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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3185 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3185 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 100, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 427, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 179, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 66)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 413, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 468, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 232, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.372
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0028-3843
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3185 journals]
  • Mechanical versus electrical detachment of coils in treatment of
           intracranial aneurysms: Role in sickle cell disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Gautam Dutta, Deepashu Sachdeva, Daljit Singh, Hukum Singh, Arvind Kumar Srivastava
       
  • Intradiploic epidermoid cyst of the temporal and occipital bone with
           intracranial extension
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Piotr Dąbrowski, Rafał Kidziński, Emilia Frankowska, Rafał Górski, Maciej Bujko
       
  • TRIO gene segregation in a family with cerebellar ataxia
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Rana Hanna Al Shaikh, Thomas Caulfield, Audrey J. Strongosky, Mavis Matthew, Karen R. Jansen-West, Mercedes Prudencio, John D. Fryer, Leonard Petrucelli, Ryan J. Uitti, Zbigniew K. Wszolek Aim of the studyTo report a family with a novel TRIO gene mutation associated with phenotype of cerebellar ataxia.Materials and methodsSeven family members of Caribbean descent were recruited through our ataxia research protocol; of the family members, the mother and all 3 children were found to be affected with severe young-onset and rapidly progressive truncal and appendicular ataxia leading to early disability. Array comparative genomic hybridization, mitochondrial DNA analysis, and whole-exome sequencing were performed on 3 of the family members (mother and 2 daughters).ResultsWhile the maternal grandmother, great uncle and great aunt were unaffected, the mother and 3 children displayed cognitive dysfunction, severe ataxia, spasticity, and speech disturbances. Age of onset ranged between 3 and 17 years, with average current disease duration of 21 years. Whole-exome sequencing showed a variant p.A1214V in exon 22 of the TRIO gene in 3 of the family members. Array comparative genomic hybridization and mitochondrial DNA analysis were normal. The same variant was later discovered in all but one family member.Conclusions and clinical implicationsThe TRIO p.A1214V variant is associated with cerebellar ataxia in the studied family; it was present in all affected and unaffected family members. Phenotype is severe and broad. Anticipation seems to be present (based on 2 affected generations). It is warranted to screen additional familial early-onset and rapidly progressive ataxia cases for this genotype. TRIO gene mutations may well represent a novel spinocerebellar ataxia subtype.
       
  • Evidence for a relatively high proportion of DM2 mutations in a large
           group of Polish patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Anna Sulek, Anna Lusakowska, Wioletta Krysa, Marta Rajkiewicz, Anna Kaminska, Monika Nojszewska, Anna Kostera-Pruszczyk, Elzbieta Zdzienicka, Jolanta Kubalska, Maria Rakowicz, Walentyna Szirkowiec, Hubert Kwiecinski, Jacek Zaremba IntroductionMyotonic dystrophies (DMs) type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2) are autosomal dominant, multisystem disorders, considered the most common dystrophies in adults. DM1 and DM2 are caused by dynamic mutations in the DMPK and CNBP genes, respectively.MethodsMolecular analyses were performed by PCR and the modified RP-PCR in patients, in their at-risk relatives and prenatal cases.ResultsThe analysis of Polish controls revealed the range of 5-31 CTG repeats for DM1 and 110-228 bp alleles for DM2. Among 318 confirmed probands - 196 (62%) were DM1 and 122 (38%) – DM2. Within DM1families, 10 subjects carried a low expanded CTG tract (< 100 repeats), which resulted in a full mutation in subsequent generations. Two related individuals had unstable alleles–188 bp and 196 bp without common interruptions.ConclusionThe relative frequencies of DM1/DM2 among Polish patients were 68% and 32%, respectively, with a relatively high proportion of DM2 mutations (1.6:1).
       
  • Hypoglossal nerve palsy as an isolated syndrome of internal carotid artery
           dissection: A review of the literature and a case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Martyna Mes, Piotr Palczewski, Piotr Szczudlik, Anna Łusakowska, Edyta Maj, Malgorzata Gawel A review of literature on the dissection of internal carotid artery was presented with a presentation of a rare case of patient with transient left hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by mechanic compression from intramural hematoma in higher extracranial portion of dissected carotid artery confirmed in MRI and CT scans. The clinical presentation and management are discussed.
       
  • Surgical treatment of adult patients with thalamic tumors with the aid of
           tractography, fMRI, transcranial electrical stimulation and direct
           electrical stimulation of the subcortical white matter
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Krzysztof Majchrzak, Barbara Bobek-Billewicz, Anna Hebda, Piotr Adamczyk, Henryk Majchrzak, Piotr Ładziński The aim of investigation was to assess treatment outcomes in adult patients with thalamic tumors, operated on with the aid of tractography (DTI) and monitoring of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) generated due to transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) and direct electrical stimulation (DES) of the subcortical white matter.38 subsequent patients with thalamic tumors were operated on using tractography (DTI)-integrated neuronavigation, transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) and direct electrical stimulation (DES). The volumetric method was used to calculate pre- and postoperative tumor volume.Total tumor resection (100%) was performed in 18 (47%) patients, subtotal in 9 (24%) (mean extent of resection −89.4%) and partial in 11 (29%) patients (mean extent of resection −77.18%). The mean extent of resection for all surgical patients was 86.5%.Two (5.2%) patients died postoperatively. Preoperative hemiparesis was present in 18 (47%) patients. Postoperative hemiparesis was observed in 11 (29%) patients of whom only in 5 (13%) new paresis was noted due to surgical intervention. In patients with hemiparesis significantly more frequently larger tumor volume was detected preoperatively. Low mean normal fractional anisotropy (nFA) values in the internal capsule were observed statistically significantly more frequently in patients with preoperative hemiparesis as compared to the internal capsule of the unaffected hemisphere. Transcranial electrical stimulation helps to predict postoperative paresis of extremities. Direct electrical stimulation is an effective tool for intraoperative localization of the internal capsule thus helping to avoid postoperative deficit.In patients with tumor grade I and II the median time to tumor progression was 36 months. In the case of patients with grades III and IV it was 14 months. The median survival time in patients with grades I and II it was 60 months. In patients with grades III and IV it was 18 months. Basing on our results, patients with glioma grade I/II according to WHO classification are the best candidates for surgical treatment of thalamic tumors. In this group of the patients more often resection is radical, median time to progression and survival time are longer than in patients with gliomas grade III and IV. Within a 7-year follow-up none of the patients with GI/GII grade glioma died.
       
  • Central nervous system microbleeds in the acute phase are associated with
           structural integrity by DTI one year after mild traumatic brain injury: A
           longitudinal study
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Aline M. Studerus-Germann, Oliver P. Gautschi, Pietro Bontempi, Jean-Philippe Thiran, Alessandro Daducci, David Romascano, Dieter von Ow, Gerhard Hildebrandt, Alexander von Hessling, Doortje C. Engel IntroductionSeveral imaging modalities are under investigation to unravel the pathophysiological mystery of delayed performance deficits in patients after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Although both imaging and neuropsychological studies have been conducted, only few data on longitudinal correlations of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) and extensive neuropsychological testing exist.MethodsMRI with T1- and T2-weighted, SWI and DTI sequences at baseline and 12 months of 30 mTBI patients were compared with 20 healthy controls. Multiparametric assessment included neuropsychological testing of cognitive performance and post-concussion syndrome (PCS) at baseline, 3 and 12 months post-injury. Data analysis encompassed assessment of cerebral microbleeds (Mb) in SWI, tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of DTI (VBM-DTI). Imaging markers were correlated with neuropsychological testing to evaluate sensitivity to cognitive performance and post-concussive symptoms.ResultsPatients with Mb in SWI in the acute phase showed worse performance in several cognitive tests at baseline and in the follow-ups during the chronic phase and higher symptom severity in the post concussion symptom scale (PCSS) at twelve months post-injury. In the acute phase there was no statistical difference in structural integrity as measured with DTI between mTBI patients and healthy controls. At twelve months post-injury, loss of structural integrity in mTBI patients was found in nearly all DTI indices compared to healthy controls.ConclusionsPresence of Mb detected by SWI was associated with worse cognitive outcome and persistent PCS in mTBI patients, while DTI did not prove to predict neuropsychological outcome in the acute phase.
       
  • Psychiatric comorbidity in multiple sclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): S.P. Panda, R.C. Das, Kalpana Srivastava, Ashutosh Ratnam, Neha Sharma AimTo study the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in patients of multiple sclerosis and their association to the degree of disability.MethodPsychiatric symptoms were assessed in 90 patients of multiple sclerosis using GHQ-12, MMSE, HADS, Beck Depression Inventory and AUDIT. Neurological disability was assessed using Expanded Disability Status Scale. Correlations were determined between EDSS scores and psychiatric scale scores.Result61% of patients had significant psychological distress. Depression was most common (38.8%) which was followed by anxiety symptoms (27.8%). Cognitive functioning was relatively intact in patients with mild to moderate neurological disability. Alcohol abuse was mostly restricted to male gender.ConclusionPsychiatric illness is highly prevalent in patients of multiple sclerosis leading to poor quality of life and significant distress. Psychiatric disability was higher in patients who had greater deterioration in neurological function. All cases of MS should be assessed for psychiatric morbidities as can be alleviated by appropriate intervention.
       
  • Characteristics and clinical correlates of white matter changes in brain
           magnetic resonance of migraine females
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Iwona Rościszewska-Żukowska, Monika Zając-Mnich, Piotr Janik ObjectiveWhite matter hyperintensities (WMHs) were often found in migraine patients. The aim of study was to characterize WMHs, assess their prevalence, determine relationship to clinical symptoms and homocysteine levels in migraine females.Methods69 women 38 with migraine without aura (MO), 31 with migraine with aura (MA) who underwent brain MRI with 1.5T scanner were enrolled. The WMHs number, location and size in FLAIR sequence were evaluated. Migraine severity was measured by pain intensity, number of attacks per month and MIDAS scale.ResultsWMHs were found in 39.1% females. There was no WMHs and migraine type correlation. The total WMHs number was higher in MO (p = 0.027). Patients with WMHs were older (p = 0.025), have higher BMI (p = 0.042), suffered longer (p = 0.001), more often had positive pregnancy history (p = 0.010) and less frequent prodromal symptoms. The age of onset, migraine's severity and homocysteine did not correlate with WMHs. No effect of antimigraine medication and oral contraceptive pills (OCP) was found. Both in MO and MA groups WMHs were located only supratentorially. In MO females WMHs were mainly located in one cerebral hemisphere (p = 0.024) whereas in MA were found bilaterally. WMHs were most commonly located in the frontal lobes. In MO lesions were small ≤3 mm and present in almost all MO patients (p = 0.027).ConclusionWMHs are present in more than one third of migraine females, regardless of aura. WHMs are located supratentorially, subcortically and in the frontal lobes. Older age, longer disease's duration, obesity and positive history of pregnancy are main risk factors for WMHs. Symptomatology and migraine severity, hyperhomocysteinemia, OCP and anti-migraine medications do not increase WMHs.
       
  • Electroencephalogram findings in patients with posterior cortical atrophy
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): E.D. Goldstein, N. Ertekin-Taner, A. Stephens, M.M. Carrasquillo, B. Boeve, W.O. Tatum, A.M. Feyissa Aim of the studyThe aim of this study is to evaluate standard scalp EEG findings in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), an atypical variant of Alzheimer's disease (AD).Clinical rationalePCA is a topographically selective variant of AD. Patients with typical AD have an increased likelihood of seizures, which may negatively impact overall functional performance and cognition. It is currently unknown what the typical EEG findings are for patients with PCA.Materials and methodsA retrospective chart review was performed on patients identified either with autopsy confirmed (n = 13) or clinically (n = 126) as PCA.Results139 patients were included though only 23 (16.5%) had undergone EEG recording. The EEG was normal in 6 (26%), while an abnormal EEG was present in 17 (74%). Interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) were found in 2 of the 23 patients (9%).ConclusionsThis study of limited sample size suggests that there may be an increased predilection to find IEDs within PCA when compared to typical AD. Larger cohorts are required to determine frequency of abnormal EEGs in PCA, roles of AEDs in therapy, and in the selection of preferred AED.Clinical implicationsPatients with PCA would potentially benefit from an EEG for assessment of IEDs which may provide the clinician with a therapeutic opportunity.
       
  • Benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes – Current concepts of
           diagnosis and treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): P. Dryżałowski, S. Jóźwiak, M. Franckiewicz, J. Strzelecka Benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) is the most common focal epilepsy of the childhood and also one of the best known. It has a proclivity to start at a particular age and remit spontaneously before adolescence. Majority of patients may avoid long-term treatment, because of the mild course and very good outcome. Only few patients may present cognitive deficits if the proper treatment is not implied. BECTS is a part of heterogeneous group of syndromes that consists of Landau-Kleffner Syndrome (LKS), Continuous Spike-and-Wave during Sleep (CSWS) and Atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE). These syndromes may be also a result of various trajectories that BECTS may evolve to. Disease is suggested to have genetic origins, as some patients have relatives with different types of epilepsy. The discovery of the pathogenic mechanism of the disease and implementation of targeted therapy belong to the main challenges in the treatment of these patients.
       
  • Central liponeurocytoma as a clinical entity
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Ali Börekci, Pınar Kuru Bektaşoğlu, Ali Fatih Ramazanoğlu, Bora Gürer, Erhan Çelikoğlu IntroductionLiponeurocytomas are mostly localized in cerebellar hemispheres and the second most common location is the vermis. It is rarely observed within the intracranial ventricles. Here, we present a case of liponeurocytoma located in the right lateral ventricle and the systematic review of the literature.State of the artWe searched PubMed with keyword ‘central liponeurocytoma’ and the references of the related articles. There were no language or year restrictions. We included articles focusing on liponeurocytomas located in the central nervous system leaving a total of 17 articles and 21 reported cases.Clinical implicationsA 62-year-old female presented with confusion and mental disorientation without any other neurological deficit. Her magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a lateral ventricle located mass lesion which was hypointense on T1-weighted images (WI) and heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-WI with cystic component. Via craniotomy, yellow-beige colored, soft and moderately vascularized mass lesion was gross totally resected. Despite postoperative MRI revealed total resection, patient had left-sided hemiparesis. The patient recovered well in her postoperative period and there was no recurrence on her 6th month follow-up MRI.Future directionsIntraventricular liponeurocytoma has a favorable clinical course, and radiological features may be useful in the diagnosis of this rare tumor before surgery. Supratentorial intraventricular location should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of the lateral ventricular tumors.
       
  • The role of inflammation and potential pharmacological therapy in
           intracranial aneurysms
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Wojciech Gruszka, Miłosz Zbroszczyk, Jacek Komenda, Katarzyna Gruszczyńska, Jan Baron Intracranial aneurysms remain important clinical concern. There is relatively low risk of rupture of symptomless aneurysms incidentally found in MRA or CTA performed due to other indications. Not all of the intracranial aneurysms should or can be treated with neurosurgery intervention or endovascular embolization. Clinical strategy for small, symptomless, unruptured aneurysms is still questionable. Mechanisms underlying aneurysms formation, progression and rupture are poorly understood. Inflammation is one of the factors suspected to participate in these processes. Therefore the aim of this manuscript is to present current state of knowledge about the role of inflammation in the formation and progression of intracranial aneurysms and in their rupture process. Current knowledge about possible pharmacological treatment of intracranial aneurysms will also be presented. Macrophages infiltration seems to participate in the formation of intracranial aneurysms. Inhibition of signals sent by macrophages may prevent the aneurysms formation. Inflammation present in the wall of the aneurysm seems to be also related to the aneurysm’s rupture risk. However it does not seem to be the only cause of the degeneration, but it can be a possible target of drug therapy. Some preliminary studies in humans indicate the potential role of aspirin as a factor that decrease the level of inflammation and lower the risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms. However further research including a greater number of subjects and a prospective randomized design are necessary to assess the role of aspirin in preventing strategy for small, symptomless, unruptured intracranial aneurysms.
       
  • Antidepressants in epilepsy
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Natalia Górska, Jakub Słupski, Wiesław Jerzy Cubała, Mariusz Stanisław Wiglusz, Maria Gałuszko-Węgielnik People with epilepsy (PWE) frequently suffer from comorbid mood and anxiety disorders. Depression is one of the major psychiatric comorbidities having a negative impact on the quality of life in people with epilepsy. A review of the literature indicates that the majority of antidepressant-related seizures have been associated with either ultra-high doses or overdosing and, generally, the risk of antidepressant-associated seizures is low. Correspondingly, there is some evidence indicating that antidepressants of most widely used groups may additionally lower the risk of triggering seizures. Four antidepressants are not recommended for patients with epilepsy, i.e.: amoxapine, bupropion, clomipramine and maprotiline. Clinicians applying first line of depression treatment in patients with epilepsy should consider use of SSRIs or SNRIs, particularly sertraline, citalopram, mirtazapine, reboxetine, paroxetine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, venlafaxine, duloxetine. Implementation of anticonvulsive drugs in depressed patients should include valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, pregabalin. The paper reviews the evidence for the clinical use of antidepressants in PWE.
       
  • Isoprostanes as potential cerebral vasospasm biomarkers
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Karol Wiśniewski, Jagoda Jóźwik-Pruska, Michał Bieńkowski, Ernest J. Bobeff, Maciej Bryl, Joanna Kałużna-Czaplińska, Dariusz J. Jaskólski Despite enormous progress in medicine, symptomatic cerebral vasospasm (CVS), remains an unexplained clinical problem, which leaves both physicians and patients helpless and relying on chance, due to the lack of specific marker indicative of imminent danger as well as the lack of specific treatment. In our opinion CVS occurrence depends on dynamic disbalance between free radicals’ formation (oxidative stress) and antioxidant activity.Isoprostanes are products of free-radical peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, and seem to mark a promising path for the research aiming to unravel its possible mechanism. Not only are they the biomarkers of oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro, but also have manifold biological effects (including vasoactive, inflammatory and mitogenic) via activation of the thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R), both in physiological and pathophysiological processes. This review addresses the importance of isoprostanes in CVS in quest of appropriate biomarkers.
       
  • Guidelines of the Polish Medical Society of radiology for the routinely
           used MRI protocol in patients with multiple sclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Marek Sąsiadek, Katarzyna Katulska, Agata Majos, Małgorzata Siger, Marcin Hartel, Alicja Kalinowska, Jerzy Walecki Magnetic resonance imaging is widely used in diagnosing multiple sclerosis as a basic method for detecting and monitoring the disease.IntroductionPolish Medical Society of Radiology presents the second version of the recommendations for the routinely conducted MRI in multiple sclerosis, which include new data and practical remarks for radiographers and radiologists. The recommended protocol aims to improve the imaging procedure and, most importantly, to standardize conducting MRI scans in all MRI departments. This is crucial for monitoring the patients with MS, which directly contributes to essential clinical decisions.Aim of the guidelinesMultiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating and degenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with its etiology still unknown. The fundamental requirement of the disease is the CNS destruction process disseminated in time (DIT) and space (DIS). MR imaging detects focal lesions in white and gray matter with high sensitivity and is the best way to assess brain atrophy in MS patients. It is unquestionably the best diagnostic tool to follow-up the clinical course of the disease and treatment of MS patients. However, to achieve a diagnosis based on MRI scans, and follow-up MS patients according to the latest standards, an MRI scan has to meet certain quality criteria that are the subject of this work.
       
  • Editorial Announcement – The Change of Publisher of the Polish Journal
           of Neurology and Neurosurgery (Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska)
    • Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 6Author(s): Zbigniew K. Wszolek, Jarosław Sławek, Mariusz Siemiński
       
  • Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in immunoglobulin
           A-associated vasculitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Gregorio P. Milani, Mario G. Bianchetti, Sebastiano A.G. Lava
       
  • Surgical treatment and prognosis of adult patients with brainstem gliomas
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Krzysztof Majchrzak, Barbara Bobek-Billewicz, Anna Hebda, Henryk Majchrzak, Piotr Ładziński, Lech Krawczyk The paper presents 47 adult patients who were surgically treated due to brainstem gliomas. Thirteen patients presented with contrast-enhancing Grades III and IV gliomas, according to the WHO classification, 13 patients with contrast-enhancing tumours originating from the glial cells (Grade I; WHO classification), 9 patients with diffuse gliomas, 5 patients with tectal brainstem gliomas and 7 patients with exophytic brainstem gliomas. During the surgical procedure, neuronavigation and the diffusion tensor tractography (DTI) of the corticospinal tract were used with the examination of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) with direct stimulation of the fundus of the fourth brain ventricle in order to define the localization of the nuclei of nerves VII, IX, X and XII. Cerebellar dysfunction, damage to cranial nerves and dysphagia were the most frequent postoperative sequelae which were also the most difficult to resolve. The Karnofsky score established preoperatively and the extent of tumour resection were the factors affecting the prognosis. The mean time of progression-free survival (14 months) and the mean survival time after surgery (20 months) were the shortest for malignant brainstem gliomas. In the group with tectal brainstem gliomas, no cases of progression were found and none of the patients died during the follow-up. Some patients were professionally active. Partial resection of diffuse brainstem gliomas did not prolong the mean survival above 5 years. However, some patients survived over 5 years in good condition.
       
  • Ganglion Impar block improves neuropathic pain in coccygodynia: A
           preliminary report
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Savas Sencan, Ozge Kenis-Coskun, Fatma Gul Ulku Demir, Isa Cuce, Tulay Ercalık, Osman Hakan Gunduz Aim of the studyTo define the effectiveness of ganglion Impar block in improving neuropathic pain.Materials and methodsPatients who had pain around the coccyx for more than three months and did not respond to conservative treatment were included in this study. All the patients underwent fluoroscopy guided transsacrococcygeal ganglion Impar block with injecting 3 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine, 2 mL saline, and 1 mL (40 mg) of methylprednisolone. Patients were evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs scale (LANSS) for neuropathic pain, Beck depression Inventory (BDI) for mood and Short-form 12 (SF-12) for quality of life before, 1 month 3 months and 6 months after the injection. Patients’ painless sitting duration was also recorded.ResultsA total of 28 patients were included in the final analyses. VAS and LANSS scores improved significantly throughout the follow-up periods. BDI scores also improved while SF-12 scores did not show significant changes. Painless sitting period of the patients’ improved significantly.ConclusionsGanglion Impar block is effective in decreasing the neuropathic component of chronic coccygodynia. This improves painless sitting in patients but its reflections on quality of life is not clear.
       
  • Case series of trigonal meningiomas
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Shyam Sundar Krishnan, Pulak Nigam, Veeraraghavalu Sudhakar Sathish Anand, Madabushi Chakravarthy Vasudevan BackgroundTrigonal meningiomas have unique clinical presentation, unlike those in other areas of brain. Situated deep in the brain, the surgical nuances of this tumour are distinctive. We present our experience with this tumour including a discussion of surgical corridors that may be employed.MethodsAt our centre, 12 trigonal meningiomas were operated over past two decades. A retrospective analysis of case records of these cases was undertaken as regards age, sex clinical presentation, imaging and surgical approach.ResultsMean time from heralding symptom to presentation was 10.4 months. At presentation, the most commonly encountered symptoms were those of non-localising symptoms attributable to raised ICP. Majority of lesions were more than 6 cm and on left side and the preferred surgical approach was inferior temporo-parietal. Most symptoms were relieved on long-term follow-up except homonymous hemianopia.ConclusionThe incidence of deficit is low on employing the “shortest route” approach, even in the dominant hemisphere and through eloquent area. This may be secondary to possible shift of eloquent area function due to longstanding lesion and may thus be a “workable” surgical option, especially in resource-limited centres where such resources as neuronavigation and tractography may be unavailable.
       
  • sP- and sE-selectin in stroke patients with metabolic disorders
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Malgorzata Pawelczyk, Andrzej Glabiński, Beata Kaczorowska, Zbigniew Baj BackgroundActivation of platelets and endothelial cells plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and thrombotic disorders.The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between the metabolic disorders and markers of platelet activity and vascular injury in patient with acute ischemic stroke.Material and methodsThe study group consisted of 84 patients with acute non-lacunar ischemic stroke divided into four subgroups with: (1) normolipidemia and normoglycemia, (2) normolipidemia and hyperglycemia, (3) hyperlipidemia and normoglycemia, (4) hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. 21 healthy subjects served as controls. We analyzed the concentration of adhesion molecules sP-selectin and sE-selectin in serum collected from all studied groups using ELISA method.ResultsWe observed significantly higher sE- and sP-selectin concentration in patients with hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia compared to both control subjects and patients with normolipidemia and normoglycemia. We did not observe additional effect of comorbid hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia on studied markers. Soluble E- and P-selectin concentration correlated positively with LDL, TC and HbA1c level in all stroke patients.ConclusionSoluble E- and P-selectin, blood markers of vascular injury and platelet activation, could be useful in the assessment of atherothrombotic properties of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in stroke patients.
       
  • Cerebral thrombolysis in patients with ischemic stroke and heart failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Piotr Sobolewski, Grzegorz Kozera, Wiktor Szczuchniak, Anna Sobota, Kamil Chwojnicki, Marcin Gruchała, Walenty M. Nyka BackgroundHeart failure (HF) is common among patients with ischemic stroke (IS), however its impact on outcome after iv-thrombolysis has not been fully determined. Moreover, definition of HF has been recently modified, but majority of stroke studies classified patients regarding an old HF criteria. Thus, the aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between both, newly and formerly defined HF and the long-term outcome, mortality and the presence of hemorrhagic complications in patients with acute IS treated with iv-thrombolysis.MethodsWe retrospectively evaluated data from 328 Caucasian patients with IS consecutively treated with iv-thrombolysis. HF was defined according to old and new definition; long-term outcome was assessed with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score and mortality rate on 90th days after IS.ResultsThe incidence of HF did not differ between patients with favorable (mRS 0–2) and unfavorable (mRS 3–6) functional outcome respectively for the old and for the new definition (10.4% vs. 15.5, p = 0.17; 17.4% vs. 18.1%, p = 0.88) and between those who survived and died within 90 days after IS (11.7% vs. 20.0%, p = 0.27; 17.2% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.38, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed no impact of HF diagnosis on outcome (p = 0.94) or mortality (p = 0.64).ConclusionThe presence of systolic HF, defined according to an old and a new definition, does not determine safety and efficacy of cerebral iv-thrombolysis in patients with IS.
       
  • Lymphocyte populations and their change during five-year glatiramer
           acetate treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Zbyšek Pavelek, Oldřich Vyšata, Lukáš Sobíšek, Blanka Klímová, Ctirad Andrýs, Doris Vokurková, Radka Mazurová, Pavel Štourač, Martin Vališ BackgroundThe goal of this study was to determine the characteristics that are affected in patients treated with glatiramer acetate (GA).MethodsA total of 113 patients were included in this study. Patients were treated with glatiramer acetate (subcutaneous injection, 20 mg, each day). Peripheral blood samples were obtained just prior to treatment as well as 5 years after GA treatment. All the calculations were performed with the statistical system R (r-project.org).ResultsAfter 5 years of treatment, a significant decrease was found in the absolute and relative CD3+/CD69+ counts, the absolute and relative CD69 counts, the relative CD8+/CD38+ count and the relative CD38 count. A significant increase was found in the absolute and relative CD5+/CD45RA+ counts and the absolute CD5+/CD45RO+ count after 5 years of treatment.ConclusionThis study presents some parameters that were affected by long-term GA treatment.
       
  • Effects of the Inerventions method on gross motor function in children
           with spastic cerebral palsy
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Indre Bakaniene, Gintare Urbonaviciene, Kristina Janaviciute, Audrone Prasauskiene Aim of the studyTo investigate the effect of the Inerventions method on gross motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP).Clinical rationale for the studyThe Inerventions method is the type of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivered through a full-body garment (Mollii suit) that aims to prompt reciprocal inhibition via the antagonist to reduce spasticity in selected muscle groups. Although Mollii is approved by the European Union as a medical device, independent clinical tests have not yet been performed.Materials and methods16 children with spastic CP, aged 4.7 ± 1.3 were recruited and then willingly assigned to the Inerventions method (n = 8) and control groups (n = 8). In the Inerventions method group, TENS was applied 1 h per session, 3 days weekly for 3 weeks. Children of the control group received functional exercises program for the same duration, frequency and length. Outcome measures included the Gross Motor Function Measure, passive range of motion (PROM), the Modified Tardieu Scale, and the Timed Up and Go test.ResultsWhile both groups experienced improvements in gross motor function and mobility, the difference in improvement between children treated with the TENS and physiotherapy did not reach statistical significance. No change occurred in PROM and spasticity in either group following the interventions.ConclusionsThere is no superior efficacy of the Inerventions method compared to conventional physiotherapy.
       
  • The influence of motor ability rehabilitation on temporal-spatial
           parameters of gait in Huntington's disease patients on the basis of a
           three-dimensional motion analysis system: An experimental trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Elżbieta Mirek, Magdalena Filip, Wiesław Chwała, Jadwiga Szymura, Szymon Pasiut, Krzysztof Banaszkiewicz, Monika Rudzińska Bar, Andrzej Szczudlik ObjectiveThere is no existing standard, evidence-based, scientific model for motor ability improvement in Huntington's Disease (HD) patients aimed at maintaining independent gait for as long as possible, or performing activities of daily living, the effectiveness of which would be supported by the results of studies using objective research tools. Under these circumstances, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of motor ability rehabilitation on the spatial-temporal parameters of gait in HD patients.DesignIt was an experimental trial. The studied group consisted of 30 patients (17 women and 13 men) with HD. In hospital conditions, the patients participated in the 3-week motor ability l rehabilitation programme tailored to individual needs. The study group was tested using the Vicon 250 three-dimensional gait analysis system before and after the physical exercise programme.ResultsWalking speed after therapy increased for the left lower limb from 1.06 (SD 0.24) [m/s] to 1.21 (SD 0.23) [m/s], and for the right lower limb from 1.07 (SD 0.25) [m/s] to 1.20 (SD 0.25) [m/s]. The cycle length increased after the applied therapy for the left lower limb from 1.17 (SD 0.20) [m] to 1.23 (SD 0.19) [m].ConclusionThe three-week motor ability rehabilitation programme positively influences spatial-temporal gait parameters in HD patients.
       
  • Comparison of the biochemical and radiological criteria for lumbar disc
           degeneration
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Mehmet Hakan Seyithanoğlu, Serkan Kitiş, Ömer Faruk Özer, Abdurrahim Koçyiğit, Tolga Dündar, Meliha Gündağ Papaker, Anas Abdallah BackgroundThe relationship between radiological degeneration criteria on lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and both the keratan sulfate (KS) and chondroitin sulfate (ChS) levels was examined in disc material taken from patients undergoing lumbar disc herniation (LDH) surgery. To examine whether the biochemical and radiological degeneration criteria testing the reliability of radiological degeneration findings agreed and to evaluate the contribution of the KS/ChS ratio to disc form (protruding or extruding).MethodsThis was a prospective experimental cohort study. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, KS and ChS levels were measured in the degenerate nucleus pulposus taken from 71 patients with a diagnosis of LDH who underwent surgery. The degeneration levels and disc form (protruding or extruding) were determined according to the Pfirrmann five-stage grading system on preoperative T2-weighted lumbar MRIs. According to the Pfirrmann system, 28 patients were grade III and 43 were grade IV. The relationship between radiological criteria and the KS/ChS ratio was statistically evaluated.ResultsThe KS levels (p = 0.046) and the KS/ChS ratio (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in grade IV patients than in grade III patients. However, there was no difference between the KS and ChS levels and the KS/ChS ratio when patients were classified as protruding or extruding according to their disc structure. Disc structure and biochemical degeneration indicators were not correlated.ConclusionsThe KS level and the KS/ChS ratio were high in patients with marked radiological degeneration on lumbar MRI, demonstrating the sensitivity and reliability of the Pfirrmann five-stage grading system for showing radiological degeneration.
       
  • MMP-9 and/or TIMP as predictors of ischaemic stroke in patients with
           symptomatic and asymptomatic atherosclerotic stenosis of carotid artery
           treated by stenting or endarterectomy – A review
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Justyna Zielinska-Turek, Małgorzata Dorobek, Grzegorz Turek, Maria Barcikowska-Kotowicz We still lack an optimal tool to predict ischaemic stroke in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis (CS). It has already been shown that patients at increased risk of ischaemic stroke can be identified based on the elevated plasma levels of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and reduced activity tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP). There are few studies presenting the role of MMP-9 and TIMP in ischaemic stroke both in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CS treated with stenting or endarterectomy, however we have not found any published review summarizing the role of abovementioned markers. MEDLINE was accessed via Pub Med, and searched for published studies that analyzed MMP-9 and TIMP levels in patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic internal carotid stenosis and/or examined these parameters as potential risk markers for ischaemic stroke. A total of 13 articles documenting the outcomes of patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis treated by carotid stenting or endarterectomy, were analyzed. Statistically significant differences in the levels of MMP-9 and/or TIMP in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CS have been reported. Also the concentrations of MMP-9 and TIMP in CS patients subjected to stenting or endarterectomy were higher than in baseline group. Moreover higher levels of MMP-9 and decreased TIMP was reported to be associated with the risk of restenosis. This systematic review shows that available evidence regarding the dynamics of MMP-9 and TIMP levels may be a predictor of cerebrovascular events in both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis in patients treated with stenting or endarterectomy.
       
  • Standard neurophysiological studies and motor evoked potentials in
           evaluation of traumatic brachial plexus injuries – A brief review of the
           literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2018Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska, Volume 52, Issue 5Author(s): Agnieszka Wiertel-Krawczuk, Juliusz Huber PurposeTraumatic damage to the brachial plexus is associated with temporary or permanent motor and sensory dysfunction of the upper extremity. It may lead to the severe disability of the patient, often excluded from the daily life activity. The pathomechanism of brachial plexus injury usually results from damage detected in structures taking origin in the rupture, stretching or cervical roots avulsion from the spinal cord. Often the complexity of traumatic brachial plexus injury requires a multidisciplinary diagnostic process including clinical evaluation supplemented with clinical neurophysiology methods assessing the functional state of its structures. Their presentation is the primary goal of this paper.MethodsThe basis for the diagnosis of brachial plexus function is a clinical examination and neurophysiology studies: electroneurography (ENG), needle electromyography (EMG), somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) assessing the function of individual brachial plexus elements.ConclusionsThe ENG and EMG studies clarify the level of brachial plexus damage, its type and severity, mainly using the Seddon clinical classification. In contrast to F-wave studies, the use of the MEPs in the evaluation of traumatic brachial plexus injury provides valuable information about the function of its proximal part. MEPs study may be an additional diagnostic in confirming the location and extent of the lesion, considering the pathomechanism of the damage. Clinical neurophysiology studies are the basis for determining the appropriate therapeutic program, including choice of conservative or reconstructive surgery which results are verified in prospective studies.
       
 
 
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