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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3181 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3181 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 105, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 444, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 320, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 425, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 483, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 267, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 211, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 227, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Analytica Chimica Acta : X
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2590-1346
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3181 journals]
  • Red blood cells membrane micropolarity as a novel diagnostic indicator of
           Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 October 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: XAuthor(s): Giada Bianchetti, Flavio Di Giacinto, Dario Pitocco, Alessandro Rizzi, Gaetano Emanuele Rizzo, Francesca De Leva, Andrea Flex, Enrico di Stasio, Gabriele Ciasca, Marco De Spirito, Giuseppe MaulucciClassification of the category of diabetes is extremely important for clinicians to diagnose and select the correct treatment plan. Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins, as well as impairment in cholesterol homeostasis, can alter lipid density, packing, and interactions of Red blood cells (RBC) plasma membranes in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, thus varying their membrane micropolarity. This can be estimated, at a submicrometric scale, by determining the membrane relative permittivity, which is the factor by which the electric field between the charges is decreased relative to vacuum. Here, we employed a membrane micropolarity sensitive probe to monitor variations in red blood cells of healthy subjects (n=16) and patients affected by type 1 (T1DM, n=10) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, n=24) to provide a cost-effective and supplementary indicator for diabetes classification. We find a less polar membrane microenvironment in T2DM patients, and a more polar membrane microenvironment in T1DM patients compared to control healthy patients. The differences in micropolarity are statistically significant among the three groups (p
       
  • Non-faradaic electrochemical impedimetric profiling of Procalcitonin and
           C-reactive protein as a dual marker biosensor for early sepsis detection

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: XAuthor(s): Ambalika Sanjeev Tanak, Badrinath Jagannath, Yashaswee Tamrakar, Sriram Muthukumar, Shalini PrasadIn this work, we demonstrate a robust, dual marker, biosensing strategy for specific and sensitive electrochemical response of Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in complex body fluids such as human serum and whole blood for the detection of sepsis. Enhanced sensitivity is achieved by leveraging the physicochemical properties of zinc oxide at the electrode-solution interface. Characterization techniques such as SEM, EDAX, AFM, FTIR and fluorescence microscopy were performed to ensure a suitable biosensing surface. The characteristic biomolecular interactions between the target analyte and specific capture probe is quantified through unique frequency signatures using non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The developed biosensor demonstrated a detection limit of 0.10 ng mL-1 for PCT in human serum and whole blood with an R2 of 0.99 and 0.98 respectively. CRP demonstrated a detection limit of 0.10 μg mL-1 in human serum and whole blood with an R2 of 0.90 and 0.98 respectively. Cross-reactivity analysis demonstrated robust selectivity to PCT and CRP with negligible interaction to non-specific biomolecules. The novel aspect of this technology is the ability to fine-tune individual biomarkers response owing to the optimal frequency tuning capability. The developed biosensor requires an ultra-low sample volume of 10 μL without the need for sample dilution for rapid analysis. We envision the developed dual marker biosensor to be useful as a sepsis-screening device for prognostic monitoring.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Outside Front Cover

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 2Author(s):
       
  • An “on-off” SERS Aptasensor Based on DNAzyme-Gold Nanorod for
           Ultrasensitive Pb2+ Detection in Human Serum

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: XAuthor(s): Wei Xu, Aiwu Zhao, Fangtao Zuo, Hafiz Muhammad Jafar HussainIt is great significance to precisely monitor lead (II) ions (Pb2+) for environment protection and human health monitoring. We designed a sensitive detection strategy for sensitive and selective determination of Pb2+, based on a Pb2+-specific DNAzyme as the catalytic unit, Cy3-labeled DNA modified gold nanorods (AuNRs) as SERS reporter. Firstly, AuNRs surface were employed as a platform for the immobilization of thiolated probe DNA, and then hybridized with DNAzyme catalytic beacons. By taking advantage of DNAzyme digest, a molecular beacon, causes a “turn-off” SERS signal by disrupting the labeled probes. Under the optical conditions, the DNAzyme-AuNRs sensor system exhibited high sensitivity, acceptable stability and reproducibility with a wide linear range from 0.5 to 100 nM (R2 = 0.9973), and an ultra-low detection limit of 0.01 nM. The proposed strategy has additional advantages of being less time-consuming, low-cost and remote query, and avoids the interference of some metals such as Fe3+, Cd2+, Ba2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. The SERS biosensor system has been successfully applied for detecting Pb2+ in real samples with a satisfactory result. The result indicated that the proposed sensing strategy not only enriches SERS platform of monitoring Pb2+ but also exhibits potential for the point-of-care diagnostic application of the clinical screening in complicated biological samples.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Influencing the selectivity of grafted anion exchangers utilizing the
           solubility of the radical initiator during the graft process

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 May 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: XAuthor(s): Achim Kaltz, Lea Bohra, Jonathan S. Tripp, Andreas SeubertA previously published radical graft-functionalization method for the synthesis of high performance anion exchangers was further investigated to control the capacity and selectivity of the exchangers. Using a hydrophobic radical initiator instead of a hydrophilic one diminished the influence of rivaling homopolymerization of monomer during the functionalization step. Instead of only generating monomer radicals in free solution the radicals are ideally generated on top of the PS/DVB surface. However, in both cases the selectivity factors of polarizable anions bromide and nitrate increased strongly with increasing capacity of the exchanger. Higher exchanger capacities could lead to coelution of bromide and/or nitrate with other analytes such as sulfate or phosphate when using the eluent as proposed in this work. By variation of the organic solvent used for functionalization it was possible to remove both the rivaling homopolymerization and the strong influence of the capacity on the selectivity. With increasing solubility of the hydrophobic radical initiator in the organic solvent the influence of the homopolymerization and the influence on the selectivity factor of bromide and nitrate decreased. Additionally, a change of bromate selectivity factor could be observed. The bromate signal is shifted closer towards the chloride signal. However, with increasing solubility of the radical initiator in the organic solvent the observed capacity of the exchangers decreases linearly, resulting in higher amounts of monomer needed for functionalization.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Evaluation of the selectivity of G-quadruplex ligands in living cells with
           a small molecule fluorescent probe

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 2Author(s): Suge Zhang, Hongxia Sun, Dawei Yang, Yan Liu, Xiufeng Zhang, Hongbo Chen, Qian Li, Aijiao Guan, Yalin TangG-quadruplex has been an emerging target for drug design due to its physiologically important roles in oncology. A number of quadruplex-interactive ligands have been developed by synthetic and medicinal chemists over the past decades. However, the great challenge still remains that the method for detecting the specific targeting of these ligands to the G-quadruplex structures in cells is still lacking. Herein, a detection system for directly identifying the specific targeting of a ligand to DNA G-quadruplexes in cells was constructed by using a small-molecular fluorescent probe (IMT) as a fluorescent indicator. Four typical ligands have been successfully evaluated, demonstrating the promising application of this detection system in the screening and evaluation of quadruplex-specific therapeutic agents.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • An electrochemical study of acrylate bone adhesive permeability and
           selectivity change during in vitro ageing: A model approach to the study
           of biomaterials and membrane barriers

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 2Author(s): M. Raja, J.C. Shelton, F. Salamat-Zadeh, M. Tavakoli, S. Donell, G. Watts, P. VadgamaThis study assessed the solute permeability of a family of UV and moisture cured acrylates-based adhesives during in vitro ageing in pH 7.4 buffer. Acrylates have a potential role in bone fracture fixation, but their inability to allow microsolute exchange between the fractured bone surfaces may contribute to ineffective healing. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used to determine the diffusion coefficients for various electrochemically active probe molecules (O2, H2O2, acetaminophen, catechol, uric acid and ascorbic acid) at proprietary acrylic, urethane – acrylate and cyanoacrylate adhesives. All adhesives proved to be impermeable for up to 9 days ageing, following which a near-exponential increase in permeability resulted for all solutes. At 18 days, the diffusion coefficients were in the range of 10−5 cm2s−1 for O2 and H2O2 and 10−6 cm2s−1 for the organic solutes; no transport selectivity was seen between the latter. Adhesive joint strength showed a direct, inverse, correlation with permeability, with the more hydrophilic cyanoacrylates showing the greatest loss of strength. Adhesive permeabilisation does not appear to be compatible with the retention of bonding strength, but it serves as a new non-destructive predictor of adhesion strength change during ageing and practical use.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Rational design of mixtures for chromatographic peak tracking applications
           via multivariate selectivity

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 2Author(s): Daniel W. Cook, Kelson G. Oram, Sarah C. Rutan, Dwight R. StollChromatographic characterization and parameterization studies targeting many solutes require the judicious choice of operating conditions to minimize analysis time without compromising the accuracy of the results. To minimize analysis time, solutes are often grouped into a small number of mixtures; however, this increases the risk of peak overlap. While multivariate curve resolution methods are often able to resolve analyte signals based on their spectral qualities, these methods require that the chromatographically overlapped compounds have dissimilar spectra. In this work, a strategy for grouping compounds into sample mixtures containing solutes with distinct spectral and, optionally, with distinct chromatographic properties, in order to ensure successful solute resolution either chromatographically or with curve resolution methods is proposed. We name this strategy rational design of mixtures (RDM). RDM utilizes multivariate selectivity as a metric for making decisions regarding group membership (i.e., whether to add a particular solute to a particular sample). A group of 97 solutes was used to demonstrate this strategy. Utilizing both estimated chromatographic properties and measured spectra to group these 97 analytes, only 12 groups were required to avoid a situation where two or more solutes in the same group could not be resolved either chromatographically (i.e., they have significantly different retention times) or spectrally (i.e., spectra are different enough to enable resolution by curve resolution methods). When only spectral properties were utilized (i.e., the chromatographic properties are unknown ahead of time) the number of groups required to avoid unresolvable overlaps increased to 20. The grouping strategy developed here will improve the time and instrument efficiency of studies that aim to obtain retention data for solutes as a function of operating conditions, whether for method development or determination of the chromatographic parameters of solutes of interest (e.g., kw).Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Analytical considerations in tsing laser ablation mhe determination of
           uranium isotope ratios in solid uranium materials uulti-collector ICP-MS

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 April 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: XAuthor(s): Michael Krachler, Zsolt Varga, Adrian Nicholl, Klaus MayerValidated analytical measurement protocols for the fast and accurate determination of the uranium (U) isotopic composition (234U, 235U, 236U, 238U) of solid nuclear materials were developed employing ns-laser ablation (LA) coupled to multi-collector ICP-MS. The accuracy of the analytical procedure was assured by frequent (n=65) analysis of a pressed pellet of certified isotopic reference material CRM U-030 (∼3 wt% 235U). The expanded uncertainty (k=2) for the n(235U)/n(238U) ratio was as low as 0.05 %, rising to 0.62 % and 1.09 % for n(234U)/n(238U) and n(236U)/n(238U) ratios, respectively. LA-MC-ICP-MS measurements of a pressed pellet of certified isotopic reference material CRM U-020 (∼2 wt% 235U) before analysis of each sample allowed calculation of the ion counter gains and mass bias correction. Both individual spot analysis and line scan analysis were used to measure n(234U)/n(238U), n(235U)/n(238U), and n(236U)/n(238U) ratios in two low-enriched UO2 pellets from the fourth Collaborative Materials Exercise (CMX-4), four seized low-enriched UO2 pellets intercepted from illicit trafficking and one metal sample consisting of depleted U. LA-MC-ICP-MS results of all investigated samples matched well with U isotope ratios obtained by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS). This independent confirmation of the LA-MC-ICP-MS results by TIMS underpinned the high quality of generated analytical data. Acquisition of several thousand data points within a couple of minutes during line scan analysis yielded detailed information on the spatial distribution of the U isotopic composition of selected UO2 pellets, revealing straightforwardly their (in˗)homogeneity on the μm-scale. Calculating skewness and half width of the frequency distributions of the n(235U)/n(238U) amount ratio allowed the quantitative assessment of the (in-)homogeneity of the investigated samples. This information allows drawing conclusions on the starting materials used for the production of the pellets. From a nuclear forensics perspective, LA-MC-ICP-MS provides quick, accurate results on the spatial distribution of major and minor U isotopes while preserving the sample i.e. piece of evidence, essentially intact.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Procedures for systematic capture and management of analytical data in
           academia

    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 1Author(s): Jan Potthoff, Pierre Tremouilhac, Patrick Hodapp, Bernhard Neumair, Stefan Bräse, Nicole JungData management in universities is a challenging endeavor in particular due to the diverse infrastructure of devices and software in combination with limited budget. Nevertheless, in particular the analytical measurements and data sets need to be stored if possible digitally and in a well-organized manner. This manuscript describes how scientists can achieve a data management workflow focusing on data capture and storage by small adaptions to commonly used systems. The presented method includes data transfer options from ubiquitous devices like NMR instruments, GC (MS) or LC (MS), IR and Raman, or mass spectrometers to a central server and the visualization of the available data files in an electronic lab notebook (ELN). The given instruments were chosen according to the needs of synthetic chemists, in particular devices needed in organic, inorganic and polymer chemistry where single data files in the range of several megabytes per data set are produced. Altogether, three different data transfer systems were elaborated to allow a flexible handling of different devices running with different proprietary software: The first procedure allows data capture via the use of a mail server as data exchange point. With the second procedure, data are automatically mirrored from a local file folder to a central storage server where new files are monitored and processed. The third procedure was designed to transfer data with manual support to a central server which is supervised to register new information. All components that are necessary to install and use the herein elaborated functions are available as Open Source and the designed workflows are described step by step to facilitate the adaption of procedures in other universities accordingly if desired.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Potential of ion mobility-mass spectrometry for both targeted and
           non-targeted analysis of phase II steroid metabolites in urine

    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 1Author(s): Maykel Hernández-Mesa, Fabrice Monteau, Bruno Le Bizec, Gaud Dervilly-PinelIn recent years, the commercialization of hybrid ion mobility-mass spectrometers and their integration in traditional LC-MS workflows provide new opportunities to extend the current boundaries of targeted and non-targeted analyses. When coupled to LC-MS, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) provides a novel characterization parameter, the so-called averaged collision cross section (CCS, Ω), as well as improves method selectivity and sensitivity by the separation of isobaric and isomeric molecules and the isolation of the analytes of interest from background noise. In this work, we have explored the potential and advantages of this technology for carrying out the determination of phase II steroid metabolites (i.e. androgen and estrogen conjugates, including glucuronide and sulfate compounds; n = 25) in urine samples. These molecules have been selected based on their relevance in the fields of chemical food safety and doping control, as well as in metabolomics studies. The influence of urine matrix on the CCS of steroid metabolites was evaluated in order to give more confidence to current CCS databases and support its use as complementary information to retention time (Rt) and mass spectra for compound identification. Samples were only diluted 10-fold with aqueous formic acid (0.1%, v/v) prior analysis. Only an almost insignificant effect of adult bovine urine matrix on the CCS of certain steroid metabolites was observed in comparison with calve urine matrix, which is a less complex sample. In addition, high accuracy was achieved for CCS measurements carried out over four months (ΔCCS 
       
  • Automated supervised learning pipeline for non-targeted GC-MS data
           analysis

    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 1Author(s): Kimmo Sirén, Ulrich Fischer, Jochen VestnerNon-targeted analysis is nowadays applied in many different domains of analytical chemistry such as metabolomics, environmental and food analysis. Conventional processing strategies for GC-MS data include baseline correction, feature detection, and retention time alignment before multivariate modeling. These techniques can be prone to errors and therefore time-consuming manual corrections are generally necessary. We introduce here a novel fully automated approach to non-targeted GC-MS data processing. This new approach avoids feature extraction and retention time alignment. Supervised machine learning on decomposed tensors of segmented chromatographic raw data signal is used to rank regions in the chromatograms contributing to differentiation between sample classes. The performance of this novel data analysis approach is demonstrated on three published datasets.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Investigations into the interaction thermodynamics of TRAP-related
           peptides with a temperature-responsive polymer-bonded porous silica
           stationary phase

    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 1Author(s): Jamil Chowdhury, Reinhard I. Boysen, Milton T.W. HearnThe interaction thermodynamics of the thrombin receptor agonistic peptide (TRAP-1), H-Ser-Phe-Leu-Leu-Arg-Asn-Pro-OH, and a set of alanine scan substitution peptides, have been investigated with an n-octadecylacrylic polymer-bonded porous silica (Sil-ODA18) and water-acetonitrile mobile phases at temperatures ranging from 5 to 80 °C in 5 °C increments. The retention of these peptides on the Sil-ODA18 stationary phase decreased as the water content in the mobile phase was lowered from 80% (v/v) to ca. 45% (v/v) and reached a minimum value for each peptide at a specific water-acetonitrile composition. Further decreases in the water content of the mobile phase led to increased retention. The magnitude of the changes in enthalpy of interaction, ΔHassoc0, changes in entropy of interaction, ΔSassoc0, and changes in heat capacity, ΔCp0, were found to be dependent on the molecular properties of the mobile phase, the temperature, the structure/mobility of the stationary phase, and the conformation and solvation state of the peptides. With water-rich mobile phases, the retention behaviour of the TRAP analogues was dominated by enthalpic processes, consistent with the participation of strong hydrogen bonding effects, but became dominated by entropic effects with acetonitrile-rich mobile phases as the temperature was increased. These changes in the retention behaviour of these TRAP peptides are consistent with the generation of water or acetonitrile clusters in the mobile phase depending on the volume fractions of the organic solvent as the Sil-ODA18 stationary phase transitions from its crystalline to its isotropic state.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • On the mechanism of protein supercharging in electrospray ionisation mass
           spectrometry: Effects on charging of additives with short- and long-chain
           alkyl constituents with carbonate and sulphite terminal groups

    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 1Author(s): Eric D.B. Foley, Muhammad A. Zenaidee, Rico F. Tabor, Junming Ho, Jonathon E. Beves, William A. DonaldSmall organic molecules are used as solution additives in electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to increase the charge states of protein ions and improve the performance of intact protein analysis by tandem mass spectrometry. The properties of the additives that are responsible for their charge-enhancing effects (e.g. dipole moment, gas-phase basicity, Brønsted basicity, and surface tension) have been debated in the literature. We report a series of solution additives for ESI-MS based on cyclic alkyl carbonates and sulphites that have alkyl chains that are from two to ten methylene units long. The extent of charging of [Val [5]]-angiotensin II, cytochrome c, carbonic anhydrase II, and bovine serum albumin in ESI-MS using the additives was measured. For both the alkyl carbonate and sulphite additives with up to four methylene units, ion charging increased as the side chain lengths of the additives increased. At a critical alkyl chain length of four methylene units, protein ion charge states decreased as the chain length increased. The dipole moments, gas-phase basicity values, and Brønsted basicities (i.e. the pKa of the conjugate acids) of the additives were obtained using electronic structure calculations, and the surface tensions were measured by pendant drop tensiometry. Because the dipole moments, gas-phase basicities, and pKa values of the additives did not depend significantly on the alkyl chain lengths of the additives and the extent of charging depended strongly on the chain lengths, these data indicate that these three additive properties do not correlate with protein charging under these conditions. For the additives with alkyl chains at or above the critical length, the surface tension of the additives decreased as the length of the side chain decreased, which correlated well with the decrease in protein charging. These data are consistent with protein charging being limited by droplet surface tension below a threshold surface tension for these additives. For additives with relatively high surface tensions, protein ion charging increased as the amphiphilicity of the additives increased (and surface tension decreased) which is consistent with protein charging being limited by the emission of charge carriers from highly charged ESI generated droplets.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • SERS detection of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and B in
           buffer and serum: Towards the development of a biodefense test platform

    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 1Author(s): China Y. Lim, Jennifer H. Granger, Marc D. PorterBotulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are classified at a highest degree of threat in biodefense, due largely to their high lethality. With the growing risk of biowarfare, the shortcomings of the gold standard test for these neurotoxins, the mouse bioassay, have underscored the need to develop alternative diagnostic testing strategies. This paper reports on the detection of inactivated Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT-A) and serotype B (BoNT-B), the two most important markers of botulism infection, by using a sandwich immunoassay, gold nanoparticle labels, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) within the context of two threat scenarios. The first scenario mimics part of the analysis needed in response to a “white powder” threat by measuring both neurotoxins in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), a biocompatible solvent often used to recover markers dispersed in a powdered matrix. The second scenario detects the two neurotoxins in spiked human serum to assess the clinical potential of the platform. The overall goal is to develop a test applicable to both scenarios in terms of projections of required levels of detection. We demonstrate the ability to measure BoNT-A and BoNT-B in PBS at a limit of detection (LoD) of 700 pg/mL (5 pM) and 84 pg/mL (0.6 pM), respectively, and in human serum at 1200 pg/mL (8 pM) and 91 pg/mL (0.6 pM), respectively, with a time to result under 24 h. The steps required to transform this platform into an onsite biodefense screening tool that can simultaneously and rapidly detect (
       
  • Extraction of hydrophobic analytes from organic solution into a titanate
           2D-nanosheet host: Electroanalytical perspectives

    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 1Author(s): Wulan Tri Wahyuni, Budi Riza Putra, Christian Harito, Dmitry V. Bavykin, Frank C. Walsh, Philip J. Fletcher, Frank MarkenTitanate nanosheets (single layer, typically 200 nm lateral size) deposited from aqueous colloidal solution onto electrode surfaces form lamellar hosts that bind redox active molecular redox probes. Here, hydrophobic redox systems such as anthraquinone, 1-amino-anthraquinone, deca-methylferrocene, 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine manganese (III) chloride (TPPMnCl), and α-tocopherol are shown to bind directly from cyclopentanone solution (and from other types of organic solvents) into the titanate nanosheet film. For anthraquinone derivatives, stable voltammetric responses are observed in aqueous media consistent with 2-electron 2-proton reduction, however, independent of the pH of the outside solution phase environments. For decamethylferrocene a gradual decay of the voltammetric response is observed, but for TPPMnCl a more stable voltammetric signal is seen when immersed in chloride containing (NaCl) electrolyte. α-Tocopherol exhibits chemically irreversible oxidation and is detected with 1 mM–20 mM linear range and approximately 10−3 M concentration limit of detection. All redox processes exhibit an increase in current with increasing titanate film thickness and with increasing external electrolyte concentration. This and other observations suggest that important factors are analyte concentration and mobility within the titanate host, as well as ion exchange between titanate nanosheets and the outside electrolyte phase to maintain electroneutrality during voltammetric experiments. The lamellar titanate (with embedded tetrabutyl-ammonium cations) behaves like a hydrophobic host (for hydrophobic redox systems) similar to hydrophobic organic microphase systems. Potential for analytical applications is discussed.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Outside Front Cover

    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 1Author(s):
       
  • Origin of the selectivity differences of aromatic alcohols and amines of
           different n-alkyl chain length separated with perfluorinated C8 and
           bidentated C8 modified silica hydride stationary phases

    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Analytica Chimica Acta: X, Volume 1Author(s): Chadin Kulsing, Yada Nolvachai, Maria T. Matyska, Joseph J. Pesek, Joshua Topete, Reinhard I. Boysen, Milton T.W. HearnPerfluorinated C8-(PerfluoroC8) and bidentate anchored C8-(BDC8)-modified silica hydride stationary phases have been employed for the isocratic separation of homologous phenylalkanols and phenylalkylamines differing in their n-alkyl chain length, using aqueous-acetonitrile (ACN) mobile phases of different ACN contents from 10 to 90% (v/v) in 10% increments. These analytes showed reversed-phase (RP) retention behaviour with mobile phases of 80% (v/v) ACN content), with the analytes exhibiting overall U-shape retention dependencies on the ACN content of the mobile phase. Further, these stationary phases showed differences in their selectivity behaviour with regard to the n-alkyl chain lengths of the different analytes. These observations could not be explained in terms of pKa, log P, molecular mass or linear solvation energy concepts. However, density functional theory (DFT) simulations provided a possible explanation for the observed selectivity trends, namely differences in the molecular geometries and structural organisation of the immobilised ligands of these two stationary phases under different solvational conditions. For mobile phase conditions favouring the RP mode, these DFT simulations revealed that interactions between adjacent BDC8 ligands occur, leading to a stationary phase with a more hydrophobic surface. Moreover, under mobile phase conditions favouring retention of the analytes in an ANP mode, these interactions of the bidentate-anchored C8 ligands resulted in hindered analyte access to potential ANP binding sites on the BDC8 stationary phase surface. With the PerfluoroC8 stationary phase, the DFT simulations revealed strong repulsion of individual perfluoroC8 ligand chains, with the perfluoroC8 ligands of this stationary phase existing in a more open brush-like state (and with a less hydrophobic surface) compared to the BDC8 ligands. These DFT simulation results anticipated the chromatographic findings that the phenylalkanols and phenylalkylamines had reduced retention in the RP mode with the PerfluoroC8 stationary phase. Moreover, the more open ligand structure of the PerfluoroC8 stationary phase enabled greater accessibility of the analytes to water solvated binding sites on the stationary phase surface under mobile phase conditions favouring an ANP retention mode, leading to retention of the analytes, particularly the smaller phenylalkylamines, via hydrogen bonding and electrostatic effects.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
 
 
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