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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3031 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3031 Journals sorted alphabetically
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 79, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
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Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 302, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
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Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
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Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
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Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
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Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
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Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
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Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 303, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 389, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access  
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 152, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
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Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 141, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.711, h-index: 78)
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Journal Cover Allergology International
  [SJR: 0.776]   [H-I: 35]   [5 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1323-8930 - ISSN (Online) 1440-1592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3031 journals]
  • Japanese guidelines for allergic diseases 2017

    • Authors: Ken Ohta; Kenji Izuhara
      Pages: 161 - 162
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Ken Ohta, Kenji Izuhara


      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.003
       
  • The effect of calprotectin on TSLP and IL-25 production from airway
           epithelial cells

    • Authors: Tomohisa Kato; Hideaki Kouzaki; Koji Matsumoto; Junichi Hosoi; Takeshi Shimizu
      Pages: 281 - 289
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Tomohisa Kato, Hideaki Kouzaki, Koji Matsumoto, Junichi Hosoi, Takeshi Shimizu
      Background Calprotectin is a heterodimer complex of the S100A8 and S100A9 proteins, and has various functions as an innate mediator at the sites of inflammation. The aim of this study was to elucidate the roles of calprotectin in the eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (ECRS). Methods Allergen-induced production of calprotectin was evaluated in cultured normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells by ELISA and RT-PCR. We then examined the roles of calprotectin on Alternaria alternata (Alternaria)-induced production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and IL-25 in NHBE cells. The extracellular concentration and allergen-induced secretion of calprotectin in cultured primary nasal epithelial (PNE) cells were examined and compared between patients with ECRS and non-eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (NECRS). Results Alternaria, house dust mites, protease from Staphylococcus aureus, papain, trypsin, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and lipopolysaccharide stimulated calprotectin production in the cultured NHBE cells. The combination of calprotectin and ATP stimulated the production of TSLP and IL-25 in NHBE cells, and calprotectin stimulated Alternaria-induced production of TSLP and IL-25, which was suppressed by blocking P2 purinergic receptors and by treatment with siRNA for S100A8, S100A9 or calprotectin receptors (Toll-like receptor 4 or receptor for advanced glycation end products). Allergen-induced calprotectin production was significantly stimulated in PNE cells from patients with ECRS. Conclusions These results indicate that calprotectin enhances the allergen-induced Th2-type inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells via the secretion of TSLP and IL-25, and that calprotectin secreted by the epithelial cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of ECRS.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.06.011
       
  • Validation and reliability of the Japanese version of the Food Allergy
           Quality of Life Questionnaire–Parent Form

    • Authors: Yumi Mizuno; Yukihiro Ohya; Mizuho Nagao; Audrey DunnGalvin; Takao Fujisawa
      Pages: 290 - 295
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Yumi Mizuno, Yukihiro Ohya, Mizuho Nagao, Audrey DunnGalvin, Takao Fujisawa
      Background Food allergy (FA) is a heavy burden for patients and their families and can significantly reduce the quality of life (QoL) of both. To provide adequate support, qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the parents' QoL may be helpful. The objective of this study is to develop and validate a Japanese version of the Food Allergy QoL Questionnaire–Parent Form (FAQLQ-PF-J), an internationally validated disease-specific QoL measurement of the parental burden of having a child with FA. Methods The FAQLQ-PF and the Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM), an instrument to test the construct validity of the FAQLQ-PF-J, were translated into Japanese. After language validation, the questionnaires were administered to parents of FA children aged 0–12 years and those of age-matched healthy (without FA) children. Internal consistency (by Cronbach's α) and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Construct validity and discriminant validity were also examined. Results One hundred twenty-seven parents of children with FA and 48 parents of healthy children filled out the questionnaire. The FAQLQ-PF-J showed excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's α > 0.77) and test-retest reliability. Good construct validity was demonstrated by significant correlations between the FAQLQ-PF-J and FAIM-J scores. It discriminated parents of children with FA from those without. The scores were significantly higher (lower QoL) for parents of FA children with a history of anaphylaxis than those without, for those with >6 FA-related symptoms experienced than those with less FA-related symptoms. Conclusions The FAQLQ-PF-J is a reliable and valid measure of the parental burden of FA in children.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.06.013
       
  • Usefulness of antigen-specific IgE probability curves derived from the
           3gAllergy assay in diagnosing egg, cow's milk, and wheat allergies

    • Authors: Sakura Sato; Kiyotake Ogura; Kyohei Takahashi; Yasunori Sato; Noriyuki Yanagida; Motohiro Ebisawa
      Pages: 296 - 301
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sakura Sato, Kiyotake Ogura, Kyohei Takahashi, Yasunori Sato, Noriyuki Yanagida, Motohiro Ebisawa
      Background Specific IgE (sIgE) antibody detection using the Siemens IMMULITE® 3gAllergy™ (3gAllergy) assay have not been sufficiently examined for the diagnosis of food allergy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of measuring sIgE levels using the 3gAllergy assay to diagnose allergic reactions to egg, milk, and wheat. Methods This retrospective study was conducted on patients with diagnosed or suspected allergies to egg, milk and wheat. Patients were divided into two groups according to their clinical reactivity to these allergens based on oral food challenge outcomes and/or convincing histories of immediate reaction to causative food(s). The sIgE levels were measured using 3gAllergy and ImmunoCAP. Predicted probability curves were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Results We analyzed 1561 patients, ages 0–19 y (egg = 436, milk = 499, wheat = 626). The sIgE levels determined using 3gAllergy correlated with those of ImmunoCAP, classifying 355 patients as symptomatic: egg = 149, milk = 123, wheat = 83. 3gAllergy sIgE levels were significantly higher in symptomatic than in asymptomatic patients (P < 0.0001). Predictive probability for positive food allergy was significantly increased and correlated with increased sIgE levels. The cut-offs for allergic reaction with 95% predictive probability as determined by the 3gAllergy probability curves were different from those of ImmunoCAP. Conclusions Measurements of sIgE against egg, milk, and wheat as determined by 3gAllergy may be used as a tool to facilitate the diagnosis of food allergy in subjects with suspected food allergies. However, these probability curves should not be applied interchangeably between different assays.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.06.012
       
  • Circulating activated innate lymphoid cells and mucosal-associated
           invariant T cells are associated with airflow limitation in patients with
           asthma

    • Authors: Ayako Ishimori; Norihiro Harada; Asako Chiba; Sonoko Harada; Kei Matsuno; Fumihiko Makino; Jun Ito; Shoichiro Ohta; Junya Ono; Ryo Atsuta; Kenji Izuhara; Kazuhisa Takahashi; Sachiko Miyake
      Pages: 302 - 309
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Ayako Ishimori, Norihiro Harada, Asako Chiba, Sonoko Harada, Kei Matsuno, Fumihiko Makino, Jun Ito, Shoichiro Ohta, Junya Ono, Ryo Atsuta, Kenji Izuhara, Kazuhisa Takahashi, Sachiko Miyake
      Background A variety of innate subsets of lymphoid cells such as natural killer (NK) cells, several populations of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells as innate-like T lymphocytes are involved in asthma and may have important effector functions in asthmatic immune responses. In the present study, we investigated whether NK cells, ILCs, and MAIT cells in the peripheral blood of patients with asthma would be associated with clinical asthma parameters. Methods We recruited 75 adult patients with mild to severe asthma. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells in peripheral venous blood samples from the patients were purified and stained with different combinations of appropriate antibodies. The cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results The percentage of activated (i.e., CD69+) NK cells in the total NK cell population was negatively correlated with FEV1% which is calculated by the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/the forced vital capacity (FVC). The percentages of CD69+ ILC1s and ILC2s were negatively correlated with FEV1% and %FEV1. The percentage of CD69+ ILC3s was positively correlated with BMI, and the percentage of CD69+ MAIT cells was negatively correlated with FEV1%. Moreover, the percentage of CD69+ NK cells, ILC1s, ILC2s, ILC3s, and MAIT cells were positively correlated with each other. Conclusions For the first time, our data showed that activated NK cells, ILC1s, ILC2s, ILC3s, and MAIT cells were positively correlated with each other and may be associated with airflow limitation in patients with asthma.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.07.005
       
  • Eosinophilia in infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome
           in Japan

    • Authors: Mitsuaki Kimura; Masaki Shimomura; Hideaki Morishita; Takaaki Meguro; Shiro Seto
      Pages: 310 - 316
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Mitsuaki Kimura, Masaki Shimomura, Hideaki Morishita, Takaaki Meguro, Shiro Seto
      Background Many Japanese infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) show eosinophilia, which has been thought to be a characteristic of food protein-induced proctocolitis (FPIP). Methods To elucidate the characteristics of eosinophilia in Japanese FPIES patients, 113 infants with non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy due to cow's milk were enrolled and classified into FPIES (n = 94) and FPIP (n = 19). Results The percentage of peripheral blood eosinophils (Eo) was increased in most FPIES patients (median, 7.5%), which was comparable with that in FPIP patients (9.0%). Among FPIES patients, Eo was the highest in patients who had vomiting, bloody stool, and diarrhea simultaneously (12.9%) and lowest in patients with diarrhea alone (3.2%). Eo showed a significant positive correlation with the incidence of vomiting (Cramer's V = 0.31, p < 0.005) and bloody stool (Cramer's V = 0.34, p < 0.0005). A significant difference was found in Eo between early- (≤10 days, n = 56) and late-onset (>10 days, n = 38) FPIES (median, 9.8% vs. 5.4%; p < 0.005). IL-5 production by peripheral blood T cells stimulated with cow's milk protein in early-onset FPIES was significantly higher than that in late-onset FPIES (67.7 pg/mL vs. 12.5 pg/mL, p < 0.01), and showed a significant positive correlation with Eo (rs = 0.60, p < 0.01). Conclusions This study demonstrated two types of eosinophilia in Japanese FPIES infants: conspicuous and mild eosinophilia in early- and late-onset FPIES patients, respectively. Conspicuous eosinophilia in early-onset FPIES is suggested to be caused by abnormally high IL-5 production.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.08.003
       
  • Efficacy and safety of bilastine in Japanese patients with chronic
           spontaneous urticaria: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind,
           placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase II/III study

    • Authors: Michihiro Hide; Akiko Yagami; Michinori Togawa; Akihiro Saito; Masutaka Furue
      Pages: 317 - 325
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Michihiro Hide, Akiko Yagami, Michinori Togawa, Akihiro Saito, Masutaka Furue
      Background Bilastine, a novel non-sedating second-generation H1-antihistamine, has been widely used in the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria with a recommended dose of 20 mg once daily in most European countries since 2010. We evaluated its efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). Methods We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II/III study (trial registration No. JapicCTI-142574). Patients (age, 18–74 years) were randomly assigned to receive bilastine 20 mg, 10 mg or placebo once daily for 2 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change from baseline (Day −3 to 0) in total symptom score (TSS) at 2 weeks (Day 8–14), consisting of the itch and rash scores. Results A total of 304 patients were randomly allocated to bilastine 20 mg (101 patients), bilastine 10 mg (100 patients), and placebo (103 patients). The changes in TSS at 2 weeks were significantly decreased by bilastine 20 mg than did placebo (p < 0.001), demonstrating the superiority of bilastine 20 mg. Bilastine 10 mg also showed a significant difference from placebo (p < 0.001). The TSS changes for the bilastine showed significant improvement from Day 1, and were maintained during the treatment period. The Dermatology Life Quality Index scores were also improved in bilastine than in placebo. The bilastine treatments were safe and well tolerated. Conclusions Two-week treatment with bilastine (20 or 10 mg) once daily was effective and tolerable in Japanese patients with CSU, demonstrating an early onset of action.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.08.004
       
  • Inverse correlation of soluble programmed cell death-1 ligand-1 (sPD-L1)
           

    • Authors: Rasoul Nasiri Kalmarzi; Nima Fattahi; Zeinab Kaviani; Pedram Ataee; Majid Mansouri; Ghobad Moradi; Alireza Yousefzade; Javid Morad Abbassi
      Pages: 326 - 331
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Rasoul Nasiri Kalmarzi, Nima Fattahi, Zeinab Kaviani, Pedram Ataee, Majid Mansouri, Ghobad Moradi, Alireza Yousefzade, Javid Morad Abbassi
      Background T-cell response outcome is determined by co-stimulatory/inhibitory signals. Programmed cell death-1 ligand-1 (PD-L1) is a member of these co-signaling molecules with known soluble form in human serum. Soluble PD-L1 (sPD-L1) is also recognized in patients with some types of malignancy or autoimmune disorders, though there are few studies on sPD-L1 roles in allergic diseases. The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the association between sPD-L1 levels with eosinophil count as well as disease severity in allergic rhinitis (AR) patients. Methods 90 patients with AR were selected. Disease severity was determined by a modified Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) classification as mild, moderate and severe. Whole blood samples were collected. Then eosinophil count and serum sPD-L1 were detected by a hematologic analyzer and a commercial ELISA kit. Results 13 (14.44%), 31 (34.44%), and 46 (51.12%) of patients had mild, moderate and severe disease, respectively. The mean levels of sPD-L1 and eosinophil count were ascertained 18.38 ± 14.42 ng/ml and 422.43 ± 262.26 cell/μl. A significant inverse correlation was determined between sPD-L1 levels and eosinophil count (r = −0.364, P < 0.001). Moreover, we detected a significant negative association between sPD-L1 levels and disease severity (r = −0.384, P < 0.001). Conclusions It is deduced that sPD-L1 can be used as a helpful marker to determine the severity of AR. Furthermore, this study indicated that sPD-L1 may have an inhibitory role in AR development, and its modulation may be considered as a useful accessory therapeutic approach for reduction of AR progression.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.08.008
       
  • Autoantibody profiles and their association with blood eosinophils in
           asthma and COPD

    • Authors: Koji Tamai; Harukazu Yoshimatsu; Toshiharu Saito; Hirofumi Matsuoka; Nobuhiko Okada; Yasuko Koma; Akiko Otsuka; Nao Oda; Sayaka Inoue; Sachie Kume; Yujiro Suzuki
      Pages: 332 - 337
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Koji Tamai, Harukazu Yoshimatsu, Toshiharu Saito, Hirofumi Matsuoka, Nobuhiko Okada, Yasuko Koma, Akiko Otsuka, Nao Oda, Sayaka Inoue, Sachie Kume, Yujiro Suzuki
      Background Autoimmune involvement in the pathogenesis of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been proposed, and autoantibodies are a hallmark of autoimmunity. This study aimed to compare the autoantibody profiles of asthma and COPD, and the relationship between autoantibodies and features of these diseases. Methods We recruited 110 asthma patients and 92 COPD patients for a prospective study. Six autoantibody types were evaluated: antinuclear antibody, anti-cytoplasmic antibodies, rheumatoid factor, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, myeloperoxidase–anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (MPO-ANCA) and proteinase 3-ANCA. Other clinical data were also recorded concurrently. Results An antinuclear antibody titre of ≥1:160 presented only in asthma but not in COPD (10% vs. 0%, p = 0.0002). Eosinophil counts in blood were negative predictors of antinuclear antibody in asthma. Conversely, eosinophil counts in blood and immunoglobulin-E levels of ≥100 IU/mL were positively associated with rheumatoid factor in asthma but not in COPD. There was no relationship between antinuclear antibody or rheumatoid factor and disease severity. Conclusions It is possible that asthma tends to involve autoimmunity associated with antinuclear antibody more frequently than COPD because asthma is the more robust factor for antinuclear antibody positivity. Antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor are associated with eosinophilic responses, but they do not work as biomarkers for disease severity.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.08.005
       
  • Evaluating the efficacy of epinastine ophthalmic solution using a
           conjunctivitis allergen challenge model in patients with birch pollen
           allergic conjunctivitis

    • Authors: Yoshiaki Tagawa; Kenichi Namba; Yumi Nakazono; Daiju Iwata; Susumu Ishida
      Pages: 338 - 343
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Yoshiaki Tagawa, Kenichi Namba, Yumi Nakazono, Daiju Iwata, Susumu Ishida
      Background The efficacy of epinastine 0.05% ophthalmic solution for pollen allergic conjunctivitis has already been shown in a conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC) test using cedar pollen as a challenge. The present study investigated the efficacy of this solution against birch pollen conjunctivitis in a CAC test. Methods Ten adult subjects (eight males and two females) with asymptomatic birch pollen conjunctivitis were enrolled in this study. The average age of the subjects was 41.1 years. This study was conducted during a period without birch pollen dispersion. In each subject, the epinastine 0.05% ophthalmic solution was instilled in one eye, and an artificial tear fluid was instilled in the fellow eye in a double-blind manner. Five minutes or 4 h after the drug instillation, both eyes were challenged with an optimal concentration of birch pollen, and ocular itching and conjunctival hyperemia were then graded. Tears were collected before the drug instillation and 20 min after the pollen challenge, and the histamine level was measured. Results The ocular itching scores and palpebral conjunctival hyperemia scores of the epinastine-treated eyes were significantly lower than those of the contralateral control eyes when the eyes were pretreated with the drug 4 h before the CAC. There was a significant correlation between the tear histamine level and mean ocular itching score of three time points (3, 5 and 10 min) following the CAC in the control eyes but not the epinastine-treated eyes. Conclusions Epinastine is effective in suppressing ocular itching and conjunctival hyperemia in birch pollen conjunctivitis.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.08.011
       
  • Diagnostic utility of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in prolonged and
           chronic cough according to atopic status

    • Authors: Takamitsu Asano; Masaya Takemura; Kensuke Fukumitsu; Norihisa Takeda; Hiroya Ichikawa; Hisatoshi Hijikata; Yoshihiro Kanemitsu; Takehiro Uemura; Osamu Takakuwa; Hirotsugu Ohkubo; Ken Maeno; Yutaka Ito; Tetsuya Oguri; Atsushi Nakamura; Akio Niimi
      Pages: 344 - 350
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Takamitsu Asano, Masaya Takemura, Kensuke Fukumitsu, Norihisa Takeda, Hiroya Ichikawa, Hisatoshi Hijikata, Yoshihiro Kanemitsu, Takehiro Uemura, Osamu Takakuwa, Hirotsugu Ohkubo, Ken Maeno, Yutaka Ito, Tetsuya Oguri, Atsushi Nakamura, Akio Niimi
      Background Cough-variant asthma (CVA) and cough-predominant asthma (CPA) are the major causes of persistent cough in Japan. The utility of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measurement in the differential diagnosis of persistent cough has been reported, but the influence of atopic status, which is associated with higher FeNO levels, on the diagnostic utility of FeNO has been unknown. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 105 non-smoking patients with prolonged and chronic cough that were not treated with corticosteroids and anti-leukotrienes. Results CPA was diagnosed in 37 patients, CVA in 40, and non-asthmatic cough (NAC) in 28. FeNO levels were significantly higher in the CPA [35.8 (7.0–317.9) ppb] and CVA [24.9 (3.1–156.0) ppb] groups than in the NAC group [18.2 (6.9–49.0) ppb] (p < 0.01 by Kruskal–Wallis test). The optimal cut-off for distinguishing asthmatic cough (AC; CPA and CVA) from NAC was 29.2 ppb [area under the curve (AUC) 0.74, p < 0.01]. Ninety-one percent of subjects with FeNO levels ≥29.2 ppb had AC. Meanwhile, 40% of AC patients had FeNO levels <29.2 ppb. Stratified cut-off levels were 31.1 ppb (AUC 0.83) in atopic subjects vs. 19.9 ppb (AUC 0.65) in non-atopic subjects (p = 0.03 for AUC). Conclusions Although high FeNO levels suggested the existence of AC, lower FeNO levels had limited diagnostic significance. Atopic status affects the utility of FeNO levels in the differential diagnosis of prolonged and chronic cough.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.08.015
       
  • Intranasal administration of IL-35 inhibits allergic responses and
           symptoms in mice with allergic rhinitis

    • Authors: Motohiko Suzuki; Makoto Yokota; Yoshihisa Nakamura; Shinya Ozaki; Shingo Murakami
      Pages: 351 - 356
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Motohiko Suzuki, Makoto Yokota, Yoshihisa Nakamura, Shinya Ozaki, Shingo Murakami
      Background IL-35 was recently identified as an anti-inflammatory cytokine. We previously reported that recombinant fusion protein of murine IL-35 and human IgG1 Fc fragment (rIL-35) reduced Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5) in vitro. However, it is unclear whether IL-35 can attenuate nasal allergic responses and symptoms of allergic rhinitis in vivo. Methods To investigate the in vivo effect of IL-35 on allergic rhinitis in mice, mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). Intranasal administration of rIL-35 and intranasal challenge of OVA were then performed. Nasal symptoms were estimated after the last nasal challenge. Nasal tissue and cervical lymph nodes (CLN) were collected. OVA-specific IgE in sera, OVA-specific T cell response, and the production of cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) stimulated by the OVA antigen were measured. The transcription level of Foxp3 and the frequency of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells were also measured. Results rIL-35 significantly inhibited the number of sneezes and nasal rubbing movements. It also reduced the number of eosinophils in the nasal mucosa and significantly decreased the level of OVA-specific IgE, the OVA-specific T cell proliferation, and the production of IL-4 and IL-5. Furthermore, rIL-35 significantly increased the production of IL-10, the transcription level of Foxp3, and the frequency of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. Conclusions This study showed for the first time that rIL-35 inhibits nasal allergic responses and symptoms in mice, and that rIL-35 increases IL-10, Foxp3, and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in CLN. This study also suggests that intranasal administration of IL-35 can attenuate allergic rhinitis.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.08.014
       
  • Rapid subcutaneous desensitization for treatment of hypersensitivity
           reactions to etanercept in two patients with positive basophil activation
           test

    • Authors: Raquel de la Varga Martínez; Diego Gutiérrez Fernández; Antonio Foncubierta Fernández; José Antonio Andrés García; Fermín Medina Varo
      Pages: 357 - 359
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Raquel de la Varga Martínez, Diego Gutiérrez Fernández, Antonio Foncubierta Fernández, José Antonio Andrés García, Fermín Medina Varo


      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.09.002
       
  • Increased airway hyperresponsiveness to adenosine in patients with aspirin
           intolerant asthma

    • Authors: Sumito Isogai; Yoshikazu Niwa; Hiroshi Yatsuya; Masamichi Hayashi; Naoki Yamamoto; Takuya Okamura; Tomoyuki Minezawa; Yasuhiro Goto; Teppei Yamaguchi; Tomoko Takeyama; Yosuke Sakakibara; Sayako Morikawa; Tomoya Horiguchi; Yusuke Gotoh; Yuki Mieno; Sakurako Uozu; Toru Nakanishi; Mitsushi Okazawa; Hiroki Sakakibara; Kazuyoshi Imaizumi
      Pages: 360 - 362
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sumito Isogai, Yoshikazu Niwa, Hiroshi Yatsuya, Masamichi Hayashi, Naoki Yamamoto, Takuya Okamura, Tomoyuki Minezawa, Yasuhiro Goto, Teppei Yamaguchi, Tomoko Takeyama, Yosuke Sakakibara, Sayako Morikawa, Tomoya Horiguchi, Yusuke Gotoh, Yuki Mieno, Sakurako Uozu, Toru Nakanishi, Mitsushi Okazawa, Hiroki Sakakibara, Kazuyoshi Imaizumi


      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.10.001
       
  • Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome in Japan in the past 10 years based
           on data from the relief system of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices
           Agency

    • Authors: Yuri Kinoshita; Hidehisa Saeki; Akihiko Asahina; Toyoko Ochiai; Masafumi Iijima
      Pages: 363 - 365
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 2
      Author(s): Yuri Kinoshita, Hidehisa Saeki, Akihiko Asahina, Toyoko Ochiai, Masafumi Iijima


      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.09.003
       
  • Diminished capacity of opsonization and immune complex solubilization, and
           detection of anti-C1q antibodies in sera from patients with hereditary
           angioedema

    • Authors: Daisuke Honda; Isao Ohsawa; Nobuyuki Sato; Hiroyuki Inoshita; Satoshi Mano; Yasuhiko Tomino; Yusuke Suzuki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 April 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Daisuke Honda, Isao Ohsawa, Nobuyuki Sato, Hiroyuki Inoshita, Satoshi Mano, Yasuhiko Tomino, Yusuke Suzuki
      Background Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by deficiency of C1 esterase inhibitor. Symptoms of HAE include edema, which can potentially cause suffocation. Some patients with HAE exhibit immunological abnormalities, which could prevent an accurate diagnosis. Low levels of complement components are characteristic of HAE and in other settings are thought to reduce elimination of apoptotic cells and immune complex (IC). Thus, we aimed to experimentally clarify the mechanism of immunological abnormalities using sera from HAE patients. Methods Serum samples from 18 patients with HAE were collected when free from angioedema attack and compared with normal human pooled sera (NHPS) from 20 healthy volunteers. Opsonization was measured as the rate of phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by macrophages differentiated from THP-1 cells incubated with serum. IC solubilization in serum was analyzed by quantifying peroxidase released from a synthetic IC composed of peroxidase and anti-peroxidase antibodies. Anti-C1q antibody levels were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Serological immunological abnormalities were detected in 12 patients. Opsonization in serum samples from each patient with HAE was lower than that in NHPS (∼20% versus 70%, respectively). The rate of IC solubilization was lower in serum from HAE patients than NHPS. Some patients had high serum anti-C1q antibody levels with increased serum IC levels. Conclusions Sera from patients with HAE exhibit anti-C1q antibodies, with a lower capacity for opsonization and IC solubilization. This may be associated with immunological abnormalities and should be investigated further to facilitate accurate diagnosis of HAE.

      PubDate: 2017-04-23T09:39:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.008
       
  • Maintenance of pathogenic Th2 cells in allergic disorders

    • Authors: Kenta Shinoda; Kiyoshi Hirahara; Toshinori Nakayama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Kenta Shinoda, Kiyoshi Hirahara, Toshinori Nakayama
      Immunological memory is an important protective mechanism that enables host organisms to respond rapidly and vigorously to pathogens that have been previously encountered. In addition to the protective function, memory CD4+ T helper (Th) cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disorders, including asthma. Recently, several investigators have identified phenotypically and functionally distinct memory Th2 cell subsets that produce IL-5. These memory Th2 cell subsets play an important role in the pathology of allergic inflammation and function as memory-type “pathogenic Th2 (Tpath2) cells” both in mice and humans. We review the role of lung Tpath2 cells in the development of allergic inflammation and, in the context of recent findings, propose a mechanism by which Tpath2 cells not only survive but also continue to function at the sites where antigens were encountered. A greater understanding of the functional molecules or signaling pathways that regulate the inflammatory niche for Tpath2 cells may aid in the design of more effective treatments for chronic inflammatory disorders.

      PubDate: 2017-04-08T13:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.005
       
  • Histamine H1 and H4 receptor expression on the ocular surface of patients
           with chronic allergic conjunctival diseases

    • Authors: Noriko Inada; Jun Shoji; Yukiko Shiraki; Hiroshi Aso; Satoru Yamagami
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Noriko Inada, Jun Shoji, Yukiko Shiraki, Hiroshi Aso, Satoru Yamagami
      Background This study investigated the histamine H1 and H4 receptors mRNA (H1R and H4R, respectively) expression on the ocular surface of patients with chronic forms of allergic conjunctival diseases to determine whether they can serve as biomarkers for allergic inflammation in the conjunctiva. Methods We examined 19 patients with vernal or atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC/VKC group) and 15 healthy volunteers (control group). The AKC/VKC group was divided into active and stable stage subgroups. Specimens were obtained from the upper tarsal conjunctiva of each participant using a modified impression cytology method. H1R, H4R, and eotaxin-1, -2, and -3 mRNA (eotaxin-1, eotaxin-2, eotaxin-3, respectively) expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis for eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil major basic protein (MBP), eotaxin-2, and histamine H4 receptor (H4R) were performed using conjunctival smears. Results The number of H4R-positive patients was higher in the active than the stable stage subgroup and control group, whereas no difference was observed for H1R. H1R levels were higher in the active than in the stable stage subgroup, while those of H4R were higher in the active stage subgroup than in the control group. H1R and H4R levels were correlated with eotaxin-2 level. In immunohistochemical analysis, H4R revealed their expression on eosinophils in conjunctival smears of patients with AKC/VKC. Conclusions H4R is useful as biomarkers of allergic inflammation on ocular surfaces. Most notably, H4R expressed on eosinophils is useful as a biomarker of eosinophilic inflammation of the ocular surface.

      PubDate: 2017-04-08T13:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.004
       
  • Nattokinase, profibrinolytic enzyme, effectively shrinks the nasal polyp
           tissue and decreases viscosity of mucus

    • Authors: Tetsuji Takabayashi; Yoshimasa Imoto; Masafumi Sakashita; Yukinori Kato; Takahiro Tokunaga; Kanako Yoshida; Norihiko Narita; Tamotsu Ishizuka; Shigeharu Fujieda
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Tetsuji Takabayashi, Yoshimasa Imoto, Masafumi Sakashita, Yukinori Kato, Takahiro Tokunaga, Kanako Yoshida, Norihiko Narita, Tamotsu Ishizuka, Shigeharu Fujieda
      Background Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is often comorbid with asthma and resistant to therapeutic interventions. We recently reported that excessive fibrin deposition caused by impairment of fibrinolysis might play pivotal role in forming nasal polyp. Nattokinase (NK), a serine protease produced by Bacillus subtilis, has been reported to be a strong fibrinolytic enzyme. NK could be a promising drug candidate for use in the treatment of both CRSwNP and asthma. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of NK on nasal polyp tissues from patients with CRSwNP. The nasal discharge from patients with CRSwNP and sputum from subjects with asthma were also used to investigate whether NK influences the viscosity of mucus. Methods To examine the effects on NK on nasal polyp tissues, pieces of nasal polyps were incubated either with saline or NK (10–1000 FU/ml) at 37 °C for 24 h. We assessed the presence of fibrin in nasal polyp tissue incubated with NK by means of immunohistochemistry. To examine the effects of NK on nasal discharge and sputum from patients with CRSwNP and asthma, respectively, were incubated with NK solution at 37 °C for 1 h. Results NK effectively shrinks the nasal polyp tissue through fibrin degradation. We also found that the viscosity of the nasal discharge and sputum from patients with CRSwNP and asthma, respectively, was significantly reduced by incubation with NK solution. Conclusions NK may be an effective alternative therapeutic option in patients with CRSwNP and comorbid asthma by causing fibrin degradation.

      PubDate: 2017-04-08T13:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.007
       
  • Patch testing in patients with recurrent vesicular hand eczema

    • Authors: Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka; Naomi Nakamura; Sachiko Ueda; Koji Masuda; Norito Katoh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 April 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka, Naomi Nakamura, Sachiko Ueda, Koji Masuda, Norito Katoh


      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.006
       
  • The dual regulation of substance P-mediated inflammation via human
           synovial mast cells in rheumatoid arthritis

    • Authors: Yuki Okamura; Shintaro Mishima; Jun-ichi Kashiwakura; Tomomi Sasaki-Sakamoto; Shota Toyoshima; Kazumichi Kuroda; Shu Saito; Yasuaki Tokuhashi; Yoshimichi Okayama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Yuki Okamura, Shintaro Mishima, Jun-ichi Kashiwakura, Tomomi Sasaki-Sakamoto, Shota Toyoshima, Kazumichi Kuroda, Shu Saito, Yasuaki Tokuhashi, Yoshimichi Okayama
      Background Neural pathways are thought to be directly involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although synovial mast cells (MCs) are activated by substance P (SP), the role of MCs in neural pathways in RA remains unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate 1) whether tachykinins are produced by synovial MCs and whether production differs in RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and 2) what is the responsible receptor for SP in synovial MCs. Methods Synovial tissues were obtained from patients with RA or OA undergoing joint replacement surgery. Cultured synovium-derived MCs were generated by culturing dispersed synovial cells with stem cell factor. SP expression was investigated using immunofluorescence and enzyme immunoassays. Mas-related gene X2 (MrgX2) expression was reduced in human MCs using a lentiviral shRNA silencing technique. Results SP expression was localized around the cell membrane in 41% (median) of the MCs in synovium from RA but in only 7% of that from OA, suggesting the activation of MCs. Synovial MCs expressed tachykinin (TAC) 1 mRNA, the expression of which was upregulated by the aggregation of FcɛRI or the addition of aggregated IgG. However, the released SP appeared to be rapidly degraded by MC chymase. Synovial MCs were activated with SP through MrgX2 to release histamine without producing proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions Activated synovial MCs may rapidly degrade SP, which may downregulate the SP-mediated activation of synoviocytes in RA. On the other hand, SP activates MCs to induce inflammatory mediators, suggesting the dual regulation of SP-mediated inflammation by MCs in RA.

      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.002
       
  • Pustular allergic contact dermatitis caused by Disperse Yellow 3 in a dark
           blue dress

    • Authors: Eri Hotta; Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka; Koji Masuda; Norito Katoh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Eri Hotta, Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka, Koji Masuda, Norito Katoh


      PubDate: 2017-04-02T13:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.001
       
  • Effectiveness of training patients using DVD in the accurate use
           of inhalers for the treatment of bronchial asthma

    • Authors: Koichiro Takita; Rieko Kondo; Takahiko Horiguchi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Koichiro Takita, Rieko Kondo, Takahiko Horiguchi
      Background Inhalants are the standard treatment for patients with bronchial asthma. Inaccurate inhaler use leads to inadequate therapeutic effects and unnecessary dosage increases. However, it is a challenge for practitioners to master the various devices available and train patients on the accurate use of inhalers. Thus, establishing a system to instruct patients on how to accurately use inhalers is essential. We prepared a DVD and accompanying user manual explaining the operation of each inhaler device used in Japan. This pilot study aimed to examine the efficacy of these materials. Methods The subjects were 33 outpatients with bronchial asthma who received treatment in our facility for asthma and had already received conventional inhalant training. The oral medication and inhalants used by the patients were not changed. The patients were randomly assigned to a DVD viewing group or non-viewing group; various parameters were comparatively examined after 4 weeks. Results Significant improvements in Asthma Control Test scores, inhalation technique, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, impulse oscillometry resonant frequency, and induced sputum eosinophil count were observed in the DVD viewing group at 4 weeks post training. Conclusions Pulmonary function and inflammatory parameters improved significantly in the DVD viewing group. These findings suggest that unnecessary step-up of asthma treatment can be avoided, leading to treatment cost reduction. Training patients with asthma in accurate inhaler use improves quality of life and therefore has great clinical significance. Hence, this method should be used more extensively in Japan and worldwide.

      PubDate: 2017-03-26T12:38:09Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.006
       
  • Roles of alternatively activated M2 macrophages in allergic contact
           dermatitis

    • Authors: Kotaro Suzuki; Kazuyuki Meguro; Daiki Nakagomi; Hiroshi Nakajima
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Kotaro Suzuki, Kazuyuki Meguro, Daiki Nakagomi, Hiroshi Nakajima
      Alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) play key roles in the suppression of Th1 cell responses and the orchestration of tissue repair. However, recent studies have shown that M2 macrophages have potentials to produce high levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, suggesting that M2 macrophages may exacerbate inflammation in some settings. In this regard, we have recently shown that large numbers of M2 macrophages accumulate in the sites of hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS), an animal model of allergic contact dermatitis, and that M2 macrophages exacerbate hapten-induced CHS by producing matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12). We have also shown that suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), a member of SOCS family proteins that are cytokine-inducible negative regulators of the JAK/STAT signaling pathways, is highly and preferentially expressed in M2 macrophages in hapten-induced CHS and that SOCS3 expressed in M2 macrophages is involved in the attenuation of CHS by suppressing MMP12 production. These findings underscore the importance of M2 macrophage-derived MMP12 in the development of CHS, and suggest that inhibition of M2 macrophages or MMP12 could be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of allergic contact dermatitis.

      PubDate: 2017-03-20T10:32:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.015
       
  • Genetic association of the functional CDHR3 genotype with early-onset
           adult asthma in Japanese populations

    • Authors: Jun Kanazawa; Hironori Masuko; Yohei Yatagai; Tohru Sakamoto; Hideyasu Yamada; Yoshiko Kaneko; Haruna Kitazawa; Hiroaki Iijima; Takashi Naito; Takefumi Saito; Emiko Noguchi; Satoshi Konno; Masaharu Nishimura; Tomomitsu Hirota; Mayumi Tamari; Nobuyuki Hizawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Jun Kanazawa, Hironori Masuko, Yohei Yatagai, Tohru Sakamoto, Hideyasu Yamada, Yoshiko Kaneko, Haruna Kitazawa, Hiroaki Iijima, Takashi Naito, Takefumi Saito, Emiko Noguchi, Satoshi Konno, Masaharu Nishimura, Tomomitsu Hirota, Mayumi Tamari, Nobuyuki Hizawa
      Background Recent studies have demonstrated that a coding SNP (rs6967330, Cys529→Tyr) in cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3), which was previously associated with wheezing illness and hospitalizations in infancy, could support efficient human rhinovirus C (RV-C) entry and replication. Here, we sought to examine the genetic contribution of this variant to the development of adult asthma. Methods We performed a candidate gene case–control association study of 2 independent Japanese populations (a total of 3366 adults). The odds ratios (ORs) for association of the A allele at rs6967330 with adult asthma were calculated according to age at onset of asthma. In addition, the effect of the CDHR3 genotype on the development of specific asthma phenotypes was examined. Results The A allele was associated with asthma (OR = 1.56; Mantel–Haenszel p = 0.0040) when the analysis was limited to patients with early-onset adult asthma. In addition, when the analysis was limited to atopic individuals, a stronger association of the CDHR3 variant with early-onset asthma was found, and interaction of the CDHR3 genotype with atopy was demonstrated. Finally, a significant association of this variant was specifically found with a phenotype of asthma characterized by atopy, early-onset, and lower lung function. Conclusions Our study supports the concept that the CDHR3 variant is an important susceptibility factor for severe adult asthma in individuals who develop the disease in early life. The interaction between the CDHR3 variant and atopy indicates that genetic predisposition to early respiratory viral infection is combined with atopy in promoting asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-03-20T10:32:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.012
       
  • Airway inflammation phenotype prediction in asthma patients using lung
           sound analysis with fractional exhaled nitric oxide

    • Authors: Terufumi Shimoda; Yasushi Obase; Yukio Nagasaka; Hiroshi Nakano; Reiko Kishikawa; Tomoaki Iwanaga
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Terufumi Shimoda, Yasushi Obase, Yukio Nagasaka, Hiroshi Nakano, Reiko Kishikawa, Tomoaki Iwanaga
      Background We previously reported the results of lung sound analysis in patients with bronchial asthma and demonstrated that the exhalation-to-inhalation sound pressure ratio in the low frequency range between 100 and 200 Hz (E/I LF) was correlated with the presence of airway inflammation and airway obstruction. We classified asthma patients by airway inflammation phenotype using the induced sputum eosinophil and neutrophil ratio and determined whether this phenotype could be predicted using E/I LF and fractional exhaled nitric oxide values. Methods Steroid-naive bronchial asthma patients were classified into four phenotypes, including “Low inflammation” (35 patients), “Eosinophilic type” (58 patients), “Neutrophilic type” (15 patients), and “Mixed type” (15 patients) based on the results of induced sputum examinations. The E/I LF data and FeNO levels were then evaluated for the four phenotype groups; the prediction powers of these two indices were then analyzed for each phenotype. Results The median E/I LF value was highest in the “Mixed type” and lowest in the “Low inflammation” group. FeNO differentiated between the “Low inflammation” and “Eosinophilic type” groups, “Low inflammation” and “Neutrophilic type” groups, and “Neutrophilic type” and “Mixed type” (p < 0.0001, p = 0.007, and p = 0.04, respectively). E/I LF differentiated between the “Low inflammation” and “Eosinophilic type” groups (p = 0.006). E/I LF could distinguish the “Mixed type” group from the “Low inflammation” and “Eosinophilic type” groups (p = 0.002). Conclusions A combination of the E/I LF value and FeNO may be useful for the classification of the airway inflammation phenotype in patients with bronchial asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-03-20T10:32:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.016
       
  • UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling regulates IgE-dependent degranulation in human
           basophils

    • Authors: Manabu Nakano; Koichi Ito; Takeo Yuno; Nobuyuki Soma; Syun Aburakawa; Kosuke Kasai; Toshiya Nakamura; Hideki Takami
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Manabu Nakano, Koichi Ito, Takeo Yuno, Nobuyuki Soma, Syun Aburakawa, Kosuke Kasai, Toshiya Nakamura, Hideki Takami
      Background P2Y purinergic receptors (P2YR) are G protein-coupled receptors that are stimulated by extracellular nucleotides. They mediate cellular effects by regulating cAMP production, protein kinase C activation, inositol trisphosphate generation, and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The P2Y6 receptor of this family is selectively stimulated by UDP, and selectively inhibited by MRS2578. In the present study, we examined the effect of UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling on IgE-dependent degranulation in human basophils. Methods Basophils were purified from human peripheral blood. The mRNA expression of genes encoding P2YR and ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (ENTPDase) was measured by RT-PCR. Intracellular Ca2+ influx via UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling in basophils was detected using a calcium probe. The effect of UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling on IgE-dependent degranulation in basophils was confirmed by measuring CD63 expression by flow cytometry. Autocrine secretion of nucleotides was detected by HPLC analysis. Results We showed that purified basophils express P2Y6 mRNA and that UDP increased intracellular Ca2+, which was reduced by MRS2578 treatment. UDP promoted IgE-dependent degranulation. Furthermore, MRS2578 inhibited IgE-dependent degranulation in basophils. HPLC analysis indicated that basophils spontaneously secrete UTP. In addition, basophils expressed the extracellular nucleotide hydrolases ENTPDase2, ENTPDase3, and ENTPDase8. Conclusions This study showed that UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling is involved in the regulation of IgE-dependent degranulation in basophils, which might stimulate the P2Y6 receptor via the autocrine secretion of UTP. Thus, this receptor represents a potential target to regulate IgE-dependent degranulation in basophils during allergic diseases.

      PubDate: 2017-03-20T10:32:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.014
       
  • Predicting future risk of exacerbations in Japanese patients with adult
           asthma: A prospective 1-year follow up study

    • Authors: Akihiko Tanaka; Tomoki Uno; Haruna Sato; Megumi Jinno; Kuniaki Hirai; Yoshito Miyata; Munehiro Yamaguchi; Shin Ohta; Tetsuya Homma; Mayumi Yamamoto; Shintaro Suzuki; Takuya Yokoe; Hironori Sagara
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Akihiko Tanaka, Tomoki Uno, Haruna Sato, Megumi Jinno, Kuniaki Hirai, Yoshito Miyata, Munehiro Yamaguchi, Shin Ohta, Tetsuya Homma, Mayumi Yamamoto, Shintaro Suzuki, Takuya Yokoe, Hironori Sagara
      Background To avoid future risk is a definitive goal of long-term asthma management. Exacerbations are considered to be the most relevant future risk in real life asthma management. Few comparative studies have evaluated the risk factors associated with exacerbations in Japanese patients with asthma. Methods We performed the prospective 1-year follow up study in Japanese patients with adult asthma. A total of 189 patients with asthma were enrolled and followed up for 1 year. Finally, 181 patients completed the study protocol. Results Of 181 patients, 43 patients (23.8%) had exacerbations during the follow-up period. Among the 45 patients who had exacerbations during the preceding year, 32 patients (71.1%) had exacerbations. Prevalence of patients with previous exacerbations and those with previous admissions were significantly higher in patients with exacerbations than those with no exacerbation. Logistic regression analysis also identified a significant association between exacerbations during the follow-up period and exacerbations during the preceding year, admissions during the preceding 3 years, ACT score below 20, low %FVC (<80%), or low FEV1 (<70%), respectively. Of the 55 patients with severe asthma, 29 patients (52.7%) had exacerbations. Among the 36 patients with severe asthma with previous exacerbations, 26 patients (72.2%) had exacerbations. The history of exacerbations during the preceding year was associated with a significantly increased risk of exacerbations both among the patients with severe asthma and those with non-severe asthma. Conclusions This study implicated that exacerbations during the preceding year reliably predict future risk of exacerbations in Japanese patients with asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-03-20T10:32:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.013
       
  • Phenotypic analysis of asthma in Japanese athletes

    • Authors: Keisuke Tsukioka; Toshiyuki Koya; Hiroshi Ueno; Masachika Hayashi; Takuro Sakagami; Takashi Hasegawa; Masaaki Arakawa; Eiichi Suzuki; Toshiaki Kikuchi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Keisuke Tsukioka, Toshiyuki Koya, Hiroshi Ueno, Masachika Hayashi, Takuro Sakagami, Takashi Hasegawa, Masaaki Arakawa, Eiichi Suzuki, Toshiaki Kikuchi
      Background Asthma in athlete populations such as Olympic athletes has various pathogeneses. However, few reports are available on the features of asthma in the athlete population in clinical practice. In this study, we focused on classifying asthma in Japanese athlete population. Methods We performed a cluster analysis of data from pulmonary function tests and clinical biomarkers before administering inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) therapy in athlete population of individuals diagnosed with asthma (n = 104; male, 76.9%; median age, 16.0 years), based on respiratory symptoms and positive data on methacholine provocation tests. We also compared backgrounds, sports types, and treatments between clusters. Results Three clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (32%) comprised athletes with a less atopic phenotype and normal pulmonary function. Cluster 2 (44%) comprised athletes with a less atopic phenotype and lower percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%FEV1) values, despite less symptomatic state. Cluster 3 (24%) comprised athletes with a strong atopic phenotype such as high eosinophil count in the blood and total serum immunoglobulin E level. After treatment with ICS or ICS plus long-acting β-adrenergic receptor agonist for 6–12 months, %FEV1 values were significantly improved in Cluster 2 athletes, whereas Cluster 3 athletes had a significant decrease in the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide compared to pretreatment values. Conclusions These data suggest three clusters exist in Japanese athlete population with asthma. Between the clusters, the characteristics differed with regard to symptoms, atopic features, and lower %FEV1 values. The pathogeneses between clusters may vary depending on the inflammation type and airway hyperresponsiveness.

      PubDate: 2017-03-15T09:18:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.009
       
  • Japanese guidelines for food allergy 2017

    • Authors: Motohiro Ebisawa; Komei Ito; Takao Fujisawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Motohiro Ebisawa, Komei Ito, Takao Fujisawa
      Five years have passed since the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for Food Allergy (JPGFA) was first revised in 2011 from its original version. As many scientific papers related to food allergy have been published during the last 5 years, the second major revision of the JPGFA was carried out in 2016. In this guideline, food allergies are generally classified into four clinical types: (1) neonatal and infantile gastrointestinal allergy, (2) infantile atopic dermatitis associated with food allergy, (3) immediate-type of food allergy (urticaria, anaphylaxis, etc.), and (4) special forms of immediate-type of food allergy such as food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis and oral allergy syndrome (OAS). Much of this guideline covers the immediate-type of food allergy that is seen during childhood to adolescence. Infantile atopic dermatitis associated with food allergy type is especially important as the onset of most food allergies occurs during infancy. We have discussed the neonatal and infantile gastrointestinal allergy and special forms of immediate type food allergy types separately. Diagnostic procedures are highlighted, such as probability curves and component-resolved diagnosis, including the recent advancement utilizing antigen-specific IgE. The oral food challenge using a stepwise approach is recommended to avoid complete elimination of causative foods. Although oral immunotherapy (OIT) has not been approved as a routine treatment by nationwide insurance, we included a chapter for OIT, focusing on efficacy and problems. Prevention of food allergy is currently the focus of interest, and many changes were made based on recent evidence. Finally, the contraindication between adrenaline and antipsychotic drugs in Japan was discussed among related medical societies, and we reached an agreement that the use of adrenaline can be allowed based on the physician's discretion. In conclusion, this guideline encourages physicians to follow the principle to let patients consume causative foods in any way and as early as possible.

      PubDate: 2017-03-15T09:18:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.001
       
  • Epidemiology of drug-induced anaphylaxis in a tertiary hospital in Korea

    • Authors: Han-Ki Park; Min-Gyu Kang; Min-Suk Yang; Jae-Woo Jung; Sang-Heon Cho; Hye-Ryun Kang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Han-Ki Park, Min-Gyu Kang, Min-Suk Yang, Jae-Woo Jung, Sang-Heon Cho, Hye-Ryun Kang
      Background Epidemiology and risk factors of drug-induced anaphylaxis are difficult to estimate due to lack of confirmative diagnosis and under reporting. Here we report the current state of drug-induced anaphylaxis in Korea based on an in-hospital pharmacovigilance database in a tertiary hospital. Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of drug-induced anaphylaxis, reported to an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center in Seoul National University Hospital from June 2009 to May 2013. Anaphylaxis occurred in patients under 18 years of age or developed by medications administered from outside pharmacies or hospitals were excluded. We assessed causative drug, incidence per use of each drug and risk factors of fatal anaphylactic shock. Results A total of 152 in-hospital drug-induced anaphylaxis cases were reported during the study period. The single most frequently reported drug was platinum compound and the incidence of anaphylaxis and anaphylactic shock in platinum compounds users was 2.84 and 1.39 per 1000 patients use. Risk factors of anaphylactic shock among total anaphylaxis cases were identified as older age ≥70 years [Odd's ratio (OR), 5.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.70–20.14]. The use of iodinated contrast media (OR, 6.19; 95% CI, 1.87–20.53) and aminosteroid neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) (OR, 12.82; 95% CI, 1.50–109.92) were also a risk factor for the development of anaphylactic shock. Conclusions Platinum compounds are the most commonly reported causative agents of in-hospital drug-induced anaphylaxis. Older age ≥70 years and drugs such as iodinated contrast media and aminosteroid NMBA are related with high risk of anaphylactic shock.

      PubDate: 2017-03-15T09:18:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.008
       
  • Utility of serum YKL-40 levels for identification of patients with asthma
           and COPD

    • Authors: Yasuhiro Gon; Shuichiro Maruoka; Reiko Ito; Kenji Mizumura; Yutaka Kozu; Hisato Hiranuma; Tomohiro Hattori; Mai Takahashi; Mari Hikichi; Shu Hashimoto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Yasuhiro Gon, Shuichiro Maruoka, Reiko Ito, Kenji Mizumura, Yutaka Kozu, Hisato Hiranuma, Tomohiro Hattori, Mai Takahashi, Mari Hikichi, Shu Hashimoto


      PubDate: 2017-03-15T09:18:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.010
       
  • Probability curves for predicting symptom severity during an oral food
           challenge with wheat

    • Authors: Naomi Kamioka; Takayasu Nomura; Taisuke Kato; Mizuki Yoneyama; Takehiro Sobajima; Hisashi Tanida; Takehiro Morishita; Shiro Sugiura; Yuichiro Suda; Yasutaka Hirabayashi; Chieko Misawa; Hidenori Tanaka; Mihoko Mizuno; Akihiko Terada; Yasushi Kanda; Shinji Saitoh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Naomi Kamioka, Takayasu Nomura, Taisuke Kato, Mizuki Yoneyama, Takehiro Sobajima, Hisashi Tanida, Takehiro Morishita, Shiro Sugiura, Yuichiro Suda, Yasutaka Hirabayashi, Chieko Misawa, Hidenori Tanaka, Mihoko Mizuno, Akihiko Terada, Yasushi Kanda, Shinji Saitoh


      PubDate: 2017-03-09T09:13:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.011
       
  • Eosinophilic gastroenteritis caused by eating hens' eggs: A case report

    • Authors: Yoshitoki Yanagimoto; Shoichiro Taniuchi; Yuko Ishizaki; Keiji Nakano; Naoki Hosaka; Kazunari Kaneko
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Yoshitoki Yanagimoto, Shoichiro Taniuchi, Yuko Ishizaki, Keiji Nakano, Naoki Hosaka, Kazunari Kaneko


      PubDate: 2017-03-09T09:13:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.007
       
  • Clock-dependent temporal regulation of IL-33/ST2-mediated mast
           cell response

    • Authors: Takahiro Kawauchi; Kayoko Ishimaru; Yuki Nakamura; Nobuhiro Nakano; Mutsuko Hara; Hideoki Ogawa; Ko Okumura; Shigenobu Shibata; Atsuhito Nakao
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Takahiro Kawauchi, Kayoko Ishimaru, Yuki Nakamura, Nobuhiro Nakano, Mutsuko Hara, Hideoki Ogawa, Ko Okumura, Shigenobu Shibata, Atsuhito Nakao
      Background Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an alarmin cytokine that binds to the interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 protein ST2. Clock is a key circadian gene that is essential for endogenous clockworks in mammals. This study investigated whether Clock temporally regulated IL-33-mediated responses in mast cells. Methods The kinetics of IL-33-mediated IL-6, IL-13, and TNF-α productions were compared between bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) from wild-type and Clock-mutated mice (Clock Δ19/Δ19 mice). The kinetics of the neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity or expression of IL-13 and Gob-5 in the lung in response to IL-33 were compared between wild-type and Clock Δ19/Δ19 mice. We also examined the kinetics of ST2 expression in mast cells and its association with Clock expression. Results There was a time-of-day-dependent variation in IL-33-mediated IL-6, IL-13, and TNF-α production in wild-type BMMCs, which was absent in Clock-mutated BMMCs. IL-33-induced neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity also showed a time-of-day-dependent variation in wild-type mice, which was absent in Clock Δ19/Δ19 mice. Furthermore, IL-33-induced IL-13 and Gob-5 expression in the lung exhibited a time-of-day-dependent variation in wild-type mice. These temporal variations in IL-33-mediated mast cell responses were associated with temporal variations of ST2 expression in mast cells. In addition, CLOCK bound to the promoter region of ST2 and Clock deletion resulted in down-regulation of ST2 expression in mast cells. Conclusions CLOCK temporally gates mast cell responses to IL-33 via regulation of ST2 expression. Our findings provide novel insights into IL-33/mast cell-associated physiology and pathologies.

      PubDate: 2017-03-03T09:08:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.004
       
  • Nonepisodic angioedema with eosinophilia: A case series from Thailand

    • Authors: Thatchai Kampitak
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Thatchai Kampitak


      PubDate: 2017-03-03T09:08:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.005
       
  • Utility of serum periostin in combination with exhaled nitric oxide in the
           management of asthma

    • Authors: Tadao Nagasaki; Hisako Matsumoto; Kenji Izuhara; Yoshihiro Kanemitsu; Yuji Tohda; Takahiko Horiguchi; Hideo Kita; Keisuke Tomii; Masaki Fujimura; Akihito Yokoyama; Yasutaka Nakano; Soichiro Hozawa; Isao Ito; Tsuyoshi Oguma; Yumi Izuhara; Tomoko Tajiri; Toshiyuki Iwata; Tetsuji Yokoyama; Akio Niimi; Michiaki Mishima
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Tadao Nagasaki, Hisako Matsumoto, Kenji Izuhara
      Type-2/eosinophilic inflammation plays a pivotal role in asthma. The identification of severe type-2/eosinophilic asthma is important for improving the management of patients with asthma. Therefore, efforts to develop non-invasive biomarkers for type-2/eosinophilic airway inflammation have been made during this decade. Currently, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and serum periostin levels are considered markers of type-2/eosinophilic inflammation in asthma. However, a single-marker approach has limited the ability to diagnose severe type-2/eosinophilic asthma accurately and predict disease outcomes precisely. The present article reviews the utility of FeNO and serum periostin levels in a single-marker approach and in a multiple-marker approach in identifying patients with severe type-2/eosinophilic asthma. Furthermore, based on a sub-analysis of the Kinki Hokuriku Airway disease Conference (KiHAC), geno-endo-phenotypes of patients were stratified into four groups according to the FeNO and serum periostin levels.

      PubDate: 2017-03-03T09:08:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.003
       
  • Two cases of autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with rheumatoid
           arthritis

    • Authors: Satoru Ito; Keiko Wakahara; Toshihisa Kojima; Nobunori Takahashi; Kimitoshi Nishiwaki; Etsuro Yamaguchi; Yoshinori Hasegawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Satoru Ito, Keiko Wakahara, Toshihisa Kojima, Nobunori Takahashi, Kimitoshi Nishiwaki, Etsuro Yamaguchi, Yoshinori Hasegawa


      PubDate: 2017-03-03T09:08:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.002
       
  • A successful case of egg allergy tolerance achieved at a local clinic

    • Authors: Yuki Okada; Akira Akasawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Yuki Okada, Akira Akasawa


      PubDate: 2017-02-24T08:57:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.01.002
       
  • Corticosteroid use in urticaria multiforme cases

    • Authors: Nazli Ercan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Nazli Ercan


      PubDate: 2017-02-24T08:57:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.11.008
       
  • Human eosinophils constitutively express a unique serine protease, PRSS33

    • Authors: Sumika Toyama; Naoko Okada; Akio Matsuda; Hideaki Morita; Hirohisa Saito; Takao Fujisawa; Susumu Nakae; Hajime Karasuyama; Kenji Matsumoto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Sumika Toyama, Naoko Okada, Akio Matsuda, Hideaki Morita, Hirohisa Saito, Takao Fujisawa, Susumu Nakae, Hajime Karasuyama, Kenji Matsumoto
      Background Eosinophils play important roles in asthma, especially airway remodeling, by producing various granule proteins, chemical mediators, cytokines, chemokines and proteases. However, protease production by eosinophils is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the production of eosinophil-specific proteases/proteinases by transcriptome analysis. Methods Human eosinophils and other cells were purified from peripheral blood by density gradient sedimentation and negative/positive selections using immunomagnetic beads. Protease/proteinase expression in eosinophils and release into the supernatant were evaluated by microarray analysis, qPCR, ELISA, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining before and after stimulation with eosinophil-activating cytokines and secretagogues. mRNAs for extracellular matrix proteins in human normal fibroblasts were measured by qPCR after exposure to recombinant protease serine 33 (PRSS33) protein (rPRSS33), created with a baculovirus system. Results Human eosinophils expressed relatively high levels of mRNA for metalloproteinase 25 (MMP25), a disintegrin and metalloprotease 8 (ADAM8), ADAM10, ADAM19 and PRSS33. Expression of PRSS33 was the highest and eosinophil-specific. PRSS33 mRNA expression was not affected by eosinophil-activating cytokines. Immunofluorescence staining showed that PRSS33 was co-localized with an eosinophil granule protein. PRSS33 was not detected in the culture supernatant of eosinophils even after stimulation with secretagogues, but its cell surface expression was increased. rPRSS33 stimulation of human fibroblasts increased expression of collagen and fibronectin mRNAs, at least in part via protease-activated receptor-2 activation. Conclusions Activated eosinophils may induce fibroblast extracellular matrix protein synthesis via cell surface expression of PRSS33, which would at least partly explain eosinophils' role(s) in airway remodeling.

      PubDate: 2017-02-24T08:57:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.01.001
       
  • Japanese guidelines for occupational allergic diseases 2017

    • Authors: Kunio Dobashi; Kazuo Akiyama; Atsushi Usami; Hiroo Yokozeki; Zenro Ikezawa; Naomi Tsurikisawa; Yoichi Nakamura; Kazuhiro Sato; Jiro Okumura; Kaoru Takayama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Kunio Dobashi, Kazuo Akiyama, Atsushi Usami, Hiroo Yokozeki, Zenro Ikezawa, Naomi Tsurikisawa, Yoichi Nakamura, Kazuhiro Sato, Jiro Okumura, Kaoru Takayama
      In 2013, a guideline for occupational allergic diseases was published for the first time in Japan. Occupational allergic diseases are likely to worsen or become intractable as a result of continuous exposure to high concentrations of causative antigens, and are socioeconomically important diseases with which the patients might sometimes lose jobs due to work interruptions. Guidelines for occupational allergic diseases have been published in many countries. This guideline consists of six chapters about occupational asthma, occupational allergic rhinitis, occupational skin diseases, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and occupational anaphylaxis shock, and legal aspects of these diseases. The guideline is characterized with the following basic structure: Clinical Questions (CQs) are set with reference to Minds (Medical Information Network Distribution Service), statements by the committee are correspondingly listed, recommended grades and evidence levels are defined, and then descriptions and references are indicated.

      PubDate: 2017-02-16T07:45:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.010
       
  • Japanese guidelines for allergic rhinitis 2017

    • Authors: Kimihiro Okubo; Yuichi Kurono; Keiichi Ichimura; Tadao Enomoto; Yoshitaka Okamoto; Hideyuki Kawauchi; Harumi Suzaki; Shigeharu Fujieda; Keisuke Masuyama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Kimihiro Okubo, Yuichi Kurono, Keiichi Ichimura, Tadao Enomoto, Yoshitaka Okamoto, Hideyuki Kawauchi, Harumi Suzaki, Shigeharu Fujieda, Keisuke Masuyama
      Like asthma and atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis is an allergic disease, but of the three, it is the only type I allergic disease. Allergic rhinitis includes pollinosis, which is intractable and reduces quality of life (QOL) when it becomes severe. A guideline is needed to understand allergic rhinitis and to use this knowledge to develop a treatment plan. In Japan, the first guideline was prepared after a symposium held by the Japanese Society of Allergology in 1993. The current 8th edition was published in 2016, and is widely used today. To incorporate evidence based medicine (EBM) introduced from abroad, the most recent collection of evidence/literature was supplemented to the Practical Guideline for the Management of Allergic Rhinitis in Japan 2016. The revised guideline includes assessment of diagnosis/treatment and prescriptions for children and pregnant women, for broad clinical applications. An evidence-based step-by-step strategy for treatment is also described. In addition, the QOL concept and cost benefit analyses are also addressed. Along with Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact of Asthma (ARIA), this guideline is widely used for various clinical purposes, such as measures for patients with sinusitis, childhood allergic rhinitis, oral allergy syndrome, and anaphylaxis and for pregnant women. A Q&A section regarding allergic rhinitis in Japan was added to the end of this guideline.

      PubDate: 2017-02-16T07:45:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.11.001
       
  • Japanese guidelines for adult asthma 2017

    • Authors: Masakazu Ichinose; Hisatoshi Sugiura; Hiroyuki Nagase; Masao Yamaguchi; Hiromasa Inoue; Hironori Sagara; Jun Tamaoki; Yuji Tohda; Mitsuru Munakata; Kohei Yamauchi; Ken Ohta
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Masakazu Ichinose, Hisatoshi Sugiura, Hiroyuki Nagase, Masao Yamaguchi, Hiromasa Inoue, Hironori Sagara, Jun Tamaoki, Yuji Tohda, Mitsuru Munakata, Kohei Yamauchi, Ken Ohta
      Adult bronchial asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, and presents clinically with variable airway narrowing (wheezes and dyspnea) and cough. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling, leading to intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased; however, the number of patients who die of asthma has decreased (1.2 per 100,000 patients in 2015). The goal of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to attain normal pulmonary function and lead a normal life, without any symptoms. A good relationship between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management by therapeutic agents and elimination of the causes and risk factors of asthma are fundamental to its treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate between mild and intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid, varying from low to high levels. Long-acting β2-agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, sustained-release theophylline, and long-acting muscarinic antagonist are recommended as add-on drugs, while anti-immunoglobulin E antibody and oral steroids are considered for the most severe and persistent asthma related to allergic reactions. Bronchial thermoplasty has recently been developed for severe, persistent asthma, but its long-term efficacy is not known. Inhaled β2-agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, and other approaches are used as needed during acute exacerbations, by choosing treatment steps for asthma in accordance with the severity of exacerbations. Allergic rhinitis, eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis, eosinophilic otitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aspirin-induced asthma, and pregnancy are also important issues that need to be considered in asthma therapy.

      PubDate: 2017-02-16T07:45:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.005
       
  • Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017

    • Authors: Ichiro Katayama; Michiko Aihara; Yukihiro Ohya; Hidehisa Saeki; Naoki Shimojo; Shunsuke Shoji; Masami Taniguchi; Hidekazu Yamada
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Ichiro Katayama, Michiko Aihara, Yukihiro Ohya, Hidehisa Saeki, Naoki Shimojo, Shunsuke Shoji, Masami Taniguchi, Hidekazu Yamada
      Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and countermeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the “Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008” prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the “Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015)” prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the “Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016” together with those for other allergic diseases.

      PubDate: 2017-02-11T06:57:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.003
       
  • Japanese guidelines for allergic conjunctival diseases 2017

    • Authors: Etsuko Takamura; Eiichi Uchio; Nobuyuki Ebihara; Shigeaki Ohno; Yuichi Ohashi; Shigeki Okamoto; Naoki Kumagai; Yoshiyuki Satake; Jun Shoji; Yayoi Nakagawa; Kenichi Namba; Kazumi Fukagawa; Atsuki Fukushima; Hiroshi Fujishima
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Etsuko Takamura, Eiichi Uchio, Nobuyuki Ebihara, Shigeaki Ohno, Yuichi Ohashi, Shigeki Okamoto, Naoki Kumagai, Yoshiyuki Satake, Jun Shoji, Yayoi Nakagawa, Kenichi Namba, Kazumi Fukagawa, Atsuki Fukushima, Hiroshi Fujishima
      The definition, classification, pathogenesis, test methods, clinical findings, criteria for diagnosis, and therapies of allergic conjunctival disease are summarized based on the Guidelines for Clinical Management of Allergic Conjunctival Disease (Second Edition) revised in 2010. Allergic conjunctival disease is defined as “a conjunctival inflammatory disease associated with a Type I allergy accompanied by some subjective or objective symptoms.” Allergic conjunctival disease is classified into allergic conjunctivitis, atopic keratoconjunctivitis, vernal keratoconjunctivitis, and giant papillary conjunctivitis. Representative subjective symptoms include ocular itching, hyperemia, and lacrimation, whereas objective symptoms include conjunctival hyperemia, swelling, folliculosis, and papillae. Patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis, which is characterized by conjunctival proliferative changes called giant papilla accompanied by varying extents of corneal lesion, such as corneal erosion and shield ulcer, complain of foreign body sensation, ocular pain, and photophobia. In the diagnosis of allergic conjunctival diseases, it is required that type I allergic diathesis is present, along with subjective and objective symptoms accompanying allergic inflammation. The diagnosis is ensured by proving a type I allergic reaction in the conjunctiva. Given that the first-line drug for the treatment of allergic conjunctival disease is an antiallergic eye drop, a steroid eye drop will be selected in accordance with the severity. In the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis, an immunosuppressive eye drop will be concomitantly used with the abovementioned drugs.

      PubDate: 2017-02-11T06:57:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.004
       
  • Japanese guidelines for childhood asthma 2017

    • Authors: Hirokazu Arakawa; Yuhei Hamasaki; Yoichi Kohno; Motohiro Ebisawa; Naomi Kondo; Sankei Nishima; Toshiyuki Nishimuta; Akihiro Morikawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Hirokazu Arakawa, Yuhei Hamasaki, Yoichi Kohno, Motohiro Ebisawa, Naomi Kondo, Sankei Nishima, Toshiyuki Nishimuta, Akihiro Morikawa
      The Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Diseases 2017 (JAGL 2017) includes a minor revision of the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Asthma 2012 (JPGL 2012) by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The section on child asthma in JAGL 2017 provides information on how to diagnose asthma between infancy and adolescence (0–15 years of age). It makes recommendations for best practices in the management of childhood asthma, including management of acute exacerbations and non-pharmacological and pharmacological management. This guideline will be of interest to non-specialist physicians involved in the care of children with asthma. JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline in that JAGL emphasizes diagnosis and early intervention of children with asthma at <2 years or 2–5 years of age. The first choice of treatment depends on the severity and frequency of symptoms. Pharmacological management, including step-up or step-down of drugs used for long-term management based on the status of asthma control levels, is easy to understand; thus, this guideline is suitable for the routine medical care of children with asthma. JAGL also recommends using a control test in children, so that the physician aims for complete control by avoiding exacerbating factors and appropriately using anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists).

      PubDate: 2017-01-22T12:19:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.11.003
       
  • A case of cholinergic urticaria with localized hypohidrosis showing sweat
           gland eosinophilic infiltration

    • Authors: Aya Iwasaki; Tomonobu Ito; Hiroshi Kawakami; Kaoru Nishiwaki; Takafumi Numata; Masuyoshi Saito; Ryoji Tsuboi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Aya Iwasaki, Tomonobu Ito, Hiroshi Kawakami, Kaoru Nishiwaki, Takafumi Numata, Masuyoshi Saito, Ryoji Tsuboi


      PubDate: 2017-01-22T12:19:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.11.007
       
  • Use of 3D-CT airway analysis software to assess a patient with severe
           persistent bronchial asthma treated with bronchial thermoplasty

    • Authors: Satoru Ishii; Motoyasu Iikura; Masayuki Hojo; Haruhito Sugiyama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Satoru Ishii, Motoyasu Iikura, Masayuki Hojo, Haruhito Sugiyama


      PubDate: 2017-01-22T12:19:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.008
       
  • Leukocytoclastic vasculitis with eosinophilic infiltration associated with
           thalidomide therapy for multiple myeloma: A case report

    • Authors: Susumu Ichiyama; Yoko Funasaka; Hiroko Yamashita; Hideto Tamura; Koiti Inokuchi; Hidehisa Saeki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Susumu Ichiyama, Yoko Funasaka, Hiroko Yamashita, Hideto Tamura, Koiti Inokuchi, Hidehisa Saeki


      PubDate: 2017-01-22T12:19:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.006
       
 
 
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