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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3044 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3044 Journals sorted alphabetically
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 84, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 341, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 215, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 135, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 349, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 318, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 407, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access  
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.711, h-index: 78)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.394, h-index: 30)
Annales d'Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.177, h-index: 13)
Annales de Chirurgie de la Main et du Membre Supérieur     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Chirurgie Plastique Esthétique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 22)
Annales de Chirurgie Vasculaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover Agriculture and Natural Resources
  [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Online) 2452-316X
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3044 journals]
  • Influence of heavy metals on rhizosphere microbial communities of Siam
           weed (Chromolaena odorata (L.)) using a 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing
           approach

    • Authors: Thanyaporn Ruangdech; Manoosak Wongphatcharachai; Christopher Staley; Michael J. Sadowsky; Kannika Sajjaphan
      Pages: 137 - 141
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 51, Issue 3
      Author(s): Thanyaporn Ruangdech, Manoosak Wongphatcharachai, Christopher Staley, Michael J. Sadowsky, Kannika Sajjaphan
      A 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing approach was used to assess the impacts of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) contamination on populations of rhizobacteria on Siam weed (Chromolaena odorata (L.)). Bacterial communities were characterized using the Illumina MiSeq platform and the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Among the 54,026 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified, 99.7% were classified as bacteria and the rest were classified as archaea. Several dominant bacterial phyla were observed in all samples—Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. These five phyla accounted for 89.2% of all OTUs identified among all sites, and only two OTUs could not be classified to a phylum. Comparison among samples containing low and high levels of Cd contamination using nonparametric Shannon and Shannon diversity indices showed that soils with low levels of diversity had a higher level of Cd (p < 0.05). These results indicated that levels of Cd may significantly alter bacterial species selection. The Cd- and Zn-resistant bacteria from each sample were subjected to heavy-metal minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) analyses. The MIC values obtained from 1152 isolates were used to individually analyze the pattern of gene function using the BioNumerics software. The results of this analysis showed that 26.7% of the bacteria were resistant to Cd concentrations up to 320 mg/L and only 2.3% of bacteria were resistant to Zn at concentrations up to 3200 mg/L. The MIC analyses indicated that the number of resistant bacteria decreased with increasing metal concentrations and those bacteria resistant to Cd and Zn may contain more than one group of metal-resistance genes.

      PubDate: 2017-09-04T00:07:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.05.005
       
  • Unveiling cryptic diversity of the anemonefish genera Amphiprion and
           Premnas (Perciformes: Pomacentridae) in Thailand with mitochondrial DNA
           barcodes

    • Authors: Pradipunt Thongtam na Ayudhaya; Narongrit Muangmai; Nuwadee Banjongsat; Worapong Singchat; Sommai Janekitkarn; Surin Peyachoknagul; Kornsorn Srikulnath
      Pages: 198 - 205
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 51, Issue 3
      Author(s): Pradipunt Thongtam na Ayudhaya, Narongrit Muangmai, Nuwadee Banjongsat, Worapong Singchat, Sommai Janekitkarn, Surin Peyachoknagul, Kornsorn Srikulnath
      The genera Amphiprion and Premnas comprise the common anemonefish that are widely distributed in tropical areas. Species identification of these two genera is difficult due to high, intraspecific, morphological variation. Recently, DNA barcoding has been employed as an efficient tool that uses a short genetic marker in an organism's DNA to enable the identification and recognition of cryptic species. This study applied three regions of mitochondrial DNA—cytochrome c oxidase I (COI), cytochrome b (Cytb) and 16S rRNA—as DNA barcodes for species identification of seven species of Amphiprion and one species of Premnas in Thailand. Three species-delimitation methods—general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC), automatic barcoding gap detection (ABGD) and a Bayesian implementation of the Poisson tree processes model (bPTP)—were also used to estimate the number of species. An overlap was found between the intra- and inter-specific genetic divergence values in Cytb and 16S rRNA, but not for the COI data. This indicated that COI was the most effective for identifying different anemonefish species. A three-gene phylogenetic analysis and species-delimitation methods based on both COI and Cytb data suggested cryptic diversity in Amphiprion clarkii, A. percula, A. ocellaris and Premnas biaculeatus. Different distributions were found also for two cryptic species of A. clarkia—one restricted to the Gulf of Thailand and the other to the Andaman Sea. The results confirmed the efficiency of COI as a suitable marker for species identification of anemonefish.

      PubDate: 2017-09-04T00:07:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.07.001
       
  • TOC

    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 51, Issue 3


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T00:07:10Z
       
  • Evaluation of horticultural traits and seed germination of Tacca
           chantrieri ‘André

    • Authors: Krisantini; Ni Made Armini Wiendi; Endah Retno Palupi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Krisantini, Ni Made Armini Wiendi, Endah Retno Palupi
      Tacca chantrieri André is a perennial plant belonging to the Taccaceae family. T. chantrieri is known as the ‘bat flower’ or ‘bat plant’ due to its unique black bracts that resemble bats. It has the potential to be commercialized as an indoor, flowering, ornamental plant due to its unique flower morphology and shade tolerance. The distribution of T. chantrieri in its natural habitat has contracted due to land clearing and habitat destruction to the extent that it is now very hard to find in its traditional natural environment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the morphological characteristics of T. chantrieri, to evaluate seed germination in vivo and in vitro, and in vitro culture of the plant using standard Murashige and Skoog (MS) media. Only 10% of the seeds germinated in 22 wk. An evaluation of the non-germinated seed showed that 42% of the seeds did not have embryos. In vitro culture using the standard MS media resulted in 3–7 new shoots growing from the basal parts of the seedlings after 22 wk, and each shoot further developed 4–7 shoots following transfer to MS media supplemented with indole acetic acid (IAA) at 0.25–0.75 mg/L and N6-benzyladenine (BA) at 1–2 mg/L. These results indicate that even though propagation protocols should be further developed, in vitro propagation using standard MS media supplemented with combinations of IAA and BA provides a more effective way to propagate T. chantrieri when compared to the conventional propagation techniques. This information will be useful for introducing T. chantrieri to the new ornamental plant market and to conservation efforts for this species.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.12.006
       
  • Growth variation and heritability in a second-generation Eucalyptus
           urophylla progeny test at Lad Krating Plantation, Chachoengsao province,
           Thailand

    • Authors: Lucky Nhlanhla Dlamini; Damrong Pipatwattanakul; Somporn Maelim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Lucky Nhlanhla Dlamini, Damrong Pipatwattanakul, Somporn Maelim
      In Thailand, Eucalyptus urophylla was introduced with the main purpose of supplying raw material for pulp and chip wood production. The demand for genetically improved seed is increasing to support high productivity plantation establishment. One of the tree improvement activities established to meet the high demand for improved seed was a second generation progeny test at Lad Kranting Plantation, Thailand to provide the best material for the successful plantation program. The aim of the current study was to compare growth variation of the first and second generation of Eucalyptus urophylla progeny that could provide information on suitable families for improved quality seed. The progeny test comprised the best 45 half-sib families selected from 80 half-sib families of the first-generation progeny test. The design of the progeny test was a randomized and complete block design (16 trees/plot × 45 plots/block × 9 blocks), with 4 rows of 4 trees at a spacing of 2 m × 1 m. Growth was assessed at age 3 yr. The average height and diameter at breast height over bark (DBH), was 13.72 m, and 8.75 cm, respectively. There were highly significant (p < 0.01) differences among provenances and families in both height and DBH. The individual heritability values for height and DBH were 0.48 and 0.60, respectively. The family heritability values for height and DBH were 0.98 and 0.99, respectively. These 45 half-sib families proved to be genetically superior ensuring higher productivity and contributing to the success of the Forest Industry Organization plantation at Lad Krating.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.12.005
       
  • Effects of altitude and harvesting dates on morphological characteristics,
           yield and nutritive value of desho grass (Pennisetum pedicellatumTrin.) in
           Ethiopia

    • Authors: Bimrew Asmare; Solomon Demeke; Taye Tolemariam; Firew Tegegne; Aynalem Haile; Jane Wamatu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Bimrew Asmare, Solomon Demeke, Taye Tolemariam, Firew Tegegne, Aynalem Haile, Jane Wamatu
      The effects of altitude and harvesting period on the performance of desho grass were evaluated in Ethiopia. A factorial arrangement of treatments was employed with a combination of two altitudes and three harvesting dates. Planting and management of desho grass was undertaken according to recommendations for the species. The data collected consisted of plant height, number of tillers, number and length of leaves, leaf-to-stem ratio and fresh yield. Chemical analysis of the constituents of desho grass samples was completed according to standard procedures. All data were subjected to two analysis of variance procedures and Pearson correlation analysis, with significance tested at p<0.05.Results indicated that most morphological characteristics were not significantly different due to altitude except the leaf length per plant. Harvesting dates significantly affected the number of leaves per plant, leaf-to-stem ratio and dry matter yield. Both altitude and harvesting date significantly affected the crude protein content, yield and fiber fractions. Calcium content was significantly different only regarding harvesting date and phosphorus content was significantly affected by altitude. Dry matter content and yield were positively correlated with parameters such as plant height, leaf length per plant, crude protein (CP) yield, fiber fractions (neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber) and with each other. Crude protein content was positively correlated with the CP yield. Overall results indicated that desho grass was affected more by harvesting date than altitude. Generally, desho grass performed well both at mid and high altitude in Ethiopia and could be a potential livestock feed in the country.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.11.001
       
  • Evaluation of vetiver grass for radiocesium absorption ability

    • Authors: Nualchavee Roongtanakiat; Thunyaras Akharawutchayanon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Nualchavee Roongtanakiat, Thunyaras Akharawutchayanon
      Plantlets of the Surat Thani and Ratchaburi ecotypes of vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides L. (Roberty). were hydroponically cultured in 134Cs solutions to investigate their 134Cs uptake ability. After 5 d of culture in 134Cs solutions, the Surat Thani plantlets were still fresh and healthy without any evidence of toxicity symptoms, while the Ratchaburi plantlets were rather dry with some brown leaves. The information from the radiographic images and photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) signals as well as the specific activity of cesium indicated that the Surat Thani plantlets cultured in 134Cs solutions were significantly superior to the Ratchaburi vetiver plantlets with regard to 134Cs absorption ability. The increase in the amount of 134Cs in the vetiver plantlets with the level of 134Cs in the culture solution was clearly demonstrated from the PSL signal, as the relationship between the PSL per square millimeter values and 134Cs solution concentrations was linear. The data also indicated that both studied vetiver ecotypes accumulated more 134Cs in the roots than in shoots; therefore, vetiver might be suitable for phytostabilization of radiocesium-polluted soil. The Surat Thani vetiver plantlets were cultured in 134Cs solution with a concentration of 5 MBq/L for different periods. The results of the radiographic image, PSL signals and the radioactivity levels in the vetiver samples strongly indicated that vetiver could absorb a greater amount of 134Cs when the period of culture was longer. After vetiver culture periods of 3 d, 6 d, 9 d, 12 d, 15 d and 18 d, the activity of 134Cs in the cultured solutions declined to 98.0%, 93.2%, 88.6%, 78.1%, 70.7% and 65.5%, respectively. These values indicated that vetiver could remediate 134Cs in the cultured solution by 2.0%, 6.8%, 11.4%, 21.9%, 29.3% and 34.5% for the respective durations.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.01.002
       
  • Optimization of coffee oil extraction from spent coffee grounds using four
           solvents and prototype-scale extraction using circulation process

    • Authors: Krit Somnuk; Pichai Eawlex; Gumpon Prateepchaikul
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Krit Somnuk, Pichai Eawlex, Gumpon Prateepchaikul
      The optimization of two parameters—espresso coffee oil extraction time and the ratio of dried spent coffee grounds (DSCG)-to-solvent—were conducted on DSCG employing four solvents. Extracted yields were investigated using response surface methodology. The two independent variables—ratio of DSCG-to-solvent (5.1–24.9 g/g) and extraction time (0.2–39.8 min)—were optimized in the batch mode. The predicted model was verified using actual experiments. The experimental yields achieved were 14.7 percent by weight (wt%; using hexane), 13.1 wt% (using anhydrous ethanol), 11.8 wt% (using hydrous ethanol), and 7.5 wt% (using methanol). Prototype extraction was tested using a circulation process. Approximately 11.8 wt% oil yield of prototype extraction could be obtained from DSCG under the optimal conditions of 30.4 min extraction time and 22.5 g/g ratio of DSCG-to-hexane from the laboratory-scale results. In this study, the miscella (the solution of coffee oil dissolved in the solvent) from up to six successive extractions was investigated to determine the optimal oil extraction process. The repeated miscella from each successive extraction showed high efficiency and stability of coffee oil yield similar to that obtained using fresh hexane.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.01.003
       
  • Cathepsin activities and thermal properties of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis
           niloticus) meat during ambient storage

    • Authors: Tulakhun Nonthaput; Waraporn Hahor; Karun Thongprajukaew; Krueawan Yoonram; Somrak Rodjaroen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Tulakhun Nonthaput, Waraporn Hahor, Karun Thongprajukaew, Krueawan Yoonram, Somrak Rodjaroen
      Understanding the postmortem changes at ambient aquatic temperature can be useful for estimating the time of death in environmental forensic studies when little information is available. Muscle degradation was investigated in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in terms of the specific activities of cathepsins (B, H and L) and the scavenging activities and thermal transition properties of myosin and actin, to assess postmortem changes with time (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 hr after death). The study results are relevant to ambient temperatures in Thailand, (about 30oC). The specific activities of the three cathepsin enzymes increased significantly with postmortem time (p < 0.05) and had a highly significant positive relationship (r = 0.987–0.997, p < 0.01, n = 32). Cathepsin H had the lowest specific activity and exhibited a different type of time profile. Its lowest specific activity was observed at 8 hr, which indicated a significant role at this point in time after death. The radical scavenging activities substantially decreased with the time since death, especially within the first 1 hr, while no changes occurred from 2–8 hr, or from 12–24 hr. The thermal properties of myosin and actin were observed up to a 24 hr delay. The degradation of each protein fluctuated with the delay time; actin was more sensitive to postmortem delay than myosin. Overall, the findings from the current study might be used as primary data to estimate the time of death of an aquatic animal. A potential application is for environmental forensics in relation to fish kill events associated with pollution crimes or the mass death of exported fish under transportation insurance, as well as in animal cruelty investigations.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.02.005
       
  • Solubility curve of rock powder inoculated with microorganisms in the
           production of biofertilizers

    • Authors: Valéria Nogueira da Silva; Luiz Eduardo de Souza Fernandes da Silva; Apolino José Nogueira da Silva; Newton Pereira Stamford; Gorete Ribeiro de Macedo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Valéria Nogueira da Silva, Luiz Eduardo de Souza Fernandes da Silva, Apolino José Nogueira da Silva, Newton Pereira Stamford, Gorete Ribeiro de Macedo
      The study was conducted at the Biochemistry Engineering Laboratory of the Federal University of the Rio Grande do Norte to verify the efficacy of microorganisms as solvents of apatite and biotite rock powder to enable the availability and rapid production of biofertilizers. Bacteria Paenibacillus polymyxa, Ralstonia solanacearum, Cromobacterium violaceum and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and fungi Penicillium fellutanum and Tricoderma humatum were inoculated into biotite rock powder and apatite rock powder originating from the States of Paraíba and Paraná, respectively, in Brazil. Rock powder samples were taken on Petri plates, 10% sulfur was added to each, and were subsequently inoculated and co-inoculated for a period of 72 days. Every 12th day, the samples were withdrawn and their mineral release curve was studied. From our results, the co-inoculations with Paenibacillus polymyxa + Ralstonia solanacearum and Paenibacillus polymyxa + Cromobacterium violaceum rendered higher solubility of K and P, respectively, at 36 days.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.01.001
       
  • Instrumental neutron activation analysis to determine inorganic elements
           in paddy soil and rice and evaluate bioconcentration factors in rice

    • Authors: Prapamon Seeprasert; Patana Anurakpongsatorn; Sirinart Laoharojanaphand; Arporn Busamongkol
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Prapamon Seeprasert, Patana Anurakpongsatorn, Sirinart Laoharojanaphand, Arporn Busamongkol
      Increased anthropogenic activity, especially in thriving industries and mining activity, has led to the accumulation of inorganic elements in the soil. This study applied neutron activation analysis for the determination of inorganic element concentrations in paddy soils and quantified the nutrient value of paddy rice cultivated on various agricultural sites throughout Thailand. The determination accuracy of the elements U, As, Sb, W, Mn, K, La, Cr, Hf, Cs, Sc, Fe, Co, Cd and Zn was assessed using National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials; the results were satisfactory, showing low relative error. High analytical precision was also observed. Cadmium was selected to check the linearity of the calibration curve against a Cd standard. For a calibration curve in the range 1–9 μg, a correlation coefficient of 0.997 was found. Trace amounts of U, As, Sb, W, Mn, K, La, Cr, Hf, Cs, Sc, Fe, Co, Zn and Cd were also found in the soil samples. However, the Co, Cd, and Zn concentrations were especially high in agricultural sites in Tak province. The elemental concentrations in rice followed the order K > Zn > Mn. The data obtained are of potential benefit for the development of trace element supplementation in food.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.09.005
       
  • Cloning and comparative analysis of zinc-finger protein gene on
           Y-chromosome (ZFY) between Thai Bangkaew dog and other Thai canids

    • Authors: Ukadej Boonyaprakob; Sommai Homsavart; Jatuporn Noosud; Rongdej Tungtrakanpoung
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Ukadej Boonyaprakob, Sommai Homsavart, Jatuporn Noosud, Rongdej Tungtrakanpoung
      The Thai Bangkaew dog is a Spitz-type dog that originated in Thailand. Legend has it that the dog is descended from hybrids between a native female dog and a male wild canid. To examine the mysterious story about the ancestry of the Thai Bangkaew dog's paternal lineage, sequence variation was examined for the last intron of the Y-chromosome-specific zinc-finger gene, ZFY, and its X homolog for male Thai Bangkaew dogs and other male Thai canids, including the Thai ridgeback and mixed breed dogs, Asiatic jackals (Canis aureus) and a dhole (Cuon alpinus). A 1,075-bp ZFY segment from DNA samples of Thai Bangkaew dogs was found to be 100% identical to the domestic dog ZFY and (if gaps are allowed) showed 81% and 92% identity to jackal ZFY and dhole ZFY, respectively. However, if gaps were treated as missing data, the 1,045-bp ZFY sequence for the Thai Bangkaew dogs was 100% identical to domestic dog ZFY and 99.5% to jackal ZFY and dhole ZFY, respectively. In addition, the 959-bp Thai Bangkaew ZFX fragments were identical and showed 100% identity to domestic dog ZFX. These genetic data suggest that the Thai Bangkaew dogs still present today share a common male ancestor with modern dogs, rather than being the descendants of dhole or jackal/dog hybrids.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.12.007
       
  • Genome-wide association study for lactation characteristics, milk yield
           and age at first calving in a Thai multibreed dairy cattle population

    • Authors: Pimchanok Yodklaew; Skorn Koonawootrittriron; Mauricio A. Elzo; Thanathip Suwanasopee; Thawee Laodim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Pimchanok Yodklaew, Skorn Koonawootrittriron, Mauricio A. Elzo, Thanathip Suwanasopee, Thawee Laodim
      A genome-wide association study was performed for milk yield per lactation (MY), initial yield (IY), peak yield (PY), persistency (PS) and age at first calving (AFC) in a Thai multibreed dairy cattle population. The dataset contained 1,305 first-lactation cows raised on 188 farms located in Central, Northeastern and Southern Thailand. Cows were genotyped with GeneSeek Genomic Profiler low-density bead chips (8,810 single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP]; n = 1,255) and with high-density bead chips (76,883 SNP; n = 50). The single SNP association analyses utilized 8,096 SNPs in common between the low and high density GeneSeek chips. The mixed model contained the fixed effects of contemporary group, fraction of non-Holstein breeds, age at first calving and gene content, and the random effects of animal and residual. Computations were done with the QXPAK.5 software. The number of SNPs associated with MY, IY, PY, PS and AFC at the significant threshold level of p < 0.00001 were 75, 102, 145, 74 and 24, respectively. Of the 366 SNP markers significantly associated with the studied traits, 54 (14.75%) were associated with two traits and 312 (85.25%) with only one trait, and all but one of the 54 SNPs associated with two traits affected MY and lactation characteristics. Genetic improvement of Thai dairy cows for lactation characteristics, milk yield and age at first calving could be aided by selecting animals with the SNP markers found to be highly associated with genes influencing these traits.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.04.002
       
  • Effect of nitrogen concentration on growth, lipid production and fatty
           acid profiles of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    • Authors: Natthawut Yodsuwan; Shigeki Sawayama; Sarote Sirisansaneeyakul
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Natthawut Yodsuwan, Shigeki Sawayama, Sarote Sirisansaneeyakul
      The marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum had a high lipid content accumulation under photoautotrophically nitrogen-deficient cultivation. The lipid content (Y P/X; 53.04 ± 3.26%) was highest with a specific rate of lipid production (q P; 1.50 ± 0.12 × 10-3 mg/mg hr), attained at the minimized specific growth rate (μ; 0.87 ± 0.13 × 10-2/hr) after 504 hr of cultivation. When the specific growth rate (μ; 2.47 ± 0.02 × 10-2/hr) was maximized in nitrogen-sufficient culture (32.09 mg/L NaNO3), the specific rate of lipid production (q P; 0.42 ± 0.19 × 10-3 mg/mg hr) was lowered. In this work, the nitrogen concentration with fixed phosphorus concentration was used to monitor the lipid accumulation, as the lower nitrogen concentration favored a higher lipid content percentage, compared with a higher nitrogen concentration. Under nitrogen-deficient conditions, P. tricornutum produced a large amount of saturated fatty acids, mainly as palmitic acid (C16:0), while palmitoleic acid (C16:1c) was found to be the sole unsaturated fatty acid. On the other hand, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5ω3c) was produced in large amounts when there was sufficient nitrogen. Since the biodiesel was qualified based on the fatty acid methyl ester composition, the oil from algae cultured under nitrogen-deficient conditions were considered to meet the biodiesel standard. Thus, P. tricornutum optimally cultivated under nitrogen-deficient conditions can accumulate a high oil content, which demonstrates its potential as a biodiesel feedstock.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.02.004
       
  • Milk Yield, Fat Yield and Fat Percentage Associations in a Thai Multibreed
           Dairy Population

    • Authors: Bodin Wongpom; Skorn Koonawootrittriron; Mauricio A. Elzo; Thanathip Suwanasopee
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Bodin Wongpom, Skorn Koonawootrittriron, Mauricio A. Elzo, Thanathip Suwanasopee
      Milk yield (MY), fat yield (FY) and fat percentage (FP) are important traits for dairy cattle selection and dairy farm profitability in Thailand. Most dairy cattle in Thailand are multibreed, comprising multiple breeds (three from eight breeds per animal). This multibreed composition of dairy animals has generated a large amount of variation in dairy traits among cows raised under farm, tropical environmental conditions across the country. Effective genetic evaluation and selection programs for dairy traits in this population require reliable variance components and genetic parameters estimated under the management, nutritional, health, and climatic conditions in Thai dairy farms. Thus, the objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for MY, FY and FP in a Thai dairy multibreed dairy cattle population using farm-collected information. The dataset consisted of pedigree and phenotypic data for MY, FY and FP from 6,596 first lactation cows from 687 farms. The data were analyzed using a three-trait (MY, FY and FP), animal mixed model. Fixed effects were herd-year-season, Holstein fraction, heterozygosity and age at first calving. Random effects were animal and residual. An average, information-restricted, maximum likelihood procedure was used to estimate variance components, which in turn were used to compute heritabilities and genetic correlations. Means (SD) were 4,315.43 kg (1,112 kg) for MY, 157.41 kg (50.42 kg) for FY and 3.59% (0.56%) for FP. Heritability estimates were 0.22 ± 0.06 for MY, 0.17 ± 0.06 for FY and 0.24 ± 0.07 for FP. Genetic correlations were 0.47 ± 0.16 between MY and FY, -0.30 ± 0.20 between MY and FP, and 0.30 ± 0.21 between FY and FP. These estimates of genetic parameters indicated that Thai dairy producers would achieve reasonable amounts of genetic progress if they selected dairy animals based on MY and either FY or FP.

      PubDate: 2017-07-26T14:50:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.12.008
       
  • FM - TOC

    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 51, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-07-18T23:02:48Z
       
  • Effects of Two Neck Rail Positions on Heifer’s Behavior and Stall
           Cleanliness in Free Stall Barn

    • Authors: Neng Risris Sudolar; Rapeepong Panivivat; Panwadee Sopannarath
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Neng Risris Sudolar, Rapeepong Panivivat, Panwadee Sopannarath
      Stall usage and cleanliness are affected by stall design, which includes neck rail positions for dairy heifers. A comparison was for two neck rail positions to determine the preferences for tropical dairy heifers in a free stall barn. Twenty four crossbred Holstein pregnant heifers were divided into two groups, one using the current and the second using the new position. The current position of neck rail was placed at 160 cm from the curb at 124 cm height, whereas the new position was placed at 150 cm from the curb at 122 cm height. The comparison test was followed by a free choice test to assess preferences for one of two positions. The dairy heifers’ activity in the stall was video recorded for 7 consecutive days for each period during the comparison test, and 3 days for preference test. Stall cleanliness was assessed once daily. The results demonstrated that the dairy heifers’ behavior were not significantly different between the two positions (p > 0.05). Dairy heifers did not show any clear preferences on one of two neck rail positions. However, the rear area of stalls with new neck rail position were cleaner than those with current neck rail position (p < 0.01). Therefore, the new position of neck rail seemed suitable for tropical dairy heifers in terms of stall cleanliness.

      PubDate: 2017-06-17T12:25:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.05.001
       
  • Optimum proportion of sweet corn by-product silage (SCW) and rice straw in
           total mixed ration using in vitro gas production

    • Authors: Thaintip Kraiprom; Sornthep Tumwasorn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Thaintip Kraiprom, Sornthep Tumwasorn
      An in vitro gas technique was used to study the effects of different proportions of sweet corn by-product silage (SCW) and rice straw (RS) on in vitro fermentation. The dietary treatments were ratios of SCW and RS all on a on a dry matter (DM) basis: T1 = SCW: RS at 60:40; T2 = SCW: RS at 50:50; and T3 = SCW:RS at 40:60. The ration of concentrate and roughage was 60:40 on a DM basis. The DM, crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) of SCW were 22.56, 7.11, 1.89, 41.34 and 78.45%, respectively. The results showed that cumulative gas production at 48 hr and 72 h after incubation with the ratio of SCW to RS at 60:40 on a DM basis was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the results from the ratio of SCW to RS at either 50:50 or 40:60 on a DM basis. The proportion of SCW and RS among treatments had no effect on true digestibility parameters. However, the in vitro organic matter digestibility parameters in the treatment group with SCW:RS at 60:40 on a DM basis were higher (p < 0.05) than in the other two treatments. The total volatile fatty acid in the treatment group with SCW:RS at 50:50 and 40:60 on a DM basis were higher (p < 0.05) than in the treatment group with SCW:RS at 60:40 on a DM basis. Acetic acid (C2), propionic acid (C3) butyric acid (C4) and the proportion of C2:C3 were not different (p < 0.05) among treatments. The levels of NH3-N in all groups were not significant (p < 0.05) among treatments. It was concluded that the optimum level of SCW:RS was 60:40 on a DM basis.

      PubDate: 2017-06-17T12:25:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.10.007
       
  • Evaluation of incense-resinous wood formation in agarwood (Aquilaria
           malaccensis Lam.) using sonic tomography

    • Authors: Nadya Putri; Lina Karlinasari; Maman Turjaman; Imam Wahyudi; Dodi Nandika
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Nadya Putri, Lina Karlinasari, Maman Turjaman, Imam Wahyudi, Dodi Nandika
      Incense-resinous wood of agarwood is a high-value non-timber forest product found in the trunk or branches of Aquliaria and Gyrinops species. Incense-resinous wood of agarwood is formed as a response to tree damage caused by wounding or fungal attack. Detection of such wood in trees has generally been carried out based on natural signs such as dark spots or black marks when peeling back tree bark, but these often yield uncertain results. Sonic tomography can be applied to predict the presence of incense-resinous wood in standing trees. The objective of this study was to evaluate sonic tomography at various trunk heights based on variations in the sound velocity associated with the presence of incense-resinous wood. Ten agarwood trees (Aquilaria malaccensis) were selected for this study; five trees were artificially inoculated with Fusarium solani fungus and the other five were untreated. The results showed that the height of the measurement did not significantly affect the propagation velocity of sound waves or the tomographic results. Sonic tomography revealed that prediction of the deteriorated zone which is indicative of incense-resinous wood formation was 1.1% greater in inoculated trees than in uninoculated trees.

      PubDate: 2017-06-17T12:25:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.08.009
       
  • Effects of Malachite Green on Growth and Tissue Accumulation in Pak Choy
           (Brassica chinensis Tsen & Lee)

    • Authors: Piyaporn Matpang; Manop Sriuttha; Narumol Piwpuan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Piyaporn Matpang, Manop Sriuttha, Narumol Piwpuan
      Reuse for agricultural purposes of aquaculture wastewater containing high levels of nutrients can be integrated into a water management strategy, in order to conserve water and alleviate water pollution problems. However, rather than nutrients, some contaminants in aquaculture wastewater may pose detrimental effects on plants being nourished. This study assessed the growth and accumulation of toxic substances of Brassica chinensis in response to Malachite Green (MG)-contaminated water. Plant seedlings were hydroponically grown with MG at 1 mg/L, 2 mg/L or 4 mg/L under ambient air conditions in the laboratory for 4 wk. Growth parameters—the number of leaves, plant height, leaf length and width, root length and dry mass of the plants—were compared with plants grown without MG (control). The concentrations at 2 mg/L and 4 mg/L affected the growth of the plants as measured by leaf length, plant height and leaf width generally to a lesser degree than the control plants and those grown at 1 mg/L MG (p < 0.05). The roots of plants were clearly affected by MG (average root length = 14.00 ± 1.17 cm, 14.50 ± 3.91 cm, 7.17 ± 1.52 cm and 6.58 ± 0.94 cm for plants from the control and treatments with MG at 1 mg/L, 2 mg/L and 4 mg/L, respectively, p < 0.001). The dry mass of treated plants (average dry mass = 1.22 ± 0.48 g/plant, 1.17 ± 0.27 g/plant and 0.86 ± 0.17 g/plant for treatments of MG at 1 mg/L, 2 mg/L and 4 mg/L, respectively) were lower than that of control plants (1.80 ± 0.73 g/plant) (p < 0.001). The increase in the oxalate content in the plant shoots suggested that the plants may accumulate substances that could be harmful to human health. Based on these results, it is proposed that the integration of hydroponic plant production with MG-contaminated water at a concentration not exceeding 1 mg/L can be applied without any reduction in the productivity of B. chinensis; however, the accumulation of toxic substances in plant tissues still needs to be identified.

      PubDate: 2017-06-13T13:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.10.008
       
  • Effects of phosphorus addition on nitrogen cycle and fluxes of N2O and CH4
           in tropical tree plantation soils in Thailand

    • Authors: Taiki Mori; Chongrak Wachrinrat; Duriya Staporn; Ponthep Meunpong; Warawich Suebsai; Kazuki Matsubara; Khitja Boonsri; Warisa Lumban; Manassawee Kuawong; Thanida Phukdee; Juruwan Srifai; Kannika Boonman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Taiki Mori, Chongrak Wachrinrat, Duriya Staporn, Ponthep Meunpong, Warawich Suebsai, Kazuki Matsubara, Khitja Boonsri, Warisa Lumban, Manassawee Kuawong, Thanida Phukdee, Juruwan Srifai, Kannika Boonman
      An incubation experiment was conducted to test the effects of phosphorus (P) addition on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and methane (CH4) uptakes, using tropical tree plantation soils in Thailand. Soil samples were taken from five forest stands—Acacia auriculiformis, Acacia mangium, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Hopea odorata, and Xylia xylocarpa—and incubated at 80% water holding capacity. P addition stimulated N2O emissions only in Xylia xylocarpa soils. Since P addition tended to increase net ammonification rates in Xylia xylocarpa soils, the stimulated N2O emissions were suggested to be due to the stimulated nitrogen (N) cycle by P addition and the higher N supply for nitrification and denitrification. In other soils, P addition had no effects on N2O emissions or soil N properties, except that P addition tended to increase the soil microbial biomass N in Acacia auriculiformis soils. No effects of P addition were observed on CH4 uptakes in any soil. It is suggested that P addition on N2O and CH4 fluxes at the study site were not significant, at least under laboratory conditions.

      PubDate: 2017-06-13T13:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.03.002
       
  • Allelopathic effects of jungle rice (Echinochloa colona (L.)Link) extract
           on seed germination and seedling growth of rice

    • Authors: Pimjai Sitthinoi; Sukumarn Lertmongkol; Wanchai Chanprasert; Srunya Vajrodaya
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Pimjai Sitthinoi, Sukumarn Lertmongkol, Wanchai Chanprasert, Srunya Vajrodaya
      The allelopathic effects of jungle rice were investigated on the seed germination and seedling growth of the two rice cultivars, Khao Dawk Mali 105 and RD41. Jungle rice extract with varying concentrations (0 mg/mL, 1 mg/mL, 5 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL) was prepared using three solvents (hexane, dichloromethane and methanol) from shoots and roots separately. The jungle rice extracts from the shoot part showed a higher inhibitory effect on the root length and seedling dry weight of rice compared to the extracts from the root part. Different extraction solvents caused differences in the inhibitory effect on the germination and seedling growth of rice and had an interaction with the extract concentration in all parameters measured. Methanol extraction solvent severely inhibited the seed germination of both cultivars regardless of the extract concentrations, whereas the jungle rice extracts using dichloromethane and hexane showed moderate inhibitory effects depending on the concentrations of 1–10 mg/mL, respectively. It can be concluded that jungle rice extracts contain allelopathic compounds and can inhibit the seed germination and seedling growth of rice. Methanol should be used as an extraction solvent if the inhibitory effect of the jungle rice extract is required.

      PubDate: 2017-06-13T13:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.09.004
       
  • Antioxidant and anticancer activities of Plectranthus stocksii Hook. f.
           leaf and stem extracts

    • Authors: Kasipandi Muniyandi; Elizabeth George; Vekataramana Mudili; Naveen Kumar Kalagatur; Allen Joseph Anthuvan; Kadirvelu Krishna; Parimelazhagan Thangaraj; Gopalan Natarajan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 June 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Kasipandi Muniyandi, Elizabeth George, Vekataramana Mudili, Naveen Kumar Kalagatur, Allen Joseph Anthuvan, Kadirvelu Krishna, Parimelazhagan Thangaraj, Gopalan Natarajan
      The properties of Plectranthus stocksii—a well-known folk medicinal plant—were investigated. The plant extracts were successively extracted and tested for phytochemicals using high performance liquid chromatography, while antioxidant and anticancerous properties were assessed using MCF-7, Caco-2 and RAW 264.7 cancerous cell line models. The methanolic extract of leaves showed higher concentrations of total phenolics (415.41 mg gallic acid equivalents/g extract) and tannins (177.53 mg gallic acid equivalents/g extract) contents than other studied extracts. In the case of flavonoids, ethyl acetate extract of leaf (LEA) showed a higher concentration (777.11 mg rutin equivalents/g extract) and was also found to have better antioxidant activity against stable radical 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (3.46 μg/mL), 2,2’azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid) disodium salt radical (27.41 mM Trolox equivalent/g extract) and superoxide (24.16 μg/mL) radicals and showed better IC50 (the concentration of the sample at which the inhibition rate reaches 50%) values on MCF-7 (48.874 μg/mL) and Caco-2 (36.088 μg/mL) cancerous cell line models. The immense anti-oxidant potential of P. stocksii leaf and stem extracts could be utilized as a good source of natural, anti-oxidant supplement in food to defend against oxidative-stress-related disorders and more generally in the food safety industry.

      PubDate: 2017-06-13T13:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.07.007
       
  • Molecular characterization and expression analysis of Cyclin B and Cell
           division cycle 2 in Gonads of Diploid and Triploid Bighead Catfish,
           Clarias macrocephalus Günther, 1864

    • Authors: Anyalak Wachirachaikarn; Wikrom Rungsin Prapansak Srisapoome Sirawut Klinbunga Uthairat Na-Nakorn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Anyalak Wachirachaikarn, Wikrom Rungsin, Prapansak Srisapoome, Sirawut Klinbunga, Uthairat Na-Nakorn
      This study investigated the differential expression of genes associated with reproduction in sterile triploid and normal diploid bighead catfish (Clarias macrocephalus Günther, 1864). The triploid fish were produced using cold shock and were reared in the same conditions as the diploid counterpart. The histomicrographs showed completely retarded triploid gonads across the samples aged 2–12 mth, whereas the gonads of the diploids were in developing stages during 2–4 mth, reached the early maturing stage at 6 mth, matured at 8 mth and showed signs of atresia at 10–12 mth. In parallel, the full-length cDNAs of cyclin B1 (CmCcnb1; 1539 bp in length with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1194 bp corresponding to 397 amino acids) and cell division cycle 2 (CmCdc2; 1355 bp, an ORF of 909 bp, 302 amino acids) of bighead catfish (Clarias macrocephalus Günther, 1864) were isolated. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the newly characterized CmCcnb1 should be regarded as a member of cyclin B1 rather than cyclin B2. The expression level of CmCcnb1 mRNA was limited in different stages of the ovaries and testes of triploids. In diploid ovaries, its expression was significantly higher than that in triploid ovaries in fish aged 2 mth (513.43 ± 82.22 fold) and in fish aged 8 mth (2,430.87 ± 900.06 fold). The CmCcnb1 level in the testes of diploids was significantly greater than that in triploids in fish aged 2 mth (928.85 ± 208.72 fold). Similarly, expression of CmCdc2 mRNA was also reduced in triploids. Its expression was significantly lower than that in diploid females aged 2 mth (7.66 ± 3.42 fold), 4 mth (59.42 ± 10.50 fold) and 8 mth (42.74 ± 8.36 fold). In males, significantly greater expression of CmCdc2 was observed at age 6 mth (58.61 ± 34.64 fold) and 8 mth (72.70 ± 4.36 fold) diploids compared to triploids. The results illustrated that CmCcnb1 and CmCdc2 are functionally involved in oogenesis and spermatogenesis and reduced expression levels of these transcripts affected the reproductive development of triploid C. macrocephalus.

      PubDate: 2017-05-24T04:22:17Z
       
  • Effects of alternative oil sources in feed on growth and fatty acid
           composition of juvenile giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii)

    • Authors: Chanpim Kangpanich; Jarunan Pratoomyot Wansuk Senanan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Chanpim Kangpanich, Jarunan Pratoomyot, Wansuk Senanan
      To relieve the pressure on the future use of fish oil (FO), alternative oil sources need to be explored. Alternative oil sources were evaluated—Schizochytrium sp. (SZ) and soybean oil (SO)—on the growth performance and flesh quality of juvenile river prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Five experimental diets differed in the types of oil used (oil comprised 3% of dietary ingredients): 3% FO, 1% SZ + 2% SO, 1.5% SZ + 1.5% SO, 2% SZ +1% SO and 3% SZ. After 60 d of the experiment, the survival rates of prawns fed non-FO diets did not significantly (p > 0.05) differ from those fed the FO diet (77.82 ± 4.45–93.38 ± 0.00%). Moreover, prawns fed diets containing both SZ and SO had significantly (p < 0.05) better growth performance than those fed a single oil source. Prawns fed 2% SZ+1% SO showed the best final weight, percentage weight gain, absolute daily weight gain, specific growth rate and feed conversion ratio (p < 0.05) while those fed 1.5% SZ +1.5% SO or 3% SZ had the highest survival. Tissues of prawns fed the non-FO diets contained higher amounts of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) but were lower in n-3 long-chain PUFAs (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) than those fed the FO diet. Among the non-FO groups, prawns fed 3% SZ had the most similar flesh fatty acid profile to those fed 3% FO. Substitution of FO with combinations of SZ and SO significantly improved growth performance and feed utilization. The study recommended diets containing 2% SZ + 1% SO or 1.5% SZ + 1.5% SO for M. rosenbergii juveniles.

      PubDate: 2017-05-24T04:22:17Z
       
  • Efficiency using computer simulation of Reverse Threshold Model Theory on
           assessing a“One Laptop Per Child” computer versus desktop computer

    • Authors: Supat Faarungsang; Sasithon Nakthong
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Supat Faarungsang, Sasithon Nakthong
      The Reverse Threshold Model Theory (RTMT) model was introduced based on limiting factor concepts, but its efficiency compared to the Conventional Model (CM) has not been published. This investigation assessed the efficiency of RTMT compared to CM using computer simulation on the “One Laptop Per Child” computer and a desktop computer. Based on probability values, it was found that RTMT was more efficient than CM among eight treatment combinations and an earlier study verified that RTMT gives complete elimination of random error. Furthermore, RTMT has several advantages over CM and is therefore proposed to be applied to most research data.

      PubDate: 2017-05-24T04:22:17Z
       
  • Phytotoxic effects of biochar-produced from argan shells-on Salad and
           Barley germination

    • Authors: Laila Bouqbis; Salma Daoud; Hans Werner Koyro; Claudia Irene Kammann; Lalla Fatima Zohra Ainlhout; Moulay Cherif Harrouni
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 May 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Laila Bouqbis, Salma Daoud, Hans Werner Koyro, Claudia Irene Kammann, Lalla Fatima Zohra Ainlhout, Moulay Cherif Harrouni
      Biochar produced from argan shells can be contaminated by toxic substances accumulated during pyrolysis process. To determine the potential impact of toxic substances and salt stress, this study focused on the effect argan shells biochar has on germination of salad (0%, 0,5%, 1%, 2%, 4% and 8% biochar dry weight in the mixture sand-biochar) and barley seeds (0%, 1%, 2,5%, 5% and 10% biochar dry weight in the mixture peat-biochar). Concerning the salt stress effect of biochar on germination of salad, no negative effect of agran shells biochar was observed neither on germination rate nor on fresh weight of seedlings. Additionally, biochar application increases the germination rate and the fresh weight of biomass in all of the considered treatments. For barley germination test, no significant difference was observed when comparing the germination rate, fresh/dry weight of barley seedlings, water content and water use efficiency of different mixtures (peat-biochar) with those of control. Thus, on both salad and barley germination test, no negative effect of biochar produced from argan shells has been revealed which provide a preliminary indication that it could be safely used for agriculture.

      PubDate: 2017-05-19T03:31:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.04.001
       
  • FM - TOC

    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources, Volume 51, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-04-05T08:43:47Z
       
  • Identification key to species of the flying lizard genus Draco Linnaeus,
           1758 (Squamata: Agamidae) in Thailand

    • Authors: Nattawut Srichairat; Pattanee Jantrarotai; Prateep Duengkae; Yodchaiy Chuaynkern
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Nattawut Srichairat, Pattanee Jantrarotai, Prateep Duengkae, Yodchaiy Chuaynkern
      A species identification key of flying lizards in the genus Draco from Thailand was constructed based on 521 preserved specimens from collections during 1967 to 2012 in the Thailand Natural History Museum, Bangkok, Thailand and the National Science Museum, Pathum Thani province, Thailand. Regardless of sexual characters, four characters were used to identify Draco spp. lizards: 1) nostril direction; 2) type of tympanum; 3) pattern of patagium; and 4) snout with or without a series of scales forming a Y-shaped figure. The specimens were identified into nine species—D. blanfordii, D. fimbriatus, D. maculatus, D. maximus, D. melanopogon, D. obscurus, D. quinquefasciatus, D. taeniopterus and D. volans.

      PubDate: 2017-03-10T12:23:07Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.02.002
       
  • Evaluation of mating type distribution and genetic diversity of three
           Magnaporthe oryzae avirulence genes, PWL-2, AVR-Pii and Avr-Piz-t, in
           Thailand rice blast isolates

    • Authors: Thanyaluk Sirisathaworn; Tanakorn Srirat; Apinya Longya; Chatchawan Jantasuriyarat
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Thanyaluk Sirisathaworn, Tanakorn Srirat, Apinya Longya, Chatchawan Jantasuriyarat
      Rice blast disease, caused by the filamentous ascomycete fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph Pyricularia oryzae), has been ranked among the most important diseases of rice. The molecular mechanisms against this fungus follow the idea of “gene-for-gene interaction”, in which a plant resistance (R) gene product recognizes a fungal avirulence (Avr) effector and triggers the defense response. However, the Avr genes have been shown to be rapidly evolving resulting in high levels of genetic diversity. This study investigated genetic diversity that is influenced by sexual recombination and mutation for the adaptation of rice blast fungus to overcome the defense response. Mating type distribution and the nucleotide sequence variation of three avirulence genes were evaluated—PWL-2, Avr-Pii and Avr-Piz-t. In total, 77 rice blast isolates collected from infected rice plants in northern, northeastern and central Thailand in 2005, 2010 and 2012, were used in the analysis with mating type and avirulence gene-specific primers. The results revealed that all the tested blast isolates belonged to the mating type MAT1-2, suggesting a lack of sexual recombination within the population. The successful rates of PWL-2, Avr-Pii and Avr-Piz-t gene-specific primer amplification were 100%, 60% and 54%, respectively. Base substitution mutation was observed in coding regions of the Avr-Pii and Avr-Piz-t genes. Although these results showed a low level of genetic diversity in Thai rice blast isolates, non-synonymous mutations did occur which revealed common mechanisms of selective pressure that are prone to adaptation of Avr genes. The information on nucleotide sequence variation and the genetic diversity of Avr genes obtained from this study could be useful for planning novel strategies in the development of rice breeding programs in Thailand.

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T16:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.08.005
       
  • Molecular identification and expression profiling of a novel
           alpha2-macroglobulin gene in giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium
           rosenbergii, De Man)

    • Authors: Wirot Likittrakulwong; Uthairat Na-Nakorn; Supawadee Poompuang; Skorn Koonawootrittriron; Prapansak Srisapoome
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Wirot Likittrakulwong, Uthairat Na-Nakorn, Supawadee Poompuang, Skorn Koonawootrittriron, Prapansak Srisapoome
      A full-length cDNA encoding a novel alpha-2 macroglobulin (Mr-2α2M) gene in giant freshwater prawn was cloned and sequenced using rapid amplification cDNA end techniques. The Mr-2α2M was 5,194 bp and comprised a 4,560-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 1,519 amino acid residues. The mature Mr-2α2M protein had a calculated molecular mass of 168.8 kDa and an estimated pI of 5.14. Mr-2α2M contained significantly functional domains, including a bait region, a thiol ester motif and a receptor-binding domain, similar to the α2Ms of other species. Amino acid sequence analysis of α2Ms indicated that Mr-2α2M was most similar to the Chinese white shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) α2M isoform 2 (Fc-A2M-2), with an identity of 58.8%, and the previously identified giant freshwater prawn Mr-1α2M protein, with an identity of 43.5%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Mr-2α2M was more closely related to Fc-A2M-2 than Mr-1α2M, which was placed in a different subminor group. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay illustrated that Mr-2α2M mRNA transcripts were strongly detected in the subcuticular epithelium, heart, midgut and muscle but marginally detected in the hemocytes of normal prawns. Immune response analysis in prawns stimulated with Aeromonas hydrophila clearly indicated that Mr-2α2M was quickly up-regulated to high levels in hemocytes and hepatopancreas after 12 hr, in contrast to the expression pattern of Mr-1α2M. This novel α2M gene may have unique, important roles in giant freshwater prawn immune systems that differ significantly from those of the previously identified Mr-1α2M gene.

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T16:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.02.001
       
  • Effects of protein levels and energy sources in total mixed ration on
           feedlot performance and carcass quality of Kamphaeng Saen steers

    • Authors: Phoompong Boonsaen; Nann Winn Soe; Wisut Maitreejet; Sutisa Majarune; Taweeporn Reungprim; Suriya Sawanon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Phoompong Boonsaen, Nann Winn Soe, Wisut Maitreejet, Sutisa Majarune, Taweeporn Reungprim, Suriya Sawanon
      The effects of dietary protein and energy sources of a total mixed ration (TMR) were evaluated based on the performance, carcass quality and production cost of feedlot Kamphaeng Saen steers. Twenty-four Kamphaeng Saen steers were assigned according to a 2 × 2 factorial in a randomized complete block design with two factors: 1) energy sources comprised of cassava chip (cTMR) and cassava chip plus ground corn (ccTMR); and 2) crude protein (CP) levels (12%CP and 14%CP). The steers were slaughtered after being fed for 120 d. The carcass characterization and meat quality were determined at day 7 of aging. The results indicated that the average daily gain, final weight (p < 0.05), carcass weight (p = 0.06) and the profit of the steers fed the cTMR were greater compared to the ccTMR without effects on carcass characteristic and meat quality. The different levels of CP in the diet had no effects (p > 0.05) on feedlot performance, carcass characteristic and meat quality but steers fed 12%CP cTMR provided a profit. Cassava chip provided good potential to be used as an energy source in a TMR for feedlot cattle.

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T16:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.02.003
       
  • In vitro propagation of the aromatic herb Strobilanthes tonkinensis Lindau

    • Authors: Niyomsri Srikun
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Niyomsri Srikun
      Strobilanthes tonkinensis Lindau. is a rare aromatic herb belonging to the family Acanthaceae. Its plant extract has been confirmed as a major source of squalene. In this research, a protocol for micropropagation was developed that can support ex situ conservation and will benefit plant material production. Shoot explants were provided from plants grown in the greenhouse and trickle irrigated for 1 mth and then effectively sterilized by shaking in NaOCl at a concentration of 1.2% for 10 min, followed by 0.6% for 15 min, which produced 70% good-growing, healthy shoots. Increasing thidiazuron and N6-benzyladenine (BA) concentrations did not promote shoot multiplication. Shoot multiplication was the best on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 16 μM BA. The highest shoot number (12 shoots/explant) was obtained at 8 wk of culture. The highest shoot elongation was obtained on the medium added with 16 μM BA for 4 wk and subsequent subculturing to hormone-free MS medium for another 4 wk. High frequency rooting (21 roots/shoot) was obtained on MS medium fortified with 7.5 μM indole-3-butyric acid. Complete plantlets that were transferred to pots under greenhouse conditions produced healthy plants with 100% survival after 5 wk.

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T16:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.01.006
       
  • Effects of shrimp chitosan on the physical properties of handsheets

    • Authors: Somwang Khantayanuwong; Chutatip Khemarom; Sumaida Salaemae
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Somwang Khantayanuwong, Chutatip Khemarom, Sumaida Salaemae
      The effects of shrimp chitosan as an additive were determined on the physical properties of handsheets, especially: their brightness, opacity, surface roughness and surface water absorptiveness. Commercial, hardwood, bleached kraft pulp was beaten to attain 390 mL Canadian standard freeness and then made into four sets of handsheets by mixing each part of the beaten pulp slurry with shrimp-chitosan solution to obtain 0.00%, 0.25%, 0.50% and 0.75% (oven dry weight (o.d. wt.) of pulp), respectively, in accordance with standard test methods. All the sets of handsheets were conditioned for 1 wk and then tested for their mechanical and physical properties at 50 ± 2 % relative humidity and 23 ± 1oC. The results indicated that even though there were some substantial decreases in some physical properties of shrimp-chitosan-treated handsheets (brightness, surface roughness and surface water absorptiveness), their opacity was slightly increased. Most of the mechanical properties of shrimp-chitosan-treated handsheets such as the bursting index, folding endurance, tensile index, modulus of elasticity and tensile energy absorption were greatly increased with the addition of shrimp chitosan at 0.25% o.d. wt. of pulp to 0.50% o.d. wt. of pulp. However, there was no effect on the tearing strength by adding shrimp chitosan to the handsheets.

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T16:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.07.006
       
  • Physicochemical Quality and Antioxidant Changes in ‘Leb Mue Nang’
           Banana Fruit during Ripening

    • Authors: Pannipa Youryon; Suriyan Supapvanich
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Pannipa Youryon, Suriyan Supapvanich
      The physicochemical and antioxidant changes of ‘Kluai Leb Mue Nang’ banana fruit (Musa AA group) were investigated during ripening. The visual appearance, peel and pulp color, firmness, total soluble solids concentration (TSS), total acidity (TA) and bioactive compounds of the fruit at three stages of ripening (mature green, ripe and overripe) were monitored. Changes in both the peel and pulp color, texture, TSS and TA contents during banana ripening were similar to those of other banana fruits. Interestingly, the highest total antioxidants capacity and total phenols concentration were found in the ripe banana fruit. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity remained constant and the highest total flavonoids concentration was found in the mature green fruit.

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T16:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2015.12.004
       
  • Host-substrate preference of Theocolax elegans (Westwood) (Hymenoptera:
           Pteromalidae), a larval parasitoid of the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais
           (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    • Authors: Saruta Sitthichaiyakul; Weerawan Amornsak
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Saruta Sitthichaiyakul, Weerawan Amornsak
      The solitary parasitoid Theocolax elegans (Westwood) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) was investigated attacking larvae of the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) under laboratory conditions. Theocolax elegans parasitoids were mass reared on 21-day-old S. zeamais fed with different host substrates consisting of brown rice, maize, sorghum and wheat. The developmental time of S. zeamais was observed. The widest head capsule was recorded from S. zeamais developing in brown rice grain kernels. The head capsule width was used to determine the age of the larval instars. The sex ratio of T. elegans progeny emerging from brown rice was the same in the choice and no-choice tests (1.8:1.0 and 1.8:1.0, respectively). Female parasitoids preferred to oviposit on S. zeamais developed in brown rice grain kernels in both tests. The number of parasitoid progeny emerging from different host substrates was different in the choice and no-choice tests. The progeny of T. elegans females and males were fully winged, short winged and wingless.

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T16:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.09.003
       
  • Soil Macrofauna Communities under Plant Cover in a No-till System in
           Thailand

    • Authors: Phakphoom Tantachasatid; Johnny Boyer; Sornprach Thanisawanyankura; Lucien Séguy; Kannika Sajjaphan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Phakphoom Tantachasatid, Johnny Boyer, Sornprach Thanisawanyankura, Lucien Séguy, Kannika Sajjaphan
      The impact of no-till cropping systems with plant cover on soil macrofauna communities was assessed according to their abundance and biomass. The study was carried out in northeastern Thailand under a conventional cropping system (plow-based tillage), no-till cropping systems with plant cover (Brachiaria ruziziensis, Stylosanthes guianensis, Stylosanthes guianensis associated with Brachiaria ruziziensis, rice straw) and under a natural dipterocarp forest. Soil macrofauna populations were sampled in 2007 (June and October) during the rainy season and at a beginning of the dry season, respectively. The results revealed that in the short term, the biological compartment responded quickly to the presence of plant cover, as shown by a significant increase in soil macrofauna abundance and total biomass. The highest mean total abundance (MTA) of 4,224 indviduals/m2 at the end of planting period (October 2007) was observed under S. guianensis cover and also the highest mean total soil macrofauna biomass (MTB) of 14.63 g/m2 was observed in the forest system in the same period. However, in the system of cultivation, the highest MTB of 11.33 g/m2 was observed under S. guianensis cover. Moreover, the change rate of soil macrofauna MTA was the highest under S. guianensis cover (+751.61%) and the change rate of soil macrofauna MTB revealed that this change rate was highest in forest (+430.07%). However, in the other systems of cultivation, the highest change rate of MTB was under S. guianensis cover (+12.96%).

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T16:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.08.004
       
  • Cultivation, production and management techniques of broom grass
           (Thysanolaena maxima Roxb.) in hilly areas of Bangladesh

    • Authors: Mohammod Jahangir Alam; Sayed Mohammod Zahirul Islam; Mohammod Motiar Rahman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2017
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Mohammod Jahangir Alam, Sayed Mohammod Zahirul Islam, Mohammod Motiar Rahman
      This paper presents the results on appropriate cultivation, plantation, production and management techniques of Thysanolaena maxima for domestication at age 1–4 yr (grown 2007–2011). Rhizome cuttings were planted in research experimental plots at spacings of T1=1.0 m × 1.0 m, T2= 1.5 m × 1.5 m and T3= 2.0 m × 2.0 m in a randomized complete block design with six replications and three treatments. The results showed that the number of panicles produced was 1,048, 41,237, 78,737 and 105,094 in year 1 to year 4, respectively. The average total green weight (kg/plot) was 10.26, 632.15, 423.34 and 543.40 and the average dry weight (kg/plot) was 9.88, 287.65, 216.93 and 241.60 in year 1 to year 4, respectively. Composite soil samples were collected and the soil pH values of the surface soil from the different treatments varied from 5.1 to 5.2. There was no significant difference among the treatments in the available P and S. The available Ca, Mg and K were higher in the T3 treatment compared with the other treatments. Planting rhizome cuttings at 2.0 m × 2.0 m spacing gave the maximum broom/panicle production.

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T16:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2016.08.006
       
 
 
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