Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3206 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3206 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 106, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 450, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 333, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 193, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Clinical Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Cosmetic Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Family Practice Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Ophthalmology and Optometry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 434, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 397, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 485, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 274, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 219, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.747
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 58  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0167-8809 - ISSN (Online) 0167-8809
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3206 journals]
  • Regional simulation of nitrate leaching potential from winter wheat-summer
           maize rotation croplands on the North China Plain using the NLEAP-GIS
           model
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 June 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 294Author(s): Zhuoting Li, Xiumei Wen, Chunsheng Hu, Xiaoxin Li, Shanshan Li, Xiaosen Zhang, Baoqing HuAbstractIdentifying the regional characteristics of nitrate leaching from croplands is of great importance when attempting to assess the groundwater contamination risk due to nitrate leaching from croplands. The regional scale model in the Nitrogen Loss and Environmental Assessment Package with GIS Capabilities (NLEAP-GIS), which takes spatial variations in soil profile properties, meteorological data, and farm practices into account, was adopted in this study to simulate the occurrence dynamics and spatial pattern of nitrate leaching downwards through the crop root zone (0–100 cm) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-summer maize (Zea mays L.) rotation croplands during 2011 and 2012 across the Jing-Jin-Ji region on the North China Plain (NCP). The results showed that the monthly nitrate leaching occurrences were driven by rainfall, irrigation, and fertilizer application. The simulated large spatial variation in cumulative nitrate leaching was positively correlated with both rainfall and fertilizer N application rates, whereas it was negatively correlated with N use efficiency. The cumulative nitrate leaching was mostly lower than 10 kg N ha–1 during the winter wheat growing season, whereas nitrate leaching during the summer maize growing season was much higher and mostly ranged from 20 to 100 kg N ha–1. The average cumulative nitrate leaching in the winter wheat-summer maize rotation system was 55.7 ± 33.5 kg N ha–1, accounting for 17.2 ± 10.2 % of the fertilizer N applied (average 176.3 ± 86.2 kg N ha–1 during each crop season). Fertilizer N application rates of 100–200 kg N ha–1 are recommended during each winter wheat and summer maize season to simultaneously achieve higher grain yields, greater N use efficiency, and a lower groundwater nitrate pollution risk on the NCP. The simulated spatial variation in nitrate leaching implied that there was a potential nitrate groundwater contaminant source and the results contributed to the spatial distribution assessment of groundwater nitrate contamination risk caused by fertilizer N inputs.
       
  • Fragility of karst ecosystem and environment: Long-term evidence from lake
           sediments
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 June 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 294Author(s): Jingan Chen, Jia Yu, Xiaoyong Bai, Yan Zeng, Jingfu WangAbstractSouthwest China is the largest continuous karst area in the world, which has suffered from serious ecological degradation. Many researchers have discussed the fragility of karst ecosystem and environment (KEE). However, these studies focused mainly on the particular karst geologic setting and short-term (annual) eco-environmental changes. At longer timescales, knowledge of how KEE responds to external disturbances such as climate changes and human activities is very limited. Based on geochemical analysis of lake sediments in the karst region of Southwest China (KRSC), this paper probes into the evolutionary characteristics of KEE at decadal-centurial timescales. Organic C/N ratios, Sr/Rb ratios and pollen assemblage in Baixian Lake indicate that striking eco-environmental deterioration occurred as a result of the drought event between 3.6 ka B.P. and 2.2 ka B.P. The regional vegetation degraded with dwindling herbs, increasing ferns and decreasing terrestrial productivity. Furthermore, the karst ecosystem had not restored to the earlier level even after a long time. Once degradation happens, the karst ecosystem would be unlikely to recover in the short term. Poor water-soil conservation capacity and weak drought resistance of karst soil should be the inherent mechanism of the fragility of terrestrial KEE. Hongfeng Lake has suffered from rapid eutrophication in the last three decades. Reservoirs respond more sensitively to agricultural N and P addition because of abundant dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) supply from the carbonate catchment in karst region than in non-karst region. A positive feedback loop may develop among elevated primary productivity, higher deposition fluxes of organic matter, anoxia in hypolimnion and enhanced internal P release in aquatic ecosystem. This positive feedback, together with the DIC fertilization effect and sensitivity to agricultural N and P addition, may explain the fragility of aquatic KEE. This paper for the first time presents a long-term evidence for the fragility of both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem in the KRSC, and provides new insights into the sensitivity and resilience of KEE to climate change and agricultural activities, highlighting the extreme importance of eco-environment protection in karst region.
       
  • Understanding nutrient allocation based on leaf nitrogen isotopes and
           elemental ratios in the karst region of Southwest China
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 June 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 294Author(s): He-Chun Piao, Si-Liang Li, Zhifeng Yan, Cai LiAbstractIt is important to understand nutrient-use-efficiency based on the interaction between nutrient allocation and plant growth. This study utilized mulberry (Morus spp.), an economically important plant for farmers, as an example, to investigate the effect of nutrient allocation on plant growth and its response to environmental conditions in the karst region of Southwest China. Leaf stoichiometric analysis and isotopic measurements were applied to reveal the causes and effects of the allocation of different nutrients. The results illustrated that the N:P ratios of mulberry leaves decreased as the mean temperature increased and plant tissues grew, exhibiting a high leaf N:P ratio (21.82 ± 6.33) at the early stage of leaf expansion, and a low ratio (10.70 ± 2.66) at the late stage of leaf development. The low leaf N:P ratios indicated that leaf development was largely limited by nitrogen availability as the plant grew. The slight difference of δ15N between leaf and root (leaf-root δ15N, −0.30 ‰) implied that the mulberry preferred ammonium-N at the early stage of leaf development, while the large difference of leaf-root δ15N (1.58 ‰) implied that the mulberry preferred nitrate-N at the late stage. Although the ammonium uptake could improve P availability by increasing soil pH value deficiency at the early stage of leaf expansion, plant growth was constrained by P availability, given the relatively high P uptake from soils and the large P allocation in leaves. Moreover, the allocations of N and P were strongly correlated with other nutrients allocations. P exhibited strongly positive effects on Ca and K allocations under P deficiency at the early stage of leaf expansion, while N presented important impacts on them under N deficiency at the late stage. To summarize, this study highlighted the interactions between allocations of different nutrient components which are related to plant growth and environmental conditions in the karst system.
       
  • Pollinator presence in orchards depends on landscape-scale habitats more
           than in-field flower resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 May 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 293Author(s): Océane Bartholomée, Amandine Aullo, Juliette Becquet, Clémence Vannier, Sandra LavorelAbstractPollination is a critical ecosystem service given its essential role in sustaining food production, while pollinating insects are declining worldwide. Pollination capacity can be estimated through direct indicators characterising pollinator communities. Pollinators need feeding and nesting resources, so their presence can also be estimated through indirect indicators characterising these resources at plot and landscape scales. In this study, we aimed to identify the subset of resource indicators accounting for pollination capacity in orchards by relating insect presence to the most relevant environmental variables for managing pollinator presence. In 31 orchards of the Grenoble region (France) we measured direct indicators of pollinator abundance and richness at plot scale. Simultaneously we quantified indirect indicators of landscape and plot scale feeding and nesting resources. We selected indicators significantly correlated with insect presence using simple linear models between resource indicators and measures of insect taxonomic richness and abundance. Multiple linear regressions including significant resource indicators at both plot and landscape scales showed that landscape composition and presence of beehives explained between 19 and 63 % of the observed variance of pollinator community indicators. Total pollinator abundance decreased with distance to the closest grassland patch and increased with abundance of beehives. Pollinator richness increased with grassland cover within a 3 km radius. Domestic honeybee abundance increased with beehives located both in the plot and the landscape, and decreased with isolation from the closest grassland patch. Wild hymenopteran abundance increased with grassland cover within 3 km and forest cover at 500 m. Dipteran abundance increased when beehives were located only in the landscape. This study highlights the prevalent role of landscape-scale resources for pollinator communities over in-field flower resources. Thus, in order to favour pollinators, management should focus mainly on the landscape scale, necessitating cooperation between farmers. However, as resource indicators explained less than half of the observed variance for most community variables, inferring pollinator community characteristics from specific environmental variables remains uncertain. Further work could explore how orchard management practices influence our conclusions.
       
  • Global meta-analyses show that conservation tillage practices promote soil
           fungal and bacterial biomass
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 May 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 293Author(s): Huaihai Chen, Zhongmin Dai, Allison M. Veach, Jianqiu Zheng, Jianming Xu, Christopher W. SchadtDespite a large number of published studies, a consensus has not been reached on how soil fungal and bacterial biomass, the primary regulators for soil organic matter decomposition, respond to conservation tillage, i.e., no or reduced tillage with>30 % residue covers. In this study we conducted a global meta-analysis of 60 studies to investigate the effects of conservation versus conventional tillage on soil fungal and bacterial biomass, fungal-to-bacterial ratios, and their relationship to other soil properties. Our results showed that conservation tillage greatly increased overall soil microbial biomass (37 %), including both fungal (31 %) and bacterial biomass (11 %), especially in top 20-cm soils or no-till agro-ecosystems, but conservation tillage effects were non-significant in sandy soils. Regardless of soil depth and tillage intensity, fungal-to-bacterial ratios did not greatly increase in conservation tillage scenarios, but were significantly affected by soil texture. Conservation tillage was also associated with significant increases in soil total C and N, and reduced soil pH. Increases in soil total C were positively associated with both fungal and bacterial biomass increases. Years under conservation tillage, time between last convention tillage to soil sampling, may indirectly affect fungal and bacterial biomass through soil C accumulation. Our meta-analysis demonstrates that soil fungi and bacteria both respond positively to conservation tillage and are significantly associated with soil C content increase.Graphical abstractIn this study we conducted a global meta-analysis to investigate effects of conservation versus conventional tillage on soil fungal and bacterial biomass, fungal-to-bacterial ratios, and their relationship to other soil properties. Our results showed that conservation tillage greatly increased overall soil microbial biomass, including both fungal and bacterial biomass, especially in topsoils, but conservation tillage effects were non-significant in sandy or deeper soils. Conservation tillage was also associated with significant increases in soil total C and N, and reduced soil pH. Our meta-analysis demonstrates that both soil fungi and bacteria respond positively to conservation tillage and are significantly associated with soil C content increase.Graphical abstract for this article
       
  • Temporary non-crop habitats within arable fields: The effects of field
           defects on carabid beetle assemblages
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 May 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 293Author(s): Miroslav Seidl, Ezequiel González, Tomáš Kadlec, Pavel Saska, Michal KnappAbstractLandscape heterogeneity and higher complexity generally increase biodiversity in agroecosystems. Carabid beetles represent abundant and important predators of pests and weed seeds in temperate agroecosystems and are affected by landscape structure. Several studies have described the impact of permanent non-crop habitats such as woodlots, hedgerows, and grassy margins on carabid assemblages. However, temporal non-crop habitat islands within arable fields have been rarely investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate spatial distribution of carabid beetles within oilseed rape fields having temporary non-crop habitats (field defects). Field defects are areas where sown plants poorly develop due to sowing failures or extreme local conditions (soil humidity, missing nutrients). In twenty oilseed rape fields, we studied carabid assemblages collected with pitfall traps in three habitat types (field interiors, field defects, and boundaries between them) and in two sampling periods (spring and summer). Both activity-density and species richness were lower in field defects than in boundaries and field interiors during both sampling periods, indicating that field defects were not a preferred habitat for carabids. Activity-density and species richness significantly increased from spring to summer in all habitat types. Species composition of carabid assemblages significantly differed between field defects and field interiors or boundaries. Field defects were characterised by impoverished carabid assemblages and the presence of few indicator species. Interestingly, field defects with well-developed plant cover hosted carabid assemblages with species richness comparable to field interiors, indicating that re-sowing of field defects can support carabid populations within arable fields. However, the consequences of re-sowing on other arthropod taxa, e.g., insects requiring habitats with bare ground, and on populations of rare weeds need to be evaluated. The lack of effects of field defect size on carabid assemblages indicated that carabid beetles react to even very small patches with unsuitable conditions (e.g., very low humidity, high temperature or food scarcity).
       
  • Worldwide importance of insect pollination in apple orchards: A review
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 May 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 293Author(s): Adara Pardo, Paulo A.V. BorgesAbstractApple (Malus domestica) is one of the most important fruit crops globally. Apple trees depend greatly on insect pollination to achieve high yields and obtain fruits of acceptable marketable quality. Since insects, such as bees and hoverflies, are most important pollinators in apple orchards, a comprehensive understanding of their occurrence and activity is vital to ensure pollination services in this agroecosystem. Here, we review and synthesize the published research on the contribution of insects to apple pollination. In our review, we focused on the following five questions: i) Are there gaps in data availability across geographical regions and research topics' ii) What is the importance of insect pollination at determining yield and fruit quality in apple orchards' iii) What is the relative contribution of wild insects to apple pollination compared to honeybees' iv) What is the influence of landscape context (matrix) on regulating apple pollination' and v) How does agricultural management affect apple pollination'. Results showed that the information is limited for certain large apple producing countries, like China or Brazil. This finding stresses the need for further research in less studied regions. There were also gaps across research topics, highlighting the need for more experimental and empirical studies, particularly on the effect of local management practices on apple pollination. Substantial evidence from qualitative analyses supports the fact that insect pollination is essential for ensuring both yields and fruit quality in apple orchards across different regions. Besides, a significant proportion of studies showed that wild pollinators are abundant in apple orchards and they are frequently more effective pollinators than honeybees. Current available findings suggest a critical role of diverse semi-natural habitats surrounding apple orchards to sustain healthy pollinator communities, while the effect of local management was less consistent.
       
  • Productivity and soil quality of organic forage, quinoa, and grain
           cropping systems in the dryland Pacific Northwest, USA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 May 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 293Author(s): Rachel A. Wieme, John P. Reganold, David W. Crowder, Kevin M. Murphy, Lynne A. Carpenter-BoggsAbstractOrganic management is rapidly expanding as an alternative to conventional agriculture, but maintaining sufficient available soil nitrogen (N) supply is a challenge for organic systems in the semiarid regions of the US Pacific Northwest (PNW). Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a potential new crop for such systems, but there are many knowledge gaps regarding impacts of quinoa in crop rotations in the US. Here we tested the effects of quinoa in organic crop rotations for the Palouse region of the PNW. Specifically, we evaluated eight 3-year grain crop sequences, as part of a longer rotation with alfalfa, on the following metrics: crop productivity, soil N budgets, soil microbial parameters, arbuscular mycorrhizae, and soil aggregate size distribution. Organic crop yields averaged 495, 2736, and 2403 kg ha−1 for chickpea, barley, and wheat, respectively (33 %, 79 % and 77 % of the respective crop county averages). Yields were affected by weather across growing seasons, as were the amount and quality of residues, which in turn influenced soil N cycling. Overall soil N supply decreased slightly through the 3-yr sequences. Cereal grain yields were correlated with inorganic N (IN), and the correlation was stronger for subsurface (30−150 cm) depths than the surface (0−30 cm); IN was sufficient to support high cereal yields even in the later years when weather was suitable, but cereal yields overall may have been N-limited. Crop yields were more highly correlated with spring surface soil potentially mineralizable N than with spring surface IN. More inorganic N was available in surface (0−30 cm) post-harvest soil following quinoa (13.1 kg N ha-1 more) compared to wheat, but quinoa yields were low, with a 4-yr average of 104 kg ha−1. Soil microbial biomass and activity were not affected by sequence treatments. Although plants of the family Amaranthaceae are often considered “non-mycorrhizal”, moderate rates of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization were observed in quinoa. However, AMF colonization was lower in quinoa compared to other grains in the sequences, and the colonization of crops following quinoa was lower than following wheat. Soil structure was finer after quinoa, with a higher proportion of aggregates in the smaller size classes. Our results show that quinoa affects soil properties, and that organic management of 3-yr dryland grain sequences in rotation with alfalfa are possible in this area, given efficient N cycling through crop residues.
       
  • Assessing the cascading effects of management and landscape on the
           arthropod guilds occurring in papaya plantations
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 May 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 293Author(s): Ana Maria Flores-Gutierrez, Francisco Mora, Luis Daniel Avila-Cabadilla, Karina Boege, Ek del-ValArthropods can provide ecosystem services or disservices to agricultural systems. Whereas herbivores can cause substantial crop losses, natural enemies can offer pest regulation services that otherwise would be difficult to obtain. Two major factors affecting arthropod communities within plantations are farming practices and surrounding landscape. Previous studies have shown that natural enemies are less abundant in plantations within simplified landscapes and intense management practices, while herbivores do not always respond to these factors. Given the different roles of arthropods in plantations, we assessed the cascading effects that the surrounding landscape and different management practices can have on different arthropod guilds in papaya plantations, ultimately affecting plant damage and fruit production. A piecewise structural equation model was used to assess the direct and indirect effects of management practices and landscape upon herbivores and their natural enemies, and their cascading effects on papaya leaf damage and fruit production. We studied 11 papaya plantations in the surroundings of a tropical dry forest (TDF) in Jalisco, Mexico. The model indicated that there is a decrease of natural enemies with intensive conventional management, which had no effect on pest abundance. Furthermore, surrounding landscape had an effect on pest abundance and not on predators, but this effect was different between seasons. Even when pest abundance explained crop damage, this was not reflected on fruit production. Crop yield was explained by management practices, available phosphorus in soil and by the abundance of natural enemies.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Corrigendum to “The long-term recovery of a moderately fertilised
           semi-natural grassland” [Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. (289) (2020) 106744]
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & EnvironmentAuthor(s): Katrin Heinsoo, Marek Sammul, Toomas Kukk, Tiiu Kull, Indrek Melts
       
  • Re-evaluation of organic carbon pool from land surface down to bedrock on
           China’s Loess Plateau
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 May 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 293Author(s): Xiaoxu Jia, Haiming Wu, Ming’an Shao, Laiming Huang, Xiaorong Wei, Yunqiang Wang, Yuanjun ZhuAbstractLarge reservoirs of organic carbon (OC) store in deep soils (>1 m below land surface) are not usually included in regional and global terrestrial C inventories. Chinaös Loess Plateau (CLP), which has the worldös deepest loess deposit and has experienced long-term, intensive agricultural and revegetation activities, could contain large stores of OC. In this study, the distribution of OC concentration and stock across the entire loess profile from the ground surface down to the bedrock (56–205 m) was assessed at five sites (Yangling, YL; Changwu, CW; Fuxian, FX; Anösai, AS; and Shenmu, SM) under three land use types (farmland, grassland and shrubland). There was pronounced decrease in mean OC concentration with increasing depth along loess profiles at all the investigated sites. OC concentration in the topmost 20 m of the loess was much higher and fluctuated more significantly than that in the deeper layers at YL, CW, FX and AS, where mean annual precipitation was>550 mm. In contrast, OC concentration was low and stable at SM with mean annual precipitation
       
  • Influence of soil tillage on natural regulation of the cabbage root fly
           Delia radicum in brassicaceous crops
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 May 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 293Author(s): Xavier Mesmin, Anne-Marie Cortesero, Loïc Daniel, Manuel Plantegenest, Vincent Faloya, Anne Le RalecAbstractGround dwelling predators provide regulation services of several insect pests. Enhancing these services may be a step toward integrated crop protection. Many studies have shown that soil tillage is deleterious to ground dwelling predators but pest regulation processes and services have rarely been measured. We performed an experiment to study whether simplifying soil tillage before the establishment of spring broccoli enhanced ground dwelling predator populations and the control they provide on Delia radicum. The direct effect of tillage on arthropods was assessed by comparing their emergence rates in plots differing in soil tillage management. The natural regulation service was assessed by comparing a control and an exclusion treatment in which predators were removed. The effect of soil tillage on carabids, spiders and staphylinids did not match the gradient of disturbance induced by tillage treatments. Tillage did not appear to affect the predators that likely contribute to D. radicum regulation. Consistently, the number of pests suppressed and the root injuries were unaffected by tillage treatments. The main deleterious effect of soil tillage was on the emergence of those carabid species that overwinter partly as larvae, suggesting that spring tillage could affect pest control in the following crops.
       
  • Multiple long-term observations reveal a strategy for soil pH-dependent
           fertilization and fungal communities in support of agricultural production
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1 May 2020Source: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 293Author(s): Qi Ning, Lin Chen, Zhongjun Jia, Congzhi Zhang, Donghao Ma, Fang Li, Jiabao Zhang, Daming Li, Xiaori Han, Zejiang Cai, Shaomin Huang, Wenzhao Liu, Bo Zhu, Yan LiAbstractAgricultural fertilization plays a crucial role in crop production, and the fungal communities catalyze transformation of soil nutrients in support of crop production. However, it remains controversial about the optimal strategy for fertilizer inputs and the adaptive mechanisms of fungal communities across China. By using seven long-term field fertilization experiments in China, we analyzed crop yields, soil properties and fungal communities in soils that were treated for> 25 years with no fertilizer (control), inorganic fertilizers (NPK) and organic-inorganic fertilizers (NPKM). Long-term NPK resulted in significant acidification up to a decline by 1.20 pH units, while NPKM prevented acidification and increased pH up to 6.39 in three acidic soils with pH < 5.70. NPKM increased crop yields by 1.19–8.72 folds in acidic soils, being significantly higher than NPK. Specific saprotroph Mortierella and Pseudaleuria in acidic soils were exclusively enriched by NPKM. Soil pH was directly related to the abundance of Mortierella, and the enrichment of Mortierella species further caused a positive direct effect on crop yield. In four alkaline soils with pH> 8.11, both NPK and NPKM led to only marginal decline of soil pH, and NPK and NPKM showed comparable crop yields. Some members of Ascomycota in alkaline soils were both enriched by NPKM and NPK. Soil available P and C:N ratio, rather than pH, directly or indirectly affect crop yield in alkaline soils. High crop yield can be achieved by the sole use of inorganic fertilizers in alkaline soils, but acidic soil productivity should be maintained by organic amendment to counteract acidification by inorganic fertilization. Our study advances a mechanistic understanding for optimizing fertilization strategies towards sustainable agriculture under increasingly intensified fertilizer inputs.
       
 
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