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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3159 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3159 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 407, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 246, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 142, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 395, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 338, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 442, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 172, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)

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Journal Cover
Learning, Culture and Social Interaction
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.578
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2210-6561
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3159 journals]
  • Conceptualizing meaningful education: The voices of indigenous parents of
           young children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 July 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Marika Matengu, Riitta-Liisa Korkeamäki, Ailie CleghornAbstractThe current study was conducted in rural Namibia by interviewing seventeen parents of pre-primary learners in an indigenous community. Interview data was analyzed qualitatively to identify advantages of education that parents found worth pursuing and supporting. The study revealed that current education models do not correspond to indigenous understanding of meaningful education, which is to equip children to effectively transition from the indigenous community to the future in the modern world. The findings suggest that parents' freedom to choose and influence education they find meaningful is limited to dominant education models mainly informed by the Global North. The development of indigenous education requires building meaningful parental participation that informs educational models. Drawing from theories of social justice, this study responds to strategies advocated to solve the quality crisis in educationally marginalized contexts and the challenge of education planners to ensure that education becomes a catalyst for social justice.
       
  • “Move over, I will find Jerusalem”: Artifacts in game design
           in classrooms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Kristine Øygardslia, Pål AarsandAbstractWhen game design is conducted in classrooms as a learning activity, the students usually have digital, as well as traditional, artifacts available. This article looks at how students organize the use of different artifacts when creating computer games about historical topics. The data informing this article consist of video data collected from one sixth-grade class and one seventh-grade class in Norway. A sociocultural perspective is used to show how the students use a combination of different artifacts as resources in the game design process, focusing on how students take epistemic stances and how the artifacts are given different epistemic status. The students jointly construct knowledge that they then integrate into computer games using artifacts such as textbooks, world maps, Google, and timelines. The article shows how designing games about historical topics is a complex process in which students use artifacts as the basis for knowledge claims and storytelling, and students need to negotiate and balance their own design preferences with historical accuracy and the expectations of the classroom setting.
       
  • The Swedish grade conference: A dialogical study of face-to-face delivery
           of summative assessment in higher education
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Janna Meyer-Beining, Sylvi Vigmo, Åsa MäkitaloAbstractThis article explores a summative assessment delivery activity frequently encountered in Swedish higher education, the grade conference. Drawing on data from a Swedish module on Environmental Engineering, we analyze ten video recorded face-to-face meetings, each involving one student and one teacher discussing a grade awarded on the basis of a student written report. Utilizing Linell's concept of communicative projects, our dialogical study describes the interactional characteristics of this institutional activity type. In that context, we also discuss the interactional framing of each meeting, the issues considered talk-about-able within the activity, as well as the institutional and personal expectations made salient in this type of summative assessment interaction. We find that the activity involves a small set of characteristic communicative projects, which on the whole serve the activity's overarching purpose of delivering and achieving acceptance of a previously determined grade on a student written report. Teacher dominated, the activity provides occasion to discuss different aspects of student work, but participants also engage in subtle negotiations of institutional and personal accountabilities.
       
  • Collaboration under constraints: Family supervision in child welfare
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Maryse Bournel-Bosson, Michèle GrossenAbstractThe French institutional context of child welfare occasionally requires educational interventions under constraints. In that case, social workers are mandated by the juvenile court to intervene in the family and set up an educational measure. Drawing on sociocultural psychology, more specifically on a dialogical approach to social interactions and discourse, this study explores how the social workers and the families cope with the paradox of constrained help and enter into some form of collaboration. The data are made up of five first time visits by the social workers at the family's home. The analysis focuses on two key moments: the definition of the situation and the formulation of the family's expectations. The analysis examines how the participants position themselves and negotiate the constraints of the situation. The results show that, beyond a one-sided definition of the situation reflecting the asymmetry between the participants, an absent third party's voice —the judge's— is repeatedly echoed and works as a local resource to preserve the participants' agency. Moreover, the results reveal that the social workers tend to turn any obstacle or difficulty formulated by the parents into an expectation that make their intervention useful and relevant.
       
  • The developing knowledge and identity of an Asian-American teacher: The
           influence of a China study abroad experience
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 17Author(s): Cheryl J. Craig, Yali Zou, Gayle CurtisAbstractThis narrative inquiry examines the way learning, culture and context shape the knowledge, identity and social interactions of teacher, Shi Tan. Through using broadening, burrowing, storying-restorying and fictionalization, the work chronicles how Shi, a child of Chinese immigrants, forms her ‘stories to live by’ over time. Early tensions surface between her parents' traditional lifestyle and what she came to know in the American context. Weekends in Chinatown, Chinese Saturday School, and summers in Asia reinforced the plotlines Shi's parents carried with them from their homeland. Concurrently, Shi's American public school and university experiences instilled in her different modes of knowing and being. A pivotal change occurred when Shi participated in a China Study Abroad trip alongside mostly White educators. While visiting Chinese schools and universities and interacting with Chinese locals, Shi's understanding of herself deepened. She questioned why the trip became a liminal space where she storied and restoried her knowledge and identity differently. The significance of this research lies in its narrative rendering of identity; its unearthing of social complexities lived in cross-cultural communities; it's lifelike characterization of how minority teachers/students navigate familial, social and cultural situations; and its advancement of knowledge that increases learning.
       
  • Connecting to the outside: Cultural resources teachers use when
           contextualizing instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 17Author(s): Kenneth Silseth, Ola ErstadAbstractThe aim of this article is to examine what resources teachers mobilize when contextualizing instruction. In this instructional method, teachers use students' everyday experiences as tools for teaching subject matter at school. Research has documented that contextualizing instruction can support classroom learning. However, we do not know very much about what types of resources teachers view as relevant in this kind of instructional work. In this article, we analyze video data of student-teacher interactions in 43 lessons, which were collected when following four lower secondary teachers over one academic year. The analysis is based on a sociocultural perspective of learning and teaching in which the focus of analysis is on what kind of everyday experiences teachers orient to when supporting students' participation. The findings show that the resources teachers orient to can be grouped into five categories: (1) teachers orienting to characteristics of the local community, (2) teachers orienting to examples from everyday practices, (3) teachers orienting to personal issues, (4) teachers orienting to concrete objects, and (5) teachers orienting to knowledge from travelling abroad. These categories show variation and multiplicity of resources that teachers use when contextualizing instruction, and the implications of this multiplicity are discussed in the article.
       
  • Children's explorations of the concept of spinning in preschool: Science
           learning in mediated activity
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 17Author(s): Robin SamuelssonThis paper examines how children explore the concept of spinning during a preschool project. It takes a cultural-historical approach, and analyzes how artifacts can be used in development of abstract concepts. In line with the pedagogical goals teachers employ these in learning activities during the project in line with their pedagogical goals. Children encounter the activities with different linguistic and perceptual means; there is, however, across the project a shift towards learning activities that promote verbal explanations. The interrelation of verbal and perceptual means, suggest ways in how children dynamically develop abstract concepts out of perceptual knowledge in activities with appropriate artifacts and teacher scaffolding.
       
  • Uncovering the pedagogical potential of texts: Curriculum materials in
           classroom interaction in first language and literature education
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 17Author(s): Ulla Karvonen, Liisa Tainio, Sara RoutarinneAbstractMost teachers in many Western countries make use curriculum materials such as textbooks, workbooks and related teacher's guides in their teaching. In this study, 29 First language and literature lessons are analysed to discover different ways in which texts that are part of curriculum materials are used in the curriculum. The findings indicate that the identification of the pedagogical potential of the texts demands a profound understanding of the subject matter. Moreover, the realization of this potential always involves creativity and improvisation. Thus, we suggest that preparedness to read curriculum materials analytically and critically is a core component of teachers' expertise.
       
  • Māori children's everyday learning over the summer holidays
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 17Author(s): Sarika Rona, Margaret Forster, John O'NeillAbstractChildren spend most of their lives learning from everyday experiences; they learn about their culture, how to live and be part of their family and community. This paper reports on a pilot study of everyday learning over the summer holidays to determine how and what selected Māori children learn in their everyday environment. This qualitative study used autodriving and photo elicitation over a 12 week period to facilitate conversations with three Māori children about everyday learning. The findings emphasised the importance of everyday learning for the children's skill and knowledge development and development of self-understanding and belonging in relation to family and culture. Indeed, social interactions with family in multiple social and cultural contexts were critical for assisting children to make sense of and find their place in the world. This result has important implications for the formal/informal education debate and we argue is a foundation that needs to be developed further in the classroom to facilitate Māori academic achievement in formal educational settings.
       
  • Constituting play connection with very young children: Adults' active
           participation in play
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 17Author(s): Annukka Pursi, Lasse LipponenAbstractA large body of educational research has focused on play as one of children's own activities, however, considerably less attention has been paid to structures and practices associated with joint play between adults and children. This article contributes to this line of research by analyzing adults' participation in joint play with very young children. The data consist of 10 rich make-believe play cases taken from 150 h of videotaped, naturally occurring interactions in a group care setting. The results show that the ability of adults to build sustained co-participation in play with very young children demands delicately timed observations, initiatives and responses with attuned and coordinated use of gesture, gaze and talk. In all, this study provides one way to study and understand better what adults are doing in practice while they are actively co-participating in play. Pedagogical implications for early childhood education are discussed.
       
  • ADHD in the Interactional Context of Children's Cultures. A sociocultural
           critique of the individualizing gaze of the diagnosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 17Author(s): Thyge TegtmejerAbstractThis sociocultural study investigates whether aspects of the disruptive classroom behaviour of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-diagnosed students can be viewed as a way of participating in students' communities in class. Over two years, the interplay among students in two ADHD-inclusive mainstream Danish classrooms was studied. Classroom observational research, diagnostic tools and school-based interventions usually frame the behaviour of ADHD-diagnosed students as individual, impulsive behaviour. However, by scrutinizing the interaction among peers in classrooms where this study was conducted, it became evident that they often create disturbances on purpose, and this seems to be an important way of creating fun and amusement, as well as marking oneself as part of the students' community. When scrutinizing diagnosed students' orientations towards other students during classroom disturbances, it can be seen that some of their behaviour is woven into these interactional patterns and is primarily directed towards peers as communication and identity work. This could have important consequences for didactics, as well as research on ADHD-inclusive classrooms. Problematic conceptions of agency associated with the diagnosis are discussed.
       
  • Promoting self-determination for students with intellectual disability: A
           Vygotskian perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 May 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Veerle Garrels, Patrik ArvidssonAbstractDespite weak correlations between IQ scores and self-determination, research indicates that individuals with intellectual disability (ID) show lower levels of self-determination than their non-disabled peers, and that they experience lower effects of self-determination interventions. From a Vygotskian perspective, self-determination skills can be considered complex cognitive abilities that develop through social interaction with and adequate scaffolding by competent tutors. This approach raises the need to look into how self-determination interventions can be adapted to the cognitive profiles of individuals with ID. In this article, the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction was used with eight adolescents with mild ID over a three-month period. Typical challenges that were encountered are described, and suggestions for how these challenges can be addressed are discussed. Findings from this study illustrate how the development of self-determination skills may be facilitated when there is congruence between the individual's neurobiological development and the social conditions for development.
       
  • On the act of giving, receiving and rendering: Piloting the use of YouTube
           videos to develop a contextually inspired portrait of social circus
           trainers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Karin Hannes, Lise UtenAbstractSocial circus interventions targeting vulnerable populations are often perceived as catalysts for change. In recent years, more attention is given to the role of trainers involved in social circus. Several studies have profiled them based on the set of competences they should master to achieve predefined outcomes in participants. We challenge the very act of profiling, arguing that the way trainers and participants connect can best be understood through observing the way they put themselves at disposal. We conducted a pilot study in which we observed a sample of 15 YouTube videos to develop an initial portrait of these trainers, meant to inform a real life observational study. From the analysis of the videos three core dimensions of interest were revealed: the trainers role in social circus activities, the actions undertaken to build meaningful relationships and the reciprocal nature of the bonding process. Rather than presenting trainers as the gifted ones, who put a set of competences to work in a social circus setting, we position them as people who are guiding and are guided themselves. We argue that this mutual learning process is a necessary condition for establishing a meaningful relationship with social circus participants and to stimulate growth.
       
  • The interplay between parental argumentative strategies, children's
           reactions and topics of disagreement during family conversations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 May 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Antonio Bova, Francesco ArcidiaconoAbstractThis study aims to explore the interplay between parents' arguments, children's reactions and topics of disagreement during mealtime conversations. Within a data corpus constituted by 30 video-recorded meals of 10 Swiss and Italian families, a corpus of 132 argumentative discussions was selected for a qualitative analysis through the pragma-dialectical approach to argumentation. Findings indicate that both parents and children assume argument schemes related to the object of the disagreement: when the contested standpoints refer to food, arguments are based on a symptomatic relation; when they refer to the behavior of children, parents base their argumentation on a causal and analogy relation, while the children's reaction is typically an expression of further doubt or a mere opposition without providing any argument. The results of this study bring further light on the actual knowledge of argumentative interactions and the interplay between topics of disagreement and the argumentative strategies adopted by family members.
       
  • Identity, tools and existential spaces
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 May 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Federica RaiaAbstractIn this article I investigate the emergence of existential spaces during collaborative team work and learning practice. Within Advanced Heart Failure (AdHF) medical training and care I show how participants engage simultaneously in multiple synchronous activities of patient care and teaching and learning and how they make meaning across these spaces about what it means to be/become a learner, and practitioner - developing practice-linked identities (Nasir & Hand, 2008), as moment-to-moment oscillating synchronous identities. Building on Heidegger’s ontological structures of world and care, I develop an operational definition of existential spaces. In the social context of teaching and learning in practice where asymmetrical power and knowledge distribution situations are in place, it is important to understand how the negotiation of different identities through these spaces can be safely operated to support learners develop practice-linked identities. Through a microethnographic multimodal analysis I make visible at the interactional level the phenomenon of negotiating through these spaces, expanding Heidegger’s concept of breakdown to a social activity initiated in order to teach novel form of practice and to support the Other to safely develop an identity congruent and integrated with others.
       
  • Myths about bilingual learning in family life settings: Werner Leopold's
           child language biographies and contemporary work on children's play
           practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 May 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Karin AronssonAbstractIn four volumes, Werner Leopold documented his first child's acquisition of German and English (e.g. 1939; 1949). In this article I problematize contemporary myths about bilingualism that partly date back to Leopold's pioneering work and his theorizing about the one-language/one-person method of language development. Notably, this method worked for his first-born, but not for his second child, whose very existence has often not been noted. A dyadic bias – privileging the study of one parent/one child – has led to a neglect of the role of siblings and peers. Moreover, a cognitive bias has led to an under-analysis of the role of play in language acquisition. On the basis of work on play practices and activity settings, this paper addresses these biases, highlighting the role of social demands and play communities for multilingual development. Several explanations are presented for why Leopold's second child did not speak German. In foregrounding the social situation of development and the role of play, this paper advocates more holistic approaches, including the study of hybrid improvisations in everyday practices.
       
  • The material and social constitution of interest
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 May 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Daniela Kruel DiGiacomo, Katie Van Horne, Erica Van Steenis, William R. PenuelAbstractIn the 21st century, what role does interest play in the organization of equitable learning opportunities for young people' Drawing on a large corpus of interview data from a longitudinal study of fifty-four adolescents involved in interest-driven afterschool activities domestically and abroad, we investigate the role of youths' interests in their everyday lives. Cognizant of the growing emphasis from sociocultural learning scholars on issues of interest, agency, and engagement as they relate to learning, we explore youths' interests from their perspective—that is, we highlight the ways in which youth themselves made sense of their interests in relation to the rest of their lives. Informed by social practice theory, our analysis situates the interests articulated from the first-person perspectives of youth amidst the broader sociocultural situations from which they arose. Analysis of data reveals the material and social constitution of interest itself—and calls for increased attention to the interplay between social relations and material realities as key mediators of contemporary learning opportunities.
       
  • Motive orientations at work
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Kasper MunkAbstractHedegaard's cultural-historical research offers unique resources for understanding motivation in institutional practices. While Hedegaard's work predominantly focuses on the motive orientations children pursue in their everyday activities, this article argues that her theoretical and methodological approach enables the unpacking of what constitutes the motivation of adult professionals. The article first provides a brief review of the growing body of research that uses Hedegaard's approach for the study of professionals. Then, drawing on a study of teacher decision-making in an English secondary school, it presents an adaptation of Hedegaard's approach which allows for analysis of moment-by-moment shifts in professionals' motive orientations. Instead of viewing work motivation in terms of fluctuation in professionals' commitments to general and analytically pre-specified goals, the article offers an approach that examines motivation as continuously shifting relationships between professionals and their work.
       
  • Potential reproduction and renewal in a weekend mosque school in Canada:
           Educators' perspectives of learning and development
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Claire Alkouatli, Jennifer A. VadeboncoeurAbstractGrounded in sociocultural theory, this paper describes and discusses three themes from a qualitative study that examined Muslim educators' perspectives on learning and developing in a Sunni mosque school in Canada. First, the educators described the objectives of Islamic education and human development as converging in a life-long trajectory. Teaching and learning Islamic principles and practices were intended for specific forms of Islamic development. Second, the educators engaged children in social practices, composed of unique pedagogies and cultural tools, to mediate their interpretations of Islam in relation to the surrounding non-Muslim cultural context. Third, the educators used pedagogies flexibly and emphasized relationships with students. Together with students, these Muslim educators constructed teaching and learning as processes of potential reproduction and renewal. This research contributes to the scant literature on learning and developing within sites of Islamic education in multicultural Canada by highlighting the current critiques around pedagogy and suggesting potential paths for future research.
       
  • Research and activist projects of resistance: The ethical-political
           foundations for a transformative ethico-onto-epistemology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Anna StetsenkoAbstractThe core argument in this paper is that all research schools and theoretical frameworks carry with them – and, importantly, also within them, as their inherent dimensions – particular ethical orientations (systems of values and ethical endpoints) tailored to and derivative from socio-political and ultimately, practical projects in which research uniquely gains its concreteness and meaning. These projects can be differentiated along the axis either of supporting (explicitly or implicitly) the status quo by taking it for granted and not challenging its reigning assumptions or, alternatively, aiming at transcending it through resistance and social transformation. These systems of values and orientations, or a sociopolitical ethos, indelibly color all other elements and dimensions of inquiries such as their ontologies and epistemologies, forming a unified ethico-onto-epistemology. Cultural-historical theory, under certain expansions and upgrades, is a paradigmatic case for advancing this position, with Hedegaard's works seen as sharing Vygotsky's broadly defined sociopolitical ethos which sheds light on her approach's significance and promise. To establish the centrality of ethico-onto-epistemology, a revision of the constitutional framework that could enable it, away from assumptions of passivity, accommodation, and adaptation, is required. A Transformative Activist Stance paves the way to understand knowledge production as always embedded within activist pursuits of broad social projects beyond the narrow confines of academia while embracing transformative agency grounded in political imagination and commitment to resistance and radical social transformation.
       
  • Zombies and ethical theories: Exploring transformational play as a
           framework for teaching with videogames
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Filipa de Sousa, Ingvill Rasmussen, Palmyre PierrouxAbstractVideogames are included among the wide array of digital resources available to teachers to foster student engagement and teach domain-specific content. In this study, we analyze how two teachers in two countries used the commercial videogame The Walking Dead™ to teach ethical theories in upper secondary citizenship education. In both cases, students collaborated in playing the videogame, and teachers led whole-class and small-group discussions to relate the game narrative to the curriculum. However, the analysis identified two different instructional designs and dialogic approaches to integrating the videogame with other educational resources. Extending the concept of transformational play, the analysis showed how the respective teaching approaches supported student learning and engagement by facilitating different types of positioning work.
       
  • John Dewey, subject purposes and schools of tomorrow: A centennial
           reappraisal of the educational contribution of physical education
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Malcolm ThorburnAbstractThis historically-themed critical paper reappraises selective progressive education writings by John Dewey in relation to two questions: firstly, how was physical education organised and taught in the Gary Schools, a programme Dewey widely praised in Schools of Tomorrow and secondly, how might the educational aspirations of Dewey benefit current subject purposes in physical education. This exercise highlights points of disconnection between the ideas of Dewey and areas of practice in the Gary Schools and the modest engagement Dewey’s theorizing has had in informing the educational contribution of physical education over the last century. Both points are problematic in pursuing progressive education agendas and the latter point highlights the continuing need for a more convincing educational account of physical education to be advanced. The paper concludes by arguing for a Deweyan and Merleau-Pontian informed account of physical education which is primed by embodied learning and social and moral development.
       
  • Children's perspectives and institutional practices as keys in a wholeness
           approach to children's social situations of development
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Mariane HedegaardAbstractThis article addresses a dilemma in relation to researching children's thinking and concept formation as an intentional process of competence acquisition and at the same time seeing children as persons in their life contexts, where the researcher also is a participant. Davydov's concept of theoretical knowledge and thinking helped me to tackle this dilemma as a dialectical process of moving from the general to the particular and back again by analysing children's concrete social situations starting from the societal conditions, then examining institutional objectives, and children's motive orientations in activity settings - in order to gain an understanding of children's social situations in their everyday activities.In this article I illustrate the problems of getting knowledge of children's conceptual and motivation development, by drawing on several of my research projects to illustrate, through my own biographic development, the dilemmas that psychology has to overcome in studying children's activities in their different social situations. The discussion particularly relates to the potential demands of the situation and children's motive orientations in these situations.
       
  • How robots challenge institutional practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Cathrine HasseAbstractIn a globalized world, tools are not what they used to be. Artefacts are material and ideal, but they are often used by people other than those who made them, creating a culture-culture split. The person who creates an artefact perceives it in one way; whereas the people who use it learn how to perceive it in relation their own activity settings and local institutional practices. In this article, I draw on a recent study of the introduction of a robot helper into the activity setting of a Danish rehabilitation centre to examine this split and to identify the processes by which material artefacts may or may not become embedded within cultures. The study traced how the staff at the centre made efforts to find uses for the robot, but ultimately recognised that they needed to reject it, as the demands made by the technology prevented their pursuing what they saw as the primary purposes of the centre. The analyses of the processes in play during attempts at accommodating and then rejecting the robot were informed by Hedegaard's seminal framing of the relationships between activity settings with their histories and motives and the institutional practices within which they are located. The study ultimately concluded that overarching motives of the everyday work of the staff determined whether they included the material artefact, the robot, in their activities as meaningful, or excluded it as meaningless.
       
  • Agency, common knowledge and motive orientation: Working with insights
           from Hedegaard in research on provision for vulnerable children and young
           people
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Anne EdwardsAbstractThe starting point for the discussion in this article is Hedegaard's extension of the work of Leont'ev on the recursive interplay of person and society. Hedegaard locates the salient aspects of the social conditions in the dialectic of mind and society in institutional practices, with recurrent demands that participants find they need to orient towards. This insight places a strong focus on the challenges of entering new practices or moving between practices. Edwards' concept of common knowledge is introduced as a resource that can mediate such transitions. Links between the idea of common knowledge, comprising the motives of actors in different practices, and Hedegaard's work on institutional demands and personal motive orientation are drawn. The explanation is given through the discussion of key ideas in two research studies: an examination of new forms of inter-professional working in schools in Chile; and a UK study of young people with autistic spectrum conditions who are making the transition into the workplace. Attention is also paid to Hedegaard's methodological contributions to the field, in particular, her focus on following the action of key informants in order to gauge their motive orientation and the how they orient themselves to the recurrent demands of the practices they are entering.
       
  • Peer organized study groups: Successful learning interactions in Mexican
           undergraduate physics
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Antonia Candela
       
  • Art on the move: The role of joint attention in visitors' encounters with
           artworks
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Dimitra ChristidouAbstractMost visitors arrive at museums and navigate their way through the galleries as part of a group, a constellation requiring them to oscillate their attention between their companions and the curated exhibition. This paper focuses on two examples of videotaped data collected at an art museum in the UK to explore the ways in which visitors achieve joint attention with their companions in front of a painting. The analysis draws on interaction analysis and foregrounds the ways in which pairs of visitors achieve joint attention, especially when there is distance between them and they are not attending the same artwork. The findings contribute to a better understanding of attention as a resource for meaning making in the museum and complement the line of research exploring how visitors negotiate and make meaning in and through social interaction.
       
  • A qualitative case study of Instructional Support practices in Chinese
           preschool classrooms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Yi Yang, Bi Ying Hu, Shulin Yu, Sherron Killingsworth Roberts, Sylvia S.L. Ieong
       
  • Student-teacher conferencing in Swedish upper secondary school: Dimensions
           of dominance and relations between perspectives in institutional discourse
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Robert OhlssonAbstractStudent-teacher conferences are mandatory in Swedish upper secondary school. Steering documents prescribe that these conversations should be characterised by equality between the interlocutors and “dialogue” is presented as an ideal for these interactions. This is a challenging task since this institutional discourse actualises the formal roles of student and teacher, and the interlocutors' relationship is inherently asymmetrical. This paper presents findings from an empirical study of audiotaped student-teacher conferences. By drawing on the concepts of perspectivisation and dominance the findings highlight ways that perspectives are related to each other in the conferences. The results show that the teachers' interactional role in the conversations was characterised by interactional dominance, while forms that had been filled out in preparation were used as tools that mediated student-teacher interaction and dominated the conferences semantically. Results pertaining to dominance and perspectivisation are further presented in terms of: perspective elicitation in the conversations; validation of the student perspective; playing down of asymmetry; and the ways that verticality between perspectives is established. It is concluded that when using guidelines involving self-assessment in a routine way as an agenda, the conferences acquires an educational and formative character rather than the open exploratory character prescribed in policy documents.
       
  • “Food for thought”: Blogging about food as dialogical strategy for
           self-disclosure and otherness
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Maria Beatrice Ligorio, Giovanna Barzanò
       
  • Just plain peers across social networks: Peer-feedback networks nested in
           personal and academic networks in higher education
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Filitsa Dingyloudi, Jan-Willem StrijbosAbstractPeer feedback (PF) is often referred to as a socially mediated learning process. Nevertheless, the surrounding social networks, within which PF interactions are nested, are often neglected. This study examines PF, personal, and academic networks in higher education to identify any peer centrality pattern. Additionally, the PF content is examined to identify any content-related pattern across PF networks. Participants were 47 master students in a German university. A subsample of 32 students, who voluntarily participated in two learning communities, so called Communities of Learning Practice (CoLP), was further examined in terms of PF networks and content of provided PF. Data were collected from social network questionnaires (cohort level) and video recordings of community events (CoLP level). Data analysis involved (a) contextual SNA of questionnaire data to identify participants' centrality in personal and academic networks, (b) SNA of video data to identify CoLP members' centrality in PF networks, and (c) content analysis of video data to identify the content of PF provision. Findings indicate a heterogeneous centrality pattern across networks and a homogeneous content-related pattern in the provided PF across CoLPs. This study aims to contribute to the reconceptualization of PF as a web of socially nested and multiplex learning interactions.
       
  • Scaffolding primary teachers in designing and enacting language-oriented
           science lessons: Is handing over to independence a fata morgana'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Jantien Smit, Martine Gijsel, Anna Hotze, Arthur BakkerAbstractThe purpose of the design-based research reported here is to show – as a proof of principle – how the idea of scaffolding can be used to support primary teachers in a professional development programme (PDP) to design and enact language-oriented science lessons. The PDP consisted of six sessions of 2.5 h each in which twelve primary school teachers took part over a period of six months. It centralised the language support that pupils need to reason during science lessons. In line with the idea of scaffolding, the structure of the PDP targeted teachers' gradual independence in designing lessons. The first research question is how scaffolding was enacted during the PDP. The analysis of video recordings, field notes, researcher and teacher logs, and teacher design assignments focused on the enactment of three scaffolding characteristics: diagnosis, responsiveness and handover to independence. The second research question concerns what teachers learned from the participation in the PDP that followed a scaffolding approach. The data analysis illustrates that these teachers had learned much in terms of designing and enacting language-oriented science lessons. In terms of diagnosis and responsiveness, our PDP approach was successful, but we problematise the ideal of scaffolding approaches focused on handover to independence.
       
  • Do children express curiosity at school' Exploring children's
           experiences of curiosity inside and outside the school context
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Tim Post, Juliette H. Walma van der Molen
       
  • Designing and implementing a test for measuring cultural dimensions in
           primary school
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Damián Gelerstein, Miguel Nussbaum, Ximena López, Ana Cortés, Cristóbal Castillo, Pablo Chiuminatto, Francisca OvalleAbstractCognition and culture are deeply intertwined as there are important cross-cultural differences in the cognitive development of individuals. Although there are a large number of studies on the subject of culture, these are qualitative in nature and not focused on school contexts. Our aim is to develop a quantitative instrument for primary education that determines the cultural texture within an individual institution, as well as among different kinds of schools. For this purpose, Hofstede's original instrument was adapted, taking into consideration the characteristics and practices of primary school students. A factor analysis and complementary qualitative analysis of the factors obtained from 783 surveys (administered to third and fourth graders) led to the creation of five dimensions, which contrasted with Hofstede's theoretical dimensions. These dimensions include Value of School Achievement, Value of Institutional Structure, Resistance to change, Normative versus Affective and Value of Equality in the Production of Knowledge. Furthermore, this new set of dimensions was a more accurate representation of the school context and the values held by primary school students. Significant differences were found in three of the dimensions when analyzing the cultural differences of the sample and taking into account the students' socioeconomic background. These findings are important as they reveal the presence of subcultures within a given society, which are determined by belonging to a certain socioeconomic class. Measuring cultural values among primary school students contributes to the creation of educational models, the design of educational institutions and the development of public policy since new structures cannot succeed without adequate cultural support.
       
  • Emotional and playful stance taking in joint play between adults and very
           young children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Annukka Pursi, Lasse Lipponen, Nina Kristiina SajaniemiAbstractThe purpose of this single case study was to investigate emotional and playful stance taking in adults and very young children as they engage in joint make-believe play activity in a natural Finnish group-care setting. Drawing on the sequential approach of conversation analysis (CA), the study represents an effort to understand play in an early childhood education (ECE) setting from both children's and adults' perspectives at the same time. The results suggest that the interplay of emotional and playful stance taking in make-believe play produces emotional transitions in interaction. These transitions can be understood as interactional accomplishments that offer children and adults the possibility to align and affiliate themselves with their own and each other's emotional experiences and to explore personal reflections of the emotionally heightened real-life trajectories in a shared make-believe play frame. Based on these findings, it is argued that creating and maintaining emotionally heightened joint play with very young children requires adults' emotional involvement and delicately calibrated participation through leading, following and leading by following. Further empirical study is needed to investigate sequences in which playful and emotional stance taking stand in a non-aligning and non-affiliating relationship. Such research could reveal problem-remedy sequences more evidently and provide important further development of ECE theory and practice for children under the age of three.
       
  • Does a good argument make a good answer' Argumentative reconstruction
           of children's justifications in a second order false belief task
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Elisabetta Lombardi, Sara Greco, Davide Massaro, Rebecca Schär, Federico Manzi, Antonio Iannaccone, Anne-Nelly Perret-Clermont, Antonella MarchettiAbstractThis paper proposes a novel approach to interpret the results of a classical second-order false belief task (the ice cream man task) administered to children in order to investigate their Theory of Mind. We adopted a dialogical perspective to study the adult-child discussion in this research setting. In particular, we see the adult-child conversation as an argumentative discussion in which children are asked to justify their answers to the questions asked by the researcher. We analysed the specificities of the research setting as an argumentative activity type; we reconstructed and analysed the children's answers on the basis of two models taken from Argumentation theory (the pragma-dialectical model and the Argumentum Model of Topics). Our findings show that some of the children's partially “incorrect” answers depend on the pragmatics of the conversation, the relation between explicit and implicit content, and a misunderstanding of the discussion issue. Other “incorrect” answers are actually based on correct inferences but they do not meet the researchers' expectations, because the children do not share the same material premises as the researchers. These findings invite further research on children's reasoning and on the characteristics of argumentation within a research task.
       
  • The Three Domains for Dialogue: A framework for analysing dialogic
           approaches to teaching and learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social InteractionAuthor(s): Elisa Calcagni, Leonardo LagoAbstractThis theoretical article focuses on the dialogic teaching literature in an effort to build an integrative framework. We deem this necessary amidst an expanding field that still lacks a common vocabulary and means for integrating and comparing available approaches. In the framework, three domains that are key in dialogic teaching are outlined: Teaching-learning, Instruments and Assumptions. These general domains comprise eleven more specific components that reflect key elements considered to play a role in underpinning, supporting and enacting dialogic teaching. We take the framework's components to analyse and compare Thinking Together and Accountable Talk, two well-developed approaches with extensive publications. We highlight the underlying aspects and key features of each approach, such as participant arrangement, talk tools and classroom norms. Finally, we speculate prospective uses of our framework in the field.
       
  • A discursive approach to the analysis of epistemic cognition
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 16Author(s): Simon Knight, Karen LittletonAbstractA core concern in learning is coming to understand the ways in which claims of knowledge are made. The epistemic cognition literature typically characterises this learning in terms of how learners cognitively conceptualise the source and nature of knowledge. Recent work has offered alternative accounts of epistemic cognition that recognise the discursive nature of the construct. These accounts are derived from analysis of the ways that learners talk about knowledge in tasks such as evaluating scientific claims from sources of varying qualities. In this paper we draw on this recent work to advance a novel approach to the analysis of discourse data in epistemic contexts. This approach is exemplified through its application to an existing dataset, demonstrating both the application of the approach and the particular kinds of discourse that learners engaged in. This discursive approach has the potential for broad application in the learning sciences' treatment of epistemic cognition.
       
  • Deconflating the ZPD and instructional scaffolding: Retranslating and
           reconceiving the zone of proximal development as the zone of next
           development
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 16Author(s): Peter SmagorinskyAbstractThis article provides a reconception of what is known as Vygotsky's “zone of proximal development,” particularly its improper conflation with the notion of “instructional scaffolding.” The article introduces the essay's purpose and motivation; reviews and critiques Vygotsky's description of the ZPD and explains how it has come to be misinterpreted; summarizes Wood, Bruner, and Ross's introduction of the scaffolding metaphor; and provides a different, more accurate translation of the ZPD as the zone of next development, based on the documentary film The Butterflies of Zagorsk. Through this analysis, the author contends that the conflation of scaffolding with the ZPD has produced a trivialization of Vygotsky's greater body of work, reducing it to a briefly-mentioned pedagogical idea and resulting in the neglect of his more important project of generating a comprehensive cultural-historical-social theory of mediated human development.
       
  • Communicative interactions in foreign language education: Contact anxiety,
           appraisal and distance
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 16Author(s): Damian J. Rivers, Andrew S. RossAbstractFramed against a backdrop of complex intergroup dynamics and the legacies created for foreign language education, the current article tests three hypotheses which explore the efficacy of direct contact encounters between Japanese university students and ‘idealized’ native-speaker English teachers. As antecedents to positive language learning outcomes, attention is given to student self-reported measures of pre-contact and post-contact anxiety, student appraisals of teacher desirability, and perceptions of distance between student and teacher. Drawn from 132 individual contact encounters experienced by 22 students, the data indicates that significant differences between pre-contact and post-contact measures were only observable in relation to students' self-reported feelings of anxiety. Moreover, while more localized assessments were found to be significant in relation to teacher appraisals and perceptions of distance, these were limited to either pre-contact or post-contact measures. The outcomes are discussed in relation to the teaching of English as Foreign Language (EFL), the role of social interaction between student and teacher, and the significance of culture.
       
  • Social learning through rural communities of practice: Empirical evidence
           from farming households in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 16Author(s): Thong Anh Tran, Helen James, Jamie PittockAbstractThe social-ecological systems of the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) are under stress driven by accelerating impacts of climate change, upstream hydropower development, and local flood management policies. These combined complexities have prompted the rural societies to make significant efforts to adapt to changing conditions. While local adaptation represents diverse patterns of communication and interactions across the social sectors, far less attention has been given to how these learning processes occur in the rural communities of practice. This paper attempts to delineate the learning dynamics in which farming households are key practitioners. The mixed methods approach that guides data collection includes focus group discussions, in-depth interviews with key informants and household surveys. The analysis suggests that social learning plays a significant role in facilitating the adoption and dissemination of experiential and experimental knowledge across geographical boundaries. This study highlights important aspects of households' social learning system characterized by informal networks with various forms of bonding and bridging relationships. These learning patterns suggest that informal communication is a dominant learning approach in the rural delta. This study contributes to advancing the theoretical and empirical knowledge of social learning and its policy implications for rural development in the VMD.
       
  • The relationship between conceptions of learning and academic outcomes in
           middle school students according to gender differences
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 16Author(s): Giuliana Pinto, Lucia Bigozzi, Giulia Vettori, Claudio VezzaniAbstractThis study was aimed at inquiring the relationships between conceptions of learning and academic outcomes in middle school students, also considering gender differences. Students' conceptions of learning were investigated in 136 participants by means of a self-report questionnaire and their academic outcomes were collected. General Linear Models were used to analyze the relationships among the variables. Conceptions of learning predicted the academic outcomes, even considering gender differences. Conceptions of learning as a ‘co-constructive and cultural process’ and as a ‘personal challenge, self-efficacy and personal growth’ were positively related to academic outcomes. Instead, a conception of learning as ‘reduction of a deficit through individual effort’ was a negative predictor. Furthermore, females showed a higher predictive association between a conception of learning as a ‘co-constructive and cultural process’ and academic outcomes, compared with this predictive association shown in males.
       
  • Striking a balance: Socio-emotional processes during argumentation in
           collaborative learning interaction
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018Source: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, Volume 16Author(s): Jaana Isohätälä, Piia Näykki, Sanna Järvelä, Michael J. Baker
       
 
 
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