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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3163 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3163 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 88, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 394, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 244, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.732, CiteScore: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 335, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 436, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)

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Journal Cover
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2341-2879
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3163 journals]
  • Influence of demographic changes on the number of visits to hospital
           emergency departments: 13 years’ experience
    • Authors: José Lorenzo Guerra Diez; Luis Gaite Pindado; Cristina Álvarez Álvarez; María Teresa Leonardo Cabello; Lino Álvarez Granda; María Jesús Cabero Pérez
      Pages: 322 - 328
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 May 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): José Lorenzo Guerra Diez, Luis Gaite Pindado, Cristina Álvarez Álvarez, María Teresa Leonardo Cabello, Lino Álvarez Granda, María Jesús Cabero Pérez
      Objective The aim of the present study is to describe the trend in volume and age-specific rates in visits to the paediatric emergency department of a university teaching hospital in Cantabria (Spain) from January 2001 to December 2013, and evaluate the influence of population growth on emergency department use. Material and methods A retrospective study was conducted to analyze all emergency department visits over a 13 year period. Simple and polynomial linear regressions were used to assess the relationship between population size and emergency department attendance rates across 2 age groups (0–2 and 3–14 years). Results From 2001 to 2013, attendance in the emergency department increased by 14.1%, whereas the paediatric population rose by 26.3%. Rates of presentation per head of population were greatest among those aged <3 years: 1.48 (95% CI 1.40 to 1.56) vs. 0.46 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.48) for the older age group (P <.01). A significant regression equation was found (F[1,11]=11.2, P <.05) with an R 2 =0.50, showing that population growth produces a continuous rise in the emergency department visits for those aged <3 years. However, ED presentations of patients aged 3–14 years fit a quadratic regression model (R 2 =0.48, F[2,10]=4.6, P <.05) so increases in population rise ED presentations until an inflection point, after which increases in population will decrease ED visits. Conclusions Those aged 0–2 years presented a steady increase in ED visits related to population growth, whereas children aged 3–14 years experienced a “saturation of the demand” and a reduction in ED presentations.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T18:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.06.004
      Issue No: Vol. 88, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Severe diarrhoea due to autoimmune enteropathy: Treatment and outcomes
    • Authors: Carmen Lázaro de Lucas; Laura Tesouro Rodríguez; Lorena Nélida Magallares García; Eva Martínez-Ojinaga Nodal; Esther Ramos Boluda
      Pages: 350 - 351
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Carmen Lázaro de Lucas, Laura Tesouro Rodríguez, Lorena Nélida Magallares García, Eva Martínez-Ojinaga Nodal, Esther Ramos Boluda


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T18:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.06.005
      Issue No: Vol. 88, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Hematemesis as debut of eosinophilic gastroenteritis in infants
    • Authors: María Soriano-Ramos; Enrique Salcedo Lobato; Yolanda Rodríguez Gil; Enrique Medina Benítez; Pedro Urruzuno Tellería
      Pages: 351 - 353
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): María Soriano-Ramos, Enrique Salcedo Lobato, Yolanda Rodríguez Gil, Enrique Medina Benítez, Pedro Urruzuno Tellería


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T18:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpedi.2017.09.003
      Issue No: Vol. 88, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Paracetamol: Useful treatment of choice for persistent arterial duct in
           very low weight premature newborns
    • Authors: Raquel Gálvez Criado; Silvia Rodríguez Blanco; Ignacio Oulego Erroz; Aquilina Jiménez González; Paula Alonso Quintela
      Pages: 353 - 355
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Raquel Gálvez Criado, Silvia Rodríguez Blanco, Ignacio Oulego Erroz, Aquilina Jiménez González, Paula Alonso Quintela


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T18:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.07.004
      Issue No: Vol. 88, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Hypophosphatasia: Clinical manifestations, diagnostic recommendations and
           therapeutic options
    • Authors: Gabriel Ángel Martos-Moreno; Joan Calzada; María L. Couce; Jesús Argente
      Pages: 356.e1 - 356.e11
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 May 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Gabriel Ángel Martos-Moreno, Joan Calzada, María L. Couce, Jesús Argente
      Hypophosphatasia is a very rare bone metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency in alkaline phosphatase activity, due to mutations in the ALPL gene. Its clinical hallmark is the impairment of skeletal and tooth mineralization, although extra-skeletal manifestations are frequent. Its phenotypic spectrum is widely variable from a subtype with exclusive odontological impairment (odontohypophosphatasia) to five subtypes with systemic involvement, classified according to the age at the onset of the first symptoms (four of them in the paediatric age range: perinatal lethal, perinatal benign, infant and childhood hypophosphatasia). Those subtypes of hypophosphatasia with an earliest onset usually involve a worse prognosis, due to the risk of developing potentially lethal complications, such as seizures or severe respiratory insufficiency, secondary to rib cage malformations. Due to the extremely low prevalence of the severe forms of hypophosphatasia, its clinical variability and overlapping phenotypic features with several more prevalent conditions, the diagnosis of hypophosphatasia in the clinical setting is challenging. However, its potential lethality and impact on the patient's quality of life, along with the recent availability of an enzyme replacement therapy, increases the relevance of the early and accurate identification of patients affected with hypophosphatasia. On the basis of published evidence and clinical experience, this article suggests an algorithm with practical recommendations for the differential diagnosis of childhood hypophosphatasia, as well as an updated review of current therapeutic options.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T18:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.06.006
      Issue No: Vol. 88, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in paediatric patients in a
           hospital emergency department
    • Authors: Borja Croche Santander; Elena Campos Alonso; Adela Sánchez Carrión; Laura Marcos Fuentes; Isabel Diaz Flores; Juan Carlos Vargas; Bárbara Fernández Domínguez; Cristóbal Toro Ibañez
      Pages: 259 - 265
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition), Volume 88, Issue 5
      Author(s): Borja Croche Santander, Elena Campos Alonso, Adela Sánchez Carrión, Laura Marcos Fuentes, Isabel Diaz Flores, Juan Carlos Vargas, Bárbara Fernández Domínguez, Cristóbal Toro Ibañez
      Introduction Antibiotics represent one of the most widely prescribed therapeutic agents in children. It has been estimated that 30–50% of antibiotic prescriptions for this population are inappropriate. In this scenario, analysis of prescription data provides an invaluable source of information as a basis for implementing strategies for improvement in this field. Objective To assess the appropriateness of antibiotic prescriptions in a paediatric population at an emergency department. Methods An observational, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was conducted on patients under 14 years who attended the emergency department during 2013. A random sample of 630 patients was selected (confidence level 99%, accuracy 5%). To assess the suitability of antibiotic prescriptions, the clinical practice was compared with an evidence-based guideline especially designed for this study. Results Antibiotics were prescribed to 16.5% patients (n =104). Antibiotic treatment was inappropriate in 51.9% patients (n =54). Unnecessary treatment was indicated in 40.7%, with wrong antibiotics chosen in 35.2%, and the posology was incorrect in 24.1% of them. The most frequent diseases with incorrectly prescribed antibiotics were: acute otitis media, episodes of wheezing, fever of unknown origin, acute pharyngo-tonsillitis, and community-acquired pneumonia. Conclusion Antibiotic prescribing seems to be inappropriate in up to half of the patients. These data reinforce the need to develop a paediatric antimicrobial stewardship programme to decrease the unnecessary use of antimicrobial agents.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T18:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.06.002
       
  • Reduced-intensity conditioning haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in
           genetic diseases: Experience of the Spanish Working Group for Bone Marrow
           Transplantation in Children
    • Authors: Lucía López-Granados; Montserrat Torrent; Ana Sastre; Marta Gonzalez-Vicent; Cristina Díaz de Heredia; Bienvenida Argilés; Antonia Pascual; José M. Pérez-Hurtado; Luisa Sisinni; Miguel Ángel Diaz; Izaskun Elorza; M. Angeles Dasí; Isabel Badell
      Pages: 196 - 203
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition), Volume 88, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lucía López-Granados, Montserrat Torrent, Ana Sastre, Marta Gonzalez-Vicent, Cristina Díaz de Heredia, Bienvenida Argilés, Antonia Pascual, José M. Pérez-Hurtado, Luisa Sisinni, Miguel Ángel Diaz, Izaskun Elorza, M. Angeles Dasí, Isabel Badell
      Introduction Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) involves implanting cellular elements capable of generating a new and healthy haematopoietic system. Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) consists of an immunosuppressive treatment to facilitate a progressive implant with lower morbidity. This type of conditioning can also lead to myelosuppression, which is potentially reversible over time. Reduced intensity conditioning enables HSCT to be performed on patients with genetic diseases for whom added comorbidity is undesirable due to the high doses of chemotherapy that accompanies conventional myeloablative regimens. Patients and methods An analysis was performed on the outcomes of 68 paediatric patients with genetic diseases who underwent HSCT with RIC between 2005 and 2013 in the of Paediatric Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Units that are part of the Spanish Working Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation in Children. A multicentre study was conducted including 68 patients, of whom 43 had Primary Immunodeficiency, 21 with congenital haematological diseases, and 4 with metabolic diseases. Results Fifty (73.5%) of the 68 patients were still alive. The overall survival (OS) at nine years was 0.74. Twenty-three (33.8%) had some event during the course of the HSCT, with an event-free survival rate of 0.66. The OS in patients with haematological diseases was 0.81, being 0.7 in primary immunodeficiencies, and 0.4 in metabolic diseases. No significant difference was observed between the 3 groups of diseases. As regards the source of haematopoietic progenitors, there was an OS rate of 0.74 in patients transplanted with peripheral blood, 0.70 with bone marrow, and 0.70 and with cord blood, with no statistically significant differences. Conclusions Favourable results have been obtained in HSCT with reduced intensity conditioning in genetic diseases. It should be noted that the risks and benefits of the RIC in patients with metabolic diseases need to be assessed on an individual basis.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T18:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2018.02.001
       
  • A family history of renal lithiasis in children diagnosed of urinary tract
           infection by Escherichia coli
    • Authors: Víctor García Nieto; Jorge Sotoca Fernández; Monica O’Hagan; Pedro Arango Sancho; Maria Isabel Luis Yanes
      Pages: 204 - 208
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition), Volume 88, Issue 4
      Author(s): Víctor García Nieto, Jorge Sotoca Fernández, Monica O’Hagan, Pedro Arango Sancho, Maria Isabel Luis Yanes
      Introduction Urinary tract infections (UTI) caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli) are common in patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria. As both UTI and hypercalciuria (prelithiasis) have a genetic basis, we wanted to know whether the family history of urolithiasis is more common in children with UTIs caused by E. coli. Secondarily, we wondered if the renal scars are more common in children with prelithiasis. Material and methods Ambispective study with collected data from 104 patients (40 male, 64 female) followed after having been diagnosed of UTI by E. coli at least once. These patients were asked about the existence of urolithiasis in relatives. The calcium and citrate urinary elimination was quantified in 80 children. Results In the total sample, family history was positive for urolithiasis in a significantly higher frequency in those children (n =71; 68.3%) than in the control population in our area (29.7%; previously published data). Prelithiasis frequency in children with UTI was 47.5% (38/80). An association was observed between the diagnosis of prelithiasis both with family history of urolithiasis (p =0.030) and the diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux (p =0.034). Children who developed renal scarring had an increased risk of prelithiasis (OR 5.3; p =0.033). Conclusions The frequency of family history of urolithiasis in children with UTI caused by E. coli is very high. Based on our results we hypothesize that the predisposition to lithiasis can involve a constitutively altered defense to E. coli and, therefore, a greater possibility for renal scars.

      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.04.002
       
  • Prevalence of breastfeeding and factors associated with the start and
           duration of exclusive breastfeeding in the Community of Madrid among
           participants in the ELOIN
    • Authors: María D. Ramiro González; Honorato Ortiz Marrón; Celina Arana Cañedo-Argüelles; María Jesús Esparza Olcina; Olga Cortés Rico; María Terol Claramonte; María Ordobás Gavín
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): María D. Ramiro González, Honorato Ortiz Marrón, Celina Arana Cañedo-Argüelles, María Jesús Esparza Olcina, Olga Cortés Rico, María Terol Claramonte, María Ordobás Gavín
      Introduction Breastfeeding has important benefits for population health. The aims of this study are: (i) to determine the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding; (ii) analyse the reasons for not starting or abandoning of breastfeeding, and (iii) describe the factors associated with the initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Material and methods Cross sectional study using the baseline data of the ELOIN cohort, obtained using an epidemiological questionnaire. A sample of 2627 children born in 2008–2009 from the Community of Madrid was studied. Logistic regression models were used. Results Prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding and breastfeeding was 77.6% and 88% respectively; prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months 25.4%, and prevalence of breastfeeding at 2 years was 7.7%. The most common reasons for abandoning breastfeeding were insufficient milk (36%), and incorporation to work (25.9%). The variables associated with starting or maintaining of exclusive breastfeeding were: mother older than 35 years, medium-high economic status, foreigner residing in Spain less than 10 years, and having participated in a breastfeeding workshop. Conclusions Breastfeeding prevalence in the Community of Madrid did not reach the international recommendations in 2008–2009. It is necessary to intensify strategies for breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support, including their periodic monitoring.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T18:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.09.004
       
  • Recommendations for the creation and operation of maternal milk banks in
           Spain
    • Authors: Javier Calvo; Nadia Raquel García Lara; María Gormaz; Manuela Peña; María José Martínez Lorenzo; Pilar Ortiz Murillo; Josep Maria Brull Sabaté; Carmen María Samaniego; Antoni Gayà
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 May 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Javier Calvo, Nadia Raquel García Lara, María Gormaz, Manuela Peña, María José Martínez Lorenzo, Pilar Ortiz Murillo, Josep Maria Brull Sabaté, Carmen María Samaniego, Antoni Gayà
      It is widely agreed that the best source of nutrition for the newborn is the milk of their own mothers. In those cases where it is not available, especially in very premature and/or very low birth weight infants, as well as other sick newborns, the preferred choice before formula is human milk provided by selected donors. This indication is supported by the highest international bodies dedicated to the health of the child population, including the World Health Organisation as well as the main national and international scientific societies in the field of Paediatrics. Milk banks are health institutions responsible for the collection, processing and distribution of donated human milk. Currently, there are 14 human milk banks operating in Spain, grouped in the Spanish Association of Human Milk Banks, created in September 2008. In order to homogenise the criteria and to unify the working methods of the different milk banks, the Spanish Association of Human Milk Banks has developed standards to harmonise the protocols, and to serve as a guide for the start-up of new milk banks in the Spanish territory. These standards, set out in the present article, range from the donor selection and the evaluation process to the collection, processing, storage, and distribution of donor human milk.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T18:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2018.01.007
       
  • Cow's milk protein intolerance imitating septic shock in a young infant
    • Authors: Sylvia Jacob; Artur Bonito Vitor
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Sylvia Jacob, Artur Bonito Vitor


      PubDate: 2018-04-24T19:35:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2018.03.001
       
  • Prevalence and prognostic value of non-thyroidal illness syndrome among
           critically ill children
    • Authors: Sohair Sayed Abu El-Ella; Muhammad Said El-Mekkawy; Mohamed Abdelrahman El-Dihemey
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Sohair Sayed Abu El-Ella, Muhammad Said El-Mekkawy, Mohamed Abdelrahman El-Dihemey
      Introduction Alterations in thyroid hormones during critical illness, known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), were suggested to have a prognostic value. However, paediatric data is limited. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and prognostic value of NTIS among critically ill children. Materials and methods A prospective observational study conducted on 70 critically ill children admitted into paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured within 24h of PICU admission. Primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Results NTIS occurred in 62.9% of patients but it took several forms. The commonest pattern was low FT3 with normal FT4 and TSH (25.7% of patients). Combined decrease in FT3, FT4, and TSH levels occurred in 7.1% of patients. An unusual finding of elevated TSH was noted in three patients, which might be related to disease severity. Low FT4 was significantly more prevalent among non-survivors compared with survivors (50% versus 19.2%, P =.028). NTIS independently predicted mortality (OR=3.91; 95% CI=1.006–15.19; P =.0491). Concomitant decrease in FT3, FT4, and TSH was the best independent predictor of mortality (OR=16.9; 95% CI=1.40–203.04; P =.026). TSH was negatively correlated with length of PICU stay (r s =—0.35, P =.011). FT3 level was significantly lower among patients who received dopamine infusion compared with those who did not receive it (2.1±0.66 versus 2.76±0.91pg/mL, P =.011). Conclusion NTIS is common among critically ill children and appears to be associated with mortality and illness severity.

      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2018.03.002
       
  • Seizing opportunities and breaking barriers to ensure the transfer of
           knowledge based on better clinical evidence
    • Authors: María Bodí; Joan Balcells
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): María Bodí, Joan Balcells


      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2018.02.002
       
  • Karyotype 48,XXXY/49,XXXXY and proximal radioulnar synostosis
    • Authors: Raquel Girón del Río; Tiago Jeronimo dos Santos; Lourdes Travieso-Suárez; María Teresa Muñoz Calvo; Jesús Argente
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Raquel Girón del Río, Tiago Jeronimo dos Santos, Lourdes Travieso-Suárez, María Teresa Muñoz Calvo, Jesús Argente


      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.05.011
       
  • Ten years of human papillomavirus vaccination. From dermatology to
           oncology via infectology
    • Authors: Fernando A. Moraga-Llop
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Fernando A. Moraga-Llop
      Human papillomavirus (HPV) was first identified in dermatology, and it was subsequently demonstrated that is was required for the development of uterine cervical cancer and other tumours, after a persistent infection by any of its oncogenic genotypes. Ten years ago, the most common infections and cancers associated with HPV could be prevented by immunization with 2 vaccines, one bivalent, and another tetravalent, and having just marketed a nonavalent one. During the period 2007–2008, the HPV vaccine was included in the Autonomous Communities vaccination calendar, and it is the second vaccine, after that of Hepatitis B, that prevents cancer. In these 10 years that these vaccines have been available the knowledge has progressed and there have been significant advances in vaccination strategies, as well as in the indications and recommendations. These include, lowering the age in the vaccination schedule, prescribing of 2 doses at 9 years and at 13–14 years, systematic vaccination of the male in some countries, immunization of the woman after adolescence, implementation of vaccination programmes in developed countries, prevention of other cancers, recommendations for vaccinations for populations at high risk of HPV infection, scientific evidence on the impact and effectiveness of vaccination, and confirmation of the safety of these vaccines, with more than 270 million doses administered, as has already been observed in clinical trials. The role of health professionals is essential to achieve and maintain high vaccine coverage.

      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.12.004
       
  • Seronegative autoimmune hepatitis: Description of two paediatric cases
    • Authors: Lorena Lahílla Cuello; Ignacio Ros Arnal; Ruth García Romero; Carlos Hörndler Argarate
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Lorena Lahílla Cuello, Ignacio Ros Arnal, Ruth García Romero, Carlos Hörndler Argarate


      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.09.001
       
  • Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome
    • Authors: Sergio García Castillo; María del Perpetuo Socorro Hoyos Vázquez; Ramón Coloma Navarro; Javier Cruz Ruiz; Francisco Javier Callejas González; Raúl Godoy Mayoral; Pedro Juan Tárraga López; José Antonio Rodríguez Montes
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Sergio García Castillo, María del Perpetuo Socorro Hoyos Vázquez, Ramón Coloma Navarro, Javier Cruz Ruiz, Francisco Javier Callejas González, Raúl Godoy Mayoral, Pedro Juan Tárraga López, José Antonio Rodríguez Montes
      Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is highly prevalent in children and a major public health problem. An attempt is made to determine the clinical and polysomnographic presentation of paediatric OSA in our area. Patients and methods Retrospective descriptive study of sleep tests conducted on children up to 14 years old from 1999 to 2012 in the Sleep Unit of the University Hospital of Albacete. Age, gender, anthropometric, clinical data, indication and variables of sleep study, treatment, and outcomes were collected. Results The study included 234 children. OSA was found in 71.8%, with 42.3% moderate and 44.6% severe. The majority were male (60.7%) and the mean age was 5 years, of whom 78% were pre-school or school age. There was overweight/obesity in 44%, with 93.4% snoring, apnoea 84.5%, and 5.4% daytime sleepiness. There were 23 polysomnographies and 145 polygraphies, with a median apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) of 10, SatO2 minimum 84%, desaturation index 8, and mean sleep supine 53.65% and supine events 57.61%. Treatment was lifestyle modifications 29.2%, CPAP 6%, and surgery 42.9%. Improved snoring and/or apnoea 69.4%, and weight 32.4% of overweight/obesity children. Conclusions Most of the studied children had a pathological AHI. Almost half were overweight/obese, and a high percentage had moderate-severe OSA. Most frequent treatment was surgery. The clinical outcome was favourable in almost 70%. Less than a third with OSA and overweight/obesity improved weight.

      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.07.003
       
  • Congenital heart disease mortality in Spain during a 10 year period
           (2003–2012)
    • Authors: Javier Pérez-Lescure Picarzo; Margarita Mosquera González; Pello Latasa Zamalloa; David Crespo Marcos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Javier Pérez-Lescure Picarzo, Margarita Mosquera González, Pello Latasa Zamalloa, David Crespo Marcos
      Introduction and objectives Congenital heart disease is a major cause of infant mortality in developed countries. In Spain, there are no publications at national level on mortality due to congenital heart disease. The aim of this study is to analyse mortality in infants with congenital heart disease, lethality of different types of congenital heart disease, and their variation over a 10-year period. Methods A retrospective observational study was performed to evaluate mortality rate of children under one year old with congenital heart disease, using the minimum basic data set, from 2003 to 2012. Mortality rate and relative risk of mortality were estimated by Poisson regression. Results There were 2,970 (4.58%) infant deaths in a population of 64,831 patients with congenital heart disease, with 73.8% of deaths occurring during first week of life. Infant mortality rate in patients with congenital heart disease was 6.23 per 10,000 live births, and remained constant during the 10-year period of the study, representing 18% of total infant mortality rate in Spain. The congenital heart diseases with highest mortality rates were hypoplastic left heart syndrome (41.4%), interruption of aortic arch (20%), and total anomalous pulmonary drainage (16.8%). Atrial septal defect (1%) and pulmonary stenosis (1.1%) showed the lowest mortality rate. Conclusions Congenital heart disease was a major cause of infant mortality with no variations during the study period. The proportion of infants who died in our study was similar to other similar countries. In spite of current medical advances, some forms of congenital heart disease show very high mortality rates.

      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.06.003
       
  • Admission, discharge and triage guidelines for paediatric intensive care
           units in Spain
    • Authors: Pedro de la Oliva; Francisco José Cambra-Lasaosa; Manuel Quintana-Díaz; Corsino Rey-Galán; Juan Ignacio Sánchez-Díaz; María Cruz Martín-Delgado; Juan Carlos de Carlos-Vicente; Ramón Hernández-Rastrollo; María Soledad Holanda-Peña; Francisco Javier Pilar-Orive; Esther Ocete-Hita; Antonio Rodríguez-Núñez; Ana Serrano-González; Luis Blanch
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Pedro de la Oliva, Francisco José Cambra-Lasaosa, Manuel Quintana-Díaz, Corsino Rey-Galán, Juan Ignacio Sánchez-Díaz, María Cruz Martín-Delgado, Juan Carlos de Carlos-Vicente, Ramón Hernández-Rastrollo, María Soledad Holanda-Peña, Francisco Javier Pilar-Orive, Esther Ocete-Hita, Antonio Rodríguez-Núñez, Ana Serrano-González, Luis Blanch
      A paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a separate physical facility or unit specifically designed for the treatment of paediatric patients who, because of the severity of illness or other life-threatening conditions, require comprehensive and continuous intensive care by a medical team with special skills in paediatric intensive care medicine. Timely and personal intervention in intensive care reduces mortality, reduces length of stay, and decreases cost of care. With the aim of defending the right of the child to receive the highest attainable standard of health and the facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation, as well as ensuring the quality of care and the safety of critically ill paediatric patients, the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (AEP), Spanish Society of Paediatric Intensive Care (SECIP) and Spanish Society of Critical Care (SEMICYUC) have approved the guidelines for the admission, discharge and triage for Spanish PICUs. By using these guidelines, the performance of Spanish paediatric intensive care units can be optimised and paediatric patients can receive the appropriate level of care for their clinical condition.

      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.10.002
       
  • Eosinophilic gastroenteropathy and digestive obstruction
    • Authors: Laura Tesouro Rodríguez; Carmen Lázaro de Lucas; Lorena Nélida Magallares García; Eva Martínez-Ojinaga Nodal; Esther Ramos Boluda
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Laura Tesouro Rodríguez, Carmen Lázaro de Lucas, Lorena Nélida Magallares García, Eva Martínez-Ojinaga Nodal, Esther Ramos Boluda


      PubDate: 2018-04-17T19:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.05.007
       
  • Efficacy of anakinra as a treatment for recurrent pericarditis
    • Authors: Sara Murias Loza; Luis García-Guereta Silva; Rosa María Alcobendas Rueda; Agustín Remesal Camba
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Sara Murias Loza, Luis García-Guereta Silva, Rosa María Alcobendas Rueda, Agustín Remesal Camba


      PubDate: 2018-03-17T09:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.05.005
       
  • Ten years experience with the first approved biosimilar recombinant human
           growth hormone drug in normal clinical practice
    • Authors: Juan Pedro López-Siguero; Margarida Palla García; Elena Martínez Busto; Francisco José Rebollo; Manuel Pombo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Juan Pedro López-Siguero, Margarida Palla García, Elena Martínez Busto, Francisco José Rebollo, Manuel Pombo
      Introduction Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is the first biosimilar drug approved by the European Medicines Agency in 2006, using the biosimilar registration process. It was authorised for the treatment of growth hormone deficiency, and growth disorders associated with Turner's syndrome, chronic renal failure, Prader-Willi syndrome, and growth disorders in children/adolescents born small for gestational age, and replacement therapy in adults with pronounced growth hormone deficiency. Materials and methods This review is focused on the scientific evidence published about this drug in the last ten years, including the clinical trials on which the approval of the regulatory authority is based, and the most relevant studies evaluating the clinical impact of the drug in clinical practice. Results The equivalence between biosimilar and original product has been confirmed in the clinical trials published by Romer et al. and López-Siguero et al. Furthermore, studies carried out in real-life conditions confirm its long-term efficacy and safety, as well as the absence of clinical impact by switching treatment from the original to the biosimilar product. Conclusion The number of patients receiving this medication has continuously increased since its approval. Its equivalence with the original product has been verified. Preliminary data from the post-authorisation PATRO study confirm the efficacy and safety of the biosimilar product in comparison with data from clinical trials. However, final results must be evaluated at the end of the study, which will provide additional information about the long-term efficacy and safety of the biosimilar drug.

      PubDate: 2018-03-17T09:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.03.021
       
  • Follow-up protocol for newborns of birthweight less than 1500g or less
           than 32 weeks gestation
    • Authors: Carmen Pallás Alonso; Pilar García González; Ana Jimenez Moya; Begoña Loureiro González; Yolanda Martín Peinador; Javier Soriano Faura; María José Torres Valdivieso; Gemma Ginovart Galiana
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Carmen Pallás Alonso, Pilar García González, Ana Jimenez Moya, Begoña Loureiro González, Yolanda Martín Peinador, Javier Soriano Faura, María José Torres Valdivieso, Gemma Ginovart Galiana
      The mortality of children with a birthweight of less than 1500g or with a gestational age of less than 32 weeks (<1500<32) has decreased significantly in the last 20 years or so. Given the higher risk of disability in these children, follow-up after hospital discharge is considered essential. In this document, the Follow-Up Group of the Spanish Society of Neonatology, in collaboration with the Spanish Society of Paediatric Primary Care, propose a follow-up protocol specific for the <1500<32, which has as its aim to standardise the activities and evaluations according to good practice criteria.

      PubDate: 2018-03-17T09:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.12.002
       
  • Oxidative stress in perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischaemic
           encephalopathy
    • Authors: Antonio Nuñez; Isabel Benavente; Dorotea Blanco; Héctor Boix; Fernando Cabañas; Mercedes Chaffanel; Belén Fernández-Colomer; José Ramón Fernández-Lorenzo; Begoña Loureiro; María Teresa Moral; Antonio Pavón; Inés Tofé; Eva Valverde; Máximo Vento
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Antonio Nuñez, Isabel Benavente, Dorotea Blanco, Héctor Boix, Fernando Cabañas, Mercedes Chaffanel, Belén Fernández-Colomer, José Ramón Fernández-Lorenzo, Begoña Loureiro, María Teresa Moral, Antonio Pavón, Inés Tofé, Eva Valverde, Máximo Vento
      Birth asphyxia is one of the principal causes of early neonatal death. In survivors it may evolve to hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and major long-term neurological morbidity. Prolonged and intense asphyxia will lead to energy exhaustion in tissues exclusively dependent on aerobic metabolism, such as the central nervous system. Energy deficit leads to ATP-dependent pumps blockage, with the subsequent loss of neuronal transmembrane potential. The most sensitive areas of the brain will die due to necrosis. In more resistant areas, neuronal hyper-excitability, massive entrance of ionic calcium, activation of NO-synthase, free radical generation, and alteration in mitochondrial metabolism will lead to a secondary energy failure and programmed neuronal death by means of the activation of the caspase pathways. A third phase has recently been described that includes persistent inflammation and epigenetic changes that would lead to a blockage of oligodendrocyte maturation, alteration of neurogenesis, axonal maturation, and synaptogenesis. In this scenario, oxidative stress plays a critical role causing direct damage to the central nervous system and activating metabolic cascades leading to apoptosis and inflammation. Moderate whole body hypothermia to preserve energy stores and to reduce the formation of oxygen reactive species attenuates the mechanisms that lead to the amplification of cerebral damage upon resuscitation. The combination of hypothermia with coadjuvant therapies may contribute to improve the prognosis.

      PubDate: 2018-03-17T09:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.05.004
       
  • Do children with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have
           a different gait pattern' Relationship between idiopathic toe-walking
           and ADHD
    • Authors: Víctor Soto Insuga; Beatriz Moreno Vinués; Rebeca Losada del Pozo; María Rodrigo Moreno; Marta Martínez González; Raquel Cutillas Ruiz; Carmen Mateos Carmen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Víctor Soto Insuga, Beatriz Moreno Vinués, Rebeca Losada del Pozo, María Rodrigo Moreno, Marta Martínez González, Raquel Cutillas Ruiz, Carmen Mateos Carmen
      Introduction Idiopathic toe-walking (ITW) is described as a gait pattern with no contact between the heels and the ground in children older than 3years. The diagnosis is clinical, making it necessary to rule out other neurological and orthopaedic conditions. A relationship between ITW and vestibular dysfunction and/or proprioceptive sensibility has been proposed. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders (autism, language and cognitive disorders) often have ITW. Objectives To determine the frequency of ITW in children with attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity (ADHD). Patients and method A study was conducted on children diagnosed with ADHD, with normal neurological examination, with no alterations in MRI scan, cognitive disorder or autism. A complete clinical anamnesis was performed and Achilles shortening was measured with a goniometer. Results The study included 312 children with a mean age of 11 years (73.7% boys). The ADHD combined subtype was the most frequent (53.8%), followed by the inattentive (44.9%), and hyperactive (1.3%). ITW was observed in 20.8% of patients, particularly in the combined subtype (P =.054). Only 32 of them (49.2%) had Achilles shortening. ITW was associated with sociability disorders (P =.01), absence of pain in legs (P =.022), and family history of ITW (P =.004). Only 11% had previously visited a doctor for this reason. Conclusions As in other neurodevelopmental disorders, children with ADHD have frequently more ITW and Achilles shortening than controls, especially if they presented with a social communication disorder or a family history of ITW. An early diagnosis is essential to establish effective treatments.

      PubDate: 2018-03-17T09:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.01.011
       
  • The treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and
           adolescents: Epidemiology, multimorbidity and integrated health services
    • Authors: Ferrán Catalá-López; Brian Hutton
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 March 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Ferrán Catalá-López, Brian Hutton


      PubDate: 2018-03-17T09:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.12.003
       
  • Recovery from episodes of Clostridium difficile infection following the
           implementation of a consensus document
    • Authors: María José González-Abad; Mercedes Alonso Sanz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 March 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): María José González-Abad, Mercedes Alonso Sanz


      PubDate: 2018-03-17T09:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.05.006
       
  • Attitudes towards cow's milk protein allergy management by Spanish
           gastroenterologist
    • Authors: Alicia Isabel Pascual Pérez; Alejandra Méndez Sánchez; Óscar Segarra Cantón; Beatriz Espin Jaime; Santiago Jiménez Treviño; Carlos Bousoño García; Juan José Díaz Martín
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Alicia Isabel Pascual Pérez, Alejandra Méndez Sánchez, Óscar Segarra Cantón, Beatriz Espin Jaime, Santiago Jiménez Treviño, Carlos Bousoño García, Juan José Díaz Martín
      Introduction Food allergy is an increasing health problem in the developed world. Cow's milk protein is the main cause of food allergy in infants. Without an appropriate diagnostic workup, there is a high risk of both over- and underdiagnosis and therefore, over and undertreatment. The objective of our study was to analyze the variability in cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) management by pediatric gastroenterologists in Spain. Methods A 50 item questionnaire, including open and closed items in a Likert's scale from 0 to 5, was drafted and distributed through the Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SEGHNP) e-mail list. Results Seventy-three questionnaires were received back out of 321. Only 3 of the items achieved concordance greater than 90%. Thirty-three percent considered oral challenge to be necessary for the diagnosis of CMPA under any circumstance. Twenty-five percent considered that symptom improvement after cow's milk removal was enough for the diagnosis. Oral challenge was performed at home by 83.5% in non-IgE mediated cases. Extensively hydrolyzed casein formulas were the treatment of choice for 69.9%. Soy formulas were the last option. Almost all respondents were aware of the existence of clinical guidelines on CMPA, being European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines the most followed (64.4%). Twenty-three percent considered that their knowledge about allergy was inadequate. Conclusions Although CMPA is a prevalent condition that pediatric gastroenterologists have been treating for decades, we found a huge variability on its management. There is potential for improvement in this field among pediatric gastroenterologist in the future.

      PubDate: 2018-03-06T21:12:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2018.01.003
       
  • Early hypophosphataemia in at risk newborns. Frequency and magnitude
    • Authors: Gerardo Bustos Lozano; Álvaro Hidalgo Romero; Ana Melgar Bonis; Noelia Ureta Velasco; Carlos Orbea Gallardo; Carmen Pallás Alonso
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Gerardo Bustos Lozano, Álvaro Hidalgo Romero, Ana Melgar Bonis, Noelia Ureta Velasco, Carlos Orbea Gallardo, Carmen Pallás Alonso
      Objective To determine the frequency and magnitude of neonatal hypophosphataemia (<4mg/dL) in a neonatal Intensive Care Unit and to describe risk groups. Patients and methods Retrospective study of hospitalised newborns over a 44 month period (phase 1). Retrospective study of <1500g/<32 weeks of gestation newborns over a 6 month period (phase 2). Prospective study of <1500g or 1550–2000g, and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) newborns. Measurements were made on the 1st, 3rd, 7th, and 14th days of life (phase 3). Results Phase 1: 34 (2.4%) of 1,394 patients had a diagnosis of hypophosphataemia, 76% of them ≤32 weeks of gestation and <1500g, and 24% >32 weeks with weight <P10. Phase 2: 12 (16.4%) of 73 patients had a diagnosis of hypophosphataemia, with <2mg/dL in 5 (6.8%). Eight (75%) of those with hypophosphataemia had IUGR, and 4 (25%) weighed <1000g. Five cases had associated hypokalaemia, and three hypercalcaemia. Phase 3: 9 (45%) of 20 patients had hypophosphataemia, all of them <1000g or <1200g and weight percentile <10. Thirty-three percent of samples on days 1, 3, and 7 showed hypophosphataemia, four of them <2mg/dL. There was mild hypokalaemia in 5 (55%), and mild hypercalcaemia in 2 (22%) cases. Hypophosphataemia was associated with lower enteral nutrition and higher parenteral amino acid intake in the early days of life. Conclusions Hypophosphataemia is common, and can be severe, in the first week of life in premature infants <1000g, and newborns <1200g with foetal malnutrition and receiving amino acids in early parenteral nutrition.

      PubDate: 2018-02-24T09:24:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.04.009
       
  • Implication of a national outbreak of Serratia marcescens associated with
           a contaminated solution of chlorhexidine in a paediatric hospital
    • Authors: Áurea Morillo; María José Torres; María Teresa Alonso Salas; Manuel Conde; Javier Aznar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Áurea Morillo, María José Torres, María Teresa Alonso Salas, Manuel Conde, Javier Aznar


      PubDate: 2018-02-24T09:24:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.04.006
       
  • Collagenous gastritis: An unusual atypical form in a male infant
    • Authors: Carmen Lázaro de Lucas; Laura Tesouro Rodríguez; Lorena Nélida Magallares García; Eva Martínez-Ojinaga Nodal; Esther Ramos Boluda
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Carmen Lázaro de Lucas, Laura Tesouro Rodríguez, Lorena Nélida Magallares García, Eva Martínez-Ojinaga Nodal, Esther Ramos Boluda


      PubDate: 2018-02-13T08:17:53Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.05.003
       
  • Challenges and opportunities in the vertical transmission of Chagas
           disease
    • Authors: María Isabel González-Tomé; Milagros García López-Hortelano; Laura Fregonese
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 February 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): María Isabel González-Tomé, Milagros García López-Hortelano, Laura Fregonese


      PubDate: 2018-02-13T08:17:53Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2018.01.001
       
  • Apnoea in infants with bronchiolitis: Incidence and risk factors for a
           prediction model
    • Authors: José Miguel Ramos-Fernández; David Moreno-Pérez; Mario Gutiérrez-Bedmar; María Ramírez-Álvarez; Yasmina Martínez García; Lourdes Artacho-González; Antonio Urda-Cardona
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 February 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): José Miguel Ramos-Fernández, David Moreno-Pérez, Mario Gutiérrez-Bedmar, María Ramírez-Álvarez, Yasmina Martínez García, Lourdes Artacho-González, Antonio Urda-Cardona
      Introduction The presence of apnoea in acute bronchiolitis (AB) varies between 1.2% and 28.8%, depending on the series, and is one of its most fearsome complications. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of apnoea in hospitalised patients diagnosed with AB, and to define their associated risk factors in order to construct a prediction model. Patients and method A retrospective observational study of patients admitted to a tertiary hospital in the last 5 years with a diagnosis of AB, according to the classic criteria. Data was collected on the frequency of apnoea and related clinical variables to find risk factors in a binary logistic regression model for the prediction of apnoea. A ROC curve was developed with the model. Results Apnoea was recorded during the admission of 53 (4.4%) patients out of a total of 1.197 cases found. The risk factors included in the equation were: female (OR 0.6, 95% CI: 0.27–1.37), caesarean delivery (OR: 3.44, 95% CI: 1.5–7.7), postmenstrual age ≤43 weeks (OR: 6.62, 95% CI: 2.38–18.7), fever (OR: 0.33, 95% CI: 0.09–1.97), low birth weight (OR: 5.93, 95% CI: 2.23–7.67), apnoea observed by caregivers before admission (OR: 5.93, 95% CI: 2.64–13.3), and severe bacterial infection (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.68–9.46). The optimal sensitivity and specificity of the model in the ROC curve was 0.842 and 0.846, respectively (P <.001). Conclusions The incidence of apnoea during admission was 4.4 per 100 admissions of AB and year. The estimated prediction model equation may be of help to the clinician in order to classify patients with increased risk of apnoea during admission due to AB.

      PubDate: 2018-02-13T08:17:53Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.03.016
       
  • Quality of life heart-disease children who have suffered from an arterial
           ischaemic stroke
    • Authors: María Vázquez López; Pedro Castro de Castro; Nuria Gil Villanueva; Andrés José Alcaraz Romero; Samuel Ignacio Pascual Pascual
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): María Vázquez López, Pedro Castro de Castro, Nuria Gil Villanueva, Andrés José Alcaraz Romero, Samuel Ignacio Pascual Pascual


      PubDate: 2018-02-03T07:39:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.04.008
       
  • Jarcho-Levin and Rokitansky syndromes. An excepcional association
    • Authors: Rebeca Barriga Buján; Alba Muinelo Segade; Ana Prado-Carro; Pedro González Herranz; Rafaela Soler Fernández
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2018
      Source:Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)
      Author(s): Rebeca Barriga Buján, Alba Muinelo Segade, Ana Prado-Carro, Pedro González Herranz, Rafaela Soler Fernández


      PubDate: 2018-02-03T07:39:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.anpede.2017.03.018
       
 
 
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