillo; Luis Moya-Albiol
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Alcohol
      Author(s): Sara Vitoria-Estruch, Angel Romero-Martínez, Marisol Lila Murillo, Luis Moya-Albiol
      Despite extensive evidence of heterogeneity in intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrator profiles, there has been little research into neuropsychological deficits which might help us understand differences within this violent population. Moreover, studies on this topic have not paid much attention to the role of alcohol abuse in neuropsychological domains of IPV perpetrators. Hence, the current study was designed to examine neuropsychological differences among individuals who have committed domestic violence with high (n=28, HA) and low (n=35, LA) levels of alcohol consumption, and non-violent individuals (n=37) to establish differential neuropsychological profiles. An exhaustive neuropsychological assessment battery was employed which combined the computer-based Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery with pencil-and-paper measures. Compared to controls, HA IPV perpetrators had slower processing speed and significantly more impairments in shift attention, working and long-term memory, cognitive flexibility, planning, decision-making, emotion decoding skills and perspective taking. Furthermore, there were differences IPV perpetrator subgroups in shift attention and cognitive empathy, with HA IPV perpetrators displaying more severe impairments in both cognitive domains than LA IPV perpetrators. Finally, the LA IPV perpetrators had significantly more impairments in working and long-term memory, executive functioning and emotion decoding skills than controls but they did not differ in processing speed, shift attention, decision making or perspective taking. Thus, the current findings suggest that IPV perpetrators with neuropsychological difficulties, especially those who are heavy drinkers, may have the greatest need for cognitive interventions.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T10:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2018.01.006
       
  • Examining the effects of alcohol on GABAA receptor mRNA expression and
           function in neural cultures generated from control and alcohol dependent
           donor induced pluripotent stem cells
    • Authors: Richard Lieberman; Henry R. Kranzler; Eric S. Levine; Jonathan Covault
      Pages: 45 - 53
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): Richard Lieberman, Henry R. Kranzler, Eric S. Levine, Jonathan Covault
      Factors influencing the development of alcohol-use disorder (AUD) are complex and heterogeneous. While animal models have been crucial to identifying actions of alcohol on neural cells, human-derived in vitro systems that reflect an individual's genetic background hold promise in furthering our understanding of the molecular and functional effects of alcohol exposure and the pathophysiology of AUD. In this report, we utilized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs)-derived neural cell cultures obtained from healthy individuals (CTLs) and those with alcohol dependence (ADs) to 1) examine the effect of 21-day alcohol exposure on mRNA expression of three genes encoding GABAA receptor subunits (GABRA1, GABRG2, and GABRD) using quantitative PCR, and 2) examine the effect of acute and chronic alcohol exposure on GABA-evoked currents using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. iPSCs from CTLs and ADs were differentiated into neural cultures enriched for forebrain-type excitatory glutamate neurons. Following 21-day alcohol exposure, significant treatment effects were observed in GABRA1, GABRG2, and GABRD mRNA expression. A modestly significant interaction between treatment and donor phenotype was observed for GABRD, which was increased in cell cultures derived from ADs. No effect of acute or chronic alcohol was observed on GABA-evoked currents in neurons from either CTLs or ADs. This work extends findings examining the effects of alcohol on the GABAA receptor in human cell in vitro model systems.

      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.08.005
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Quantitative trait loci for sensitivity to acute ethanol and ethanol
           consummatory behaviors in rats
    • Authors: Bruce H. Mandt; Colin Larson; Tina Fay; Pequita Bludeau; Richard M. Allen; Richard A. Deitrich; Richard A. Radcliffe
      Pages: 55 - 67
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): Bruce H. Mandt, Colin Larson, Tina Fay, Pequita Bludeau, Richard M. Allen, Richard A. Deitrich, Richard A. Radcliffe
      Individuals with a low initial response to alcohol (i.e., ethanol) are at greater risk of developing alcohol abuse or dependence later in life. Similar to humans, individual differences in ethanol sensitivity also can be seen in rats, and several laboratories have used these individual differences to generate selectively bred rats that differ in acute ethanol sensitivity. We have worked with two sets of such rats (Inbred High or Low Alcohol Sensitivity strains, IHAS or ILAS, respectively; Inbred Alcohol Tolerant or Non-Tolerant strains, IAT and IANT, respectively) and have confirmed previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for these acute differences with the use of recombinant congenic lines; however, the relationship between acute sensitivity and ethanol drinking in these rats has yet to be determined. Thus, here we tested the hypothesis that QTLs underlying variation in initial low sensitivity to ethanol also will modulate variation in ethanol drinking behaviors. Separate groups of selectively inbred parent and congenic rats were tested for the loss of righting response (LORR) and also assessed for ethanol consummatory behavior using either operant self-administration or an intermittent-access two-bottle choice procedure. LORR testing confirmed the presence of a LORR duration QTL in all of the congenics; however, the lack of a corresponding difference in blood ethanol concentration at the regaining of the righting response suggests that these QTLs may be mediating a difference in ethanol metabolism rather than in neuronal sensitivity. IHAS/ILAS-derived congenic rats did not differ from parent rats at any point during operant self-administration. IAT/IANT-derived congenic rats showed small, but significant, increases in ethanol consumption relative to the parent strains only during the initial stages of operant self-administration. In contrast to operant testing, IHAS/ILAS-derived congenic rats showed significantly greater ethanol consumption and preference than parent rats during intermittent-access testing. There were not differences, however, between IAT/IANT congenic and parent rats during intermittent access. These data support the hypothesis that there is a genetic relationship between initial ethanol sensitivity and ethanol consumption, at least for the IHAS/ILAS-derived congenic rats. Our current studies, however, cannot eliminate pharmacokinetic or taste preference factors as contributing to the rats' responses, nor can we eliminate the possibility of a linkage effect because of the fairly large size of the QTL intervals; i.e., distinct genes may be mediating the acute sensitivity and drinking responses.

      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.08.002
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Testing bidirectional relationships between alcohol use and depressive
           symptoms: What is the role of the serotonin transporter gene'
    • Authors: Roy Otten; Carmen S. van der Zwaluw; Rutger C. Engels
      Pages: 69 - 75
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): Roy Otten, Carmen S. van der Zwaluw, Rutger C. Engels
      Alcohol abuse often co-exists with a major depressive disorder. In order to understand the development of this comorbidity, it is important to concentrate on the preceding process. It has been suggested that the link between alcohol use and depressive symptoms is a result of an interaction with genetic factors. The aim of this study was to longitudinally examine the effect of the 5-HTTLPR genotype on the association between depressive symptoms and alcohol use in a Dutch community sample. Following a stepwise approach, bivariate correlations, longitudinal regression analyses, and latent growth curve analyses were separately conducted for 316 males and 321 females. A positive correlation between depressive symptoms and alcohol use was shown in female carriers of the 5-HTTLPR short allele. In addition, latent growth curve analyses showed a positive association between alcohol use and the intercept of depressive symptoms (but not the slope), but only in female carriers of the 5-HTTLPR short allele. These findings show that alcohol use may be positively related, at least cross-sectionally, to depressive symptoms in female carriers of the 5-HTTLPR S allele, and indicate that moderators such as SLC6A4 genotype and sex need to be taken into account when examining associations between depressive symptoms and drinking behavior. In order to gain insight into the longitudinal association between alcohol use and depressive symptoms, studies should concentrate on earlier stages and focus on more fine-grained research designs that allow day-to-day changes in both alcohol use and depressive symptoms.

      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.08.003
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Role of small GTPase rac2 in the expression chemokines CCL5 and CXCL8
           motif in bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM)
    • Authors: A.C. Azim; T. Murungi
      First page: 88
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): A.C. Azim, T. Murungi


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.005
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Chronic alcohol consumption alters transcriptional profiles and mucosal
           cytokine production of intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes
    • Authors: T. Barr; K. Grant; I. Messaoudi
      First page: 88
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): T. Barr, K. Grant, I. Messaoudi


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.006
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Phenotype differences in spleen and liver T cells following injection with
           control or ethanol exposed precision cut liver slices (PCLS)
    • Authors: J.R. Bowman; M.J. Duryee; C.D. Hunter; J.R. O’Dell; T.R. Mikuls; L.W. Klassen; G.M. Thiele
      First page: 88
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): J.R. Bowman, M.J. Duryee, C.D. Hunter, J.R. O’Dell, T.R. Mikuls, L.W. Klassen, G.M. Thiele


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.007
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and alcohol exposure in lung donors
    • Authors: M. Camargo-Moreno; M. Yong; E.J. Kovacs; E.M. Lowery
      Pages: 88 - 89
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): M. Camargo-Moreno, M. Yong, E.J. Kovacs, E.M. Lowery


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.008
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Histone H4 lysine 12 acetylation leads to epigenetic regulation of the
           novel cannabinoid G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) in alcohol treated
           human dendritic cells
    • Authors: B. Castillo; G. Figueroa; J. Napuri; M. Agudelo
      First page: 89
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): B. Castillo, G. Figueroa, J. Napuri, M. Agudelo


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.009
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Multiple-day binge ethanol intoxication is associated with an
           anti-inflammatory alveolar macrophage phenotype
    • Authors: B.J. Curtis; J.A. Shults; Devin M. Boe; L. Ramirez; E.J. Kovacs
      First page: 89
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): B.J. Curtis, J.A. Shults, Devin M. Boe, L. Ramirez, E.J. Kovacs


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.010
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Effects of ethanol and ethanol metabolites on the formation of heteromeric
           complexes between chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 and α1-adrenergic
           receptors in human vascular smooth muscle cells
    • Authors: J.M. Eby; H.M. LaPorte; M. Majetschak
      First page: 89
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): J.M. Eby, H.M. LaPorte, M. Majetschak


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.011
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Methylation profile of monocyte-derived dendritic cells after acute
           exposure to alcohol and synthetic cannabinoids
    • Authors: F.G. Parira; M. Agudelo
      Pages: 89 - 90
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): F.G. Parira, M. Agudelo


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.012
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Cannabis use in individuals with severe alcohol use disorders in Colorado
           after cannabis decriminalization
    • Authors: J.T. Hua; M. Afshar; B.J. Clark; E.J. Kovacs; E.L. Burnham
      First page: 90
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): J.T. Hua, M. Afshar, B.J. Clark, E.J. Kovacs, E.L. Burnham


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.013
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates alcoholic fatty liver disease in
           mice
    • Authors: L. Jia; X. Chang; C. Liu; C.C. Lord; N. Ahmed; C.E. Lee; S. Lee; M.C. Mitchell; P.E. Scherer; J.K. Elmquist
      First page: 90
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): L. Jia, X. Chang, C. Liu, C.C. Lord, N. Ahmed, C.E. Lee, S. Lee, M.C. Mitchell, P.E. Scherer, J.K. Elmquist


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.014
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Characterization of regulatory T cells after alcohol intoxication combined
           with burn injury
    • Authors: M.E. Luck; X. Li; M.A. Choudhry
      Pages: 90 - 91
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): M.E. Luck, X. Li, M.A. Choudhry


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.015
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Alcohol use promotes intestinal infection in patients with inflammatory
           bowel disease
    • Authors: P.V. Kuprys; A.N. Cobb; A.N. Kothari; A.R. Cannon; J. Eberhardt; P.C. Kuo; M.A. Choudhry
      First page: 91
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): P.V. Kuprys, A.N. Cobb, A.N. Kothari, A.R. Cannon, J. Eberhardt, P.C. Kuo, M.A. Choudhry


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.016
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Heavy alcohol use in organ donors results in a decrease in organ
           allocation and utilization
    • Authors: E.M. Lowery; C. Joyce; M. Afshar
      First page: 91
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): E.M. Lowery, C. Joyce, M. Afshar


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.017
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Targeted liver metabolomics reveals a role for CCL2 in arginine metabolism
           and glutathione generation in a model of alcoholic liver injury
    • Authors: P. Mandrekar; A. Lim; D. Catalano
      First page: 91
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): P. Mandrekar, A. Lim, D. Catalano


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.018
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Changes in cytokine and glial responses induced by binge-like drinking
           under nondependent conditions
    • Authors: S.A. Marshall; S.E. McIntosh; L.E. Dorn; E. Greengrove; R.D. Thomas; D.T. Lysle; T.E. Thiele
      Pages: 91 - 92
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): S.A. Marshall, S.E. McIntosh, L.E. Dorn, E. Greengrove, R.D. Thomas, D.T. Lysle, T.E. Thiele


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.019
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Alcohol intake and T cell aging in HIV+ humans are associated with gut
           bacterial burden
    • Authors: V.J. Maffei; R.W. Siggins; M. Luo; P. Molina; C.M. Taylor; D.A. Welsh
      First page: 92
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): V.J. Maffei, R.W. Siggins, M. Luo, P. Molina, C.M. Taylor, D.A. Welsh


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.020
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • A novel phenotype of ALDH2 polymorphism: alcohol-induced skin pigmentation
    • Authors: A. Matsumoto; T. Hara; C. Shimanoe; T. Yuzuriha; C. Yoshimori; T. Muto; K. Endo; M. Hara; M. Ichiba; T. Konakahara; I. Yajima; V. Vasiliou; B.-J. Song; M. Fujita
      First page: 92
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): A. Matsumoto, T. Hara, C. Shimanoe, T. Yuzuriha, C. Yoshimori, T. Muto, K. Endo, M. Hara, M. Ichiba, T. Konakahara, I. Yajima, V. Vasiliou, B.-J. Song, M. Fujita


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.021
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • In vitro Comparison of Ethanol Metabolism in Precision Cut Liver Slices
           from C57Bl/6, Balb/c, DBA/2J and 129S1/SvlmJ Mice
    • Authors: J.D. McGowan; M.N. Harry; J.R. Bowman; M.J. Duryee; C.D. Hunter; T.R. Mikuls; L.W. Klassen; G.M. Thiele
      Pages: 92 - 93
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): J.D. McGowan, M.N. Harry, J.R. Bowman, M.J. Duryee, C.D. Hunter, T.R. Mikuls, L.W. Klassen, G.M. Thiele


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.022
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • TRPV6 deficient mice are resistant to ethanol-induced disruption of
           colonic epithelial tight junctions, mucosal barrier dysfunction and liver
           damage
    • Authors: A.S. Meena; P.K. Shukla; B. Manda; S. Amin; R.K. Rao
      First page: 93
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): A.S. Meena, P.K. Shukla, B. Manda, S. Amin, R.K. Rao


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.023
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Impact of repeated binge drinking on resistance to bacterial pneumonia
    • Authors: B. Nanduri; W. Tan; A. Akgul; L.A. Shack; S.B. Pruett
      First page: 93
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): B. Nanduri, W. Tan, A. Akgul, L.A. Shack, S.B. Pruett


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.024
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Binge ethanol impairs airway cilia motility
    • Authors: M.E. Price; J.A. Pavlik; D. Katafiasz; K.L. Bailey; J.H. Sisson
      First page: 93
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): M.E. Price, J.A. Pavlik, D. Katafiasz, K.L. Bailey, J.H. Sisson


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.025
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Role of acquired CFTR dysfunction in alcohol impairment of mucus clearance
    • Authors: L. Rasmussen; D. Stafford; J. LaFontaine; C.M. Evans; S.M. Rowe; S.M. Bailey; W.E. Swords; E.L. Burnham; S. Vamsee Raju
      Pages: 93 - 94
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): L. Rasmussen, D. Stafford, J. LaFontaine, C.M. Evans, S.M. Rowe, S.M. Bailey, W.E. Swords, E.L. Burnham, S. Vamsee Raju


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.026
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Ethanol-induced suppression of mesenchymal stem cell osteochondrogenic
           differentiation is associated with increased FoxO signaling
    • Authors: P.M. Roper; A.R. Spotts; J.J. Callaci
      First page: 94
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): P.M. Roper, A.R. Spotts, J.J. Callaci


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.027
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Alcohol use and alcohol-associated dysbiosis increase susceptibility to
           pneumococcal pneumonia in a humanized murine HIV model
    • Authors: D.R. Samuelson; R.W. Siggins; S. Ruan; A.M. Amedee; J.E. Shellito; D.A. Welsh
      First page: 94
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): D.R. Samuelson, R.W. Siggins, S. Ruan, A.M. Amedee, J.E. Shellito, D.A. Welsh


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.028
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Assessing the contribution of adolescent intermittent binge intoxication
           upon pulmonary activation
    • Authors: V. Sivaraman; A. McAllister; T. Willoughby
      First page: 94
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): V. Sivaraman, A. McAllister, T. Willoughby


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.029
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Alcohol-induced adipocentric immunometabolic dysregulation
    • Authors: F.M. Souza-Smith; Liz Simon; Robert Siggins; Patricia E. Molina
      Pages: 94 - 95
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): F.M. Souza-Smith, Liz Simon, Robert Siggins, Patricia E. Molina


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.030
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Dose dependent transcriptional changes in circulating myeloid cells
           following chronic ethanol consumption
    • Authors: S. Sureshchandra; A. Jankeel; C. Stull; K. Grant; Ilhem Messaoudi
      First page: 95
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): S. Sureshchandra, A. Jankeel, C. Stull, K. Grant, Ilhem Messaoudi


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.031
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Lung mucosal immunity from secretory IgA may be impaired by MAA-adducted
           protein stimulation of epithelial cell TGF-β
    • Authors: T.A. Wyatt; T.J. Wetzel; J.H. Sisson
      First page: 95
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): T.A. Wyatt, T.J. Wetzel, J.H. Sisson


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.032
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Alcohol induces alveolar macrophage oxidative stress by down-regulating
           the expression of Nox1-related microRNA-1264
    • Authors: S.M. Yeligar; C.M. Hart; L.A.S. Brown
      Pages: 95 - 96
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66
      Author(s): S.M. Yeligar, C.M. Hart, L.A.S. Brown


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.11.033
      Issue No: Vol. 66 (2017)
       
  • Instructions to Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Alcohol, Volume 66


      PubDate: 2017-12-27T08:14:59Z
       
  • Correlations of Blood Alcohol Concentrations (BACs), Breath Alcohol
           Concentrations (BrACs) and Psychomotor Evaluations in a Clinically
           Monitored Study of Alcohol Intake in Brazil
    • Authors: Ana Paula; Drummond-Lage Rodrigo Gomes Freitas Gabriel Cruz Luigi Perillo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 October 2017
      Source:Alcohol
      Author(s): Ana Paula Drummond-Lage, Rodrigo Gomes de Freitas, Gabriel Cruz, Luigi Perillo, Marco Antonio Paiva, Alberto Julius Alves Wainstein
      Background Policies that establish maximum blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) or breath alcohol concentration (BrACs) for drivers while driving can reduce traffic accidents by approximately 20%. In Brazil, the National Transit Council (CONTRAN) considers positive BAC and/or BrAC tests or signs of psychomotor capacity alterations as evaluated by a police authority to be an administrative infraction or even a crime. The observed clinical symptoms of alcohol intoxication based on a subject’s appearance may not necessarily reflect the quantified BAC and/or BrAC. This study compared the clinical symptoms identified by a medical authority (M) and a non-medical authority (NM) with BAC and BrAC measurements. Methods Brazilian health volunteers (n=15) drank ethanol (40%v/v) and, at scheduled times, the subjects underwent blood draws for BAC analysis, were tested for BrAC analysis, and underwent psychomotor alteration assessments performed by M and NM. Results Concentration-time profiles of the BACs and BrACs of the volunteer subjects were generated. The BAC values reached a peak at 60’ and subsequently decreased with time. The average BrAC values decreased with time since ingestion. During the evaluations, M was able to identify a lack of static equilibrium until 240’ and a lack of dynamic equilibrium until 120’. A lack of upper limb motor coordination was observed until 90’, and a lack of coordination in the lower limbs was observed only during the first hour. Regarding the tests performed by NM, the signs related to the subjects’ appearances were observed more frequently until 60’. The other analyzed symptoms were not identified. Naturally, the signs reported by both M and NM disappeared with time. Conclusion The evaluations of psychomotor changes performed by Brazilians M were superior to those performed by NM. However, independent of the examiner, at the alcohol concentrations reached in this study, the psychomotor alteration evaluations were ineffective compared with the BAC and BrAC results.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T01:27:26Z
       
  • Regional Dysregulation of Taurine and Related Amino Acids in the Fetal Rat
           Brain Following Gestational Alcohol Exposure
    • Authors: Raine Lunde-Young; Katie Davis-Anderson; Vishal Naik; Matthew Nemec; Guoyao Wu; Jayanth Ramadoss
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 September 2017
      Source:Alcohol
      Author(s): Raine Lunde-Young, Katie Davis-Anderson, Vishal Naik, Matthew Nemec, Guoyao Wu, Jayanth Ramadoss
      The fetal brain exhibits exquisite alcohol-induced regional neuronal vulnerability. A candidate mechanism for alcohol-mediated brain deficits is disruption of amino acid (AA) bioavailability. AAs are vitally important for proper neurodevelopment, as they comprise the most abundant neurotransmitters in the brain and act as neurotransmitter precursors, nitric oxide donors, antioxidants, and neurotrophic factors, which induce synaptogenesis, neuronal proliferation, and migration. We hypothesized that gestational alcohol alters brain AA concentrations, disrupts AAs associated with neuropathogenesis, and that alterations are region-specific. We assigned pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to either a pair-fed control or a binge alcohol treatment group on gestational day (GD) 4. Alcohol animals acclimatized via a once daily orogastric gavage of a 4.5 g/kg alcohol dose from GD 5-10, and progressed to a 6 g/kg alcohol dose from GD 11-20. Pair-fed animals received isocaloric maltose dextrin (once daily; GD 5-20). Fetal cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus were collected on GD 21. Following collection, Fluorometric High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) involving pre-column derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde quantified regional content of 22 AAs. Chronic binge alcohol administration to pregnant dams regionally altered AA concentrations in all three structures, with the cerebral cortex exhibiting least vulnerability and the hippocampus exhibiting maximal vulnerability. We conjecture that the AA imbalances observed in this study are critically implicated in pathological and compensatory processes occurring in the brain in response to gestational alcohol exposure.

      PubDate: 2017-10-08T01:27:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.07.010
       
  • Effects of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Modulation on Ethanol-
           and Sucrose-Seeking and Consumption in the Rat
    • Authors: Kyle A. Windisch; Cristine L. Czachowski
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2017
      Source:Alcohol
      Author(s): Kyle A. Windisch, Cristine L. Czachowski
      Rationale Previous studies suggest that group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) are involved in regulating ethanol seeking and consumption. Objective The mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 (LY37) and selective mGluR2 positive allosteric modulator biphenyl-indanone A (BINA) were used to investigate the relative contribution of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors on ethanol and sucrose seeking and consumption. A microinjection study was then performed to examine the role of nucleus accumbens (NAc) core mGluR2/3 on ethanol-seeking. Methods For the systemic experiments, separate groups of male Wistar rats [LY37 (0-2.0 mg/kg); BINA (0-20 mg/kg)] were trained to complete a response requirement (RR) resulting in access to 10% ethanol or 2% sucrose (in separate groups) for a 20-minute drinking period. Animals then underwent consummatory testing (weekly drug injections with RR1) followed by appetitive testing (weekly drug injections followed by extinction session). A separate group of male Wistar rats was surgically implanted with bilateral guide cannulae directed towards the NAc core and had weekly microinjections followed by an extinction session. Results Systemic administration of the mGluR2/3 agonist LY37 significantly reduced ethanol- and sucrose-seeking. The same treatment also reduced sucrose consumption and body weight (24-hours post injection). Systemic administration of the selective mGluR2 PAM BINA, however, had no effect on either seeking or consumption of ethanol or sucrose. Intra-accumbens core LY37 significantly reduced ethanol-seeking. Conclusions: These findings suggest that systemic mGluR2/3 agonism, but not allosteric modulation of mGluR2, reduces reinforcer seeking. In particular, NAc core group II mGluR may be involved in regulating ethanol-seeking.

      PubDate: 2017-09-23T23:26:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.07.011
       
  • Evaluation of laboratory tests for cirrhosis and for alcohol use, in the
           context of alcoholic cirrhosis
    • Authors: John B. Whitfield; Steven Masson; Suthat Liangpunsakul; Jessica Hyman; Sebastian Mueller; Guruprasad Aithal; Florian Eyer; Dermot Gleeson; Andrew Thompson; Felix Stickel; Michael Soyka; Ann K. Daly; Heather J. Cordell; Tiebing Liang; Tatiana Foroud; Lawrence Lumeng; Munir Pirmohamed; Bertrand Nalpas; Camille Bence; Jean-Marc Jacquet; Alexandre Louvet; Romain Moirand; Pierre Nahon; Sylvie Naveau; Pascal Perney; Philippe Podevin; Paul S. Haber; Helmut K. Seitz; Christopher P. Day; Philippe Mathurin; Timothy M. Morgan; Devanshi Seth
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2017
      Source:Alcohol
      Author(s): John B. Whitfield, Steven Masson, Suthat Liangpunsakul, Jessica Hyman, Sebastian Mueller, Guruprasad Aithal, Florian Eyer, Dermot Gleeson, Andrew Thompson, Felix Stickel, Michael Soyka, Ann K. Daly, Heather J. Cordell, Tiebing Liang, Tatiana Foroud, Lawrence Lumeng, Munir Pirmohamed, Bertrand Nalpas, Camille Bence, Jean-Marc Jacquet, Alexandre Louvet, Romain Moirand, Pierre Nahon, Sylvie Naveau, Pascal Perney, Philippe Podevin, Paul S. Haber, Helmut K. Seitz, Christopher P. Day, Philippe Mathurin, Timothy M. Morgan, Devanshi Seth
      Laboratory tests can play an important role in assessment of alcoholic patients, including for evaluation of liver damage and as markers of alcohol intake. Evidence on test performance should lead to better selection of appropriate tests and improved interpretation of results. We compared laboratory test results from 1578 patients between cases (with alcoholic cirrhosis; 753 men, 243 women) and controls (with equivalent lifetime alcohol intake but no liver disease; 439 men, 143 women). Comparisons were also made between 631 cases who had reportedly been abstinent from alcohol for over 60 days and 364 who had not. ROC curve analysis was used to estimate and compare tests’ ability to distinguish patients with and without cirrhosis, and abstinent and drinking cases. The best tests for presence of cirrhosis were INR and bilirubin, with AUCs of 0.91 ± 0.01 and 0.88 ± 0.01 respectively. Confining analysis to patients with no current or previous ascites gave AUCs of 0.88 ± 0.01 for INR and 0.85 ± 0.01 for bilirubin. GGT and AST showed discrimination between abstinence and recent drinking in patients with cirrhosis, including those without ascites, when appropriate (and for GGT, sex-specific) limits were used. For AST, a cut-off limit of 85 units/l gave 90% specificity and 37% sensitivity; for GGT cut-off limits of 288 units/l in men and 138 units/l in women gave 90% specificity for both and 40% sensitivity in men, 63% sensitivity in women. INR and bilirubin show the best separation between patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (with or without ascites) and control patients with similar lifetime alcohol exposure. Although AST and GGT are substantially increased by liver disease, they can give useful information on recent alcohol intake in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis when appropriate cut-off limits are used.

      PubDate: 2017-09-23T23:26:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.07.006
       
  • Alcohol withdrawal upregulates mRNA encoding for CaV2.1-α1 subunit in the
           rat inferior colliculus
    • Authors: Jamila Newton; Shubhankar Suman; Luli R. Akinfiresoye; Kamal Datta; David M. Lovinger; Prosper N’Gouemo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2017
      Source:Alcohol
      Author(s): Jamila Newton, Shubhankar Suman, Luli R. Akinfiresoye, Kamal Datta, David M. Lovinger, Prosper N’Gouemo
      We previously reported increased current density through P-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in inferior colliculus (IC) neurons during alcohol withdrawal. However, the molecular correlate of this increased P-type channel current is currently unknown. Here, we probe changes in mRNA and protein expression of the pore-forming CaV2.1-α1 (P/Q-type) subunits in IC neurons during the course of alcohol withdrawal‒induced seizures (AWSs). Rats received three daily doses of ethanol or the vehicle every eight hours for four consecutive days. The IC was dissected at various time intervals following alcohol withdrawal, and the mRNA and protein levels of the CaV2.1-α1 subunits were measured. In separate experiments, rats were tested for acoustically evoked seizure susceptibility 3, 24, and 48 hours after alcohol withdrawal. AWSs were observed 24 hours after withdrawal; no seizures were observed at 3 or 48 hours or in the control-treated rats. Compared to control-treated rats, the mRNA levels of the CaV2.1α1 subunit were increased 1.9-fold and 2.1-fold at 3 and 24 hours, respectively; change in mRNA expression was nonsignificant 3 and 48 hour following alcohol withdrawal. Western blot analyses revealed that protein levels of the CaV2.1-α1 subunits were not altered in IC neurons following alcohol withdrawal. We conclude that expression of the Cacna1a mRNA increased in before the onset of AWS susceptibility, suggesting that altered CaV2.1 channel expression may play a role in AWS pathogenesis.

      PubDate: 2017-09-23T23:26:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.07.007
       
  • The Effects of Working Memory Load and Attention Refocusing on Delay
           Discounting Rates in Alcohol Use Disorder with Comorbid Antisocial
           Personality Disorder
    • Authors: Rachel L. Gunn; Kyle R. Gerst; Allison J. Lake; Peter R. Finn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2017
      Source:Alcohol
      Author(s): Rachel L. Gunn, Kyle R. Gerst, Allison J. Lake, Peter R. Finn
      Executive working memory capacity (eWMC) is central to adaptive decision-making. Research has revealed reduced eWMC and higher rates of impulsive decision-making in those with alcohol use disorders (AUDs: DSM-IV Alcohol Dependence of Alcohol Abuse) and antisocial psychopathology (AP). Recent work has shown that placing a load on working memory (WM) further increases impulsive decision-making on the delay discounting (DD) task in those with AUDs and AP. The current study examined the effects of an attention refocusing manipulation to offset the effects of this WM-load on DD rates in control subjects, those with AUDs without AP, and AUDs with AP (AUD-AP). Results revealed that (1) the AUD-AP group had higher DD rates (i.e., more impulsive decision-making) than the AUD group, followed by controls, and, (2) attention refocusing after a load is placed on WM was associated with lower DD rates compared to the load without refocusing in both AUD groups, but not controls. Results suggest that refocusing attention after a cognitive load may be an effective cognitive strategy for reducing the impulsivity-enhancing effects of cognitive load on decision-making in individuals with AUDs and AP.

      PubDate: 2017-09-23T23:26:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.07.009
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.90.119.59
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-