for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3163 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3163 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 88, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 394, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 244, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.732, CiteScore: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 135, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 337, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 436, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
Agriculture and Natural Resources
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2452-316X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3163 journals]
  • Effects of a short-term molt using cassava meal, broken rice, or corn meal
           on plasma thyroxin concentrations, organ weights and intestinal
           histopathology in older (95 wk) laying hens

    • Authors: Nirat Gongruttananun; Panaput Guntapa; Kanokporn Saengkudrua
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 May 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Nirat Gongruttananun, Panaput Guntapa, Kanokporn Saengkudrua
      The effects of a nonfasting induced molt were determined on the thyroxin concentration, organ weight and intestinal histopathology in 95-wk-old hens. Hens (60 birds each treatment) were randomly assigned to four treatments for 14 d: 1) molted by feeding broken rice (BRO), 2) fed corn (COR), 3) fed cassava (CAS), or 4) a non-molt control (NON). During the molt period, the BRO, COR and CAS groups were exposed to an 8 hr light: 16 hr dark photoperiod, whereas the control hens were fed a layer ration and provided with 16 hr of light per day. The body weight loss in the CAS hens was 21.90% which was significantly higher than those of the BRO (6.01%) or COR hens (9.30%). The CAS hens completely stopped laying on d 7, whereas the BRO and COR birds exhibited reductions but continued laying. The egg weight of the COR treatment was significantly lower than those of the BRO and CAS treatments. At the end of the molt period, the hematocrit values of the BRO and CAS hens were significantly higher than those of the COR hens. The plasma thyroxin concentrations of the CAS treatment were significantly higher than those of the COR treatment, whereas the BRO hens had a value intermediate between the two groups. The CAS and COR hens had reduced liver weights compared with the BRO hens. However, the thyroid weights of the CAS and COR hens were significantly greater than those of the BRO hens. No inflammatory evidence was observed in any treatment from the examination of intestinal histopathology.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T19:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.05.005
       
  • Esophagogastric region and liver tissue in dog-faced water snake Cerberus
           rynchops: Histology and histochemistry

    • Authors: Piyakorn Boonyoung; Sinlapachai Senarat; Jes Kettratad; Wannee Jiraungkoorskul; Pisit Poolprasert; Sansareeya Wangkulangkul; Theerakamol Pengsakul; Watiporn Yenchum; Yassir Sulieman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 May 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Piyakorn Boonyoung, Sinlapachai Senarat, Jes Kettratad, Wannee Jiraungkoorskul, Pisit Poolprasert, Sansareeya Wangkulangkul, Theerakamol Pengsakul, Watiporn Yenchum, Yassir Sulieman
      Observation of the esophagogastric region and liver tissue of the dog-faced water snake, Cerberus rynchops, living in Thailand was evaluated using standard histological techniques. The results revealed that the digestive tract of this snake consists of three parts: the oesophagus, stomach and intestine, respectively. From the histological analysis, the longitudinal folds of the oesophagus were lined by pseudostratified columnar epithelia with goblet cells. The goblet cells stained positively with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and alcian blue (AB) methods. In the stomach, gastric glands extended into the lamina propria. Each gastric gland had a greater cell size than other regions and also a branched tubular gland was visible in the histological images. The mucous neck cell was positive to PAS and AB reactions, whereas, the oxynticopeptic cells slightly reacted to both PAS and AB staining and were preferentially located in this gland. The liver parenchyma of C. rynchops was composed of hepatic sinusoids and hepatocytes. In conclusion, this was the first study on digestive tract and liver tissue in C. rynchops from the Paknam Pranburi Estuary, Thailand.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T19:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.05.006
       
  • Effects of root colonization by zinc-solubilizing bacteria on rice plant
           (Oryza sativa MR219) growth

    • Authors: Nur Maizatul Idayu Othman; Radziah Othman; Halimi Mohd Saud; Puteri Edaroyati Megat Wahab
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 May 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Nur Maizatul Idayu Othman, Radziah Othman, Halimi Mohd Saud, Puteri Edaroyati Megat Wahab
      Two experiments were conducted using gnotobiotic conditions and sand culture treatment to determine the effects of root colonization by zinc-solubilizing bacteria (ZSB) on rice growth. Both experiments were designed as complete randomized designs. The first experiment was conducted in a growth chamber under gnobiotic conditions. Five-day-old rice plantlets (MR219) were inoculated with bacterial isolates—Acinetobacter sp. (TM56) and Serratia sp. (TM9). The roots were cut for analysis using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The second experiment was also conducted in a growth chamber under sand culture conditions. The treatments consisted of the control, two bacterial isolates—Acinetobacter sp (TM56) and Serratia sp. (TM9), two types of zinc sources—ZnSO4 and ZnO and three zinc rates—0 mg/L, 0.2 mg/L and 0.4 mg/L. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and means comparison. Acinetobacter sp. and Serratia sp. were able to colonize and penetrate rice plant roots. Bacterial populations of Serratia sp. were affected by different rates of zinc for endophytes and the rhizosphere. From the study, there were significant differences among bacterial inoculation and the different rates and sources of zinc. However, inoculation with Acinetobacter sp. at 0.2 mg/L of ZnSO4 produced the highest rice plant growth and root development. It was concluded that rice plant growth was affected by ZSB inoculation, zinc sources and the rate of zinc.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T19:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.05.004
       
  • Purification and characterization of a harsh conditions-resistant protease
           from a new strain of Staphylococcus saprophyticus

    • Authors: Sasithorn Uttatree; Jittima Charoenpanich
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Sasithorn Uttatree, Jittima Charoenpanich
      A major road block to the industrial usage of known proteases is their limited stability under harsh conditions. Hence, there is always a need for newer enzymes with novel properties that can further satisfy all industrial demands. This study described a benthic marine bacterium, Staphylococcus saprophyticus that secretes an alkaliphilic and broad-temperature active protease (10–80 °C). The protease was successfully purified 42.66-fold using 70–80% ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel-permeable column chromatography. It had a relative molecular mass of 28 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and retained high activity and significant stability at 60–80 °C, over a wide range of pH (3.0–12.0), inhibitors and metal ions. Furthermore, the enzyme was stable in surfactants (such as sodium dodecyl sulfate), oxidizing agents (such as H2O2), bleaching agents (such as zeolite) and hydrophobic solvents (such as benzene, hexanes and hexadecane). These properties support the enzyme's potential as a vigorous biocatalyst for industrial applications.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T19:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.05.001
       
  • Assessment of some genetic attributes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)
           using gene-specific molecular markers

    • Authors: Rona Mahmud; Muhammed Rezwan Kabir; Md. Ekramul Hoque; Md. Abdullah Yousuf Akhond
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Rona Mahmud, Muhammed Rezwan Kabir, Md. Ekramul Hoque, Md. Abdullah Yousuf Akhond
      Twenty-four wheat genotypes were characterized for the presence of three stress related genetic attributes using gene-specific molecular markers. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of approximately 110 bp of 1RS rye chromosome fragment from 16 genotypes were obtained using specific primer pairs indicating the presence of translocation in these lines. The same genotypes were screened for the presence of dwarfing genes where 19 genotypes showed the presence of either the Rht-B1b or Rht-D1b allele having a semi-dwarf phenotype. Two of the genotypes (Kheri and Sufi) had wild type alleles in both the loci and two other genotypes showed the presence of double dwarf alleles (Rht-B1b+Rht-D1b). A 16.9 kDa HSP gene was characterized by validating a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) linked with thermo tolerance in wheat. Thirteen of the 24 genotypes, which failed to amplify the specific PCR product due to the presence of an SNP, are expected to show tolerance for heat stress. Among the genotypes, Sonora-64, Balaka, Barkat, Aghrani and BARI Gom-24 (Prodip) tested positive for all the three markers evaluated (rye translocation, dwarfing genes and heat tolerance). These genotypes could be used to improve various stress tolerance attributes in wheat for future breeding programs.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T19:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.05.003
       
  • Species diversity and polyunsaturated fatty acid content of
           thraustochytrids from fallen mangrove leaves in Chon Buri province,
           Thailand

    • Authors: Somtawin Jaritkhuan; Sudarat Suanjit
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Somtawin Jaritkhuan, Sudarat Suanjit
      Screening and isolation were carried out of thraustochytrids from fallen, senescent mangrove leaves from three mangrove forests in Chon Buri province, Thailand. In total, 715 thraustochytrid isolates were obtained and classified into 10 species: Aurantiochytrium mangrovei, A. limacinum, Aurantiochytrium sp.1, Aurantiochytrium sp.2, Aurantiochytrium sp.3, Aurantiochytrium sp.4, Aurantiochytrium sp.5, Aurantiochytrium sp.7, Unknown 1 and Unknown 2. The frequency of occurrence of thraustochytrids ranged from 2.50% to 57.50% and was higher in the dry season than the rainy season. The dominant species found in these areas were A. mangrovei and A. limacinum, and the leaves of Avicennia alba had the greatest abundance of A.mangrovei (57.50%) and A.limacinum (28.75%). The biomass of A. mangrovei and A. limacinum was in the range 6.88–22.49 g/L, and 9.39–20.71 g/L, respectively. The highest content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3,) in A. limacinum and A. mangrovei at 1.43–29.67% and 0.84–31.09% of total fatty acid, respectively. The arachidonic acid (ARA, C20:4n-6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) contents were highest in A. limacinum (0.03–0.10% of total fatty acid), and A. mangrovei (0.13–0.60% of total fatty acid), whereas the amount of docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, C22:5n-3) was similar in A. limacinum (0.41–6.08% of total fatty acid) and A. mangrovei (0.23–7.51% of total fatty acid). The results from this study add to the database of biodiversity of thraustochytrids in Thailand and showed that high amounts of C22:6n-3 in some selected strains have potential for use in aquaculture or commercial use.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T19:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.05.002
       
  • Survey of flood-tolerant bamboos in 2011 flooding in Thailand

    • Authors: Sarawood Sungkaew; Atchara Teerawatananon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Sarawood Sungkaew, Atchara Teerawatananon
      This survey work was undertaken in 2013 but has never been published. Several places that suffered from the 2011 Thailand floods were surveyed during December 2012 to March 2013 to identify potential bamboo species that could tolerate flooding stress. In total, 23 survey points were investigated, mainly in those places where flooding persisted for relatively long periods. These also included another flood-prone area in the riparian forests along the Mun River, northeastern Thailand. Ten bamboo species were found in the study areas. Some bamboo species in the genus Bambusa were more flood-tolerant than those from other genera. The relatively well-known multi-purpose bamboo species, B. beecheyana, was the most flood-tolerant and it appeared that it could withstand being flooded for at least 5 mth.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T19:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.001
       
  • Biochar properties affecting carbon stability in soils contrasting in
           texture and mineralogy

    • Authors: Somchai Butnan; Jonathan L. Deenik; Banyong Toomsan; Patma Vityakon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 April 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Somchai Butnan, Jonathan L. Deenik, Banyong Toomsan, Patma Vityakon
      A pot experiment involving growing three consecutive corn crops in two contrasting tropical soils—a coarse-textured, Al-rich Ultisol and a fine-textured, Mn-rich Oxisol—treated with two eucalyptus wood biochars—at low (350 °C) and high (800 °C) pyrolysis temperatures—at weight per weight rates of 0%, 1%, 2% and 4%, was conducted to assess their effects on the soil organic carbon (SOC) stability (soil C remaining relative to initial soil C) 144 d after biochar application (after the third crop harvest). The low temperature biochar had higher volatile matter but lower ash and fixed C contents than its high temperature counterpart. In the Ultisol, the SOC stability significantly increased with both biochars at up to the 2% rate but beyond which it did not further increase, whereas, in the Oxisol, the SOC stability significantly decreased at all rates of high temperature biochar and at the 2% and 4% rates of the low temperature biochar. Proposed mechanisms underlying these contrasting responses of the two soils involve their different buffering capacities and their mineralogy in relation to the Al in the Ultisol and the Mn in the Oxisol interacting with the different contents of the three main biochar constituents (volatile matter, ash and fixed C) of the two biochars.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.002
       
  • Antifungal property of chili, shallot and garlic extracts against
           pathogenic fungi, Phomopsis spp., isolated from infected leaves of para
           rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.)

    • Authors: Patcharawan Sittisart; Siriporn Yossan; Poonsuk Prasertsan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Patcharawan Sittisart, Siriporn Yossan, Poonsuk Prasertsan
      The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal property of extracts of chili, shallot and garlic (local varieties in Sisaket, Thailand) against pathogenic fungi, Phomopsis spp., which were isolated from infected leaves of para rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.). Seven isolates of Phomopsis spp. namely Phomopsis sp. SSK1.1, SSK1.2, SSK3.1, SSK4.1, SSK5.1, SSK5.2 and SSK7.1 were identified on the basis of morphological characteristics. Fresh plants were extracted with water to obtain crude extracts and their antifungal properties were tested on potato dextrose agar (PDA) media. The study demonstrated that increasing the concentrations (20%, 40%, 60% or 80%) of the chili extract exhibited a dependent increase in the inhibitory level on mycelial growth of Phomopsis spp. SSK3.1, SSK4.1 and SSK5.2. The inhibitory level on mycelial growth of shallot extract also increased in a dose-dependent manner in all isolates of Phomopsis. The garlic extract had significant inhibition on the growth of all isolates with complete inhibition at 80% concentration. The highest levels of percentage inhibition of mycelial growth were with garlic extract followed by shallot and chili extracts, respectively. The study also showed that these plant extracts contained some polyphenols (apigenin, gallic acid, catechin, quercetin, kaempferol and tannic acid) which are well-known compounds possessing antifungal activity. Therefore, it is possible that the antifungal properties of these plant extracts were partly due to these polyphenols or unknown active compounds which could not be analyzed in this study. Collectively, these results suggest that local varieties of both shallot and garlic possess strong antifungal properties.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.005
       
  • Comparison of leaf osmotic adjustment expression in wheat (Triticum
           aestivum L.) under water deficit between the whole plant and tissue levels
           

    • Authors: Song Ai Nio; Daniel Peter Mantilen Ludong; Len J. Wade
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Song Ai Nio, Daniel Peter Mantilen Ludong, Len J. Wade
      This study compared osmotic adjustment (OA) expression and solutes involved in leaves of wheat with high OA capacity (cv. Hartog) under water deficit (WD) in the glasshouse (whole plant level) and laboratory (tissue level). WD was applied at the reproductive stage for the whole plant level and WD was induced at the tissue level using polyethylene glycol (PEG) 8000 as a non-permeating osmotic agent. In the whole plant Experiment, leaf OA was expressed at 16 days (0.26 MPa) and increased to 0.37 MPa at 37 days of treatment. In the tissue level experiment, exposure of leaf segments to PEG 8000 treatments of 0, −0.5, −1.0 and −1.5 MPa and sampling times of 0, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h showed that the maximum leaf OA (0.37 MPa) was expressed on PEG −0.5 MPa after 48 h of treatment. K+, glycinebetaine and proline accounted for 21, 19 and 21% of OA in the glasshouse experiment. K+ did not contribute to the OA, while Na+ and proline only accounted for 5 and 1% in the laboratory experiment. Although OA was expressed in leaf segments of wheat subjected to WD under PEG -0.5 MPa, the laboratory-based PEG method with leaf segments could not substitute for the glasshouse experiment for screening germplasm for OA capacity.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.003
       
  • Protective effect of Canna indica on cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury
           in rats

    • Authors: Mallikarjuna Rao Talluri; Kishore Naidu Killari; N.V.S. Viswanadha Murthy Manepalli; Prasad Konduri; Kiran Kumar Bandaru
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Mallikarjuna Rao Talluri, Kishore Naidu Killari, N.V.S. Viswanadha Murthy Manepalli, Prasad Konduri, Kiran Kumar Bandaru
      The antioxidant capacity and cerebroprotective effect of Canna indica roots were estimated. The methanolic extract of C. indica roots was studied for free radical scavenging activity on superoxide, hydroxyl and 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazylfree radicals and compared with standard drug ascorbic acid using a pre-treatment for 1 wk at a daily oral dose, of 400 mg/kg or 800 mg/kg and then cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced by occluding bilateral common carotid arteries for 30 min, followed by 4 h reperfusion. Quercetin (20 mg/kg, by intraperitoneal injection) was used as the standard drug. At the end of the experiment, animals were sacrificed by decapitation, and the brain was removed for the estimation of various biochemical parameters—assessment of cerebral infarct size and examination of oxidative stress enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Pre-treatment with methanolic extract of C. indica significantly reversed the levels of biochemical parameters and significantly reduced theedema and cerebral infarct size compared to the ischemic control group. The results indicated that C. indica ameliorates the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and enhances the antioxidant defense. Further studies should involve the complete isolation of pure, biologically active compounds from the different extracts from C. indica like methanol in the present research.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.007
       
  • Impact of inulin on viability and storage stability of probiotic
           Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR 2075 in fermented rice extract

    • Authors: Wanticha Savedboworn; Sureeporn Niyomrat; Janyawan Naknovn; Kriangkrai Phattayakorn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Wanticha Savedboworn, Sureeporn Niyomrat, Janyawan Naknovn, Kriangkrai Phattayakorn
      The influence was determined of various concentrations of inulin as a prebiotic on the growth of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR 2075 fermented in Plai Ngahm Prachin Buri rice extract. The supplementation of 2% inulin provided the highest viable cell number of 8.90 log colony forming units/mL after fermentation at 37 °C for 24 h. The storage stability of the probiotic strain could be considered in terms of the specific rate of cell death (k value). The supplementation of 2% inulin exhibited the lowest k value of 2.48 × 10−2/d (30.16% survival) and 8.03 × 10−2/d (7.84% survival) after storage at 4 °C for 52 d and 30 °C for 31 d, respectively. The total reducing sugar and free amino nitrogen profiles of all treatments decreased over the storage period.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.008
       
  • In vitro micropropagation and allelopathic effect of lantana (Lantana
           camara L.)

    • Authors: Varaporn Veraplakorn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Varaporn Veraplakorn
      The invasive plant, lantana (Lantana camara L.), is well known as a traditional medicinal plant and it may become important in the development of modern drugs. Lantana has long been touted as containing potent allelochemicals and in vitro-produced tissues may be appropriate sources for the production and isolation of bioactive compounds. In this research, effective techniques for shoot multiplication and root and callus induction were developed and the allelopathic efficiency of in vitro leaf and callus was examined. The optimized medium for shoot multiplication was Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 12.0–20.0 μM thidiazuron. For rooting, high root numbers were obtained on MS medium containing 5.0 or 10.0 μM 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). In addition, the highest relative growth rate of callus was achieved when lantana leaf was cultured on NB medium (MS medium with 21.5 μM NAA and 22.5 μM N6-benzyladenine). For allelopathic effects, the results suggested high potential activity of lantana leaf and callus that was able to variably inhibit the seed germination and seedling growth of all four test species. Leaf and callus extract had no significant effect on the germination of Brassica campestris var. chinensis. Callus extract showed superior ability to suppress germination for Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. and Zea mays L. but inferior inhibition ability for Sorghum bicolor L. These results suggested that the extract of lantana in vitro leaf and callus will be an interesting natural source for further study to develop natural herbicides.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.006
       
  • Toward sustainable phosphorus management in Sri Lankan rice and
           vegetable-based cropping systems: A review

    • Authors: Dinarathna Sirisena; Lalith D.B. Suriyagoda
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Dinarathna Sirisena, Lalith D.B. Suriyagoda
      Upland soils used for vegetable cultivation and lowland soils used for rice cultivation in Sri Lanka are inherently low in phosphorus (P) availability for plants. Rice is grown twice a year while vegetables are grown in intensive rotations. Heavy doses of inorganic and organic P sources are regularly applied to vegetable cultivating systems aimed at maximizing productivity, and disregarding the relatively lower P fertilizer application rates recommended by the government Department of Agriculture. This practice has led to the development of high P concentrations in intensive, high-value vegetable cultivating systems which is threatening environmental sustenance (267 mg available P/kg of soil). For rice, only inorganic P sources are widely being applied and the excessive soil P loading is less severe than that in vegetable cultivating systems (13 mg available P/kg soil). However, rice crops grown in most of the lowlands do not show positive responses to added P fertilizers. The development of chronic diseases among the inhabitants in certain intensively rice cultivated regions in Sri Lanka is suspected to be due to the presence of high concentrations of heavy metals in P fertilizers and the accumulation of those in food chains. Despite sustainable and updated P fertilizer recommendations being available, farmers continue to apply overdoses of P, seeking higher crop yields. Therefore, coordination and active intervention of all the related institutes are required when improving the awareness of farmers on this malpractice, and ensuring the sustainability of vegetable and rice cultivating systems in Sri Lanka with respect to P nutrition.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.004
       
  • Overexpression and characterization of alkaliphilic Bacillus firmus strain
           K-1 xylanase

    • Authors: Karntichar Mongkorntanyatip; Puangpen Limsakul; Khanok Ratanakhanokchai; Pongsak Khunrae
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Karntichar Mongkorntanyatip, Puangpen Limsakul, Khanok Ratanakhanokchai, Pongsak Khunrae
      The alkaliphilic Bacillus firmus strain K-1 produces an alkaliphilic xylanase (Xyn11A) which can be stable across a wide pH range and active at high temperatures. However, the enzyme suffers from low activity when isolated directly from the culture broth using corn husk. A method was developed which employed recombinant DNA technology to produce recombinant Xyn11A (rXyn11A) in an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The thioredoxin-fused Xyn11A (Thio-rXyn11A) could be expressed as a soluble form in BL21 (DE3). The expressed protein was tobacco etch virus (TEV) cleavaged to remove the thioredoxin tag and subjected to further purification using Ni2+-NTA affinity chromatography followed by gel-filtration chromatography. Activity of rXyn11A was shown to be under the same conditions as the native enzyme isolated directly from the K-1, having a broad range of active pH (5.0–12.0), with the maximum activity obtained from pH 5.0 at 60 °C. Interestingly, the obtained rXyn11A exhibited a very large increase in specific activity (3034 U/mg), which was 84-times higher than that reported in the native enzyme when observed under the same conditions. Also seen in the xylan hydrozation assay, the rXyn11A hydrolyzed insoluble xylans around 100-times more effectively than the native enzyme. The results from this study demonstrated a successful method for generating the enzyme rXyn11A with much improved activity, making it feasible for industrial applications.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.011
       
  • Improving physical properties of degraded soil: Potential of poultry
           manure and biochar

    • Authors: Kayode Steven Are; Ayodele Olumide Adelana; IbukunOluwa Oladapo Fademi; Oluseyi Abel Aina
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Kayode Steven Are, Ayodele Olumide Adelana, IbukunOluwa Oladapo Fademi, Oluseyi Abel Aina
      The application of organic materials for soil amendment plays important roles in reclaiming and improving the physical quality (SPQ) of degraded soils. This study assessed the effects of composted and non-composted poultry manures and biochar on the SPQ indicators of a degraded soil. A randomized complete block design was applied with four replications using five treatments: 1) veticompost (composted poultry manure + vetiver grass prunes), 2) poultry tea (non-composted poultry slurry), 3) solid non-composted poultry manure, 4) poultry biochar and 5) an unamended control. The soil physical quality indicators were determined after four consecutive growing seasons, with maize (Zea mays var. DMR-ESR-Y) planted as the test crop in each season. In comparison with the other treatments, poultry biochar consistently retained 3.3–31.3% more water at lower suctions (0–500 kPa). The saturated hydraulic conductivity following the application of poultry biochar (9.2 mm/hr) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than for other organic amendments (16.5–18.2 mm/hr). The increase in water stable aggregates under the veticompost treatment was 3.4–26.7% greater than for the other treatments. The comparison of the SPQ indices indicated positive effects from the amendments on the soil physical properties in the order: unamended control < poultry biochar < poultry tea < non-composted poultry manure < veticompost. Composted and non-composted manures and biochar favored better maize growth and resulted in significantly higher grain yields (1.48–1.73 t/ha) than the unamended control treatments (0.87 t/ha). These results suggest that composted and non-composted manures may be more worthwhile than biochar for improving the physical quality of degraded soil.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.009
       
  • Ontogenetic development of the digestive tract and ultrastructure of the
           anterior intestinal epithelia in tiger grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus
           (Forsskål, 1775) larvae

    • Authors: Kornrawee Aiemsomboon; Wanpen Khammee; Paiboon Bunlipatanon; Uthairat Na-Nakorn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 March 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Kornrawee Aiemsomboon, Wanpen Khammee, Paiboon Bunlipatanon, Uthairat Na-Nakorn
      The ontogeny of the digestive tract and ultrastructure of the anterior intestine in Epinephelus fuscoguttatus (Forsskål, 1775) larvae were examined using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy from hatching to 42 d after hatching (DAH). The first developmental stage started at hatching when the digestive tract was a simple tube. The second stage (2–3 DAH), the endo-exotrophic stage, was the time when the mouth of the tiger grouper larvae developed. The third stage (3–24 DAH) started after the depletion of the yolk-sac (3 DAH). The remarkable changes included the appearance of gastric glands at 9 DAH, eosinophilic supranuclear vacuoles appearing in the posterior intestine at 5 DAH and lipid vacuoles found in the interior intestine at 6 DAH which indicated the beginning of protein and lipid absorption. The last stage (after 24 DAH) started when the gastric glands and pyloric caeca were fully developed. The formation of the gastric glands and pyloric caeca indicated a suitable time for weaning. The ultrastructural features of epithelium cells of the anteria intestine showed large lipid droplets at the beginning of the exotrophic stage. From this time onwards, the lipid droplets became smaller, while the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were well-developed. Upon metamorphosis, the tiger grouper larvae had eosinophilic granule cells (EGCs) in the intestinal epithelia. This substantially increased immunity capability at this time. This study showed that during a critical period of larval survival, the ontogeny coincided with exogenous feeding, while the ultrastructure showed lipid metabolism, hence highlighting the importance of fatty acid in the development of the larvae.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T09:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.03.010
       
  • Buttressing impact on diameter estimation in plantation teak (Tectona
           grandis L.f.) sample trees in northern Thailand

    • Authors: Andrew J. Warner; Monton Jamroenprucksa; Ladawan Puangchit
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 February 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Andrew J. Warner, Monton Jamroenprucksa, Ladawan Puangchit
      Buttressing consists of ground-upward deformations from the circular cross section of a tree and can be quite pronounced in tropical species, thus making the measurement of lower diameters in older trees especially problematical in collecting accurate sample tree data. A technique to correct for buttress distortion of diameter estimates from girth tape measurement was applied using photographic images of cross sections at known lower bole heights on 331 plantation teak sample trees in eight plantations over four provinces in northern Thailand. Image scaling and image correction for distortion were used to obtain an equivalent diameter based on the actual digitized sectional area and standard geometry. The estimates of diameters over buttressing exceeded equivalent sectional area diameter estimates by more than a nominated 3% difference for at least one measuring height in the lower bole on 73% of the trees measured. The results of the t test analysis indicated that the two sets of diameters were highly significantly (p < 0.001) different with the data measured using the girth tape overestimating the actual buttressed sectional area based on the sectional analysis. The study indicated that pronounced buttressing is common, especially in the lower bole of plantation teak trees and correction is essential where such sample tree measurements are to be used in taper modeling to avoid introducing a potentially large overestimation bias into the model.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T18:52:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2018.01.001
       
  • Snail as Mini-Livestock: Nutritional Potential of Farmed Pomacea
           canaliculata (Ampullariidae)

    • Authors: Sampat Ghosh; Chuleui Jung; Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 February 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Sampat Ghosh, Chuleui Jung, Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow
      Amino acids, fatty acids and minerals were investigated in the farmed freshwater snail Pomacea canaliculata (Ampullariidae) to understand its nutritional potential as alternative livestock. Snail samples with removed gut content were collected from a local snail farm in the Republic of Korea. Almost all the essential amino acids present in the snail protein satisfied the recommended level for an ideal protein pattern, while methionine was present at a marginal level. The proportion of unsaturated fatty acids (60.5%) was higher than that of saturated fatty acids (39.5%). The ratio of polyunsaturated to monounsaturated fatty acids was 1.08, underscoring the high nutritional quality of the fat content of the species. The most abundant mineral was calcium. The high K/Na ratio (3.9) and the presence of substantial amounts of phosphorus, iron and zinc makes P. canaliculata snail meat potentially valuable. Thus, the utilization of under-appreciated nutritious food resources could be helpful in mitigating food security problems and in solving nutritional shortcomings in underprivileged parts of the world.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T18:52:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.12.007
       
  • Evaluation of dilute acid pretreatment for bioethanol fermentation from
           sugarcane bagasse pith

    • Authors: Nipat Sritrakul; Sunee Nitisinprasert; Suttipun Keawsompong
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2018
      Source:Agriculture and Natural Resources
      Author(s): Nipat Sritrakul, Sunee Nitisinprasert, Suttipun Keawsompong
      Sugarcane bagasse pith is the most abundant agricultural waste in Thailand and an attractive raw material for biosugar production using dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study, the raw material was pretreated at 121oC with different sulfuric acid concentrations (0%, 1%, 2%, 3% or 4% volume per volume, v/v) and pretreatment times (30, 60 or 90 min). The pretreated solid was hydrolyzed using a commercial enzyme (Celluclast® 1.5L). The maximum total sugars yield (53.7 g/100 g dry bagasse pith) was achieved at 1–2% v/v H2SO4 for 90 min, representing 67% of total sugars in the bagasse pith. For ethanol production, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) and separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) processes were employed using Pichia stipitis JCM 10742. The results indicated that both the ethanol concentration and productivity using SSF were higher than from the SHF process. The ethanol concentration and productivity using SSF were 3.70 g/L and 0.15 g/L/hr in 24 hr fermentation, respectively, while for the SHF process the results were 2.58 g/L and 0.09 g/L/hr in 30 hr fermentation, respectively.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T18:52:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anres.2017.12.006
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.81.105.205
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-