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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3162 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3162 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 97, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 428, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 290, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 66)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 412, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 363, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 472, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 232, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 206, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Rhizosphere
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.281
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2452-2198
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3162 journals]
  • Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nematodes in a 14 years
           no-tillage chronosequence
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 10Author(s): Marco Aurélio Carbone Carneiro, Paula Camylla Ramos de Assis, Helder Barbosa Paulino, Mara Rubia da Rocha, Renato Andrade Teixeira, Flávio Araújo Pinto, Jessé Valentim dos Santos, José Oswaldo Siqueira, Edicarlos Damacena de Souza We evaluated the effects of the conversion of native areas of the Cerrado to no-tillage on the population of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nematodes. Three areas under no-tillage (7, 11 and 14 years of cultivation) were evaluated and compared to adjacent areas of the Cerrado not impacted by agriculture. Results indicated that although no-tillage is a conservation system, it has either slightly reduced, slightly improved, or maintained the taxonomic and functional diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nematodes, even after 14 years of cultivation. In addition, cultivated areas presented reduced diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and increased occurrence of plant parasitic nematodes. The observed differences could be a result of both disturbance to the soil structure through agriculture and reduced plant diversity in the soybean-corn rotation, as compared to the adjacent uncultivated Cerrado.
       
  • Fast and efficient symbiotic gene-based duplex PCR approach for the
           preliminary selection of legume root nodule bacteria
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 10Author(s): Valéria Borges da Silva, Aleksandro Ferreira da Silva, Thaise Rosa da Silva, Jonnathan Whiny Moraes dos Santos, Jéssica Fernanda da Silva, Adailson Pereira de Souza, Ana Dolores Santiago de Freitas, Paulo Ivan Fernandes-Júnior The isolation of root nodule bacteria (RNB) usually lead to obtainment of several non-rhizobia, mainly those fast-growing bacteria. The plant-authentication experiments to select the nodulating bacteria are time consuming and can be ruined in case of nodulation of negative controls. To speed up this step in rhizobiology research a fast, simple and efficient duplex PCR assay for the amplification of nodC and nifH genes in was developed aiming to separate rhizobia and non-rhizobia in RNB culture collections. The method was optimized with 43 reference strains and was applied to a new culture collection for validation. Considering all bacteria, 106 out of 109 nodulating rhizobia were positive for both genes. Among non-nodulating, 48 out of 48 were nodC-negative. The results demonstrated the efficiency of this new method that can be completed in a day, to save time and money in RNB isolation projects, fulfilling Koch's postulate, and separating rhizobia from non-rhizobial bacteria.
       
  • Tea yield maintained in PGPR inoculated field plants despite significant
           reduction in fertilizer application
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 10Author(s): P.L.K. Tennakoon, R.M.C.P. Rajapaksha, L.S.K. Hettiarachchi A study was conducted to formulate dual plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculants, indigenous to each soil series where fields were located, to enhance growth and yield of tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze), managed with low fertilizers inputs.Field experiments were conducted in five different locations with both early and later stages of mature tea fields representing three soil series i.e Kandy, Matale and Ukuwela. Soil series specific dual inoculants (i.e., Azospirillum sp. + Rhodococcus sp. for Kandy, Azospirillum sp. + Microbacterium sp. for Matale and Azospirillum sp. + Bacillus cereus for Ukuwela soil series) were tested in fields having respective soil series. In addition, a common consortium (Azospirillum sp. + Bacillus cereus) was tested across all the three soil series. They were tested along with a modified VP/UM 910 fertilizer mixture composed of 2/3 N and ½ P of the recommended application, and compared with three non-inoculated controls: an untreated control, a non-inoculated modified VP/UM 910 fertilizer control, and the VP/UM 910 recommended dose of fertilizer control, each with three replicates. Yield records were maintained and soils and leaf N and P contents were assessed after one year.The made tea yield of each soil series, with its soil series specific dual inoculants, conducted in four locations representing Kandy and Matale soil series, varied from 2521 to 2681 kg ha−1 yr−1 and remained comparable to fields with the recommended fertilizer treatment (2491–2697 kg ha−1 yr−1). Comparable yields to recommended fertilizer treatment due to series specific dual inoculant could also be observed in the location representing Ukuwela soil series.Results indicated that a 1/3 reduction of N and 1/2 reduction of P from the recommended fertilizer dosage VP/UM 910 are possible with application of dual PGPR inoculants formulated with soil series specific strains.
       
  • Biogeochemical cycles of key elements in the paddy-rice rhizosphere:
           Microbial mechanisms and coupling processes
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 10Author(s): Xiaomeng Wei, Zhenke Zhu, Liang Wei, Jinshui Wu, Tida Ge Rice feeds more than 50% of the world’s population, 88% of which is planted in paddy fields. Paddy-rice rhizosphere is a unique habitat characterized by redox heterogeneity that is generated from radial O2 loss from roots and intensive water management, which allows the differentiation of microbial niches in the narrow rhizosphere and leads to strong couplings of functional processes. This review summarizes the biogeochemical processes of key elements (C, N, P, and Fe) in the rice rhizosphere and their coupling mechanisms. We emphasize the redox gradient in rice rhizosphere and the role of microorganisms in element cycling under altering redox conditions. We argue that C turnover and nutrient (N and P) availability are closely linked to each other, during which Fe reduction and oxidation play important roles. For further development in this field, we suggest further effort to reveal several key processes, including, the high resolution in situ distribution of biotic and abiotic factors, stoichiometric regulations on microbial processes, and the functions of key microbial guilds or species in element cycles.
       
  • Diversity and distribution of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in cassava
           (Manihot esculenta Crantz) croplands in Cameroon as revealed by Illumina
           MiSeq
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 March 2019Source: RhizosphereAuthor(s): Papa Saliou Sarr, Akifumi Sugiyama, Aime Didier Boyogueno Begoude, Kazufumi Yazaki, Shigeru Araki, Eiji Nawata Cassava, one of the most important crops in the tropics is positively affected by the association with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF). Such association is greatly influenced by the nature of the existing local AMF community. Here, we characterized AMF communities in soils from cassava fields in Andom and Bityili villages, located in Eastern and Southern Cameroon, respectively, by Illumina MiSeq of the ITS2 region. Soil characteristics involved marked changes in soil available P and slight differences in other nutrients availability and soil pH. Clustering based on a 97% sequence similarity generated 60 AMF Operational taxonomic units (OTU) grouped into the 12 genera Paraglomus, Claroideoglomus, Rhizophagus, Kamienskia, Funneliformis, Dominikia, Glomus, Ambispora, Archaeospora, Dentiscutata, Acaulospora, and Redeckera. Fifteen AMF species were identified from the 27 OTU, and they were dominated by Glomus sinuosum and Paraglomus occultum in both sites. The Andom soil which had less available P showed a higher AMF diversity and contained 10 site-specific species, compared to the Bityili soil where only 2 site-specific species were recovered. Multivariate analysis indicated that soil available P and C/N ratio were the main edaphic factors influencing the structure AMF in the study sites. This study provided useful information on the composition of AMF community in cassava field soils in two agro-ecologies of Cameroon.
       
  • Mitigation of effect of salt stress on the nodulation, nitrogen fixation
           and growth of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) by triple microbial
           inoculation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2019Source: RhizosphereAuthor(s): Mohamed Hemida Abd-Alla, Nivien A. Nafady, Shymaa R. Bashandy, Amany A. Hassan
       
  • Rhizobia protect their legume hosts against soil-borne microbial
           antagonists in a host-genotype-dependent manner
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Chandra N. Jack, Katherine J. Wozniak, Stephanie S. Porter, Maren L. Friesen Microbial inhabitants of the rhizosphere can have substantial impacts on the fitness of their associated host plants, in both beneficial and detrimental ways. Soil-borne pathogens can impose severe fitness costs that can be mitigated or eliminated in many cases by co-occurring beneficial bacteria that directly or indirectly temper pathogens’ antagonistic effects. Rhizobial bacteria are best known for their role as nitrogen fixing symbionts in the rhizobia-legume mutualism but there is growing evidence that they can also act as protective agents against microbial pathogens. This study examined the role of rhizobial bacterium Ensifer medicae in protecting the burclover, Medicago polymorpha, against antagonistic soil microbes in complex soil communities. Exposing plants to concentrated slurries of soil inoculum had an adverse effect on all aspects of plant fitness in M. polymorpha. However, inoculating plants with rhizobia increased plant survival in the presence of live soil inoculum from 18% to over 80%. In addition, the soil microbiome changed the symbiotic relationship between plants and rhizobia; plants that were co-inoculated with dilute soil inoculum and a beneficial rhizobium produced more nodules with a higher nodule biomass than plants inoculated with rhizobium alone. Finally, we found that the effects of soil microbes and rhizobia on root biomass, root:shoot ratio, and nodule number differed between host genotypes, indicating there is potential for complex plant-bacterial interactions to respond to selection and potentially contribute to the maintenance of both plant genetic variation and bacterial diversity.
       
  • Arbuscular mycorrhizae alleviate mild to moderate water stress and improve
           essential oil yield in thyme
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Ali Abdollahi Arpanahi, Mohammad Feizian In order to study the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and water stress on Thymus Vulgaris L. essential oil composition, an experiment was designed in full factorial randomized pattern with three replications. Factors consisted of four irrigation levels and two different inocula. Results showed that water stress decreased growth parameters of T. vulgaris but inoculation with AMF alleviated adverse effects of water stress. Result showed that when we used AMF with mild-moderate water stress, there is an increase in essential oil content but at severe water-stress essential oil content decreased. Interaction of AMF and water stress had significant effects on most components of T. vulgaris essential oil.
       
  • Suppression of Phytophthora capsici infection and promotion of tomato
           growth by soil bacteria
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Sharifah Farhana Syed-Ab-Rahman, Yawen Xiao, Lilia C. Carvalhais, Brett J. Ferguson, Peer M. Schenk Phytophthora capsici causes root, crown and fruit rot on many plant species including tomato and other solanaceous species. Plant growth promotion and suppression of P. capsici on tomato were assessed for three soil bacterial isolates, namely Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (UQ154), Bacillus velezensis (UQ156) and Acinetobacter sp. (UQ202). Cultures were applied as seed treatments (pre and post-infection inoculation) plus a soil drench at transplanting. The bacterial isolates significantly promoted growth of seedlings, as measured by root length, total fresh weight, and seedling vigor. We observed a reduction in pathogen load in tomato roots in both treatments using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). This work confirms the broad-spectrum activity of these bacterial isolates for our previous findings of biocontrol activity on different plants.
       
  • Salicylic acid but not jasmonic acid improved canola root response to
           salinity stress
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Salar Farhangi-Abriz, Tahereh Alaee, Alireza Tavasolee We evaluated the effect of foliar sprays of 1 mM salicylic acid and 0.5 mM jasmonic acid on root growth of canola (Brassica napus, Cultivar: Ocapi) under different levels of salt stress (0, 40, 70, 100 mM NaCl) as a practical means to reduce water-stress. Salinity decreased the primary and lateral root length and weight, root diameter, density, shoot dry weight, shoot/root ratio and root water content, but increased the Root length/ Root weight ratio. Jasmonic acid increased the lateral root growth, but reduced the primary root growth and shoot dry weight and did not alter the root water content under different levels of salt stress. Salicylic acid had no effect on lateral root growth, but increased the primary root length, weight, diameter and root density in plants. These enhancements by salicylic acid increased the water content in root tissues and caused considerable improvement in canola growth.
       
  • Identification and characterization of a long-chain N-acyl homoserine
           lactone from Rhizobium sp. isolated from Zea x mays rhizosphere
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Nágela Priscila Ferreira, Lucas Ulisses Rovigatti Chiavelli, Diego Luis Lucca, Silvana Maria de Oliveira Santin, Foteini Pavli, George-John Nychas, Mónica Yolardy Alzate Zuluaga, André Luíz Martinez de Oliveira, Armando Mateus Pomini The microbiological study of maize rhizosphere (Zea x mays) cultivated in Brazil led to the isolation of a bacterium, which was identified as Rhizobium sp. based upon 16 S rRNA analysis. The chemical study of fractions obtained from bacterium extract allowed the identification of the compound N-(3-oxo-tetradec-7-enoyl)-homoserine lactone (1) using uni and bidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), gas chromatography coupled to low resolution electron impact mass spectrometry (GC–MS), and ultra-high resolution Qq-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHR-QqTOF-MS). Biological assays with the strains Agrobacterium tumefasciens A136 and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 were also performed and showed negative results, corroborating the hypothesis of production of only the long chain acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) 1, and the lack of presence of short or medium chain homologues, as observed by instrumental GC–MS and NMR analyses. The chemotaxonomic relevance of the presence of long chain AHL in Rhizobiaceae was discussed.
       
  • Are dark septate endophytes bioindicators of climate in mountain
           ecosystems'
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Anita PandeyDark septate endophytes (DSE), often referred as a miscellaneous group of ascomycetous anamorphic fungi, are making their way in root-microbiome research. Reports, on occurrence of these endophytic fungi, are increasingly emerging from various mountain ecosystems showing their dominance with increasing altitude; also causing shift in colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Can these DSE be seen as root associated bioindicators for climate change, by anticipating and monitoring shifts in the community structure of root mycorrhizae and endophytes'
       
  • Phosphogypsum significantly alters root growth and fungal colonization of
           smooth brome and sheep fescue on a reclamation site
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Katja Boldt-Burisch, Naeth M. Anne Phosphogypsum (PG) is a by-product of phosphate fertilizer production. This study is the first to investigate Bromis inermis and Festuca ovina root morphology and colonization with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and dark septate endophytes (DSE) in pure PG and PG with a soil cap (soil). Root length density was significantly lower for plants on PG than on soil and both plant species were colonized with AMF and DSE, with lower frequency and intensity in PG. Phosphorus (20 times), calcium (35 times) and sulphur (50 times) were significantly higher in PG than in soil; resulting higher root tissue concentrations were significantly negatively correlated with mycorrhizal colonization for Festuca but not Bromus. Higher fungal colonization of Bromus, especially with DSE known to be prevalent in extreme environments, may be responsible for its better performance on PG relative to Festuca.
       
  • Arbuscular mycorrhizae alleviate water deficit stress and improve
           antioxidant response, more than nitrogen fixing bacteria or chemical
           fertilizer in the evening primrose
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Mahmood Mohammadi, Seyed Ali Mohammad Modarres-Sanavy, Hemmatolah Pirdashti, Behnam Zand, Zeinolabedin Tahmasebi-Sarvestani We treated the evening primrose grown under moderate or severe water deficit with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae), and nitrogen fixing bacteria (Azospirillum lipoferum), or with a chemical fertilizer (urea + triple superphosphate). The experiment was conducted at an arid and a semi-arid experimental station with plants grown in the field, after greenhouse propagation. Experiments were conducted in a split factorial layout within a randomized complete block design with three replications, at each location. Our results show that under physiological stress conditions caused by water deficit, the evening primrose adopts typical strategies to reduce the negative impact of water deficit stress. Some of these strategies include antioxidant enzyme synthesis, which protect from reactive oxygen species, a decrease in overall growth, but relative increase in root, and an increase in plant antioxidant pigments. Water deficit significantly reduced plant total biomass and chlorophyll a (especially in the arid region), but it increased the root to shoot ratio, chlorophyll b, carotenoid, anthocyanin, proline, the antioxidant enzymes peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (especially in the arid region). The application of the chemical fertilizers and biological inoculants in all conditions decreased H2O2 and antioxidant enzymes activity. The arbuscular mycorrhizae alleviated the physiological stress response more than the nitrogen fixing bacteria or chemical fertilizer by increasing anti-oxidant pigments concentration, total biomass and root to shoot ratio of evening primrose under water deficit stress. Therefore, arbuscular mycorrhizae should be considered an essential component of evening primrose cultivation in arid or semi-arid climates to alleviate moderate to severe water deficit.Graphical abstractfx1
       
  • Site-specific differences in microbial community structure and function
           within the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of wetland plants is plant species
           dependent
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Lindsey K. Clairmont, Kevin J. Stevens, Robin M. Slawson Two types of organisms that are vital to the ecosystem services provided by wetlands are plants and soil microorganisms, more specifically, the bacteria associated with the roots of wetland plants. In order to better understand the relationships between wetland plants and their associated microorganisms, we tested the hypothesis that the microbial rhizosphere and rhizoplane communities in wetland systems highly impacted by anthropogenic activities subjected to poor water quality inputs would differ from those communities in areas less impacted by anthropogenic activity receiving higher water quality inputs. To test this hypothesis we compared structural and functional characteristics of microbial communities from water, rhizosphere and rhizoplane microbial communities associated with three wetland plant species (Iris versicolor, Potamogeton natans and Veronica spicata) at two sites along the Grand River (Ontario Canada) experiencing different levels of anthropogenic impact. West Montrose (WM) is a northern site which has historically been classified as having “good” water quality, while Rare (RA) is a site located in a highly urbanized area receiving effluent from a municipal waste water treatment plant (WWTP). Microbial community composition, assessed using PCR-DGGE, differed between sites, community types and plant species, however, the magnitude of variance between sites was dependent on the associated plant species and the community type. Rhizoplane microbial communities associated with I. versicolor, P. natans, and V. spicata shared 8.1%, 19.9% and 23.9% structural similarity between sites. Rhizosphere microbial communities associated with I. versicolor, P. natans, and V. spicata exhibited 33%, 11.2% and 15.6% structural similarity between sampling locations. Functional community characteristics, determined by BiologTM Ecoplate carbon source utilization profiles exhibited by microbial communities from the rhizoplane and rhizosphere, were unique to each site for I. versicolor and P. natans (rhizoplane community only), but not for V. spicata. Assessment of fecal coliforms and fecal indicator microorganisms (Salmonella, Enterococcus and Escherichia coli) also revealed site-specific differences as well as differences among plant species, most notably the absence of Enterococcus spp. from the rhizosphere of P. natans at both sampling sites. These findings suggest that plant species differ in their ability to recruit root-associated microorganisms, and may be affected differently by variability in environmental conditions, such as site-specific differences in water quality or water chemistry.
       
  • Successful stem cutting propagation of Patrinia rupestris for
           horticulture
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Su Jung Song, Chung Ho Ko, Un Seop Shin, Hye Jin Oh, Sang Yong Kim, Seung Youn Lee This study was conducted to develop a protocol for the vegetative propagation of Patrinia rupestris (Pall.) Juss., to facilitate its use for ornamental and medical purposes. Cuttings of P. rupestris were treated with distilled water (control), commercial rooting powder (Rooton, 0.4% 1-naphthylacetamide), α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). The stem cuttings pretreated with 2685, 5370 µM NAA or 4920 µM IBA displayed the best rooting traits; the rooting percentage, number of adventitious roots, length of roots, and fresh weight of roots. It would be advisable to use the lower concentration, for economy in using the hormone. We recommend treating cuttings with 2685 µM NAA for the propagation of P. rupestris to produce large amounts of planting materials.
       
  • Maize plant growth response to whole rhizosphere microbial communities in
           different mineral N and P fertilization scenarios
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Dante A. López-Carmona, Alejandro Alarcón, Esperanza Martínez-Romero, Juan José Peña-Cabriales, John Larsen With the objective to examine maize plant response to whole rhizosphere microbial communities in terms of growth and nutrition, we performed a greenhouse pot experiment with full mineral fertilization except for N and P, which were applied in a fully factorial set-up (Without, with N, with P and with N+P). Rhizosphere microbial communities were measured in terms of mycorrhiza formation and biomarker fatty acids. Whole rhizosphere microbial communities promoted plant growth with single N fertilization (P limitation), whereas negative plant growth responses were observed without fertilization (N and P limitation), single P fertilization (N limitation) and dual N and P fertilization (no nutrient limitation). Whole rhizosphere microbial communities increased and decreased shoot N content without and with N fertilization, respectively. On the other hand whole rhizosphere microbial communities increased shoot P content both with and without P fertilization, though more without P. The observed plant growth and shoot nutrient response to whole rhizosphere microbial communities seems to be linked to the root association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and abundance of rhizosphere microorganisms. In conclusion, our results show that maize plant response to whole rhizosphere microbial communities in terms of growth and nutrition is strongly associated with N and P fertilization balance.
       
  • Mycorrhizas improve the absorption of non-available phosphorus by the
           green manure Tithonia diversifolia in poor soils
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Franklin M. Scrase, Fergus L. Sinclair, John F. Farrar, Paulo S. Pavinato, Davey L. Jones The use of Tithonia diversifolia (Tithonia) as green manure has spread over some parts of Africa, Latin America and Asia justified by its fast growth cycle, high nitrogen fixation capacity and high accumulation of phosphorus (P) in tissue, with improved capacity to explore nutrients like P in poor soils. We hypothesized here that P acquisition by Tithonia from poor soils is greatly facilitated by rapid root proliferation and by the formation of symbioses with native arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi; and that organic P sources are more suitable for Tithonia use than inorganic complexed ones. It was used a mesh exclusion technique in rhizotron to measure uptake of P by Tithonia plants from 33P-labelled sub-compartments into which either extra mycelial mycorrhizal hyphae and roots or only mycorrhizal hyphae could penetrate, in a poor P soil from Nepal. The sub-compartment labelled P was provided as either inorganic33P (33Pi), microbial33P or as 33Pi bound to either Ca or Fe. Root access to the sub-compartments containing 33Pi associated with added cations (Ca or Fe) did not increase 33Pi uptake relative to mycorrhizal hyphal access only. Uptake of microbial33P doubled when roots as well as mycorrhizal hyphae were present, indicating that extra mycelial mycorrhizal fungi associated with Tithonia contribute to uptake of mineral bound P, but do not participate in organic P cycles.
       
  • The ability of plants to produce strigolactones affects rhizosphere
           community composition of fungi but not bacteria
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Lilia C. Carvalhais, Vivian A. Rincon-Florez, Philip B. Brewer, Christine A. Beveridge, Paul G. Dennis, Peer M. Schenk Strigolactones are an important group of plant hormones. When released from roots, they act as signalling molecules that induce branching of arbuscular mycorrhizal hyphae. However, the extent to which they affect the rhizosphere microbiome is unknown. Filling this knowledge gap is important because the diversity and composition of the root-associated microbiome influence plant fitness. In this study, we hypothesised that strigolactone-producing plants harbour a different community of rhizosphere bacteria and fungi compared to plants whose strigolactone synthesis is impaired. To test this hypothesis, we compared the diversity of rhizosphere bacterial and fungal communities associated with wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and a mutant impaired in the production of strigolactones due to a disruption of the MORE AXILLARY GROWTH 4 (MAX4) gene. Our results indicate that the plant's ability to produce strigolactone is significantly correlated with changes in the composition (beta diversity) of rhizosphere fungal but not bacterial communities. No differences in alpha diversity (richness and evenness) were observed for either bacterial or fungal communities between the rhizospheres of max4 and wild-type. Epicoccum nigrum, Penicillium, Fibulochlamys chilensis, Herpotrichiellaceae, Mycosphaerella and Mycosphaerellaceae were among the fungal taxa possibly attracted to or mostly influenced by strigolactones given that they were present at higher abundances in the rhizosphere of the wild-type compared to the mutant. Our study provides evidence that rhizosphere fungal diversity are more strongly affected than bacterial diversity by the plant's ability to produce strigolactones.
       
  • High salt tolerant plant growth promoting rhizobacteria from the common
           ice-plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Ahmad Mahmood, Rio Amaya, Oğuz Can Turgay, Ahmet Emre Yaprak, Takeshi Taniguchi, Ryota Kataoka Prevalent salinity hinders the plant growth, and efforts for vegetation are limited due to excessive concentration of salts. The microbiome associated with extreme habitats has the potential of inducing stress avoidance, tolerance, and resistance strategies in the host plants for energy requirements. Manipulation of such interactions offers the potential revegetation, and utilization of saline soils, and with the similar objectives, the rhizosphere of Common ice-plant was explored for incident bacteria helping the plant grow better. The isolation resulted in 152 isolates, and above 50% isolates were observed tolerant to 513 mM of NaCl, and the two, PR-3 and PR-6, most promising even showed tolerance up to 1250 mM salinity. Both the strains showed indole acetic acid production, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity, but neither of them had nitrogen fixation ability. Phosphorus solubilization, and siderophore production was shown by either of them. Plant growth promoting (PGP) assay showed significant root elongation when compared with control, which was further confirmed by the pot experiment where the above-ground part of the Common ice-plant also showed significant growth over control. Concluding, rhizosphere bacteria from the halophyte plant showed different PGP abilities, and thus can be applied for improving the growth of associated plant in saline conditions.
       
  • Phosphate solubilization potential of endophytic fungi isolated from Taxus
           wallichiana Zucc. roots
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Priyanka Adhikari, Anita Pandey Endophytic microorganisms live inside the host plant and contribute in various biological processes, without causing any harmful effect. Inorganic phosphate solubilization, through microorganisms, is one of the major mechanisms involved in plant growth. The present study highlights the potential of endophytic fungi for their ability to solubilize insoluble phosphates in presence of tricalcium (TCP), aluminium (AlP), and iron phosphate (FeP) at different temperatures through production of phosphatases, phytases and organic acids. Five endophytic fungi, isolated from the roots of Taxus wallichiana, were identified following their phenotypic and molecular characters. Three fungal isolates showed maximum similarity with species of Penicillium (GBPI TWR_F1, GBPI TWR_F2, and GBPI TWR_F3) and two with species of Aspergillus (GBPI TWR_F4 and GBPI TWR_F5). All the endophytes solubilized phosphate by utilizing the substrates namely calcium, aluminium and iron phosphate along with the production of phosphatase and phytase enzymes. Maximum phosphate solubilization and phytase activity was recorded in case of the fungal isolate GBPI TWR_F2 (P. daleae) being 83.42 ± 3.41 µg/ml TCP, 57.63 ± 0.79 µg/ml AlP, and 57.76 ± 1.70 µg/ml FeP at 15 °C. GBPI TWR_F2 and GBPI TWR_F5 (Aspergillus sp.) produced maximum calcium phytase at 25 and 15 °C, 10.33 ± 0.13 and 10.37 ± 0.37 µM/ml, respectively. Phosphatase production was higher in acidic conditions in comparison to alkaline. In quantification of organic acids through HPLC, malic and succinic acids were determined in maximum quantity 0.97 ± 0.003 and 0.92 ± 0.008 µg/ml, respectively, followed by oxalic (0.71 ± 0.006 µg/ml) and lactic acid (0.61 ± 0.005 µg/ml). Citric acid was estimated in minimum quantity.Graphical abstractfx1
       
  • Inside Front Cover - Editorial Board Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s):
       
  • Corrigendum to “Histopathology of charcoal rot disease (Macrophomina
           phaseolina) in resistant and susceptible cultivars of soybean”
           [Rhizosphere 7 (2018) 27–34]
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Parisa Hemmati, Doustmorad Zafari, Seyed Bagher Mahmoodi, Majid Hashemi, Majid Gholamhoseini, Aria Dolatabadian, Reza Ataei
       
  • Light intensity controls rhizosphere respiration rate and rhizosphere
           priming effect of soybean and sunflower
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Rhizosphere, Volume 9Author(s): Mao Tang, Weixin Cheng, Hui Zeng, Biao Zhu Rhizosphere respiration (Rroot) and rhizosphere priming effect (RPE) are crucial for regulating soil carbon dynamics. However, their responses to light intensity are not fully resolved. We investigated Rroot and RPE of soybean and sunflower using a continuous isotope-labeling technique. The two species were subjected to five levels of light intensity in a growth chamber. Plants were maintained at full light from seeding for 45 or 59 days, and switched to shading treatments for four days. Soil respiration was partitioned into root- and soil-derived CO2 during the last five days (day0, full light; day1–4, shading). Both soybean and sunflower Rroot showed significant positive relationships with light intensity, particularly after one day of shading. Moreover, both plants showed positive RPE (44–98%) at full light, but with increasing duration and intensity of shading, the RPE declined and even became negative (up to –20%). Indeed, a positive relationship between light intensity and RPE was observed in both species. Overall, our results showed that shading, by influencing light intensity and presumably photosynthesis rate and belowground carbon allocation, exerts a significant control of rhizosphere respiration rate and priming effect of the two species.
       
 
 
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