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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3158 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3157 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 97, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 422, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 168, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 408, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 471, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 229, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 194, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
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Agriculture and Natural Resources
Number of Followers: 3  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2452-316X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3158 journals]
  • Effect of urea- and molasses-treated sugarcane bagasse on nutrient
           composition and in vitro rumen fermentation in dairy cows

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Ratchataporn Lunsin, Suntariporn Duanyai, Ruangyote Pilajun, Somporn Duanyai, Prapatsorn Sombatsri The effect of urea- and molasses-treated sugarcane bagasse was studied on the chemical composition, fermentation quality, in vitro gas production and digestibility in dairy cows. The experiment followed a completely randomized design in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with a control (sugarcane bagasse without any treatment). Factor A was before or after the sugarcane bagasse had been fermented with substrate at 21 d, factor B was the level of urea (0% or 5%), and factor C was the level of molasses (0% or 5%). The results showed that the crude protein content of the sugarcane bagasse increased (p 
       
  • Variance components and animal rankings for milk yield and fat yield in a
           multibreed dairy cattle population using genomic-polygenic, genomic and
           polygenic models

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Bodin Wongpom, Skorn Koonawootrittriron, Mauricio A. Elzo, Thanathip Suwanasopee The variance ratios were estimated and animal rankings of genomic-polygenic (GP), genomic (G) and polygenic (P) models were compared for milk yield (MY) and fat yield (FY) in a Thai multibreed dairy cattle population. The dataset contained monthly records of MY and FY from 600 first-lactation cows from 56 farms in Central Thailand. The mixed model contained herd-year-season, Holstein fraction, heterozygosity of the cow and age at first calving as fixed effects (all models). Random effects were single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; GP and G models), animal polygenic (GP and P models) and the residual. The GP heritability estimates were higher for MY (0.38) and FY (0.41) than for the P model (0.28 for MY and 0.30 for FY). The fractions of the additive genetic variance explained by the SNP markers were 50% for MY and 48% for FY. Rank correlations between GP and G were the highest for both MY and FY (0.99; p 
       
  • A preliminary serological study of Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma
           lewisi in a Chinese human population

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Jiang-Mei Gao, Philippe Truc, Marc Desquesnes, Philippe Vincendeau, Patrick Courtois, Xuan Zhang, Su-Jin Li, S. Jittapalapong, Zhao-Rong Lun Trypanosoma evansi, known as an animal trypanosome, is widely distributed in many countries of Africa, Asia and South America; it causes significant economic loss in these countries. A few cases have also occurred in some countries of Europe due to the importation of infected animals from endemic regions. Rare human T. evansi infections were attended by the health departments and international health organizations in these endemic countries. Trypanosoma lewisi, a cosmopolitan parasite of rats, sometimes found in humans, is currently considered as a zoonotic pathogen and has gained special attention from scientists and international health organizations such as the World Health Organization. The current study considered the serological screening of human infection by T. evansi and T. lewisi in a Chinese human population. None of the 622 samples was found positive for T. evansi infection using the card agglutination test for the trypanosome antigen Rotat 1.2, while, 2.41% of the examined serum samples exhibited some seropositivity to T. lewisi using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No significant difference was found between the samples from areas in the South (Zhaoqing, Guangdong) and Central (Zhengzhou, Henan) China.
       
  • Genetic diversity and relationships among Lyle's flying fox colonies in
           Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Ngamphrom Sukgosa, Sutee Duangjai, Prateep Duengkae, Supaporn Wacharapluesadee, Pimchanok Songmongkol, Sangchai Yingsakmongkon, Kevin J. Olival, Thiravat Hemachudha Lyle's flying fox (Pteropus lylei) is a large frugivorous bat found in central Thailand that usually roosts in temples in the middle of towns in close proximity to humans. Pteropus lylei is considered a reservoir for Nipah encephalitis viral outbreaks reported in Malaysia and Bangladesh. Thailand is bordered to the south by Malaysia. Information on the genetic diversity and genetic relationships of P. lylei is limited; therefore, cytochrome b (cytb) DNA sequences were used to examine the genetic diversity and genetic relationships of P. lylei. In total, 52 P. lylei individuals from 10 colonies in central Thailand were analyzed. The study identified 25 unique haplotypes and 43 variable sites among the 52 individuals. The results showed that P. lylei had high levels of haplotype diversity (0.949, 25 different haplotypes among 52 individuals) but low levels of nucleotide diversity (0.006). The overall pairwise φST was 0.006 (p 
       
  • Growth response to population density in larval stage of darkling beetles
           (Coleoptera; Tenebrionidae) Tenebrio molitor and Zophobas atratus

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Jingyoh Zaelor, Sangvorn Kitthawee Insect farming efficiency is deterred by the complications associated with a high population density, such as competition and stress. Darkling beetles are farmable insect candidates as they are well adapted to survive at a high larval density. This study tested the effect on productivity of the larval density in two species of darkling beetle, Tenebrio molitor Linn. and Zophobas atratus Fab. Larval weight gain was measured by feeding larvae with wheat (Triticum aestivum Linn.) bran and leaves of ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.). Larvae were also abstained to test weight loss at different larval densities. The results showed similar weight gains in both species (p = 0.7858). During abstaining periods, Z. atratus had significantly higher weight loss (p 
       
  • Genetic variation of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes across Thailand based on
           nuclear DNA sequences

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Pimnapat Parimittr, Theeraphap Chareonviriyaphap, Michael J. Bangs, Uraiwan Arunyawat The Aedes aegypti L. mosquito is the primary vector of dengue viruses in Thailand, where dengue disease is a major public health problem in both urban and rural areas. Understanding the genetic variation of Ae. aegypti populations can help to understand the distribution, population structure and gene flow of this species. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were used to analyze the genetic variation of 21 Ae. aegypti populations collected across six geographic locations in Thailand. Nuclear DNA sequences of four putative neutral fragments located on different chromosomes were examined. An average of 14 SNPs per kb was detected per population. Tajima's D statistical test showed no significant deviation from the neutral equilibrium model in the majority of populations, suggesting that the detected patterns of variation were under random mutation and genetic drift equilibrium. Relatively low genetic differentiation was detected between all mosquito populations.
       
  • Prediction of biochemical mechanism of anti-inflammation explained from
           two marine-derived bioactive compounds

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Jidapa Sornsiri, Klaokwan Srisook, Preedawan Pornngam, Pitak Sootanan Marine brown macroalgae contain several bioactive compounds with potent anti-inflammatory properties but undescribed pharmacological properties. This study provided the first description of the biochemical mechanism of anti-inflammation from two bioactive compounds (fucoxanthin and sargachromenol) found in brown macroalgae (Sargassum spp.) based on a functional module-based analysis of a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The constructed PPI network of fucoxanthin and sargachromenol with 18 and 5 inflammatory proteins, respectively, have scale-free, small world and modular properties. There were 6 and 1 inflammatory modules found associated with the anti-inflammatory actions of fucoxanthin and sargachromenol, respectively. Of particular interest was that the anti-inflammatory effect of fucoxanthin and sargachromenol may be partly attributable to regulation of the I-kappa B kinase/NF-kappa B cascade and regulation of gene expression, respectively. These can be used to search for potential targets of fucoxanthin and of sargachromenol to treat inflammation. Therefore, functional module-based analysis of a PPI network can be an initial method for elucidating the anti-inflammatory mechanism of active compounds and finding their targets to validate in a wet laboratory clinical application and for further drug development.
       
  • Acid hydrolysis optimization of cocoa pod shell using response surface
           methodology approach toward ethanol production

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Vinayaka B. Shet, Nisha sanil, Manasa Bhat, Manasa Naik, Leah Natasha Mascarenhas, Louella Concepta Goveas, C. Vaman Rao, P. Ujwal, K. Sandesh, A. Aparna Cocoa pod shell (CPS) is an underutilized agricultural lignocellulosic biomass. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis was carried out to release the reducing sugars from CPS. The conditions (CPS weight, concentration of HCl, revolutions per minute, hydrolysis period) which affect HCl hydrolysis were screened using one factor at a time approach of which determined that CPS weight, HCl concentration and hydrolysis period had a significant effect on the acid hydrolysis process. The levels of these factors were further optimized using a central composite design using response surface methodology. The optimized conditions were 8.36% (weight per volume) of CPS, 3.6 N of HCl concentration with 7.36 h of acid hydrolysis which yielded 4.09 g/L reducing sugars. A second order model was generated and validated, which was found to be a good fit (coefficient of determination = 0.914). The released reducing sugars after the acid hydrolysis under optimized conditions were subjected to alcoholic fermentation by Pichia stipitis to produce bioethanol. The bioethanol concentration reached 2 g/L at 2% (volume per volume) inoculum concentration after 72 h of fermentation.
       
  • Effect of carboxymethyl cellulose on properties of wheat flour-tapioca
           starch-based batter and fried, battered chicken product

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Rungnaphar Pongsawatmanit, Soraya Ketjarut, Panusorn Choosuk, Pattharasuda Hanucharoenkul Hydrocolloid is widely used to improve the quality of food. In this study, the effect of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) on the properties of batter and fried, battered product prepared from wheat flour (WF)-tapioca starch (TS) blends was investigated. The dry-mixes were prepared from the flour blends of 91.4% flour blend [WF/TS (1:1) and CMC (0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75% or 1.0%)], 5.5% salt and 3.1% leavening agent and then mixed with water (1:1.3) for batter preparation. The batters had a significant increase in consistency coefficient, yield stress and batter pickup with increasing CMC replacement in the dry mix. However, CMC did not significantly (p > 0.05) alter either the differential scanning calorimetry thermal properties of the batters or the rapid visco-analyzer viscosity after holding at 95 °C for 4 min. The substitution of CMC decreased the oil content but increased the moisture content in the pre-fried chicken wing sticks. After final frying at 180 °C, the oil content of the fried product was significantly (p  0.05) differences in the overall liking scores in the fried products without and with 0.5% CMC replacement in the flour blend. The results indicated that CMC could be used in WF/TS batter preparation, enhancing the batter pickup and quality and especially acting as an oil barrier-forming ingredient for fried, battered foods.
       
  • Determination of water activity, total soluble solids and moisture,
           sucrose, glucose and fructose contents in osmotically dehydrated papaya
           using near-infrared spectroscopy

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Bumrungrat Rongtong, Thongchai Suwonsichon, Pitiporn Ritthiruangdej, Sumaporn Kasemsumran Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a rapid analysis method that is widely used for quantitative determination of the major constituents in many food products. NIRS was applied in conjunction with a chemometric algorithm, namely the partial least squares regression (PLSR), to develop the optimum model for predicting the qualities of osmotically dehydrated papaya (ODP). Two hundred ODP samples were collected from commercial products and from different laboratory ODP processes with varying sucrose concentrations (35ºBrix, 45ºBirx, 55ºBrix and 65ºBrix) at 40 °C for 6 h and drying times at 60 °C for 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 10 h and 12 h. All samples were divided into a calibration set (n = 140) and a validation set (n = 60) before quality determination and NIRS analysis. Samples were scanned over the NIR spectral range of 800–2400 nm in reflectance mode and their spectra were pretreated using the second derivative method. Suitable predictive models were developed by applying full wavelength PLSR and two wavelength interval selection methods, named the moving window partial least squares regression (MWPLSR) and the searching combination moving window partial least squares regression (SCMWPLSR). The results showed that SCMWPLSR provided better performance than PLSR and MWPLSR. The root mean square error of prediction values of water activity, moisture content, total soluble solids and the sucrose, glucose and fructose contents from SCMWPLSR were 0.014, 0.69% (dry basis), 0.58ºBrix, 14.44 g/100 g of sample, 6.72 g/100 g of sample and 4.89 g/100 g of sample, respectively, with correlation coefficients in the range 0.981–0.994.
       
  • Optimization of pumpkin and feed moisture content to produce healthy
           pumpkin-germinated brown rice extruded snacks

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Phanlert Promsakha na Sakon Nakhon, Kamolwan Jangchud, Anuvat Jangchud, Chulaluck Charunuch The effects of three levels of pumpkin flour (PF; 10, 20 and 30%) and three levels of feed moisture content (FM; 13, 16 and 19%) on the physical properties, antioxidant activity and sensory properties of pumpkin-germinated brown rice extrudates were investigated. The increase in the PF increased the bulk density, hardness, total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity, but decreased the expansion ratio of the extruded snack. Decreasing the FM caused an increase in the TPC and antioxidant activity of the snack product. The predicted optimum formulation of extrudates using response surface methodology was 10–13% PF and 13–14% FM under extrusion conditions at 140 °C (zone 6) and 350 rpm screw speed. These conditions produced extruded snacks with TPC values of 20–28 mg GAE/100 g sample on a dry basis and appearance and hardness liking scores of more than 6.5 (on a 9-point hedonic scale). Therefore, the results of this study supported the utilization of PF and germinated brown rice flour to develop healthy snack products.
       
  • Combined effects of food additives and heat treatment on fruit rot disease
           and quality of harvested dragon fruit

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Pongphen Jitareerat, Kanlaya Sripong, Kato Masaya, Sukanya Aiamla-or, Apiradee Uthairatanakij The effects of food additives (sodium carbonate, SC and potassium sorbate, PS) at 0%, 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% weight per volume on fungal spore germination of dragon fruit rot diseases, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, C. capsici and Fusarium sp. were investigated on media. PS at all concentrations showed complete inhibition of spore germination in the three fungi. SC 2% inhibited the germination of C. gloeosporioides by 100% while SC 3% completely inhibited the germination of C. capsici and Fusarium sp. PS solution was selected to study its combined effects with hot water treatment on fruit rot disease and quality of dragon fruit artificially inoculated with C. gloeosporioides. The fruit samples were treated in a heated (55 °C) solution of 1% PS for 5 min and then cooled in tap water at 10 °C (PS-55 °C + cold H2O). Non-treated fruit and fruit treated with the fungicide carbendazim were used as controls. All samples were assessed after being kept at 13 °C for 15 d. The treatment of PS-55 °C + cold H2O reduced the severity of diseases and helped to delay chlorophyll degradation in the dragon fruit bracts, had little impact on the respiration rate, delayed ethylene production and maintained the total ascorbic acid content. However, PS-55 °C + cold H2O treatment, while having little initial effect, did reduce fruit firmness after 15 d of storage. The PS-55 °C + cold H2O treatment did not affect weight loss or the total soluble solids concentration. These findings showed that the PS-55 °C + cold H2O treatment could act as a safe alternative method for suppressing fruit rot disease while maintaining the quality of dragon fruit during cold storage.
       
  • Detection and allele identification of rice blast resistance gene, Pik, in
           Thai rice germplasm

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Kasirapat Ariya-anandech, Chaivarakun Chaipanya, Wattanaporn Teerasan, Sureeporn Kate-Ngam, Chatchawan Jantasuriyarat The objectives of this study were to detect the rice blast resistance gene, Pik, in Thai rice germplasm and to identify their alleles. Rice blast resistance gene specific primers were designed and used to screen for the presence of the Pik resistance gene in 373 Thai rice varieties. The results showed that 29 out of the 373 Thai rice varieties contained the Pik gene. All 29 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were digested by the PstI restriction enzyme. PCR products from 25 rice varieties could be digested by the PstI enzyme, indicating that they contained the Pikp resistance group, which has a narrow disease spectrum. The PCR products from four rice varieties could not be digested by the PstI enzyme, suggesting that they contained the desirable Pikm resistance group, which has a broad disease spectrum. The nucleotide sequences of these four rice varieties in the Pikm resistance group revealed that the Khaw reng rice variety had the Pikm allele and the other three rice varieties had the Piks allele. Khaw reng can be used as an elite resistant donor in conventional and molecular breeding programs for blast disease resistance in Thailand.
       
  • Study of prebiotic properties from edible mushroom extraction

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Thornthan Sawangwan, Wanwipa Wansanit, Lalita Pattani, Chanai Noysang The prebiotic properties were investigated of seven edible mushrooms: Auricularia auricula-judae, Lentinus edodoes, Pleurotus citrinopileatus, Pleurotus djamor, Pleurotus ostreatus, Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.Fr.) Kummer and Pleurotus pulmonarius. All mushrooms were extracted using distilled water and ethanol at a ratio of 1:4 vol per volume, respectively, at 80 °C and shaken at 150 revolutions per minute for 1–4 hr before the total carbohydrates and total reducing sugar were determined. After 3 hr of extraction, P. ostreatus had the maximum yield of total carbohydrates (6.7325 ± 0.0261 mg/mL) and total reducing sugar (2.6737 ± 0.0027 mg/mL). Based on high performance liquid chromatography analysis, A. auricula-judae had the highest levels of galactose and maltrotriose (928.26 mM and 112.59 mM, respectively), while L. edodoes had a high lactulose level (229.64 mM). Each mushroom extract was supplemented in Man Rogosa Sharpe broth for cultivation of probiotic strains of L. acidophilus and L. plantarum. Next, the prebiotic properties were determined based on probiotic growth stimulation, pathogenic inhibition (against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Samonella Paratyphi and Stapphylococcus aureus) and gastrointestinal tolerance (in amylase, bile extract and HCl). High probiotic growth stimulation resulted for L. acidophilus cultured with L. edodoes extract (1.9779 ± 0.0032), and for L. plantarum cultured with P. pulmonarius extract (1.9702 ± 0.0072). The widest inhibition zone of S. Paratyphi in the culture of L. acidophilus was 1.1500 ± 0.0707 cm with P. ostreatus extract. The highest survival percentage for gastrointestinal tolerance of probiotics after incubation for 2 hr with HCl was 13.64% for P. djamor extract cultured in L. acidophilus.
       
  • High temperature alcoholic fermentation by new thermotolerant yeast
           strains Pichia kudriavzevii isolated from sugarcane field soil

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Pongsanat Pongcharoen, Jariya Chawneua, Wittaya Tawong The thermotolerant and ethanogenic yeasts are an important factor in numerous ethanol industrial applications. In this study, the potential of new isolates of thermotolerant, ethanol-producing yeasts was successfully demonstrated. In total, 60 yeast isolates were obtained from soil sugarcane fields in Uttaradit, Kamphang Phet, Chai Nat, Sukhothai, Nakhon Sawan and Phitsanulok provinces, Thailand and subjected to characterization of thermotolerance using an enrichment technique with 4% (volume per volume) ethanol. The growth performance and fermentation activity under stress conditions were compared with that of Thai industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae TISTR 5606. Interestingly, the results showed that 30 isolates grew at high temperatures (up to 45 °C). Three isolates (NUNS–4, NUNS–5 and NUNS–6) could tolerate those conditions on agar composed of yeast extract, peptone and glucose containing 13% (v/v) ethanol. Furthermore, gas chromatography analysis to determine the ethanol concentration revealed the three new isolates produced higher amounts of ethanol than S. cerevisiae TISTR 5606 at fermentation temperatures of 40 °C and 45 °C (p 
       
  • FM - TOC

    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s):
       
  • In-vitro starch and protein digestibility and proximate composition of
           soybean flour fermented with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) consortia

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Alloysius Chibuike Ogodo, Ositadinma Chinyere Ugbogu, Reginald Azu Onyeagba, Hope Chukwuemeka Okereke The changes in the proximate composition, in-vitro starch/protein digestibility and microbiological quality of lactic acid bacteria (LAB)-fermented soybean flour were evaluated at 12 h intervals for 48 h. Soybean was processed into flour and fermented with LAB-consortium previously isolated from maize (Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1+Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ATCC53/03 + Lactobacillus nantensis LP33 + Lactobacillus fermentum CIP102980 + Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 20016), and sorghum (Pediococcus acidilactici DSM 20284 + Lactobacillus fermentum CIP102980 + Lactobacillus brevis ATCC14869 + Lactobacillus nantensis LP33 + Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1). The flour was also fermented naturally for comparison. There was significant (p 
       
  • Genetic variation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) germplasm assessed
           using random amplified polymorphic DNA markers

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Hadsaya Panyanitikoon, Chanuluk Khanobdee, Chatchawan Jantasuriyarat, Sompid Samipak In total, 26 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to assess the genetic diversity of 38 cucumber accessions curated at Rajamangala University of Technology Lanna, Lampang, Thailand. Polymorphic (140) and monomorphic (10) fragments were detected with this set of markers. The polymorphic information content value ranged from 0.04 to 0.45, with an average value of 0.27. The dendrogram based on hierarchical cluster analysis using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean algorithm classified cucumber germplasm into clusters A and B which corresponded well with plant disease reaction to downy mildew. Cluster A was divided into subgroups A1 and A2. The A1 subgroup had a higher yield, longer fruit length and longer flesh pith length than the A2 subgroup and B cluster, while fruit width was uniform across accessions. This grouping was in good agreement with country of origin, with A1 members being from Far East Asia, A2 members from Southeast Asia and B members from South Asia. The close genetic relationship between A1 and A2 suggested more mobile seed transfer between Far East Asia and Southeast Asia while separation of the B cluster suggested limited genetic transfer from South Asia to other parts of the Asia continent.
       
  • Enzymes involved in immunity and characteristics of hemolymph in red
           sternum syndrome mud crabs (Scylla serrata)

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Chantana Kankamol, Jintana Salaenoi The activities were compared of the immunological enzymes phenoloxidase (PO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the concentration of proteins and urea nitrogen (UN) in the hemolymph of red sternum syndrome mud crabs, Scylla serrata, (Forskål, 1755) (Decapoda: Portunidae), with those of normal crabs. Twenty-five red sternum mud crabs and 10 normal mud crabs were randomly collected from crab farms in Samut Songkram province, Thailand. Statistical analysis used the mean ± SD and Student's t test at a significance level of α = 0.05. Levels of PO were 0.032 ± 0.013 units/mg protein and 0.075 ± 0.028 units/mg protein, while SOD levels were 0.493 ± 0.079 units/mg protein and 1.464 ± 0.783 units/mg protein, in normal and red sternum mud crabs, respectively. There was a significant difference in enzyme activities between the two groups. The hemolymph protein concentration in normal crabs was 1.03 ± 0.20 mg/mL which was significantly higher than in red sternum syndrome crabs (0.66 ± 0.23 mg/mL). The UN level in the hemolymph of normal mud crabs was significantly higher (10.78 ± 3.96 mg/dL) compared with that of red sternum mud crabs (4.59 ± 1.57 mg/dL). The findings revealed that the protein and UN levels in the hemolymph of red sternum mud crabs had decreased significantly. The red sternum syndrome was inversely related to the accumulated amount of protein and UN in crabs and had an extreme effect on protein metabolism.
       
  • Cypermethrin resistance in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera:
           Noctuidae) from three locations in Thailand and detoxification enzyme
           activities

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Torranis Ruttanaphan, Wanchai Pluempanupat, Vasakorn Bullangpoti The tobacco cutworm Spodoptera litura is one of the key insect pests of vegetables in Thailand. This study evaluated cypermethrin resistance in populations of S. litura collected from vegetable crops in Bang Len and Kamphaeng Saen district, Nakhon Pathom province and from Wang Nam Khiao district, Nakhon Ratchasima province, Thailand. Resistance of S. litura was determined using the topical application method and biochemical assays, and all three field populations exhibited a trend of increasing resistance to cypermethrin compared to the susceptible laboratory population, with median lethal dose (LD50) values varying from 10.98 parts per million (ppm) to 15.74 ppm. The activities of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and carboxylesterase in field populations of S. litura were significantly increased compared to those in susceptible insects, but glutathione S-transferase activity was significantly increased only in the Kamphaeng Saen population. These results indicated that the three field populations of S. litura had developed resistance to cypermethrin and it is suggested that continuous application of cypermethrin to control tobacco cutworm should be avoided to prevent the development of high cypermethrin resistance in this pest.
       
  • In vitro mineral nutrition for improving growth and
           multiplication of stevia

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Sukalya Poothong, Thanh Khen, Orada Chumphukam In vitro propagation is important for rapid multiplication of a wide range of nursery crops or medicinal plants, including stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mineral salts on plant growth and development of stevia shoot cultures. Response surface methodology was used to design experiments by varying three factors: nitrogen salts (NH4NO3 and KNO3), mesos salts (CaCl2, KH2PO4 and MgSO4) and minor elements (Zn-Mn-Cu-Co-Mo-B-I-EDTA-chelated iron). The concentrations of each factor were defined as relative concentrations compared to Murashige and Skoog (MS) concentrations (0.5–3.0 × MS). The effects were evaluated of these three factors on plant quality, multiplication, shoot length and leaf numbers. The minor elements were the most significant factors associated with shoot length and leaf numbers. Increasing minor elements above an MS level of 1 × and decreasing nitrogen tended to increase shoot length significantly. Increasing minor elements and nitrogen up to 3 × MS and increasing mesos to 1.5 × MS were required to improve leaf numbers. Two optimized media were compared to MS for growth characteristics, phenolics and antioxidant activity. One of the media was identified as significantly better than MS for growth, low phenolic production and low antioxidant response.
       
  • Comparison of synbiotic beverages produced from riceberry malt extract
           using selected free and encapsulated probiotic lactic acid bacteria

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Atchareeya Nakkarach, Ulaiwan Withayagiat There has been much recent interest in probiotic products for lactose-intolerant consumers. This research developed a non-dairy synbiotic beverage from riceberry malt extract (RME). The objectives of the study were to select suitable lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and to compare the stabilities of products produced from free and encapsulated cells. Five LAB (Enterococcus faecalis N1-33, Lactobacillus acidophilus TISTR450, Lactobacillus johnsonii KUN119-2, Lactobacillus plantarum TC24 and Lactobacillus reuteri KUB-AC5) were tested for their ability to grow in RME, their survival under simulated gastrointestinal tract conditions and their antimicrobial activity. L. plantarum TC24 had the greatest probiotic potential. Comparisons of free versus encapsulated cell growth rates and their respective stabilities were carried out at two storage temperatures (8 °C and 30 °C) for 31 d. Calcium alginate encapsulation improved the survivability of L. plantarum TC24 under gastrointestinal tract conditions. However, the same treatment did not affect survivability under fermentation and storage conditions. Both free and encapsulated cell products could be stored at 8 °C for 15 d and the products retained viable cells at a level of 9 log colony forming units/mL. The encapsulated cell product was less preferable in consumer tests than the free cell product. The results suggested that RME has potential as a raw material for the production of nondairy synbiotic items for human consumption.
       
  • Antioxidative peptides from fish sauce by-product: Isolation and
           characterization

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Waeowalee Choksawangkarn, Susanee Phiphattananukoon, Janthima Jaresitthikunchai, Sittiruk Roytrakul Fish sauce by-product (FSB) refers to solid waste from fish sauce industry. It is composed of nutritionally important biomolecules; however, FSB is currently undervalued. FSB contains natural protein hydrolysate produced from digestion of fish proteins using various proteases from their digestive system and halophiles in the fermentation tank. This study focused on the potential use of FSB from the lowest grade fish sauce production as a source of bioactive peptides. The results showed that the FSB extract contained about 10% (weight per volume) protein and the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profile was similar to that of fish sauce. The antioxidant activity of the FSB extract was determined using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay. The two most effective fractions had half maximal inhibition values of 0.57 ± 0.05 mg/mL and 1.25 ± 0.16 mg/mL. Upon digestion with Proteinase K, the activity decreased, suggesting that active molecules were derived from proteins or peptides. The low molecular weight FSB fraction contained potent antioxidative molecules, which were identified as PQLLLLLL and LLLLLLL. The study provided useful information for future development of value-added products from the solid waste produced during fish sauce manufacturing, which is one of the important marine industries in Southeast Asia.
       
  • Evaluation of antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of solvent extracts
           of agro-food by-products (cashew nut shell, coconut shell and groundnut
           hull)

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Anand Prakash, Vellingiri Vadivel, Sanaulla Farisa Banu, Paramasivam Nithyanand, Cheepurupalli Lalitha, Pemaiah Brindha In India, agro-food by-products such as shell cake of cashew nut (Anacardium occidentale L.), shell of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) and hull of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) are cheaply available on a vast scale. Even though a small portion of these solid waste materials is being used, a large quantity is not being utilized. Based on literature data, these by-products could be used as a source of valuable phytochemicals. The present study explored a suitable solvent system and extraction conditions for the recovery of polyphenols from three different agro-food by-products. The optimal conditions for the recovery of polyphenols from agro-food by-products were investigated in addition to evaluating their antioxidant and antibacterial properties. Among the three investigated by-products, methanolic extract of cashew nut shell was the most prominent source of antioxidants (3412.28 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/L) compared to coconut shell (1056.32 mg GAE/L) and groundnut hull (426.35 mg GAE/L). The in vitro antioxidant assay produced promising radical scavenging activity of shell extract of coconut (concentration at which the response was reduced by half; IC50 = 12 μg/mL) compared to cashew nut (IC50 = 44 μg/mL) and groundnut hull extract (IC50 = 48 μg/mL). The anti-bacterial activity of different solvent extracts revealed that the methanolic extracts from cashew nut and coconut shells were more effective in inhibiting the growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The present work revealed the possibility of recovery of useful phytochemical compounds from agro-food byproducts which could be used subsequently as natural food preservatives.
       
  • Effects of drum drying on physical and antioxidant properties of riceberry
           flour

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Porntip Wiriyawattana, Suntaree Suwonsichon, Thongchai Suwonsichon The effects of drum drying on the physical and antioxidant properties of pregelatinzed riceberry flour were investigated. The drum drying temperature was varied (110 °C, 120 °C and 130 °C) and unheated riceberry flour was used as the control. The results showed that all pregelatinized riceberry flour samples had lower (p ≤ 0.05) L* value, but higher (p ≤ 0.05) a* and b* values than the control. The water absorption index and swelling power of all pregelatinized riceberry flour samples were also significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher than those of the control. The results from rapid visco analysis indicated that the pasting time, pasting temperature, peak viscosity, trough viscosity, final viscosity and set back of riceberry flour decreased (p ≤ 0.05) after drum drying. Moreover, the total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, as measured using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl and 2,2′azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid) disodium salt radical assays, respectively, also decreased (p ≤ 0.05) after drum drying. Such changes were more evident with increased drum drying temperature in the range 110–130 °C. In addition, increasing the drum drying temperature led to poorer stability to withstand the thermal treatment and stress than in pregelatinized riceberry flour. The results suggested that special attention should be given to the drum drying temperature as it affects not only the physical but also the antioxidant properties of the pregelatinized riceberry flour. Pregelatinized riceberry flour produced using drum drying at 110 °C could be applied to formulate an instant soup product because it had high values for water absorption capacity, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity and was completely gelatinized and stable against thermal treatment and stress.
       
  • Effect of a rubber plantation on termite diversity in Melawi, West
           Kalimantan, Indonesia

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Mohamad Rusdi Hidayat, Wahyu Maulana Endris, Yulia Dwiyanti One of the negative effects of rubber plantation expansion is the loss of biodiversity in the area. One of the widely used rubber plantation systems is rubber forest agroforestry, which is known to have little effect on biodiversity. This study compared termite species in rubber forest with those in the primary forest within Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park in Melawi, Indonesia. Two rubber forest sites (newly opened) and unproductive/old rubber forest, were chosen to estimate the long term effects of rubber forest on termite biodiversity. A standardized transect method was used for termite collection. In total, 35 termite species belonging to eight sub families were collected. Termite species richness in the old rubber forest decreased up to 62.5% compared to that in primary forest sites. In the newly opened rubber forest site, termite species richness was only slightly less than that of the primary forest sites. Termite species richness results corresponded with their functional groups, with no soil feeders found in the old rubber forest. Furthermore, the calculation of several diversity indices also confirmed the results. The results indicated that the expansion of rubber forest in the area appears to have adversely affected termite diversity more than expected.
       
  • Identification and characterization of glycoproteins during oil palm
           somatic embryogenesis

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Suvichark Aroonluk, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Yodying Yingchutrakul, Suthathip Kittisenachai, Chatchawan Jantasuriyarat The objective of this experiment was to characterize differentially expressed glycoprotein in a somatic embryogenesis process during oil palm tissue culture. Embryogenic callus in the somatic embryo acquisition stages (globular, torpedo and cotyledonary) and oil palm plantlets were collected to extract total protein and isolated glycoprotein using a concanavalin A N-linked affinity column. Tryptic glycoproteins were isolated using nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 383 glycoproteins were identified and analyzed. The percentages of existence of glycoprotein were observed, from highest to lowest amounts, in the metabolic process, binding and nuclear components, respectively. Different glycoproteins were involved in membrane trafficking machinery, signaling to stress and in hormonal and environmental response for plant growth and development. PREDICTED: protein TIC 40, chloroplastic-like was expressed in the globular, torpedo and plantlet stages. The protein can be further developed into a glycoprotein biomarker, as a biological indicator of the somatic embryo maturation stage. This study should assist deeper understanding of the important role of glycoprotein specificity in somatic embryogenesis that controls plant cell response and growth development during oil palm tissue culture.
       
  • A direct gene transferring system for Oncidium orchids, a difficult crop
           for genetic transformation

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Krittiya Niyomtham, Kisana Bhinija, Pattana S. Huehne Oncidium orchids are susceptible to damage through viral infection caused by the Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV). Generating a virus-resistant plant is a major challenge. Unfortunately, gene transformation in Oncidium orchids is not easy. This study developed selection steps for a direct gene transferring system through particle bombardment. Optimized hygromycin screening was reported in the transformed protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of two commercial Oncidium hybrids (Onc. Gower Ramsey and Onc. Sweet Sugar) with the RNAi construction of the coat protein gene of CymMV. The transgenic Onc. Sweet Sugar PLBs were regenerated on a modified Murashige and Skoog medium containing hygromycin. The effective selection system in exterminating non-transformed PLBs and the functional transgene in the transgenic lines was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The application of this study may help the gene transformation system of other orchid plant species.
       
  • Prevention potential of Cordyceps militaris aqueous extract against
           cyclophosphamind-induced mutagenicity and sperm abnormality in rats

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Thanawit Tongmai, Monchan Maketon, Pramote Chumnanpuen For decades, many natural products (from plants, animals, fungi and bacteria) have been popularly used for nutrapharmaceutical purposes such as treating and preventing a variety of symptoms and diseases. Cordyceps militaris is becoming one of the most popular medicinal mushrooms, especially in Asian countries because of the promising abilities of its extracts in promoting health (antihypertensive, hypoglycemic, sexual potentiative, cancer/tumor prevention, cancer treatment). Nevertheless, research on antimutagenic activity which can protect against DNA damage from chemicals and free radicals is still insufficient. Thus, the present study investigated the antimutagenic effect of aqueous extract from C. militaris in male albino rats using micronucleus and sperm morphology assays. Male Wistar rats (n = 15) were orally administered with crude C. militaris extract at doses of 40 mg/kg bodyweight (bw) and 60 mg/kg bw for 3 wk before mutagenic induction using cyclophosphamind (CP). The normal control group received only distilled water (1 mL/d). The results of antimutagenic assay at 1 wk after CP injection showed that the frequency of micronuclei found in the control group after CP injection was higher than for the standard criterion of rat, while, the frequency in the treated group was significantly lower. However, the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes to normochromatic erythrocytes in all treated groups was lower than that of the standard and the total sperm abnormalities in all treated groups were not significantly different from the control group. These results revealed the potential preventive benefit of a mutagenic effect of C. militaris aqueous extract on male rats.
       
  • First record of Ceriporia inflata and Ceriporia lacerata
           (Phanerochaetaceae, Basidiomycota) from Indonesian tropical forest

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Retno Wulandari, Pongtharin Lotrakul, Rudianto Amirta, Seung Wook Kim, Hunsa Punnapayak, Sehanat Prasongsuk Resupinate fungi (Basidiomycota) are wood-inhabiting fungi found abundantly in the tropical rainforest of Indonesia. A survey in East Kalimantan discovered two new recorded species for Indonesia: Ceriporia inflata and Ceriporia lacerata. The morphological characteristics of these two resupinate fungi were similar to those of the holotype specimens found in sub-tropical forest in China and Japan. Based on maximum parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of internal transcribed spacers and large subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA sequences, these two new records were placed within the Ceriporia group.
       
  • Morphological study of Gelasinospora from dung and antagonistic effect
           against plant pathogenic fungi in vitro

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Onuma Piasai, Manorat Sudsanguan Animal dung samples were collected from Surin and Suphan Buri provinces, Thailand. The alcohol treatment technique was used for fungal isolation. Identification of the genus Gelasinospora was based on morphological characteristics of ascomata, asci and ascospore ornamentation when grown on potato dextrose agar. Microscopic features were examined under stereo and compound microscopes and ascospores were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Four species of Gelasinospora were recorded: G. calospora, G. hippopotama, G. indica and G. stellata. The generic diagnostic description of each species was recorded. The species G. hippopotama and G. stellata, which were isolated from cow and buffalo dung are new records for Thailand. The in vitro antagonistic activity tests were conducted using isolates of each of the four species of Gelasinospora against seven genera of plant pathogenic fungi. All isolates of Gelasinospora inhibited 100% on the mycelial growth of Phytophthora palmivora and also inhibited more than 75% of the mycelial growth of Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum capsici and Curvularia lunata. All isolates failed to inhibit the mycelial growth of Rhizoctonia oryzae and Sclerotium rolfsii, except for G. hippopotama KUFC6898, which inhibited 75.5% of the mycelial growth of R. oryzae.
       
  • Utilization of agricultural waste biomass by cellulolytic isolate
           Enterobacter sp. SUK-Bio

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Pankajkumar R. Waghmare, Swapnil M. Patil, Sanjivani L. Jadhav, Byong-Hun Jeon, Sanjay P. Govindwar A cellulolytic bacterium was isolated from plant litter soil and identified as Enterobacter sp. SUK-Bio. This isolate was investigated for its utilization of different cellulosic materials (carboxymethyl cellulose, sugarcane trash, grass powder, sorghum husk, wheat straw and water hyacinth). Utilization of sorghum husk was comparatively more than for the other cellulosic materials used, producing higher cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes (filter paperase (0.15 U/mL), β-glucosidase (37.10 U/mL), endoglucanase (12.24 U/mL), exoglucanase (2.52 U/mL), xylanase (26.26 U/mL) and glucoamylase (33.26 U/mL)) on day 8 of incubation. Furthermore, it produced the maximum reducing sugar production (554 mg/L) at a rate of 3.84 mg/h/L. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of sorghum husk revealed functional groups changes and a decrease in the total crystallinity ratio after microbial degradation. The effects of supplementation of different metals additives, thermal stability and pH on cellulolytic enzymes were also studied.
       
  • FM - TOC

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s):
       
 
 
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