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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3049 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3089 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 86, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 363, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 228, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
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Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
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Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
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Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 132, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
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Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
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Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
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Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
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Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 360, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
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Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 330, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 417, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
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Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  

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Journal Cover Allergology International
  [SJR: 0.776]   [H-I: 35]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1323-8930 - ISSN (Online) 1440-1592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3049 journals]
  • Old friends, microbes, and allergic diseases

    • Authors: Naoki Shimojo; Kenji Izuhara
      Pages: 513 - 514
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Naoki Shimojo, Kenji Izuhara


      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.009
       
  • Effectiveness of training patients using DVD in the accurate use
           of inhalers for the treatment of bronchial asthma

    • Authors: Koichiro Takita; Rieko Kondo; Takahiko Horiguchi
      Pages: 545 - 549
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Koichiro Takita, Rieko Kondo, Takahiko Horiguchi
      Background Inhalants are the standard treatment for patients with bronchial asthma. Inaccurate inhaler use leads to inadequate therapeutic effects and unnecessary dosage increases. However, it is a challenge for practitioners to master the various devices available and train patients on the accurate use of inhalers. Thus, establishing a system to instruct patients on how to accurately use inhalers is essential. We prepared a DVD and accompanying user manual explaining the operation of each inhaler device used in Japan. This pilot study aimed to examine the efficacy of these materials. Methods The subjects were 33 outpatients with bronchial asthma who received treatment in our facility for asthma and had already received conventional inhalant training. The oral medication and inhalants used by the patients were not changed. The patients were randomly assigned to a DVD viewing group or non-viewing group; various parameters were comparatively examined after 4 weeks. Results Significant improvements in Asthma Control Test scores, inhalation technique, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, impulse oscillometry resonant frequency, and induced sputum eosinophil count were observed in the DVD viewing group at 4 weeks post training. Conclusions Pulmonary function and inflammatory parameters improved significantly in the DVD viewing group. These findings suggest that unnecessary step-up of asthma treatment can be avoided, leading to treatment cost reduction. Training patients with asthma in accurate inhaler use improves quality of life and therefore has great clinical significance. Hence, this method should be used more extensively in Japan and worldwide.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.006
       
  • Phenotypic analysis of asthma in Japanese athletes

    • Authors: Keisuke Tsukioka; Toshiyuki Koya; Hiroshi Ueno; Masachika Hayashi; Takuro Sakagami; Takashi Hasegawa; Masaaki Arakawa; Eiichi Suzuki; Toshiaki Kikuchi
      Pages: 550 - 556
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Keisuke Tsukioka, Toshiyuki Koya, Hiroshi Ueno, Masachika Hayashi, Takuro Sakagami, Takashi Hasegawa, Masaaki Arakawa, Eiichi Suzuki, Toshiaki Kikuchi
      Background Asthma in athlete populations such as Olympic athletes has various pathogeneses. However, few reports are available on the features of asthma in the athlete population in clinical practice. In this study, we focused on classifying asthma in Japanese athlete population. Methods We performed a cluster analysis of data from pulmonary function tests and clinical biomarkers before administering inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) therapy in athlete population of individuals diagnosed with asthma (n = 104; male, 76.9%; median age, 16.0 years), based on respiratory symptoms and positive data on methacholine provocation tests. We also compared backgrounds, sports types, and treatments between clusters. Results Three clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (32%) comprised athletes with a less atopic phenotype and normal pulmonary function. Cluster 2 (44%) comprised athletes with a less atopic phenotype and lower percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%FEV1) values, despite less symptomatic state. Cluster 3 (24%) comprised athletes with a strong atopic phenotype such as high eosinophil count in the blood and total serum immunoglobulin E level. After treatment with ICS or ICS plus long-acting β-adrenergic receptor agonist for 6–12 months, %FEV1 values were significantly improved in Cluster 2 athletes, whereas Cluster 3 athletes had a significant decrease in the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide compared to pretreatment values. Conclusions These data suggest three clusters exist in Japanese athlete population with asthma. Between the clusters, the characteristics differed with regard to symptoms, atopic features, and lower %FEV1 values. The pathogeneses between clusters may vary depending on the inflammation type and airway hyperresponsiveness.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.009
       
  • Epidemiology of drug-induced anaphylaxis in a tertiary hospital in Korea

    • Authors: Han-Ki Park; Min-Gyu Kang; Min-Suk Yang; Jae-Woo Jung; Sang-Heon Cho; Hye-Ryun Kang
      Pages: 557 - 562
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Han-Ki Park, Min-Gyu Kang, Min-Suk Yang, Jae-Woo Jung, Sang-Heon Cho, Hye-Ryun Kang
      Background Epidemiology and risk factors of drug-induced anaphylaxis are difficult to estimate due to lack of confirmative diagnosis and under reporting. Here we report the current state of drug-induced anaphylaxis in Korea based on an in-hospital pharmacovigilance database in a tertiary hospital. Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of drug-induced anaphylaxis, reported to an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center in Seoul National University Hospital from June 2009 to May 2013. Anaphylaxis occurred in patients under 18 years of age or developed by medications administered from outside pharmacies or hospitals were excluded. We assessed causative drug, incidence per use of each drug and risk factors of fatal anaphylactic shock. Results A total of 152 in-hospital drug-induced anaphylaxis cases were reported during the study period. The single most frequently reported drug was platinum compound and the incidence of anaphylaxis and anaphylactic shock in platinum compounds users was 2.84 and 1.39 per 1000 patients use. Risk factors of anaphylactic shock among total anaphylaxis cases were identified as older age ≥70 years [Odd's ratio (OR), 5.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.70–20.14]. The use of iodinated contrast media (OR, 6.19; 95% CI, 1.87–20.53) and aminosteroid neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) (OR, 12.82; 95% CI, 1.50–109.92) were also a risk factor for the development of anaphylactic shock. Conclusions Platinum compounds are the most commonly reported causative agents of in-hospital drug-induced anaphylaxis. Older age ≥70 years and drugs such as iodinated contrast media and aminosteroid NMBA are related with high risk of anaphylactic shock.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.008
       
  • Genetic association of the functional CDHR3 genotype with early-onset
           adult asthma in Japanese populations

    • Authors: Jun Kanazawa; Hironori Masuko; Yohei Yatagai; Tohru Sakamoto; Hideyasu Yamada; Yoshiko Kaneko; Haruna Kitazawa; Hiroaki Iijima; Takashi Naito; Takefumi Saito; Emiko Noguchi; Satoshi Konno; Masaharu Nishimura; Tomomitsu Hirota; Mayumi Tamari; Nobuyuki Hizawa
      Pages: 563 - 567
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Jun Kanazawa, Hironori Masuko, Yohei Yatagai, Tohru Sakamoto, Hideyasu Yamada, Yoshiko Kaneko, Haruna Kitazawa, Hiroaki Iijima, Takashi Naito, Takefumi Saito, Emiko Noguchi, Satoshi Konno, Masaharu Nishimura, Tomomitsu Hirota, Mayumi Tamari, Nobuyuki Hizawa
      Background Recent studies have demonstrated that a coding SNP (rs6967330, Cys529→Tyr) in cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3), which was previously associated with wheezing illness and hospitalizations in infancy, could support efficient human rhinovirus C (RV-C) entry and replication. Here, we sought to examine the genetic contribution of this variant to the development of adult asthma. Methods We performed a candidate gene case–control association study of 2 independent Japanese populations (a total of 3366 adults). The odds ratios (ORs) for association of the A allele at rs6967330 with adult asthma were calculated according to age at onset of asthma. In addition, the effect of the CDHR3 genotype on the development of specific asthma phenotypes was examined. Results The A allele was associated with asthma (OR = 1.56; Mantel–Haenszel p = 0.0040) when the analysis was limited to patients with early-onset adult asthma. In addition, when the analysis was limited to atopic individuals, a stronger association of the CDHR3 variant with early-onset asthma was found, and interaction of the CDHR3 genotype with atopy was demonstrated. Finally, a significant association of this variant was specifically found with a phenotype of asthma characterized by atopy, early-onset, and lower lung function. Conclusions Our study supports the concept that the CDHR3 variant is an important susceptibility factor for severe adult asthma in individuals who develop the disease in early life. The interaction between the CDHR3 variant and atopy indicates that genetic predisposition to early respiratory viral infection is combined with atopy in promoting asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.012
       
  • Predicting future risk of exacerbations in Japanese patients with adult
           asthma: A prospective 1-year follow up study

    • Authors: Akihiko Tanaka; Tomoki Uno; Haruna Sato; Megumi Jinno; Kuniaki Hirai; Yoshito Miyata; Munehiro Yamaguchi; Shin Ohta; Tetsuya Homma; Mayumi Yamamoto; Shintaro Suzuki; Takuya Yokoe; Hironori Sagara
      Pages: 568 - 573
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Akihiko Tanaka, Tomoki Uno, Haruna Sato, Megumi Jinno, Kuniaki Hirai, Yoshito Miyata, Munehiro Yamaguchi, Shin Ohta, Tetsuya Homma, Mayumi Yamamoto, Shintaro Suzuki, Takuya Yokoe, Hironori Sagara
      Background To avoid future risk is a definitive goal of long-term asthma management. Exacerbations are considered to be the most relevant future risk in real life asthma management. Few comparative studies have evaluated the risk factors associated with exacerbations in Japanese patients with asthma. Methods We performed the prospective 1-year follow up study in Japanese patients with adult asthma. A total of 189 patients with asthma were enrolled and followed up for 1 year. Finally, 181 patients completed the study protocol. Results Of 181 patients, 43 patients (23.8%) had exacerbations during the follow-up period. Among the 45 patients who had exacerbations during the preceding year, 32 patients (71.1%) had exacerbations. Prevalence of patients with previous exacerbations and those with previous admissions were significantly higher in patients with exacerbations than those with no exacerbation. Logistic regression analysis also identified a significant association between exacerbations during the follow-up period and exacerbations during the preceding year, admissions during the preceding 3 years, ACT score below 20, low %FVC (<80%), or low FEV1 (<70%), respectively. Of the 55 patients with severe asthma, 29 patients (52.7%) had exacerbations. Among the 36 patients with severe asthma with previous exacerbations, 26 patients (72.2%) had exacerbations. The history of exacerbations during the preceding year was associated with a significantly increased risk of exacerbations both among the patients with severe asthma and those with non-severe asthma. Conclusions This study implicated that exacerbations during the preceding year reliably predict future risk of exacerbations in Japanese patients with asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.013
       
  • UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling regulates IgE-dependent degranulation in human
           basophils

    • Authors: Manabu Nakano; Koichi Ito; Takeo Yuno; Nobuyuki Soma; Syun Aburakawa; Kosuke Kasai; Toshiya Nakamura; Hideki Takami
      Pages: 574 - 580
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Manabu Nakano, Koichi Ito, Takeo Yuno, Nobuyuki Soma, Syun Aburakawa, Kosuke Kasai, Toshiya Nakamura, Hideki Takami
      Background P2Y purinergic receptors (P2YR) are G protein-coupled receptors that are stimulated by extracellular nucleotides. They mediate cellular effects by regulating cAMP production, protein kinase C activation, inositol trisphosphate generation, and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The P2Y6 receptor of this family is selectively stimulated by UDP, and selectively inhibited by MRS2578. In the present study, we examined the effect of UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling on IgE-dependent degranulation in human basophils. Methods Basophils were purified from human peripheral blood. The mRNA expression of genes encoding P2YR and ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (ENTPDase) was measured by RT-PCR. Intracellular Ca2+ influx via UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling in basophils was detected using a calcium probe. The effect of UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling on IgE-dependent degranulation in basophils was confirmed by measuring CD63 expression by flow cytometry. Autocrine secretion of nucleotides was detected by HPLC analysis. Results We showed that purified basophils express P2Y6 mRNA and that UDP increased intracellular Ca2+, which was reduced by MRS2578 treatment. UDP promoted IgE-dependent degranulation. Furthermore, MRS2578 inhibited IgE-dependent degranulation in basophils. HPLC analysis indicated that basophils spontaneously secrete UTP. In addition, basophils expressed the extracellular nucleotide hydrolases ENTPDase2, ENTPDase3, and ENTPDase8. Conclusions This study showed that UDP/P2Y6 receptor signaling is involved in the regulation of IgE-dependent degranulation in basophils, which might stimulate the P2Y6 receptor via the autocrine secretion of UTP. Thus, this receptor represents a potential target to regulate IgE-dependent degranulation in basophils during allergic diseases.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.014
       
  • Histamine H1 and H4 receptor expression on the ocular surface of patients
           with chronic allergic conjunctival diseases

    • Authors: Noriko Inada; Jun Shoji; Yukiko Shiraki; Hiroshi Aso; Satoru Yamagami
      Pages: 586 - 593
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Noriko Inada, Jun Shoji, Yukiko Shiraki, Hiroshi Aso, Satoru Yamagami
      Background This study investigated the histamine H1 and H4 receptors mRNA (H1R and H4R, respectively) expression on the ocular surface of patients with chronic forms of allergic conjunctival diseases to determine whether they can serve as biomarkers for allergic inflammation in the conjunctiva. Methods We examined 19 patients with vernal or atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC/VKC group) and 15 healthy volunteers (control group). The AKC/VKC group was divided into active and stable stage subgroups. Specimens were obtained from the upper tarsal conjunctiva of each participant using a modified impression cytology method. H1R, H4R, and eotaxin-1, -2, and -3 mRNA (eotaxin-1, eotaxin-2, eotaxin-3, respectively) expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis for eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil major basic protein (MBP), eotaxin-2, and histamine H4 receptor (H4R) were performed using conjunctival smears. Results The number of H4R-positive patients was higher in the active than the stable stage subgroup and control group, whereas no difference was observed for H1R. H1R levels were higher in the active than in the stable stage subgroup, while those of H4R were higher in the active stage subgroup than in the control group. H1R and H4R levels were correlated with eotaxin-2 level. In immunohistochemical analysis, H4R revealed their expression on eosinophils in conjunctival smears of patients with AKC/VKC. Conclusions H4R is useful as biomarkers of allergic inflammation on ocular surfaces. Most notably, H4R expressed on eosinophils is useful as a biomarker of eosinophilic inflammation of the ocular surface.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.004
       
  • Nattokinase, profibrinolytic enzyme, effectively shrinks the nasal polyp
           tissue and decreases viscosity of mucus

    • Authors: Tetsuji Takabayashi; Yoshimasa Imoto; Masafumi Sakashita; Yukinori Kato; Takahiro Tokunaga; Kanako Yoshida; Norihiko Narita; Tamotsu Ishizuka; Shigeharu Fujieda
      Pages: 594 - 602
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Tetsuji Takabayashi, Yoshimasa Imoto, Masafumi Sakashita, Yukinori Kato, Takahiro Tokunaga, Kanako Yoshida, Norihiko Narita, Tamotsu Ishizuka, Shigeharu Fujieda
      Background Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is often comorbid with asthma and resistant to therapeutic interventions. We recently reported that excessive fibrin deposition caused by impairment of fibrinolysis might play pivotal role in forming nasal polyp. Nattokinase (NK), a serine protease produced by Bacillus subtilis, has been reported to be a strong fibrinolytic enzyme. NK could be a promising drug candidate for use in the treatment of both CRSwNP and asthma. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of NK on nasal polyp tissues from patients with CRSwNP. The nasal discharge from patients with CRSwNP and sputum from subjects with asthma were also used to investigate whether NK influences the viscosity of mucus. Methods To examine the effects on NK on nasal polyp tissues, pieces of nasal polyps were incubated either with saline or NK (10–1000 FU/ml) at 37 °C for 24 h. We assessed the presence of fibrin in nasal polyp tissue incubated with NK by means of immunohistochemistry. To examine the effects of NK on nasal discharge and sputum from patients with CRSwNP and asthma, respectively, were incubated with NK solution at 37 °C for 1 h. Results NK effectively shrinks the nasal polyp tissue through fibrin degradation. We also found that the viscosity of the nasal discharge and sputum from patients with CRSwNP and asthma, respectively, was significantly reduced by incubation with NK solution. Conclusions NK may be an effective alternative therapeutic option in patients with CRSwNP and comorbid asthma by causing fibrin degradation.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.007
       
  • Diminished capacity of opsonization and immune complex solubilization, and
           detection of anti-C1q antibodies in sera from patients with hereditary
           angioedema

    • Authors: Daisuke Honda; Isao Ohsawa; Nobuyuki Sato; Hiroyuki Inoshita; Satoshi Mano; Yasuhiko Tomino; Yusuke Suzuki
      Pages: 603 - 609
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Daisuke Honda, Isao Ohsawa, Nobuyuki Sato, Hiroyuki Inoshita, Satoshi Mano, Yasuhiko Tomino, Yusuke Suzuki
      Background Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by deficiency of C1 esterase inhibitor. Symptoms of HAE include edema, which can potentially cause suffocation. Some patients with HAE exhibit immunological abnormalities, which could prevent an accurate diagnosis. Low levels of complement components are characteristic of HAE and in other settings are thought to reduce elimination of apoptotic cells and immune complex (IC). Thus, we aimed to experimentally clarify the mechanism of immunological abnormalities using sera from HAE patients. Methods Serum samples from 18 patients with HAE were collected when free from angioedema attack and compared with normal human pooled sera (NHPS) from 20 healthy volunteers. Opsonization was measured as the rate of phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by macrophages differentiated from THP-1 cells incubated with serum. IC solubilization in serum was analyzed by quantifying peroxidase released from a synthetic IC composed of peroxidase and anti-peroxidase antibodies. Anti-C1q antibody levels were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Serological immunological abnormalities were detected in 12 patients. Opsonization in serum samples from each patient with HAE was lower than that in NHPS (∼20% versus 70%, respectively). The rate of IC solubilization was lower in serum from HAE patients than NHPS. Some patients had high serum anti-C1q antibody levels with increased serum IC levels. Conclusions Sera from patients with HAE exhibit anti-C1q antibodies, with a lower capacity for opsonization and IC solubilization. This may be associated with immunological abnormalities and should be investigated further to facilitate accurate diagnosis of HAE.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.008
       
  • The significant expression of TRPV3 in nasal polyps of eosinophilic
           chronic rhinosinusitis

    • Authors: Takahiro Tokunaga; Takahiro Ninomiya; Yukinori Kato; Yoshimasa Imoto; Masafumi Sakashita; Tetsuji Takabayashi; Emiko Noguchi; Shigeharu Fujieda
      Pages: 610 - 616
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Takahiro Tokunaga, Takahiro Ninomiya, Yukinori Kato, Yoshimasa Imoto, Masafumi Sakashita, Tetsuji Takabayashi, Emiko Noguchi, Shigeharu Fujieda
      Background The number of patients with eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (ECRS) has been increasing in recent years in Japan. In ECRS, nasal polyps recur immediately after endoscopic sinus surgery. The molecular biological mechanism underlying the refractoriness of ECRS is unclear. Methods Whole-transcriptome analysis with next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq) was conducted to investigate the molecular biological mechanism of ECRS. Real-time PCR, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the results of RNA-seq. Results RNA-seq analysis revealed that in the nasal polyps of ECRS, the levels of 3 transcripts were elevated significantly and those of 7 transcripts were diminished significantly. Among the genes encoding these transcripts, TRPV3 (transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 3) was identified as the only gene that is highly expressed in ECRS nasal polyps but this gene's expression was not previously detected using DNA microarray analysis in peripheral blood eosinophils. TRPV3 is newly identified here as a gene transcribed in ECRS. Our analysis also revealed that TRPV3 was highly expressed in the infiltrating eosinophils and mucosal epithelium of the nasal polyps of ECRS, and further that the more severe the refractoriness was after surgery, the higher the TRPV3 expression was in nasal polyps. Conclusions TRPV3 might play a role in the refractoriness of ECRS. Additional studies are required to evaluate the function of TRPV3 in ECRS.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.04.002
       
  • A retrospective study: Acute rheumatic fever and post-streptococcal
           reactive arthritis in Japan

    • Authors: Satoshi Sato; Yoji Uejima; Eisuke Suganuma; Tadamasa Takano; Yutaka Kawano
      Pages: 617 - 620
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Satoshi Sato, Yoji Uejima, Eisuke Suganuma, Tadamasa Takano, Yutaka Kawano
      Background Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) are immune-mediated consequences of group A streptococcal pharyngitis. ARF has declined in developed nations. No prevalence survey of PSRA has been conducted. This study evaluated the incidence and characteristics of ARF and PSRA in Japanese children. Methods From 2010 to 2015, ARF and PSRA were evaluated using clinical data retrospectively collected by chart review from 528 hospitals. Results From 323 hospitals (61% response rate), 44 cases of ARF and 21 cases of PSRA were reported. Patients with ARF and/or PSRA were mainly from large cities in Japan. The mean age of ARF occurrence was 8.5 years, and the ratio of female/male patients was 16:28. Major manifestations in the acute phase included carditis, 27 cases (61.4%); polyarthritis, 22 cases (50%); erythema marginatum, 7 cases (15.9%); Sydenham chorea, 3 cases (6.8%); and subcutaneous nodules, 1 case (2.3%). Twenty-one (58.3%) patients had migratory arthritis. During the follow-up period, 6 patients (13.6%) showed mild carditis. For PRSA, the mean age was 8.2 years, and the ratio of female/male patients was 12:9. Six (28.6%) patients had monoarthritis, and 4 (19%) patients had migratory arthritis. No patient had carditis. Conclusions Although ARF and PSRA are rare in the Japanese pediatric population, substantial numbers of patients with both conditions were identified in this study. We observed a high incidence of arthritis and carditis in ARF patients. No PSRA case was complicated with carditis. General pediatricians need to have updated information about ARF and PSRA, even in industrialized countries.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.04.001
       
  • Eosinophilic gastroenteritis caused by eating hens' eggs: A case report

    • Authors: Yoshitoki Yanagimoto; Shoichiro Taniuchi; Yuko Ishizaki; Keiji Nakano; Naoki Hosaka; Kazunari Kaneko
      Pages: 621 - 623
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Yoshitoki Yanagimoto, Shoichiro Taniuchi, Yuko Ishizaki, Keiji Nakano, Naoki Hosaka, Kazunari Kaneko


      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.007
       
  • Utility of serum YKL-40 levels for identification of patients with asthma
           and COPD

    • Authors: Yasuhiro Gon; Shuichiro Maruoka; Reiko Ito; Kenji Mizumura; Yutaka Kozu; Hisato Hiranuma; Tomohiro Hattori; Mai Takahashi; Mari Hikichi; Shu Hashimoto
      Pages: 624 - 626
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Yasuhiro Gon, Shuichiro Maruoka, Reiko Ito, Kenji Mizumura, Yutaka Kozu, Hisato Hiranuma, Tomohiro Hattori, Mai Takahashi, Mari Hikichi, Shu Hashimoto


      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.010
       
  • Probability curves for predicting symptom severity during an oral food
           challenge with wheat

    • Authors: Naomi Kamioka; Takayasu Nomura; Taisuke Kato; Mizuki Yoneyama; Takehiro Sobajima; Hisashi Tanida; Takehiro Morishita; Shiro Sugiura; Yuichiro Suda; Yasutaka Hirabayashi; Chieko Misawa; Hidenori Tanaka; Mihoko Mizuno; Akihiko Terada; Yasushi Kanda; Shinji Saitoh
      Pages: 627 - 628
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Naomi Kamioka, Takayasu Nomura, Taisuke Kato, Mizuki Yoneyama, Takehiro Sobajima, Hisashi Tanida, Takehiro Morishita, Shiro Sugiura, Yuichiro Suda, Yasutaka Hirabayashi, Chieko Misawa, Hidenori Tanaka, Mihoko Mizuno, Akihiko Terada, Yasushi Kanda, Shinji Saitoh


      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.011
       
  • Pustular allergic contact dermatitis caused by Disperse Yellow 3 in a dark
           blue dress

    • Authors: Eri Hotta; Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka; Koji Masuda; Norito Katoh
      Pages: 629 - 631
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Eri Hotta, Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka, Koji Masuda, Norito Katoh


      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.001
       
  • Patch testing in patients with recurrent vesicular hand eczema

    • Authors: Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka; Naomi Nakamura; Sachiko Ueda; Koji Masuda; Norito Katoh
      Pages: 632 - 633
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka, Naomi Nakamura, Sachiko Ueda, Koji Masuda, Norito Katoh


      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.006
       
  • A case of refractory chronic rhinosinusitis with anti-desmoglein 3 IgG4
           autoantibody

    • Authors: Yasushi Ota; Fumio Ishikawa; Toshiya Sato; Nobuyuki Hiruta; Makoto Kitamura; Hiromitsu Yokota; Yoshihiro Ikemiyagi; Hideaki Bujo; Mutsunori Fujiwara; Mitsuya Suzuki
      Pages: 634 - 636
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Yasushi Ota, Fumio Ishikawa, Toshiya Sato, Nobuyuki Hiruta, Makoto Kitamura, Hiromitsu Yokota, Yoshihiro Ikemiyagi, Hideaki Bujo, Mutsunori Fujiwara, Mitsuya Suzuki


      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.04.009
       
  • Preface to the proceedings of the Workshop on Eosinophils in Allergy and
           Related Diseases 2016

    • Authors: Kohei Yamauchi
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Supplement
      Author(s): Kohei Yamauchi


      PubDate: 2017-09-06T04:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.006
       
  • Neuropsychiatry phenotype in asthma: Psychological stress-induced
           alterations of the neuroendocrine-immune system in allergic airway
           inflammation

    • Authors: Isao Ohno
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Supplement
      Author(s): Isao Ohno
      Since the recognition of asthma as a syndrome with complex pathophysiological signs and symptoms, recent research has sought to classify asthma phenotypes based on its clinical and molecular pathological features. Psychological stress was first recognized as a potential immune system modulator of asthma at the end of the 19th century. The activation of the central nervous system (CNS) upon exposure to psychological stress is integral for the initiation of signal transduction processes. The stress hormones, including glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, which are secreted following CNS activation, are involved in the immunological alterations involved in psychological stress-induced asthma exacerbation. The mechanisms underlying this process may involve a pathological series of events from the brain to the lungs, which is attracting attention as a conceptually advanced phenotype in asthma pathogenesis. This review presents insights into the critical role of psychological stress in the development and exacerbation of allergic asthma, with a special focus on our own data that emphasizes on the continuity from the central sensing of psychological stress to enhanced eosinophilic airway inflammation.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T04:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.005
       
  • The dual regulation of substance P-mediated inflammation via human
           synovial mast cells in rheumatoid arthritis

    • Authors: Yuki Okamura; Shintaro Mishima; Jun-ichi Kashiwakura; Tomomi Sasaki-Sakamoto; Shota Toyoshima; Kazumichi Kuroda; Shu Saito; Yasuaki Tokuhashi; Yoshimichi Okayama
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Supplement
      Author(s): Yuki Okamura, Shintaro Mishima, Jun-ichi Kashiwakura, Tomomi Sasaki-Sakamoto, Shota Toyoshima, Kazumichi Kuroda, Shu Saito, Yasuaki Tokuhashi, Yoshimichi Okayama
      Background Neural pathways are thought to be directly involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although synovial mast cells (MCs) are activated by substance P (SP), the role of MCs in neural pathways in RA remains unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate 1) whether tachykinins are produced by synovial MCs and whether production differs in RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and 2) what is the responsible receptor for SP in synovial MCs. Methods Synovial tissues were obtained from patients with RA or OA undergoing joint replacement surgery. Cultured synovium-derived MCs were generated by culturing dispersed synovial cells with stem cell factor. SP expression was investigated using immunofluorescence and enzyme immunoassays. Mas-related gene X2 (MrgX2) expression was reduced in human MCs using a lentiviral shRNA silencing technique. Results SP expression was localized around the cell membrane in 41% (median) of the MCs in synovium from RA but in only 7% of that from OA, suggesting the activation of MCs. Synovial MCs expressed tachykinin (TAC) 1 mRNA, the expression of which was upregulated by the aggregation of FcɛRI or the addition of aggregated IgG. However, the released SP appeared to be rapidly degraded by MC chymase. Synovial MCs were activated with SP through MrgX2 to release histamine without producing proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions Activated synovial MCs may rapidly degrade SP, which may downregulate the SP-mediated activation of synoviocytes in RA. On the other hand, SP activates MCs to induce inflammatory mediators, suggesting the dual regulation of SP-mediated inflammation by MCs in RA.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T04:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.002
       
  • Long-term safety of subcutaneous immunotherapy with TO-204 in Japanese
           patients with house dust mite-induced allergic rhinitis and allergic
           bronchial asthma: Multicenter, open label clinical trial

    • Authors: Takao Fujisawa; Terufumi Shimoda; Keisuke Masuyama; Kimihiro Okubo; Kohei Honda; Mitsuhiro Okano; Toshio Katsunuma; Atsuo Urisu; Yasuto Kondo; Hiroshi Odajima; Kazuyuki Kurihara; Makoto Nagata; Masami Taniguchi; Shoichiro Taniuchi; Satoru Doi; Tomoshige Matsumoto; Shoji Hashimoto; Akihiko Tanaka; Kensuke Natsui; Nahoko Abe; Hideki Ozaki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Takao Fujisawa, Terufumi Shimoda, Keisuke Masuyama, Kimihiro Okubo, Kohei Honda, Mitsuhiro Okano, Toshio Katsunuma, Atsuo Urisu, Yasuto Kondo, Hiroshi Odajima, Kazuyuki Kurihara, Makoto Nagata, Masami Taniguchi, Shoichiro Taniuchi, Satoru Doi, Tomoshige Matsumoto, Shoji Hashimoto, Akihiko Tanaka, Kensuke Natsui, Nahoko Abe, Hideki Ozaki
      Background To evaluate the long-term safety of subcutaneous immunotherapy with TO-204, a standardized house dust mite (HDM) allergen extracts, we conducted a multicenter, open label clinical trial. Methods Japanese patients aged 5–65 years were eligible for the study, if they had HDM-induced allergic rhinitis (AR), allergic bronchial asthma (BA), or both. TO-204 was administered in a dose titration scheme, and the maintenance dose was determined according to the predefined criteria. The treatment period was 52 weeks, and patients who were willing to continue the treatment received TO-204 beyond 52 weeks. This clinical trial is registered at the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center (Japic CTI-121900). Results Between July 2012 and May 2015, 44 patients (28 with AR and 16 with allergic BA) were enrolled into the study. All patients were included in the analysis. The duration of treatment ranged from 23 to 142 weeks and the median maintenance dose was 200 Japanese allergy units (JAU). Adverse events occurred in 22 patients (50%). The most common adverse event was local reactions related to the injection sites. Four patients experienced anaphylactic reactions when they were treated with the dose of 500 JAU. Two patients experienced anaphylactic shock with the doses of 1000 JAU at onset. These 6 patients could continue the study with dose reduction. Conclusions Safety profile of TO-204 was acceptable in Japanese patients with HDM-induced AR or allergic BA. Higher doses should be administered carefully, because the risk of anaphylaxis increased at doses of 500 or 1000 JAU.

      PubDate: 2017-12-08T17:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.11.004
       
  • Serum periostin is associated with body mass index and allergic rhinitis
           in healthy and asthmatic subjects

    • Authors: Hirokazu Kimura; Satoshi Konno; Hironi Makita; Natsuko Taniguchi; Hiroki Kimura; Houman Goudarzi; Kaoruko Shimizu; Masaru Suzuki; Noriharu Shijubo; Katsunori Shigehara; Junya Ono; Kenji Izuhara; Yoichi Minagawa Ito; Masaharu Nishimura
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Hirokazu Kimura, Satoshi Konno, Hironi Makita, Natsuko Taniguchi, Hiroki Kimura, Houman Goudarzi, Kaoruko Shimizu, Masaru Suzuki, Noriharu Shijubo, Katsunori Shigehara, Junya Ono, Kenji Izuhara, Yoichi Minagawa Ito, Masaharu Nishimura
      Background Many studies have attempted to clarify the factors associated with serum periostin levels in asthmatic patients. However, these results were based on studies of subjects mainly characterized by high eosinophil counts, which may present as an obstacle for clarification in the identification of other factors associated with serum periostin levels. The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with serum periostin levels in healthy subjects. We also assessed some factors in asthmatic subjects to confirm their extrapolation for management of asthma. Methods Serum periostin levels were measured in 230 healthy subjects. Clinical factors of interest included body mass index (BMI) and allergic rhinitis (AR). Additionally, we confirmed whether these factors were associated with serum periostin in 206 asthmatic subjects. We further evaluated several obesity-related parameters, such as abdominal fat distribution and adipocytokine levels. Results Smoking status, blood eosinophil count, total immunoglobulin E, and the presence of AR were associated with serum periostin in healthy subjects. There was a negative association between BMI and serum periostin in both healthy and asthmatic subjects, while there was a tendency of a positive association with AR in asthmatic subjects. There were no differential associations observed for subcutaneous and abdominal fat in relation to serum periostin in asthmatic subjects. Serum periostin was significantly associated with serum levels of adiponectin, but not with leptin. Conclusions Our results provided clarity as to the factors associated with serum periostin levels, which could be helpful in the interpretation of serum periostin levels in clinical practice.

      PubDate: 2017-12-08T17:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.11.006
       
  • Recent advancement to prevent the development of allergy and allergic
           diseases and therapeutic strategy in the perspective of barrier
           dysfunction

    • Authors: Osamu Natsume; Yukihiro Ohya
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Osamu Natsume, Yukihiro Ohya
      Therapeutic strategy in late 20th century to prevent allergic diseases was derived from a conceptual framework of allergens elimination which was as same as that of coping with them after their onset. Manifold trials were implemented; however, most of them failed to verify the effectiveness of their preventive measures. Recent advancement of epidemiological studies and cutaneous biology revealed epidermal barrier dysfunction plays a major role of allergen sensitization and development of atopic dermatitis which ignites the inception of allergy march. For this decade, therapeutic strategy to prevent the development of food allergy has been confronted with a paradigm shift from avoidance and delayed introduction of allergenic foods based on the theoretical concept to early introduction of them based on the clinical and epidemiological evidences. Especially, prevention of peanut allergy and egg allergy has been established with the highest evidence verified by randomized controlled trials, although application in clinical practice should be done with attention. This paradigm shift concerning food allergy was also due to the discovery of cutaneous sensitization risk of food allergens for an infant with eczema revealed by prospective studies. Here we have recognized the increased importance of prevention of eczema/atopic dermatitis in infancy. Two randomized controlled trials using emollients showed successful results in prevention of atopic dermatitis in infancy; however, longer term safety and prognosis including allergy march should be pursued. To establish more fundamental strategy for prevention of the development of allergy, further studies clarifying the mechanisms of interaction between barrier dysfunction and microbial milieu are needed with macroscope to understand the relationship between allergic diseases and a diversity of environmental influences.

      PubDate: 2017-12-08T17:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.11.003
       
  • Long-term immunological effects of Japanese cedar pollen-based
           subcutaneous immunotherapy

    • Authors: Chisato Inuo; Hitoshi Ando; Kenichi Tanaka; Yoichi Nakajima; Ikuya Tsuge; Atsuo Urisu; Yasuto Kondo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Chisato Inuo, Hitoshi Ando, Kenichi Tanaka, Yoichi Nakajima, Ikuya Tsuge, Atsuo Urisu, Yasuto Kondo


      PubDate: 2017-12-08T17:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.11.002
       
  • Th1-related disease development during omalizumab treatment: Two cases
           with severe asthma

    • Authors: Hiroaki Hayashi; Yuma Fukutomi; Chihiro Mitsui; Kentaro Watai; Yasuhiro Tomita; Yosuke Kamide; Kiyoshi Sekiya; Takahiro Tsuburai; Ayako Horita; Ikuo Saito; Yoshinori Hasegawa; Masami Taniguchi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Hiroaki Hayashi, Yuma Fukutomi, Chihiro Mitsui, Kentaro Watai, Yasuhiro Tomita, Yosuke Kamide, Kiyoshi Sekiya, Takahiro Tsuburai, Ayako Horita, Ikuo Saito, Yoshinori Hasegawa, Masami Taniguchi


      PubDate: 2017-12-08T17:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.10.008
       
  • Surfing as a risk factor for sensitization to poly(γ-glutamic acid) in
           fermented soybeans, natto, allergy

    • Authors: Naoko Inomata; Mami Miyakawa; Michiko Aihara
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Naoko Inomata, Mami Miyakawa, Michiko Aihara
      Background Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PGA) is an allergen in natto, fermented soybeans, which causes late-onset anaphylaxis. We hypothesized that jellyfish stings sensitize adults to PGA because a surfer had allergies to both natto and jellyfish, whose sting contains PGA. The aim of the study was to identify behavioral factors, such as marine sports, associated with PGA sensitization. Methods Outpatients diagnosed with food allergies based on relevant clinical history, positive skin test and/or food challenge test answered a questionnaire during a regular visit in 2016. Results Questionnaire data from 140 outpatients were analyzed. These patients were divided into two groups: natto allergy group (13 patients, M:F = 10:3, mean age 40.6 years) and non-natto allergy group (127 patients, M:F = 46:81, mean age 44.5 years). All patients with natto allergy had positive results in skin prick test and basophil activation test with PGA. Of these, 92.3% had a marine sport hobby, especially surfing (84.6%). PGA sensitization was independently associated with marine sports (odds ratio, 278.0, 95 percent confidence interval, 36.9–6315.9, p < 0.001) adjusted for male sex and sea bathing, but not with male sex or sea bathing. In addition, although there was no significant difference in the experience of marine sports between natto and non-natto allergy groups, the natto allergy group participated significantly more frequently in marine sports than the non-natto allergy group (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between natto consumption amount and PGA sensitization. Conclusions Surfing is a risk factor for PGA sensitization in those with allergy to natto.

      PubDate: 2017-12-08T17:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.11.001
       
  • Barrier dysfunction in the skin allergy

    • Authors: Gyohei Egawa; Kenji Kabashima
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Gyohei Egawa, Kenji Kabashima
      The skin is continuously exposed to external pathogens, and its barrier function is critical for skin homeostasis. Previous studies have shown that the barrier dysfunction is one of the most predisposing factors for the development of skin allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis. In this article, we summarize how the physical barrier of the skin is organized and review its link to the pathomechanism of skin allergic diseases. We describe the formation of the SC barrier in terms of the following five categories: 1) filaggrin metabolism; 2) cornified envelope; 3) intercellular lipids; 4) corneodesmosome; and 5) corneocyte desquamation. New approaches to restoring the skin barrier function are also discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-12-08T17:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.10.002
       
  • Barrier dysfunction in the nasal allergy

    • Authors: Ayumi Fukuoka; Tomohiro Yoshimoto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Ayumi Fukuoka, Tomohiro Yoshimoto
      Epithelial cells form the first physiological barrier against invasion by pathogens and the infiltration of allergens. Tight junctions (TJ), a cell–cell junctional complex located on the apical side of epithelial cells, have a critical role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Impaired TJ structures are observed in patients with asthma, atopic dermatitis and nasal allergy; therefore, the dysfunction of epithelial barriers might be involved in the initiation or progression of allergic diseases. Protease-containing allergens and environmental pollutants enhance paracellular transport in epithelial cells through disruption of epithelial barrier function. This suggests that the disruption of TJ leads to the promotion of allergen delivery into the subepithelia, resulting in the progression of allergic diseases. Thus, protection of the epithelial barrier function might prevent or inhibit the development or exacerbation of allergic diseases. Recently, we reported that diesel exhaust particles (DEP), the main component of particulate patter 2.5, exacerbated allergic rhinitis (AR) in a mouse model through TJ disruption. In addition, we revealed that the oxidative stress-mediated pathway is involved in the effects caused by DEP and that nasal treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger suppressed DEP-induced TJ disruption and exacerbation of AR. In this review, we focus on the relationship between TJ disruption and allergic disease. Furthermore, we discuss our recent findings regarding TJ disruption and the exacerbation of AR.

      PubDate: 2017-11-17T06:25:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.10.006
       
  • Efficacy and safety of benralizumab in Japanese patients with severe,
           uncontrolled eosinophilic asthma

    • Authors: Ken Ohta; Mitsuru Adachi; Yuji Tohda; Tadashi Kamei; Motokazu Kato; J. Mark Fitzgerald; Masayuki Takanuma; Tadahiro Kakuno; Nobuyuki Imai; Yanping Wu; Magnus Aurivillius; Mitchell Goldman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Ken Ohta, Mitsuru Adachi, Yuji Tohda, Tadashi Kamei, Motokazu Kato, J. Mark Fitzgerald, Masayuki Takanuma, Tadahiro Kakuno, Nobuyuki Imai, Yanping Wu, Magnus Aurivillius, Mitchell Goldman
      Background In the Phase III CALIMA trial, benralizumab significantly reduced asthma exacerbations, increased lung function, and alleviated symptoms for patients with severe, uncontrolled eosinophilic asthma. The aim of this subgroup analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of benralizumab for Japanese patients in the CALIMA trial. Methods CALIMA was a randomised, controlled trial of 1306 patients (aged 12–75 years; registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01914757) with severe asthma uncontrolled by medium- to high-dosage inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonists (ICS/LABA). Patients received 56 weeks' benralizumab 30 mg either every 4 weeks (Q4W) or every 8 weeks (Q8W; first three doses Q4W), or placebo Q4W. The primary analysis population was patients receiving high-dosage ICS/LABA with blood eosinophils ≥300 cells/μL. This subgroup analysis covered Japanese patients from this group. Results Of 83 patients randomised in Japan, 46 were receiving high-dosage ICS/LABA and had blood eosinophils ≥300 cells/μL. Compared with placebo, benralizumab reduced the annual rate of asthma exacerbations by 66% (Q4W; rate ratio 0.34, 95% CI, 0.11–0.99) and 83% (Q8W; rate ratio 0.17, 95% CI, 0.05–0.60); increased prebronchodilator FEV1 by 0.334 L (Q4W; 95% CI, 0.020–0.647) and 0.198 L (Q8W; 95% CI, −0.118 to 0.514); and decreased total asthma symptom score by 0.17 (Q4W; 95% CI, −0.82 to 0.48) and 0.24 (Q8W; 95% CI, −0.87 to 0.40). Percentages of adverse events were consistent with the overall CALIMA group. Conclusions Benralizumab reduced annual asthma exacerbations and symptoms, increased lung function, and was well-tolerated by Japanese patients with severe, uncontrolled eosinophilic asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T05:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.10.004
       
  • Up-regulation of serum periostin and squamous cell carcinoma antigen
           levels in infants with acute bronchitis due to respiratory syncytial virus
           

    • Authors: Hiroaki Nakamura; Kenichi Akashi; Masako Watanabe; Shoichiro Ohta; Junya Ono; Yoshinori Azuma; Noriko Ogasawara; Keisuke Yamamoto; Norikazu Shimizu; Hiroyuki Tsutsumi; Kenji Izuhara; Toshio Katsunuma
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Hiroaki Nakamura, Kenichi Akashi, Masako Watanabe, Shoichiro Ohta, Junya Ono, Yoshinori Azuma, Noriko Ogasawara, Keisuke Yamamoto, Norikazu Shimizu, Hiroyuki Tsutsumi, Kenji Izuhara, Toshio Katsunuma
      Background Periostin and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) are involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. Acute bronchitis due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection during infancy exhibits an asthma-like pathogenesis, suggesting that it may be associated with the subsequent development of asthma. However, the mechanism by which RSV infection leads to development of asthma has not yet been fully elucidated. Methods Infants younger than 36 months were enrolled and classified into three groups. Group I included patients hospitalized with RSV-induced bronchitis. These patients were further stratified into two sub-groups according to whether the criteria for the modified Asthma Predictive Index (mAPI) had been met: Group I consisted of mAPI (+) and mAPI (−) patients; Group II included patients with food allergy as a positive control group; and Group III included children with no allergy as a negative control group. Serum periostin and SCCA levels were measured in the groups. This study was registered as a clinical trial (UMIN000012339). Results We enrolled 14 subjects in Group I mAPI (+), 22 in Group I mAPI (−), 18 in Group II, and 18 in Group III. In Group I, the serum periostin and SCCA levels were significantly higher during the acute phase compared with the recovery phase. However, no significant differences were found between Group I mAPI (+) and mAPI (−). Conclusions The serum periostin and SCCA levels increased during acute RSV bronchitis. Both periostin and SCCA may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute bronchitis due to RSV.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T05:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.10.003
       
  • How important is allergic sensitization as a cause of atopic asthma'

    • Authors: Jun Kanazawa; Hironori Masuko; Hideyasu Yamada; Yohei Yatagai; Tohru Sakamoto; Haruna Kitazawa; Hiroaki Iijima; Takashi Naito; Tomomitsu Hirota; Mayumi Tamari; Nobuyuki Hizawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 November 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Jun Kanazawa, Hironori Masuko, Hideyasu Yamada, Yohei Yatagai, Tohru Sakamoto, Haruna Kitazawa, Hiroaki Iijima, Takashi Naito, Tomomitsu Hirota, Mayumi Tamari, Nobuyuki Hizawa


      PubDate: 2017-11-10T05:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.10.005
       
  • Efficacy and safety of omalizumab for the treatment of refractory chronic
           spontaneous urticaria in Japanese patients: Subgroup analysis of the phase
           3 POLARIS study

    • Authors: Michihiro Hide; Atsuyuki Igarashi; Akiko Yagami; Yuko Chinuki; Naoko Inomata; Atsushi Fukunaga; Guenther Kaiser; Junyi Wang; Soichiro Matsushima; Steven Greenberg; Sam Khalil
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 November 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Michihiro Hide, Atsuyuki Igarashi, Akiko Yagami, Yuko Chinuki, Naoko Inomata, Atsushi Fukunaga, Guenther Kaiser, Junyi Wang, Soichiro Matsushima, Steven Greenberg, Sam Khalil
      Background Omalizumab, a humanized anti-IgE monoclonal antibody, proved efficacious and well tolerated in patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) refractory to H1 antihistamines (H1AH) in the POLARIS study (NCT02329223), a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in East Asian patients. However, data in Japanese patients, who have specific baseline characteristics (e.g., low angioedema incidence, different background medications) that may impact clinical outcomes, are lacking. This pre-specified analysis presents additional patient-level data over time, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics data for omalizumab and IgE, and efficacy and safety data for omalizumab in Japanese patients. Methods Japanese patients (N = 105) were randomized 1:1:1 to omalizumab 300 mg, 150 mg, or placebo by subcutaneous injection every 4 weeks. Efficacy and safety were assessed primarily based on changes from baseline to Week 12 in weekly itch-severity scores (ISS7) and weekly urticaria activity scores (UAS7), and incidence of adverse events (AEs), respectively. Patient-level UAS7 data over time were also reviewed. Results At Week 12, least squares mean (LSM) changes from baseline in ISS7 were greater with omalizumab vs. placebo (−9.54 and −7.29 for omalizumab 300 mg and 150 mg, respectively, vs. placebo [−5.17]). Corresponding LSM changes from baseline in UAS7 were −21.61 and −15.59 (vs. placebo [−10.88]). Most responders in the omalizumab 300 mg group displayed improvement of disease activity within 2–4 weeks and had well-controlled symptoms during the treatment period. Overall AE incidence was similar across treatment arms. Conclusions This subgroup analysis demonstrated that omalizumab is a well-tolerated, beneficial option for treatment of CSU in H1AH-refractory Japanese patients.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T05:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.10.001
       
  • Successful treatment of refractory alopecia universalis by persuading a
           patient not to sleep with her dog

    • Authors: Takahiro Arita; Tomoko Nomiyama; Jun Asai; Norito Katoh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Takahiro Arita, Tomoko Nomiyama, Jun Asai, Norito Katoh


      PubDate: 2017-11-10T05:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.011
       
  • Phenotype classification using the combination of lung sound analysis and
           fractional exhaled nitric oxide for evaluating asthma treatment

    • Authors: Terufumi Shimoda; Yasushi Obase; Yukio Nagasaka; Sadahiro Asai
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Terufumi Shimoda, Yasushi Obase, Yukio Nagasaka, Sadahiro Asai
      Background We report the utility of combining lung sound analysis and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) for phenotype classification of airway inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma. We investigated the usefulness of the combination of the expiration-to-inspiration sound power ratio in the mid-frequency range (E/I MF) of 200–400 Hz and FeNO for comprehensively classifying disease type and evaluating asthma treatment. Methods A total of 233 patients with bronchial asthma were included. The cutoff values of FeNO and E/I MF were set to 38 ppb and 0.36, respectively, according to a previous study. The patients were divided into 4 subgroups based on the FeNO and E/I MF cutoff values. Respiratory function, the percentages of sputum eosinophils and neutrophils, and patient background characteristics were compared among groups. Results Respiratory function was well controlled in the FeNO low/E/I MF low group (good control). Sputum neutrophil was higher and FEV1,%pred was lower in the FeNO low/E/I MF high group (poor control). History of childhood asthma and atopic asthma were associated with the FeNO high/E/I MF low group (insufficient control). The FeNO high/E/I MF high group corresponded to a longer disease duration, increased blood or sputum eosinophils, and lower FEV1/FVC (poor control). Conclusions The combination of FeNO and E/I MF assessed by lung sound analysis allows the condition of airway narrowing and the degree of airway inflammation to be assessed in patients with asthma and is useful for evaluating bronchial asthma treatments.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T05:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.09.004
       
  • Chronic spontaneous urticaria and the extrinsic coagulation system

    • Authors: Yuhki Yanase; Satoshi Morioke; Kazumasa Iwamoto; Shunsuke Takahagi; Kazue Uchida; Tomoko Kawaguchi; Kaori Ishii; Izumi Hide; Michihiro Hide
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 October 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Yuhki Yanase, Shunsuke Takahagi, Michihiro Hide
      Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a common skin disorder characterized by daily or almost daily recurring skin edema and flare with itch. Recently, the activation of the blood coagulation cascade has been suggested to be involved in CSU, but the trigger of the coagulation cascade remains unclear. In this article, we review recent understanding of the relationship between the pathogenesis of CSU and extrinsic coagulation reactions. In CSU, vascular endothelial cells and eosinophils may play a role as TF-expressing cells for activating the extrinsic coagulation pathway. Moreover, the expression of TF on endothelial cells is synergistically enhanced by the activation of Toll-like receptors and histamine H1 receptors. The activated coagulation factors may induce plasma extravasation followed by degranulation of skin mast cells and edema formation recognized as wheal in CSU. Molecules involved in this cascade could be a target for new and more effective treatments of urticaria.

      PubDate: 2017-10-07T15:22:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2017.07.026
       
  • Airway inflammation phenotype prediction in asthma patients using lung
           sound analysis with fractional exhaled nitric oxide

    • Authors: Terufumi Shimoda; Yasushi Obase Yukio Nagasaka Hiroshi Nakano Reiko Kishikawa
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 4
      Author(s): Terufumi Shimoda, Yasushi Obase, Yukio Nagasaka, Hiroshi Nakano, Reiko Kishikawa, Tomoaki Iwanaga
      Background We previously reported the results of lung sound analysis in patients with bronchial asthma and demonstrated that the exhalation-to-inhalation sound pressure ratio in the low frequency range between 100 and 200 Hz (E/I LF) was correlated with the presence of airway inflammation and airway obstruction. We classified asthma patients by airway inflammation phenotype using the induced sputum eosinophil and neutrophil ratio and determined whether this phenotype could be predicted using E/I LF and fractional exhaled nitric oxide values. Methods Steroid-naive bronchial asthma patients were classified into four phenotypes, including “Low inflammation” (35 patients), “Eosinophilic type” (58 patients), “Neutrophilic type” (15 patients), and “Mixed type” (15 patients) based on the results of induced sputum examinations. The E/I LF data and FeNO levels were then evaluated for the four phenotype groups; the prediction powers of these two indices were then analyzed for each phenotype. Results The median E/I LF value was highest in the “Mixed type” and lowest in the “Low inflammation” group. FeNO differentiated between the “Low inflammation” and “Eosinophilic type” groups, “Low inflammation” and “Neutrophilic type” groups, and “Neutrophilic type” and “Mixed type” (p < 0.0001, p = 0.007, and p = 0.04, respectively). E/I LF differentiated between the “Low inflammation” and “Eosinophilic type” groups (p = 0.006). E/I LF could distinguish the “Mixed type” group from the “Low inflammation” and “Eosinophilic type” groups (p = 0.002). Conclusions A combination of the E/I LF value and FeNO may be useful for the classification of the airway inflammation phenotype in patients with bronchial asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
       
  • Therapeutic approaches of asthma and COPD overlap

    • Authors: Mitsuko Kondo; Jun Tamaoki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Mitsuko Kondo, Jun Tamaoki
      Asthma and COPD overlap (ACO) is an important clinical phenotype, due to the low-health-related quality of life (QOL), rapid decline in lung function, frequent exacerbation, and high economic burden. However, no large-scaled therapeutic trials of ACO have been conducted. At present, ACO is treated according to asthma/COPD guidelines. The goals of ACO treatment are to relieve symptoms and improve QOL and lung functions. Treatment must also prevent disease progression, airway remodeling, exacerbation, complications, and comorbidities. To achieve these goals, ACO needs first to be assessed based on pathophysiological findings. Comprehensive long-term management includes medication, reduction of risk factors, environmental improvement, patient education, rehabilitation, and vaccination. Drug treatment for ACO employs a combination of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and long-acting bronchodilators; long-acting muscarinic antagonists and/or long-acting β2-agonists. The dose of ICS is determined according to ACO severity. Leukotriene receptor antagonists and theophylline are used as add-on drugs. Macrolides and expectorants are recommended for reduction of mucus hypersecretion. Anti-IgE and anti–IL-5 antibodies, oral corticosteroids, and oxygen therapy are additional treatments for the most severe ACO. The therapeutic effects are evaluated using lung function tests, eosinophil counts in sputum and blood, FeNO, and symptom questionnaires. ACO exacerbation is treated by inhalation of short-acting β2-agonist and systemic corticosteroids. The doses of corticosteroids are determined based on the asthma/COPD component of the exacerbation. Administration of antibiotics is recommended if sputum is purulent. Referral to specialists is necessary in cases of inability to control symptoms by medication, uncertain diagnosis with atypical features, or severe complications and comorbidities.

      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.09.002
       
  • A case of clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis that developed during
           anti-TNF-α therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

    • Authors: Miki Takata; Akira Yamasaki; Nanako Yamada; Hiroshi Hagino; Yoshihiro Funaki; Tomoya Harada; Ryota Okazaki; Yasuyuki Hasegawa; Takehito Fukushima; Masato Morita; Yuriko Sueda; Akihiro Yamamoto; Eiji Shimizu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Miki Takata, Akira Yamasaki, Nanako Yamada, Hiroshi Hagino, Yoshihiro Funaki, Tomoya Harada, Ryota Okazaki, Yasuyuki Hasegawa, Takehito Fukushima, Masato Morita, Yuriko Sueda, Akihiro Yamamoto, Eiji Shimizu


      PubDate: 2017-09-30T16:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.09.001
       
  • Role of airway epithelial barrier dysfunction in pathogenesis of asthma

    • Authors: Yasuhiro Gon; Shu Hashimoto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Yasuhiro Gon, Shu Hashimoto
      Bronchial asthma is characterized by persistent cough, increased sputum, and repeated wheezing. The pathophysiology underlying these symptoms is the hyper-responsiveness of the airway along with chronic airway inflammation. Repeated injury, repair, and regeneration of the airway epithelium following exposure to environmental factors and inflammation results in histological changes and functional abnormalities in the airway mucosal epithelium; such changes are believed to have a significant association with the pathophysiology of asthma. Damage to the barrier functions of the airway epithelium enhances mucosal permeability of foreign substances in the airway epithelium of patients with asthma. Thus, epithelial barrier fragility is closely involved in releasing epithelial cytokines (e.g., TSLP, IL-25, and IL-33) because of the activation of airway epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and innate group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2). Functional abnormalities of the airway epithelial cells along with the activation of dendritic cells, Th2 cells, and ILC2 form a single immunopathological unit that is considered to cause allergic airway inflammation. Here we use the latest published literature to discuss the potential pathological mechanisms regarding the onset and progressive severity of asthma with regard to the disruption of the airway epithelial function.

      PubDate: 2017-09-24T04:28:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.011
       
  • Vitamin D deficiency exacerbates sensitization and allergic diarrhea in a
           murine food allergy model

    • Authors: Teruaki Matsui; Hirotaka Yamashita; Ken-ichi Saneyasu; Hiroyuki Tanaka; Komei Ito; Naoki Inagaki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Teruaki Matsui, Hirotaka Yamashita, Ken-ichi Saneyasu, Hiroyuki Tanaka, Komei Ito, Naoki Inagaki


      PubDate: 2017-09-24T04:28:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.010
       
  • Long-term course of serum total and free IgE levels in severe asthma
           patients treated with omalizumab

    • Authors: Yasuhiro Gon; Reiko Ito; Shuichiro Maruoka; Kenji Mizumura; Yutaka Kozu; Hisato Hiranuma; Yuko Iida; Mari Hikichi; Sotaro Shikano; Shu Hashimoto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Yasuhiro Gon, Reiko Ito, Shuichiro Maruoka, Kenji Mizumura, Yutaka Kozu, Hisato Hiranuma, Yuko Iida, Mari Hikichi, Sotaro Shikano, Shu Hashimoto


      PubDate: 2017-09-24T04:28:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.003
       
  • Mast cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells are useful
           for allergen tests

    • Authors: Akira Igarashi; Yasuhiro Ebihara; Tomoaki Kumagai; Hiroyuki Hirai; Kinya Nagata; Kohichiro Tsuji
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Akira Igarashi, Yasuhiro Ebihara, Tomoaki Kumagai, Hiroyuki Hirai, Kinya Nagata, Kohichiro Tsuji
      Background Several methods have been developed to detect allergen-specific IgE in sera. The passive IgE sensitization assay using human IgE receptor-expressing rat cell line RBL-2H3 is a powerful tool to detect biologically active allergen-specific IgE in serum samples. However, one disadvantage is that RBL-2H3 cells are vulnerable to high concentrations of human sera. Only a few human cultured cell lines are easily applicable to the passive IgE sensitization assay. However, the use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to generate human mast cells (MCs) has not yet been reported. Methods The nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-responsive luciferase reporter gene was stably introduced into a human iPSC line 201B7, and the transfectants were induced to differentiate into MCs (iPSC-MCs). The iPSC-MCs were sensitized overnight with sera from subjects who were allergic to cedar pollen, ragweed pollen, mites, or house dust, and then stimulated with an extract of corresponding allergens. Activation of iPSC-MCs was evaluated by β-hexosaminidase release, histamine release, or luciferase intensity. Results iPSCs-MCs stably expressed high-affinity IgE receptor and functionally responded to various allergens when sensitized with human sera from relevant allergic subjects. This passive IgE sensitization system, which we termed the induced mast cell activation test (iMAT), worked well even with undiluted human sera. Conclusions iMAT may serve as a novel determining system for IgE/allergens in the clinical and research settings.

      PubDate: 2017-09-19T04:23:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.008
       
  • Mucus plugging in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: Implication of
           the eosinophil DNA traps

    • Authors: Ayumi Omokawa; Shigeharu Ueki; Yuta Kikuchi; Masahide Takeda; Mariko Asano; Kazuhiro Sato; Masaaki Sano; Hiroshi Ito; Makoto Hirokawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Ayumi Omokawa, Shigeharu Ueki, Yuta Kikuchi, Masahide Takeda, Mariko Asano, Kazuhiro Sato, Masaaki Sano, Hiroshi Ito, Makoto Hirokawa


      PubDate: 2017-09-06T04:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.002
       
  • Exposure amount and timing of solar irradiation during pregnancy and the
           risk of sensitization in children

    • Authors: Hyun Yong Koh; Eunhae Cho; So-Yeon Lee; Woo Kyung Kim; Yong Mean Park; Jihyun Kim; Kangmo Ahn; Seung Won Lee; Mi Ae Kim; Myung-Il Hahm; Yoomi Chae; Kee-Jae Lee; Ho-Jang Kwon; Man Yong Han
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Hyun Yong Koh, Eunhae Cho, So-Yeon Lee, Woo Kyung Kim, Yong Mean Park, Jihyun Kim, Kangmo Ahn, Seung Won Lee, Mi Ae Kim, Myung-Il Hahm, Yoomi Chae, Kee-Jae Lee, Ho-Jang Kwon, Man Yong Han
      Background Solar irradiation affects sensitization to aeroallergens and the prevalence of allergic diseases. Little is known, however, about how the time and amount of solar irradiation during pregnancy affects such risks in children. We aimed to find out how solar irradiation during pregnancy affects sensitization to aero-allergens and the prevalence of allergic diseases in children. Methods This population-based cross-sectional study involved 7301 aged 6 years and aged 12 years children. Maternal exposure to solar irradiation during pregnancy was evaluated using data from weather stations closest to each child's birthplace. Monthly average solar irradiation during the second and third trimesters was calculated with rank by quartiles. Risks of allergic sensitization and allergic disease were estimated. Results Relative to the first (lowest) quartile, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for allergic sensitization in the fourth (highest) quartile was lowest within solar irradiation during pregnancy months 5–6 (aOR = 0.823, 95% CI 0.720–0.942, p < 0.05). During months 9–10, the aOR for allergic sensitization for the fourth was higher than the first quartile of solar irradiation (aOR = 1.167, 95% CI 1.022–1.333, p < 0.05). Similar results were observed when solar irradiation was analyzed as a continuous variable during months 5 (aOR = 0.975, 95% CI 0.962–0.989, p < 0.001) and month 9 (aOR = 1.018, 95% CI 1.004–1.031, p = 0.003). Increased solar irradiation during months 7–8 increased the risk of asthma (aOR = 1.309, 95% CI 1.024–1.674, p = 0.032). Conclusions Maternal exposure to solar irradiation during the second trimester of pregnancy associated with reduced aeroallergen sensitization, whereas solar irradiation during the third trimester was related to increased sensitization to aeroallergens.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T04:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.007
       
  • Role of the microbiota in skin immunity and atopic dermatitis

    • Authors: Yuriko Yamazaki; Yuumi Nakamura; Gabriel Núñez
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Yuriko Yamazaki, Yuumi Nakamura, Gabriel Núñez
      Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 15–20% of children and 2–5% of adults in industrialized countries. The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus selectively colonizes the lesional skin of AD patients while this bacterium is absent in the skin of the majority of healthy individuals. However, the role of S. aureus in the pathogenesis of AD remains poorly understood. In addition to S. aureus, recent studies show a contribution of the skin microbiota to the regulation of immune responses in the skin as well as to the development of inflammatory skin disease. This review summarizes current knowledge about the role of the microbiota in skin immune responses and the role of S. aureus virulent factors in the pathogenesis of AD.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T04:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.004
       
  • Hand eczema as a risk factor for food allergy among occupational kitchen
           workers

    • Authors: Takafumi Minami; Yuma Fukutomi; Kiyoshi Sekiya; Akira Akasawa; Masami Taniguchi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Takafumi Minami, Yuma Fukutomi, Kiyoshi Sekiya, Akira Akasawa, Masami Taniguchi
      Background An increasing number of studies in children is highlighting the importance of transdermal routes of exposure to food allergens through damaged skin in the pathogenesis of food allergies. However, data on this in adults are limited. A few case-series studies has documented development of food allergy among kitchen workers with hand eczema after direct contact exposure to foods. Methods To explore the significance of hand eczema as a risk factor for food allergies in adults at the epidemiological level, we performed a cross-sectional web-based questionnaire survey on kitchen workers whose exposures were classed as occupational (cooks and food handlers, n = 1592) or non-occupational (housewives, n = 1915). Logistic regression was used to explore the association between the presence/severity of hand eczema and the risk of food allergy after adjustment for potential confounders. Results Current hand eczema and current diagnosed food allergy were more common among occupational kitchen workers (OKW) than among non-occupational kitchen workers (NOKW) (32.3%-vs-29.9% and 9.9%-vs-3.8%, respectively). Current hand eczema was significantly associated with increased risk of current diagnosed food allergy in OKW (adjusted odds ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.6–3.7). Those with more severe hand eczema were more likely to suffer from allergic symptoms for foods, and diagnosed food allergy. Conclusions This study illustrates a significant public health problem in the adult population, documenting a major impact of hand eczema on the ongoing adult food allergy epidemic.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T04:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.005
       
  • Bugging allergy; role of pre-, pro- and synbiotics in allergy prevention

    • Authors: Christina E. West; Majda Dzidic; Susan L. Prescott; Maria C. Jenmalm
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Christina E. West, Majda Dzidic, Susan L. Prescott, Maria C. Jenmalm
      Large-scale biodiversity loss and complex changes in social behaviors are altering human microbial ecology. This is increasingly implicated in the global rise in inflammatory diseases, most notably the “allergy epidemic” in very early life. Colonization of human ecological niches, particularly the gastrointestinal tract, is critical for normal local and systemic immune development and regulation. Disturbances in composition, diversity and timing of microbial colonization have been associated with increased allergy risk, indicating the importance of strategies to restore a dysbiotic gut microbiota in the primary prevention of allergic diseases, including the administration of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics. Here, we summarize and discuss findings of randomized clinical trials that have examined the effects of these microbiome-related strategies on short and long-term allergy preventative effects – including new guidelines from the World Allergy Organization which now recommend probiotics and prebiotics for allergy prevention under certain conditions. The relatively low quality evidence, limited comparative studies and large heterogeneity between studies, have collectively hampered recommendations on specific probiotic strains, specific timing and specific conditions for the most effective preventive management. At the same time the risk of using available products is low. While further research is needed before specific practice guidelines on supplement probiotics and prebiotics, it is equally important that the underlying dietary and lifestyle factors of dysbiosis are addressed at both the individual and societal levels.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T04:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.08.001
       
  • Development of the gut microbiota in infancy and its impact on health in
           later life

    • Authors: Masaru Tanaka; Jiro Nakayama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 August 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Masaru Tanaka, Jiro Nakayama
      Gut microbial ecology and function are dynamic in infancy, but are stabilized in childhood. The ‘new friends’ have a great impact on the development of the digestive tract and host immune system. In the first year of life, especially, the gut microbiota dramatically changes through interactions with the developing immune system in the gut. The process of establishing the gut microbiota is affected by various environmental factors, with the potential to be a main determinant of life-long health. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding gut microbiota establishment, including the importance of various factors related to the development of the immune system and allergic diseases later in life.

      PubDate: 2017-08-21T04:00:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.07.010
       
  • Gut microbiome, metabolome, and allergic diseases

    • Authors: So-ichiro Hirata; Jun Kunisawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): So-ichiro Hirata, Jun Kunisawa
      The number of patients with allergic and inflammatory disorders has been increasing during the past several decades. Accumulating evidence has refined our understanding of the relationship between allergic diseases and the gut microbiome. In addition, the gut microbiome is now known to produce both useful and harmful metabolites from dietary materials. These metabolites and bacterial components help to regulate host immune responses and potentially affect the development of allergic diseases. Here, we describe recent findings regarding the immunologic crosstalk between commensal bacteria and dietary components in the regulation of host immunity and the influence of this relationship on the development of allergic diseases.

      PubDate: 2017-07-15T03:31:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.008
       
 
 
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