for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3043 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3043 Journals sorted alphabetically
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 83, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 331, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 211, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 128, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 343, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 307, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 405, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access  
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 191, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.711, h-index: 78)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.394, h-index: 30)
Annales d'Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.177, h-index: 13)
Annales de Chirurgie de la Main et du Membre Supérieur     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Chirurgie Plastique Esthétique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 22)
Annales de Chirurgie Vasculaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Allergology International
  [SJR: 0.776]   [H-I: 35]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1323-8930 - ISSN (Online) 1440-1592
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3043 journals]
  • Beyond Th2, more than ILC2

    • Authors: Kenji Izuhara
      Pages: 367 - 368
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Kenji Izuhara


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.007
       
  • Roles of alternatively activated M2 macrophages in allergic contact
           dermatitis

    • Authors: Kotaro Suzuki; Kazuyuki Meguro; Daiki Nakagomi; Hiroshi Nakajima
      Pages: 392 - 397
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Kotaro Suzuki, Kazuyuki Meguro, Daiki Nakagomi, Hiroshi Nakajima
      Alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) play key roles in the suppression of Th1 cell responses and the orchestration of tissue repair. However, recent studies have shown that M2 macrophages have potentials to produce high levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, suggesting that M2 macrophages may exacerbate inflammation in some settings. In this regard, we have recently shown that large numbers of M2 macrophages accumulate in the sites of hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS), an animal model of allergic contact dermatitis, and that M2 macrophages exacerbate hapten-induced CHS by producing matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12). We have also shown that suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), a member of SOCS family proteins that are cytokine-inducible negative regulators of the JAK/STAT signaling pathways, is highly and preferentially expressed in M2 macrophages in hapten-induced CHS and that SOCS3 expressed in M2 macrophages is involved in the attenuation of CHS by suppressing MMP12 production. These findings underscore the importance of M2 macrophage-derived MMP12 in the development of CHS, and suggest that inhibition of M2 macrophages or MMP12 could be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of allergic contact dermatitis.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.015
       
  • Atopic dermatitis: immune deviation, barrier dysfunction, IgE
           autoreactivity and new therapies

    • Authors: Masutaka Furue; Takahito Chiba; Gaku Tsuji; Dugarmaa Ulzii; Makiko Kido-Nakahara; Takeshi Nakahara; Takafumi Kadono
      Pages: 398 - 403
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Masutaka Furue, Takahito Chiba, Gaku Tsuji, Dugarmaa Ulzii, Makiko Kido-Nakahara, Takeshi Nakahara, Takafumi Kadono
      Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic or chronically relapsing, eczematous, severely pruritic skin disorder mostly associated with IgE elevation and skin barrier dysfunction due to decreased filaggrin expression. The lesional skin of AD exhibits Th2- and Th22-deviated immune reactions that are progressive during disease chronicity. Th2 and Th22 cytokines further deteriorate the skin barrier by inhibiting filaggrin expression. Some IgEs are reactive to self-antigens. The IgE autoreactivity may precipitate the chronicity of AD. Upon activation of the ORAI1 calcium channel, atopic epidermis releases large amounts of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), which initiates the Th2 and Th22 immune response. Th2-derived interleukin-31 and TSLP induce an itch sensation. Taken together, TSLP/Th2/Th22 pathway is a promising target for developing new therapeutics for AD. Enhancing filaggrin expression using ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor may also be an adjunctive measure to restore the disrupted barrier function specifically for AD.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.002
       
  • Utility of serum periostin in combination with exhaled nitric oxide in the
           management of asthma

    • Authors: Tadao Nagasaki; Hisako Matsumoto; Kenji Izuhara; Yoshihiro Kanemitsu; Yuji Tohda; Takahiko Horiguchi; Hideo Kita; Keisuke Tomii; Masaki Fujimura; Akihito Yokoyama; Yasutaka Nakano; Soichiro Hozawa; Isao Ito; Tsuyoshi Oguma; Yumi Izuhara; Tomoko Tajiri; Toshiyuki Iwata; Tetsuji Yokoyama; Akio Niimi; Michiaki Mishima
      Pages: 404 - 410
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Tadao Nagasaki, Hisako Matsumoto, Kenji Izuhara
      Type-2/eosinophilic inflammation plays a pivotal role in asthma. The identification of severe type-2/eosinophilic asthma is important for improving the management of patients with asthma. Therefore, efforts to develop non-invasive biomarkers for type-2/eosinophilic airway inflammation have been made during this decade. Currently, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and serum periostin levels are considered markers of type-2/eosinophilic inflammation in asthma. However, a single-marker approach has limited the ability to diagnose severe type-2/eosinophilic asthma accurately and predict disease outcomes precisely. The present article reviews the utility of FeNO and serum periostin levels in a single-marker approach and in a multiple-marker approach in identifying patients with severe type-2/eosinophilic asthma. Furthermore, based on a sub-analysis of the Kinki Hokuriku Airway disease Conference (KiHAC), geno-endo-phenotypes of patients were stratified into four groups according to the FeNO and serum periostin levels.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.003
       
  • Assessing usability of the “Adherence Starts with Knowledge 20”
           (ASK-20) questionnaire for Japanese adults with bronchial asthma receiving
           inhaled corticosteroids long term

    • Authors: Ryo Atsuta; Yasuo To; Susumu Sakamoto; Isao Mukai; Akihiro Kobayashi; Arisa Kinoshita; Kazuhisa Takahashi
      Pages: 411 - 417
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ryo Atsuta, Yasuo To, Susumu Sakamoto, Isao Mukai, Akihiro Kobayashi, Arisa Kinoshita, Kazuhisa Takahashi
      Background Maintaining high treatment adherence levels is critical for effective management of chronic diseases. The Adherence Starts with Knowledge 20 (ASK-20) questionnaire is the only linguistically validated patient-reported treatment adherence tool available in Japan. We conducted additional analyses on ASK-20 data from Japanese adults with asthma. Methods This was a prospective, non-interventional, single-visit, multi-centre study in Japanese adults (n = 300) with asthma receiving long-term treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) or ICS/long-acting beta-agonists. We tested the reliability, validity and the relationship between different adherence conditions and ASK-20 score. At one centre, ICS adherence prescription rate was calculated retrospectively based on 2-year percentage ICS adherence data contained within medical records. Results The ASK-20 had good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.76; n = 290). Discriminant validity was demonstrated with significant correlations between the percentage ICS adherence rates and both the mean ASK-20 total score and mean total barrier count (TBC) (r = −0.51 and −0.58, p < 0.001; n = 111). The ASK-20 total score discriminated between subjects with good and poor adherence measured by patients' reported questionnaire and between those of high and low percentage ICS adherence rates. All other factors that possibly affect adherence were correlated with the mean ASK-20 total score and mean TBC in addition to the number of medicines taken every day. Conclusions The Japanese ASK-20 is a reliable tool for assessing possible medication adherence barriers and adherence behaviour in Japanese adults with asthma. Furthermore, our results are comparable with those obtained using the ASK-20 in the United States.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.09.001
       
  • Discrepancies in the diagnosis and classification of nonsteroidal
           anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity reactions in children

    • Authors: Tuğba Arikoglu; Gulen Aslan; Didem Derici Yildirim; Sehra Birgul Batmaz; Semanur Kuyucu
      Pages: 418 - 424
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Tuğba Arikoglu, Gulen Aslan, Didem Derici Yildirim, Sehra Birgul Batmaz, Semanur Kuyucu
      Background Hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently encountered in daily clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine the confirmation rates, risk factors of NSAID hypersensitivity in children and to try to classify them with a standardized diagnostic protocol. Methods All patients with a suspicion of NSAID-induced hypersensitivity were evaluated with European Network for drug Allergy (ENDA) recommendations. The children were classified as selective responders (SRs) or cross-intolerant (CI) depending on the drug provocation test (DPT) results. Results We evaluated 106 children with a suspicion of NSAID hypersensitivity. NSAID hypersensitivity was confirmed with tests in 31 patients; 4 (12.9%) were diagnosed by skin tests and 27 (87.1%) by DPTs and two patients with a history of anaphylaxis by medical records. Eleven patients (33.3%) were classified as SRs, whereas twenty-two (66.6%) children as CIs. SRs and CIs were further classified as NSAID-induced urticaria/angioedema (n = 8), NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease (n = 6) and NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease (n = 1) and single NSAID-induced urticaria/angioedema and/or anaphylaxis (n = 11). Eight (24.2%) patients could not be categorized according to ENDA/GA2LEN classification; one CI patient could not be classified based on pathomechanisms, seven CIs could not be categorized based on the underlying disease and clinical manifestations. A reaction within an hour of drug intake (aOR:3.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.18–7.67, p = 0.021), a history with multiple NSAIDs hypersensitivity (aOR:2.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.16–7.60, p = 0.022), and family history of atopy (aOR:4.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.50–10.82, p = 0.006) were found as the independent risk factors related to confirmed NSAID hypersensitivity. Conclusions This study suggests the presence of different phenotypes which do not fit into the current classifications in children with NSAID hypersensitivity.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.10.004
       
  • Complementary and alternative medicine for allergic rhinitis in Japan

    • Authors: Syuji Yonekura; Yoshitaka Okamoto; Daiju Sakurai; Toshioki Sakurai; Tomohisa Iinuma; Heizaburou Yamamoto; Toyoyuki Hanazawa; Shigetoshi Horiguchi; Yuichi Kurono; Kohei Honda; Yuichi Majima; Keisuke Masuyama; Noriaki Takeda; Shigeharu Fujieda; Mitsuhiro Okano; Satoshi Ogino; Kimihiro Okubo
      Pages: 425 - 431
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Syuji Yonekura, Yoshitaka Okamoto, Daiju Sakurai, Toshioki Sakurai, Tomohisa Iinuma, Heizaburou Yamamoto, Toyoyuki Hanazawa, Shigetoshi Horiguchi, Yuichi Kurono, Kohei Honda, Yuichi Majima, Keisuke Masuyama, Noriaki Takeda, Shigeharu Fujieda, Mitsuhiro Okano, Satoshi Ogino, Kimihiro Okubo
      Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is extensively used in patients with allergic diseases worldwide. The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual situation of CAM practice in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Methods We distributed questionnaires to otolaryngologists at 114 facilities in Japan. The subjects who participated in this study included children <16 years of age and adults ≥16 years of age diagnosed with allergic rhinitis by otolaryngologists. The survey was performed in the period from September 2007 to August 2009. Furthermore, we performed the same investigation out of the hospital setting, such as during general health examinations. All questionnaires were returned to Chiba University and analyzed. Results The proportions of patients who had ever experimented with CAM in the hospital survey were 7.1% (225/3170) and 19.2% (1416/7363) of children and adults, respectively. Approximately 36.2% of the adult patients thought that the treatments were effective. The main reasons for CAM use were safety, convenience and low price. However, the group who spent more than $1000 on CAM felt more dissatisfaction and anxiety related to treatment at the hospital. The situation of CAM practice was not consistent and was instead influenced by the backgrounds of the subjects. Conclusions Many patients who receive CAM report feeling that the effects of treatment provided by hospitals are insufficient and have concerns about the side effects of such treatments. Information regarding standard treatments, as described in the guidelines, should become widely known and diffused, and strong communication with patients should be considered.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.10.006
       
  • Beneficial effects of Galectin-9 on allergen-specific sublingual
           immunotherapy in a Dermatophagoides farinae-induced mouse model of
           chronic asthma

    • Authors: Masaki Ikeda; Shigeki Katoh; Hiroki Shimizu; Akira Hasegawa; Katsuyo Ohashi-Doi; Mikio Oka
      Pages: 432 - 439
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Masaki Ikeda, Shigeki Katoh, Hiroki Shimizu, Akira Hasegawa, Katsuyo Ohashi-Doi, Mikio Oka
      Background Allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy is a potential disease-modifying treatment for allergic asthma. Galectin-9 (Gal-9), a β-galactoside-binding protein with various biologic effects, acts as an immunomodulator in excessive immunologic reactions by expanding regulatory T cells (Treg) and enhancing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. We investigated the efficacy of sublingually administered Gal-9 as an adjuvant to a specific allergen in a Dermatophagoides farinae (Df)-induced mouse model of chronic asthma. Methods BALB/c mice were intranasally sensitized with Df extract 5 days/week for 5 weeks, and then sublingual Df-allergen extract for 2 weeks (5 days/week). Three days after the final sublingual treatment, mice were intranasally challenged with Df extract. The early asthmatic response (EAR) was evaluated 5 min after the last Df challenge. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was assayed and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 24 h after the last allergen challenge. Serum IgE and cytokine levels, and number of inflammatory cells in the BAL fluid (BALF) were analyzed. Results Sublingual Df treatment in the presence of Gal-9, but not alone, significantly reduced AHR; EAR; number of eosinophils and interleukin-13 in the BALF; and serum IgE levels. BALF TGF-β1 levels were significantly increased in the presence of Gal-9 compared with Df alone. Treg depletion blocked the inhibitory effects of Gal-9 on the EAR, AHR, eosinophilic airway inflammation, and Df-specific serum IgE levels, and suppressed BALF TGF-β1 levels. Conclusions Gal-9 exhibited beneficial effects of sublingual Df allergen-specific immunotherapy in a Df-induced mouse model of chronic asthma, possibly by Gal-9-induced TGF-β1 production in the lung.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.10.007
       
  • Serum IL-21 levels are elevated in atopic dermatitis patients with acute
           skin lesions

    • Authors: Hiromi Mizutani; Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka; Naomi Nakamura; Koji Masuda; Norito Katoh
      Pages: 440 - 444
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Hiromi Mizutani, Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka, Naomi Nakamura, Koji Masuda, Norito Katoh
      Background Interleukin (IL)-21 is a member of the type I cytokine family and plays a role in the pathogenesis of T helper type 2 allergic diseases. It has been reported that IL-21 expression is upregulated in acute skin lesions in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients; however, little is known about the serum IL-21 levels of AD patients. The aim of this study was to quantify the serum IL-21 levels of AD patients and to evaluate the relationships between the serum IL-21 level and disease severity, laboratory markers, and eruption type in AD patients. Methods We measured the serum IL-21 levels of adult AD patients and healthy control subjects using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results The adult AD patients exhibited significantly higher serum IL-21 levels than the healthy control subjects. A comparison of the patients' serum IL-21 levels based on the clinical severity of their AD revealed that the patients with severe AD demonstrated significantly higher serum IL-21 levels than those with mild AD and the healthy control subjects. The serum IL-21 levels were significantly correlated with the skin severity score, and especially with the degree of acute lesions such as erythema and edema/papules. The serum IL-21 level was not associated with laboratory markers, such as the serum IgE level, the serum thymus and activation-related chemokine level, blood eosinophilia, and the serum lactate dehydrogenase level. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-21 might be involved in the pathogenesis of AD, especially the development of acute skin lesions.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.10.010
       
  • Efficacy and safety of mepolizumab in Japanese patients with severe
           eosinophilic asthma

    • Authors: Terufumi Shimoda; Hiroshi Odajima; Arisa Okamasa; Minako Kawase; Masaki Komatsubara; Bhabita Mayer; Steven Yancey; Hector Ortega
      Pages: 445 - 451
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Terufumi Shimoda, Hiroshi Odajima, Arisa Okamasa, Minako Kawase, Masaki Komatsubara, Bhabita Mayer, Steven Yancey, Hector Ortega
      Background The MENSA trial assessed the efficacy and safety of mepolizumab in patients with severe eosinophilic asthma. This report describes the efficacy and safety of mepolizumab in Japanese patients from MENSA. Methods A post hoc analysis of the Japanese subgroup from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, double-dummy, Phase III MENSA trial (NCT01691521). Patients ≥12 years with severe eosinophilic asthma received mepolizumab 75 mg intravenously (IV), 100 mg subcutaneously (SC), or placebo, every 4 weeks for 32 weeks. The primary endpoint was the annualized rate of exacerbations. Secondary and other endpoints included annualized rate of exacerbations requiring emergency department (ED) visit/hospitalization, morning peak expiratory flow (PEF), St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score and eosinophil counts. Adverse events (AEs) were monitored. Results In the Japanese subgroup (N = 50), the rate of clinically significant exacerbations was reduced by 90% (rate ratio [RR]: 0.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02–0.57; P = 0.010) with mepolizumab IV and 62% (RR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.12–1.18; P = 0.094) with mepolizumab SC, versus placebo. No exacerbations requiring ED visit/hospitalization were reported with mepolizumab IV; exacerbations were reduced by 73% (RR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.06–1.29; P = 0.102) with mepolizumab SC versus placebo. Compared with placebo, mepolizumab IV and SC numerically increased morning PEF from baseline by 40 L/min and 13 L/min, improved quality of life by greater than the minimal clinically important difference (SGRQ: 9.5 [P = 0.083] and 7.9 [P = 0.171] points) and reduced eosinophil counts. AE incidence was similar between treatments. Results were broadly consistent with the overall population. Conclusions Mepolizumab was efficacious and well tolerated in Japanese patients with severe eosinophilic asthma, producing similar responses to the overall MENSA population.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.11.006
       
  • Cytokine profile after oral food challenge in infants with food
           protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome

    • Authors: Mitsuaki Kimura; Yasunori Ito; Masaki Shimomura; Hideaki Morishita; Takaaki Meguro; Yuichi Adachi; Shiro Seto
      Pages: 452 - 457
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Mitsuaki Kimura, Yasunori Ito, Masaki Shimomura, Hideaki Morishita, Takaaki Meguro, Yuichi Adachi, Shiro Seto
      Background Although food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is supposed to be caused by inflammation, the role of cytokines has not yet been clarified. Methods To elucidate the role of cytokines in the development of symptoms and abnormal laboratory findings at an oral food challenge (OFC), changes in serum cytokine levels were analyzed for 6 OFCs in 4 patients with FPIES. The result of OFC was judged positive if any gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea, or bloody stool) were induced. Results Among 11 cytokines profiled, serum levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-5, and IL-8 were clearly increased in all 4 positive OFCs in which elevations of the serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and peripheral blood neutrophilia were also seen. The level of serum IL-10 also rose in 2 positive OFCs. Remarkable increases in the serum level of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-12 were observed in a positive OFC where the serum level of CRP rose markedly (6.75 mg/dL). The serum levels of IL-5 were also elevated in 2 negative OFCs. No apparent specific correlations were found between cytokines and GI symptoms. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-2 and IL-8 are involved in the antigen-specific immune responses in most patients with FPIES. Further studies are needed to elucidate the significance of these cytokine in the pathogenesis of FPIES.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.001
       
  • Analysis of primary treatment and prognosis of spontaneous urticaria

    • Authors: Toshihiko Tanaka; Makiko Hiragun; Michihiro Hide; Takaaki Hiragun
      Pages: 458 - 462
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Toshihiko Tanaka, Makiko Hiragun, Michihiro Hide, Takaaki Hiragun
      Background The prognosis of spontaneous urticaria in association with early treatment remains unclear. In this study, we retrospectively studied the prognosis of acute spontaneous urticaria in relation to age and treatments in a local clinic of dermatology. Methods Out of 5000 patients who visited an office dermatology clinic, clinical records of patients with spontaneous urticaria were extracted. Their prognosis and the relation to age and treatments were analyzed by the Kaplan–Meier method and generalized Wilcoxon test. Results Among 386 patients diagnosed with spontaneous urticaria, 284 patients (73.6%) began treatments within a week after the onset. Their non-remission rates after one week, four weeks and one year from the onset were 26.8%, 15.0% and 6.7%, respectively. The non-remission rates of patients who were 20-years-old or younger by one year after the onset of urticaria, were significantly lower than those of patients older than 20-years-old. No apparent relationship between remission rates and sex or the use of steroids was detected. However, the non-remission rates of urticaria treated with a standard dose of antihistamine were lower than that treated with additional medications. Conclusions Most patients who began treatments within one week from the onset remitted quickly. However approximately 7% of them continued to suffer from symptoms for more than a year. Such prolongation tended to be seen among patients who required other medications in addition to a standard dose of antihistamine.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.007
       
  • Human eosinophils constitutively express a unique serine protease, PRSS33

    • Authors: Sumika Toyama; Naoko Okada; Akio Matsuda; Hideaki Morita; Hirohisa Saito; Takao Fujisawa; Susumu Nakae; Hajime Karasuyama; Kenji Matsumoto
      Pages: 463 - 471
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sumika Toyama, Naoko Okada, Akio Matsuda, Hideaki Morita, Hirohisa Saito, Takao Fujisawa, Susumu Nakae, Hajime Karasuyama, Kenji Matsumoto
      Background Eosinophils play important roles in asthma, especially airway remodeling, by producing various granule proteins, chemical mediators, cytokines, chemokines and proteases. However, protease production by eosinophils is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the production of eosinophil-specific proteases/proteinases by transcriptome analysis. Methods Human eosinophils and other cells were purified from peripheral blood by density gradient sedimentation and negative/positive selections using immunomagnetic beads. Protease/proteinase expression in eosinophils and release into the supernatant were evaluated by microarray analysis, qPCR, ELISA, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining before and after stimulation with eosinophil-activating cytokines and secretagogues. mRNAs for extracellular matrix proteins in human normal fibroblasts were measured by qPCR after exposure to recombinant protease serine 33 (PRSS33) protein (rPRSS33), created with a baculovirus system. Results Human eosinophils expressed relatively high levels of mRNA for metalloproteinase 25 (MMP25), a disintegrin and metalloprotease 8 (ADAM8), ADAM10, ADAM19 and PRSS33. Expression of PRSS33 was the highest and eosinophil-specific. PRSS33 mRNA expression was not affected by eosinophil-activating cytokines. Immunofluorescence staining showed that PRSS33 was co-localized with an eosinophil granule protein. PRSS33 was not detected in the culture supernatant of eosinophils even after stimulation with secretagogues, but its cell surface expression was increased. rPRSS33 stimulation of human fibroblasts increased expression of collagen and fibronectin mRNAs, at least in part via protease-activated receptor-2 activation. Conclusions Activated eosinophils may induce fibroblast extracellular matrix protein synthesis via cell surface expression of PRSS33, which would at least partly explain eosinophils' role(s) in airway remodeling.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.01.001
       
  • Clock-dependent temporal regulation of IL-33/ST2-mediated mast
           cell response

    • Authors: Takahiro Kawauchi; Kayoko Ishimaru; Yuki Nakamura; Nobuhiro Nakano; Mutsuko Hara; Hideoki Ogawa; Ko Okumura; Shigenobu Shibata; Atsuhito Nakao
      Pages: 472 - 478
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Takahiro Kawauchi, Kayoko Ishimaru, Yuki Nakamura, Nobuhiro Nakano, Mutsuko Hara, Hideoki Ogawa, Ko Okumura, Shigenobu Shibata, Atsuhito Nakao
      Background Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an alarmin cytokine that binds to the interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 protein ST2. Clock is a key circadian gene that is essential for endogenous clockworks in mammals. This study investigated whether Clock temporally regulated IL-33-mediated responses in mast cells. Methods The kinetics of IL-33-mediated IL-6, IL-13, and TNF-α productions were compared between bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) from wild-type and Clock-mutated mice (Clock Δ19/Δ19 mice). The kinetics of the neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity or expression of IL-13 and Gob-5 in the lung in response to IL-33 were compared between wild-type and Clock Δ19/Δ19 mice. We also examined the kinetics of ST2 expression in mast cells and its association with Clock expression. Results There was a time-of-day-dependent variation in IL-33-mediated IL-6, IL-13, and TNF-α production in wild-type BMMCs, which was absent in Clock-mutated BMMCs. IL-33-induced neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity also showed a time-of-day-dependent variation in wild-type mice, which was absent in Clock Δ19/Δ19 mice. Furthermore, IL-33-induced IL-13 and Gob-5 expression in the lung exhibited a time-of-day-dependent variation in wild-type mice. These temporal variations in IL-33-mediated mast cell responses were associated with temporal variations of ST2 expression in mast cells. In addition, CLOCK bound to the promoter region of ST2 and Clock deletion resulted in down-regulation of ST2 expression in mast cells. Conclusions CLOCK temporally gates mast cell responses to IL-33 via regulation of ST2 expression. Our findings provide novel insights into IL-33/mast cell-associated physiology and pathologies.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.004
       
  • An infant case of severe hypereosinophilia and systemic symptoms with
           multiple drug hypersensitivity and reactivation of cytomegalovirus and BK
           virus

    • Authors: Ayumi Kobayashi; Reiko Takasawa; Kei Takasawa; Masato Nishioka; Masahide Kaneko; Hiroshi Ono; Takanobu Maekawa; Tomohiro Morio; Masayuki Shimohira
      Pages: 479 - 481
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ayumi Kobayashi, Reiko Takasawa, Kei Takasawa, Masato Nishioka, Masahide Kaneko, Hiroshi Ono, Takanobu Maekawa, Tomohiro Morio, Masayuki Shimohira


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.10.002
       
  • Poor pharmacological adherence to inhaled medicines compared with oral
           medicines in Japanese patients with asthma and chronic obstructive
           pulmonary disease

    • Authors: Yohei Imamura; Tomotaka Kawayama; Takashi Kinoshita; Yuki Sakazaki; Makoto Yoshida; Koichiro Takahashi; Kazuhiko Fujii; Masaru Ando; Tomoaki Hoshino; Tomoaki Iwanaga; Hirotsugu Kohrogi; Yoichi Nakanishi; Hiroshi Mukae; Kentaro Watanabe; Shinichiro Hayashi; Junichi Kadota; Toshihiko Ii; Hiromasa Inoue; Takao Tochigi; Jiro Fujita; Hiroshi Nakamura
      Pages: 482 - 484
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Yohei Imamura, Tomotaka Kawayama, Takashi Kinoshita, Yuki Sakazaki, Makoto Yoshida, Koichiro Takahashi, Kazuhiko Fujii, Masaru Ando, Tomoaki Hoshino, Tomoaki Iwanaga, Hirotsugu Kohrogi


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.10.008
       
  • Three cases of interstitial pneumonia with anti-signal recognition
           particle antibody

    • Authors: Ryuichi Togawa; Yoshinori Tanino; Takefumi Nikaido; Naoko Fukuhara; Manabu Uematsu; Kenichi Misa; Yuki Sato; Nozomu Matsuda; Yoshihiro Sugiura; Sachiko Namatame; Hiroko Kobayashi; Yasuhito Hamaguchi; Manabu Fujimoto; Masataka Kuwana; Mitsuru Munakata
      Pages: 485 - 487
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ryuichi Togawa, Yoshinori Tanino, Takefumi Nikaido, Naoko Fukuhara, Manabu Uematsu, Kenichi Misa, Yuki Sato, Nozomu Matsuda, Yoshihiro Sugiura, Sachiko Namatame, Hiroko Kobayashi, Yasuhito Hamaguchi, Manabu Fujimoto, Masataka Kuwana, Mitsuru Munakata


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.10.009
       
  • Corticosteroid use in urticaria multiforme cases

    • Authors: Nazli Ercan
      Pages: 488 - 489
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Nazli Ercan


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.11.008
       
  • Food allergy to millet and cross-reactivity with rice, corn and other
           cereals

    • Authors: Wolfgang Hemmer; Gabriele Sesztak-Greinecker; Stefan Wöhrl; Felix Wantke
      Pages: 490 - 492
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Wolfgang Hemmer, Gabriele Sesztak-Greinecker, Stefan Wöhrl, Felix Wantke


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.11.002
       
  • Development of a prediction model for a severe reaction in cow's milk
           challenges

    • Authors: Shiro Sugiura; Kemal Sasaki; Teruaki Matsui; Tomoko Nakagawa; Naoyuki Kando; Komei Ito
      Pages: 493 - 494
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Shiro Sugiura, Kemal Sasaki, Teruaki Matsui, Tomoko Nakagawa, Naoyuki Kando, Komei Ito


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.11.005
       
  • A case of cholinergic urticaria with localized hypohidrosis showing sweat
           gland eosinophilic infiltration

    • Authors: Aya Iwasaki; Tomonobu Ito; Hiroshi Kawakami; Kaoru Nishiwaki; Takafumi Numata; Masuyoshi Saito; Ryoji Tsuboi
      Pages: 495 - 496
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Aya Iwasaki, Tomonobu Ito, Hiroshi Kawakami, Kaoru Nishiwaki, Takafumi Numata, Masuyoshi Saito, Ryoji Tsuboi


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.11.007
       
  • Leukocytoclastic vasculitis with eosinophilic infiltration associated with
           thalidomide therapy for multiple myeloma: A case report

    • Authors: Susumu Ichiyama; Yoko Funasaka; Hiroko Yamashita; Hideto Tamura; Koiti Inokuchi; Hidehisa Saeki
      Pages: 497 - 498
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Susumu Ichiyama, Yoko Funasaka, Hiroko Yamashita, Hideto Tamura, Koiti Inokuchi, Hidehisa Saeki


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.006
       
  • Drug eruption caused by esomeprazole: A case report and mini-review

    • Authors: Maiko Taura; Jun Asai; Yusuke Wakabayashi; Koji Masuda; Norito Katoh
      Pages: 499 - 500
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Maiko Taura, Jun Asai, Yusuke Wakabayashi, Koji Masuda, Norito Katoh


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.009
       
  • Use of 3D-CT airway analysis software to assess a patient with severe
           persistent bronchial asthma treated with bronchial thermoplasty

    • Authors: Satoru Ishii; Motoyasu Iikura; Masayuki Hojo; Haruhito Sugiyama
      Pages: 501 - 503
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Satoru Ishii, Motoyasu Iikura, Masayuki Hojo, Haruhito Sugiyama


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2016.12.008
       
  • A successful case of egg allergy tolerance achieved at a local clinic

    • Authors: Yuki Okada; Akira Akasawa
      Pages: 504 - 506
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Yuki Okada, Akira Akasawa


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.01.002
       
  • Two cases of autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with rheumatoid
           arthritis

    • Authors: Satoru Ito; Keiko Wakahara; Toshihisa Kojima; Nobunori Takahashi; Kimitoshi Nishiwaki; Etsuro Yamaguchi; Yoshinori Hasegawa
      Pages: 507 - 509
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Satoru Ito, Keiko Wakahara, Toshihisa Kojima, Nobunori Takahashi, Kimitoshi Nishiwaki, Etsuro Yamaguchi, Yoshinori Hasegawa


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.002
       
  • Nonepisodic angioedema with eosinophilia: A case series from Thailand

    • Authors: Thatchai Kampitak
      Pages: 510 - 511
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Allergology International, Volume 66, Issue 3
      Author(s): Thatchai Kampitak


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.02.005
       
  • Surveillance of the use of adrenaline auto-injectors in Japanese children

    • Authors: Komei Ito; Manabu Ono; Naoyuki Kando; Teruaki Matsui; Tomoko Nakagawa; Shiro Sugiura; Motohiro Ebisawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Komei Ito, Manabu Ono, Naoyuki Kando, Teruaki Matsui, Tomoko Nakagawa, Shiro Sugiura, Motohiro Ebisawa
      Background The appropriate usage of an adrenaline auto-injector (AAI, Epipen®) is a key aspect of patient and social education in the management of anaphylaxis. However, although AAIs are being prescribed increasingly frequently, there are few reports on their actual use. Methods The Anaphylaxis Working Group of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology requested that society members register cases in which AAIs were used. Two hundred and sixty-six cases were collected from March 2014 to March 2016. Results The cases included 240 events of immediate-type food allergies caused by cow's milk (n = 100), hen's egg (n = 42), wheat (n = 40), and peanuts (n = 11). Exercise-related events were reported in 19 cases; however, the diagnosis of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with a specific causative food was only made in 4 cases (wheat, n = 2; fish, n = 1; squid, n = 1). The frequent reasons for the causative intake included programmed intake (n = 48), failure to check the food labeling (n = 43), and consuming an inappropriate food (n = 26). AAIs were used at schools or nurseries in 67 cases, with school or nursery staff members administering the AAI in 39 cases (58%). On arriving at the hospital, the symptom grade was improved in 71% of the cases, while grade 4 symptoms remained in 20% of the cases. No lethal cases or sequelae were reported. Conclusions AAIs were used effectively, even by school teachers. The need to visit a hospital after the use of an AAI should be emphasized because additional treatment might be required.

      PubDate: 2017-08-11T03:51:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.07.002
       
  • Desensitization to a whole egg by rush oral immunotherapy improves the
           quality of life of guardians: A multicenter, randomized, parallel-group,
           delayed-start design study

    • Authors: Naoka Itoh-Nagato; Yuzaburo Inoue; Mizuho Nagao; Takao Fujisawa; Naoki Shimojo; Tsutomu Iwata; Yuichi Adachi; Koichi Arakawa; Takayasu Arima; Keitaro Fukushima; Akira Hoshioka; Takashi Igarashi; Toshiko Itazawa; Komei Itoh; Makoto Kameda; Naoyuki Kando; Izumi Kato; Taeru Kitabayashi; Takae Kobayashi; Harumi Koyama; Yoshinori Morita; Taiji Nakano; Shuichi Suzuki; Yuri Takaoka; Minako Tomiita; Hisako Yagi; Yuko Yajima; Akiko Yamaide; Masahiro Yasui; Shigemi Yoshihara
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Naoka Itoh-Nagato, Yuzaburo Inoue, Mizuho Nagao, Takao Fujisawa, Naoki Shimojo, Tsutomu Iwata
      Background Patients with food allergies and their families have a significantly reduced health-related quality of life (QOL). Methods We performed a multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, delayed-start design study to clarify the efficacy and safety of rush oral immunotherapy (rOIT) and its impact on the participants' daily life and their guardians (UMIN000003943). Forty-five participants were randomly divided into an early-start group and a late-start group. The early-start group received rOIT for 3 months, while the late-start group continued the egg elimination diet (control). In the next stage, both groups received OIT until all participants had finished 12 months of maintenance OIT. Results The ratio of the participants in whom an increase of the TD was achieved in the first stage was significantly higher in the early-start group (87.0%), than in the late-start group (22.7%). The QOL of the guardians in the early-start group significantly improved after the first stage (65.2%), in comparison to the late-start group (31.8%). During 12 months of rOIT, the serum ovomucoid-specific IgE levels, the percentage of CD203c+ basophils upon stimulation with egg white, and the wheal size to egg white were decreased, while the serum ovomucoid-specific IgG4 levels were increased. However, approximately 80% of the participants in the early-start group showed an allergic reaction during the first stage of the study, whereas none of the patients in the late-start group experienced an allergic reaction. Conclusions rOIT induced desensitization to egg and thus improved the QOL of guardians; however, the participants experienced frequent allergic reactions due to the treatment.

      PubDate: 2017-08-11T03:51:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.07.007
       
  • An analysis of factors related to the effect of sublingual immunotherapy
           on Japanese cedar pollen induced allergic rhinitis

    • Authors: Syuji Yonekura; Yoshitaka Okamoto; Daiju Sakurai; Kimihiro Okubo; Minoru Gotoh; Shinya Kaneko; Akiyoshi Konno
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Syuji Yonekura, Yoshitaka Okamoto, Daiju Sakurai, Kimihiro Okubo, Minoru Gotoh, Shinya Kaneko, Akiyoshi Konno
      Background Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) can improve the symptoms of allergic rhinitis and modify its natural history; however, its efficacy varies among patients. This study aimed to determine which factors modify the effect of SLIT through post hoc analysis of a previous phase 3 trial of standardized Japanese cedar (JC) pollen extract (CEDARTOLEN®). Methods The study included 482 patients who had previously completed a phase 3 trial during two seasons. The SLIT and placebo groups each contained 241 subjects. Because pollen dispersal differed in the two seasons, we identified good and poor responders from the SLIT group in the 2nd season. We compared patient baseline characteristics, changes in serum immunoglobulin, and severity of symptoms in the 1st season between good and poor responders, as well as between SLIT and placebo groups. Results When we compared the baseline characteristics of good and poor responders, a significant difference was observed in body mass index (BMI) such that the patients with BMI ≥25 presented with lower treatment efficacy. No significant difference was observed in correlation with any other factors or treatment-induced alterations of serum immunoglobulin levels. We found that 75.3% of the patients with moderate symptoms and 50.9% of the patients with severe or very severe symptoms in the 1st season met our criteria for good responders in the 2nd season. Conclusions BMI might modify the effect of SLIT; however, other factors were not related clearly. The severity of symptoms in the 1st season of treatment does not predict that in the 2nd season.

      PubDate: 2017-08-01T03:43:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.07.005
       
  • Bronchial thermoplasty for severe uncontrolled asthma in Japan

    • Authors: Motoyasu Iikura; Masayuki Hojo; Naoko Nagano; Keita Sakamoto; Konomi Kobayashi; Shota Yamamoto; Masao Hashimoto; Satoru Ishii; Shinyu Izumi; Haruhito Sugiyama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Motoyasu Iikura, Masayuki Hojo, Naoko Nagano, Keita Sakamoto, Konomi Kobayashi, Shota Yamamoto, Masao Hashimoto, Satoru Ishii, Shinyu Izumi, Haruhito Sugiyama


      PubDate: 2017-08-01T03:43:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.07.006
       
  • Occupational allergy to Triticum spelta flour

    • Authors: Gemma Mencia; David El-Qutob; Fernando Pineda; Miriam Castillo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Gemma Mencia, David El-Qutob, Fernando Pineda, Miriam Castillo


      PubDate: 2017-08-01T03:43:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.07.004
       
  • Th9 cells induce steroid-resistant bronchial hyperresponsiveness in mice

    • Authors: Mayumi Saeki; Osamu Kaminuma; Tomoe Nishimura; Noriko Kitamura; Akio Mori; Takachika Hiroi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Mayumi Saeki, Osamu Kaminuma, Tomoe Nishimura, Noriko Kitamura, Akio Mori, Takachika Hiroi
      Background Reduced responsiveness to corticosteroid therapy is a major problem for patients with severe asthma. Although Th9 cells, along with Th2 cells, facilitate antigen-induced airway eosinophilia and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), the sensitivity of Th9 cell-mediated responses to steroid therapy remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of dexamethasone (Dex) on antigen-induced airway inflammation in Th9 cell-transferred mice. Methods Ovalbumin (OVA)-specific Th2 and Th9 cells were polarized from the CD4+ T cells of DO11.10/RAG-2 −/− mice. BALB/c mice were adoptively transferred with Th2 or Th9 cells and challenged with OVA. Dex treatment was performed twice, at 1 h before and at 24 h after the OVA challenge. Following treatment, the number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the bronchial responsiveness to inhaled methacholine were determined. Results In both the Th2 and Th9 cell-transferred mice, substantial accumulation of eosinophils in the lungs and BHR were induced by challenge with the specific antigen. In the Th2 cell-transferred mice, these responses were significantly diminished by Dex treatment. In contrast, neither cellular infiltration nor BHR was affected by Dex treatment in the Th9 cell-transferred mice, although the Th9 cells substantially expressed glucocorticoid receptor α. Accordingly, antigen-induced interleukin-9 expression in the Th9 cells was attenuated by Dex treatment at least in vitro. Antigen-induced lung infiltration of infused Th2 cells but not Th9 cells was significantly suppressed by Dex. Conclusions In contrast to Th2-mediated responses, Th9-mediated airway inflammation was not affected by Dex. Th9 cells might be involved in the developmental mechanisms of steroid-resistant asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-08-01T03:43:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.07.001
       
  • Histopathological and clinical evaluation of chronic spontaneous urticaria
           patients with neutrophilic and non-neutrophilic cutaneous infiltrate

    • Authors: Cíntia Freitas Martins; Karina Lopes Morais; Pamela Figueroa; Natasha Favoretto Dias; Neusa Sakai Valente; Celina Wakisaba Maruta; Paulo Ricardo Criado
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Cíntia Freitas Martins, Karina Lopes Morais, Pamela Figueroa, Natasha Favoretto Dias, Neusa Sakai Valente, Celina Wakisaba Maruta, Paulo Ricardo Criado
      Background Chronic urticaria has an expressive prevalence in general population, especially in adults, and is defined by the presence of intermittent hives for six weeks or longer. Our study aims to characterize the histological patterns of chronic spontaneous urticaria, based on the inflammatory cell infiltrate, and correlate them to laboratory exams. Methods It was performed a retrospective analysis of laboratory, histopathology and direct immunofluorescence data of 93 patients with chronic urticaria. For histopathological analysis, cell count was performed in four fields at high magnification (×400) for each specimen. The resulting cell count medians were submitted to statistical analysis and, then, were correlated to laboratorial findings. Results We found a female predominance (76.34%) of chronic urticaria cases, and an average age of 42.5 years (SD ± 15). Two histological groups were distinctive: 1) chronic urticaria with predominance of neutrophils or eosinophils – N (%) = 39 (42.4%) – and 2) chronic urticaria with predominance of lymphocytes – N (%) = 53 (57.6%). There was not significant correlation between histological groups and laboratorial tests. Moreover, direct immunofluorescence was positive in 21 (33,87%) from 62 patients. Conclusions There is not enough scientific evidence to support neutrophilic urticaria as a solid, separate entity.

      PubDate: 2017-08-01T03:43:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.012
       
  • Serum levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigens 1 and 2 reflect disease
           severity and clinical type of atopic dermatitis in adult patients

    • Authors: Tomoko Okawa; Yukie Yamaguchi; Kenzen Kou; Junya Ono; Yoshinori Azuma; Noriko Komitsu; Yusuke Inoue; Masumi Kohno; Setsuko Matsukura; Takeshi Kambara; Shoichiro Ohta; Kenji Izuhara; Michiko Aihara
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Tomoko Okawa, Yukie Yamaguchi, Kenzen Kou, Junya Ono, Yoshinori Azuma, Noriko Komitsu, Yusuke Inoue, Masumi Kohno, Setsuko Matsukura, Takeshi Kambara, Shoichiro Ohta, Kenji Izuhara, Michiko Aihara
      Background Recent studies have indicated that serum levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) 1 and 2 induced by type 2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13, are increased in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). However, no clinical studies have analyzed serum levels of SCCA2 in larger series of AD patients or their association with various clinical characteristics. This study was performed to clarify whether serum levels of SCCA2 are associated with disease severity and clinical phenotypes of adult AD patients. Methods An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to examine serum SCCA2 levels in 240 adult patients with AD and 25 healthy controls in this study. Serum SCCA2 levels were analyzed with clinical characteristics and laboratory parameters including thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), blood eosinophils, total IgE, and specific IgE (Japanese cedar pollen, Dermatophagoides farina, Candida, malassezia, Staphylococcal enterotoxin B). Expression of SCCA2 in AD eruption was examined by immunohistochemistry. The effect of treatment on serum SCCA2 was also assessed. Results Serum SCCA2 level showed a positive correlation with disease severity, levels of TARC, LDH, eosinophil counts, and IgE levels. Robust expression of SCCA2 was detected in the supra basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of AD patients. Serial measurements of serum SCCA2 revealed decreased levels of SCCA2 after treatment for AD. Conclusions Serum SCCA2 levels reflected disease severity and clinical type of AD. Serum SCCA2 may thus be a relevant biomarker for AD.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:38:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.016
       
  • Immediate-type allergic reactions to local anesthetics

    • Authors: Naomi Nakamura; Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka; Koji Masuda; Norito Katoh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Naomi Nakamura, Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka, Koji Masuda, Norito Katoh


      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:38:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.07.003
       
  • Resveratrol inhibits IgE binding and down-regulates intracellular
           phosphorylation of Syk following IgE aggregation on human basophils

    • Authors: Sayaka Arakawa; Maho Suzukawa; Sayaka Igarashi; Hirotoshi Matsui; Masao Yamaguchi; Takahide Nagase; Ken Ohta
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Sayaka Arakawa, Maho Suzukawa, Sayaka Igarashi, Hirotoshi Matsui, Masao Yamaguchi, Takahide Nagase, Ken Ohta


      PubDate: 2017-07-15T03:31:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.015
       
  • Epithelial-mesenchymal transition of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells
           up-regulates cytokine production upon LPS stimulation

    • Authors: Takafumi Kato; Koichi Kobayashi; Maho Suzukawa; Minako Saito; Kenichi Okuda; Kazuya Koyama; Sayaka Igarashi; Sayaka Arakawa; Nobuharu Ohshima; Hirotoshi Matsui; Takahide Nagase; Ken Ohta
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Takafumi Kato, Koichi Kobayashi, Maho Suzukawa, Minako Saito, Kenichi Okuda, Kazuya Koyama, Sayaka Igarashi, Sayaka Arakawa, Nobuharu Ohshima, Hirotoshi Matsui, Takahide Nagase, Ken Ohta


      PubDate: 2017-07-15T03:31:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.014
       
  • Elevated uric acid and adenosine triphosphate concentrations in
           bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of eosinophilic pneumonia

    • Authors: Takehito Kobayashi; Kazuyuki Nakagome; Toru Noguchi; Kiyoko Kobayashi; Yutaka Ueda; Tomoyuki Soma; Kenji Ikebuchi; Hidetomo Nakamoto; Makoto Nagata
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Takehito Kobayashi, Kazuyuki Nakagome, Toru Noguchi, Kiyoko Kobayashi, Yutaka Ueda, Tomoyuki Soma, Kenji Ikebuchi, Hidetomo Nakamoto, Makoto Nagata
      Background Recent evidence has suggested that the innate immune response may play a role in the development of eosinophilic airway inflammation. We previously reported that uric acid (UA) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), two important damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), activate eosinophil functions, suggesting that these molecules may be involved in the development of eosinophilic airway inflammation. The objective of this study was to measure the concentrations of DAMPs including UA and ATP in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients with eosinophilic pneumonia (EP). Methods BAL was performed in patients with EP including acute and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, and in patients with hypersensitivity pneumonia, and sarcoidosis. UA, ATP, and cytokine concentrations in the BALF were then measured. Results The UA concentration was increased in the BALF of EP patients. UA concentrations correlated with eosinophil numbers, and with eosinophil-derived neurotoxin and interleukin (IL)-5 concentrations. Furthermore, the ATP concentration was increased in the BALF of EP patients and ATP concentrations correlated with UA concentrations. Moreover, IL-33 was increased in EP patients and IL-33 concentrations correlated with UA and ATP concentrations. Conclusions The UA and ATP concentration was increased in the BALF of EP patients. UA concentrations correlated with eosinophil numbers, and with ATP and IL-33 concentrations. Our findings suggest that DAMPs such as UA and ATP play a role in the pathogenesis of EP.

      PubDate: 2017-07-15T03:31:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.010
       
  • Survey on the proper use of an adrenaline auto-injector in 551 Japanese
           outdoor workers after Hymenoptera stings

    • Authors: Hirokuni Hirata; Naruo Yoshida; Masamitsu Tatewaki; Sadaaki Shiromori; Kozo Sato; Tomoshige Wakayama; Shingo Tokita; Kumiya Sugiyama; Masafumi Arima; Kazuhiro Kurasawa; Takeshi Fukuda; Daisuke Shima; Yasutsugu Fukushima
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Hirokuni Hirata, Naruo Yoshida, Masamitsu Tatewaki, Sadaaki Shiromori, Kozo Sato, Tomoshige Wakayama, Shingo Tokita, Kumiya Sugiyama, Masafumi Arima, Kazuhiro Kurasawa, Takeshi Fukuda, Daisuke Shima, Yasutsugu Fukushima


      PubDate: 2017-07-15T03:31:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.009
       
  • Gut microbiome, metabolome, and allergic diseases

    • Authors: So-ichiro Hirata; Jun Kunisawa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): So-ichiro Hirata, Jun Kunisawa
      The number of patients with allergic and inflammatory disorders has been increasing during the past several decades. Accumulating evidence has refined our understanding of the relationship between allergic diseases and the gut microbiome. In addition, the gut microbiome is now known to produce both useful and harmful metabolites from dietary materials. These metabolites and bacterial components help to regulate host immune responses and potentially affect the development of allergic diseases. Here, we describe recent findings regarding the immunologic crosstalk between commensal bacteria and dietary components in the regulation of host immunity and the influence of this relationship on the development of allergic diseases.

      PubDate: 2017-07-15T03:31:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.008
       
  • Flow cytometry-based diagnosis of primary immunodeficiency diseases

    • Authors: Hirokazu Kanegane; Akihiro Hoshino; Tsubasa Okano; Takahiro Yasumi; Taizo Wada; Hidetoshi Takada; Satoshi Okada; Motoi Yamashita; Tzu-wen Yeh; Ryuta Nishikomori; Masatoshi Takagi; Kohsuke Imai; Hans D. Ochs; Tomohiro Morio
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Hirokazu Kanegane, Akihiro Hoshino, Tsubasa Okano, Takahiro Yasumi, Taizo Wada, Hidetoshi Takada, Satoshi Okada, Motoi Yamashita, Tzu-wen Yeh, Ryuta Nishikomori, Masatoshi Takagi, Kohsuke Imai, Hans D. Ochs, Tomohiro Morio
      Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases of the immune system. The definite diagnosis of PID is ascertained by genetic analysis; however, this takes time and is costly. Flow cytometry provides a rapid and highly sensitive tool for diagnosis of PIDs. Flow cytometry can evaluate specific cell populations and subpopulations, cell surface, intracellular and intranuclear proteins, biologic effects associated with specific immune defects, and certain functional immune characteristics, each being useful for the diagnosis and evaluation of PIDs. Flow cytometry effectively identifies major forms of PIDs, including severe combined immunodeficiency, X-linked agammaglobulinemia, hyper IgM syndromes, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, IPEX syndrome, CTLA 4 haploinsufficiency and LRBA deficiency, IRAK4 and MyD88 deficiencies, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, chronic mucocuneous candidiasis, and chronic granulomatous disease. While genetic analysis is the definitive approach to establish specific diagnoses of PIDs, flow cytometry provides a tool to effectively evaluate patients with PIDs at relatively low cost.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.003
       
  • Efficacy of oral immunotherapy with a rice-based edible vaccine containing
           hypoallergenic Japanese cedar pollen allergens for treatment of
           established allergic conjunctivitis in mice

    • Authors: Ken Fukuda; Waka Ishida; Yosuke Harada; Yuhya Wakasa; Hidenori Takagi; Fumio Takaiwa; Atsuki Fukushima
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 July 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Ken Fukuda, Waka Ishida, Yosuke Harada, Yuhya Wakasa, Hidenori Takagi, Fumio Takaiwa, Atsuki Fukushima
      Background We have previously shown that prophylactic oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing hypoallergenic modified antigens suppressed the development of allergic conjunctivitis induced by Japanese cedar pollen. We have now investigated the efficacy of oral immunotherapy with such transgenic rice for established allergic conjunctivitis in mice. Methods BALB/c mice were sensitized with two intraperitoneal injections of Japanese cedar pollen in alum, challenged with pollen in eyedrops, and then fed for 16 days with transgenic rice seeds expressing modified Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 or with nontransgenic rice seeds as a control. They were then challenged twice with pollen in eyedrops, with clinical signs being evaluated at 15 min after the first challenge and the eyes, blood, spleen, and lymph nodes being isolated at 24 h after the second challenge. Results The number of eosinophils in the conjunctiva and the clinical score for conjunctivitis were both significantly lower in mice fed the transgenic rice than in those fed nontransgenic rice. Oral vaccination with transgenic rice seeds also resulted in a significant increase in the production of IFN-γ by splenocytes, whereas it had no effect on the number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the spleen or submandibular or mesenteric lymph nodes. Conclusions Oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing hypoallergenic allergens ameliorated allergic conjunctivitis in the established setting. Such a rice-based edible vaccine is potentially both safe and effective for oral immunotherapy in individuals with allergic conjunctivitis.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.006
       
  • A lung sound analysis in a child thought to have cough variant asthma: A
           case report

    • Authors: Eri Imai; Mayumi Enseki; Mariko Nukaga; Hideyuki Tabata; Kota Hirai; Masahiko Kato; Hiroyuki Mochizuki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 June 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Eri Imai, Mayumi Enseki, Mariko Nukaga, Hideyuki Tabata, Kota Hirai, Masahiko Kato, Hiroyuki Mochizuki


      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.004
       
  • Neuropsychiatry phenotype in asthma: Psychological stress-induced
           alterations of the neuroendocrine-immune system in allergic airway
           inflammation

    • Authors: Isao Ohno
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Isao Ohno
      Since the recognition of asthma as a syndrome with complex pathophysiological signs and symptoms, recent research has sought to classify asthma phenotypes based on its clinical and molecular pathological features. Psychological stress was first recognized as a potential immune system modulator of asthma at the end of the 19th century. The activation of the central nervous system (CNS) upon exposure to psychological stress is integral for the initiation of signal transduction processes. The stress hormones, including glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, which are secreted following CNS activation, are involved in the immunological alterations involved in psychological stress-induced asthma exacerbation. The mechanisms underlying this process may involve a pathological series of events from the brain to the lungs, which is attracting attention as a conceptually advanced phenotype in asthma pathogenesis. This review presents insights into the critical role of psychological stress in the development and exacerbation of allergic asthma, with a special focus on our own data that emphasizes on the continuity from the central sensing of psychological stress to enhanced eosinophilic airway inflammation.

      PubDate: 2017-07-06T03:03:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.005
       
  • Different hypersensitivities against homologous proteins of MGL_1304 in
           patients with atopic dermatitis

    • Authors: Takuma Kohsaka; Takaaki Hiragun; Kaori Ishii; Makiko Hiragun; Akiko Kamegashira; Michihiro Hide
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 June 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Takuma Kohsaka, Takaaki Hiragun, Kaori Ishii, Makiko Hiragun, Akiko Kamegashira, Michihiro Hide
      Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is exacerbated by sweating, and the skin of most patients with AD are resided by Malassezia (M.) fungi. Recently, MGL_1304 produced by M alassezia globosa was identified as the major histamine releasing antigen in human sweat. Methods The full length cDNA of the counterpart of MGL_1304 in M alassezia restricta (Mala r 8), was cloned by degenerate PCR and rapid identification of cDNA ends (RACE). Recombinant MGL_1304, and its counterparts, Mala s 8 (produced by M alassezia sympodialis) and Mala r 8 were prepared, and compared in their allergenicities by dot blot analysis and histamine release tests with sera and basophils of patients with AD. Results The identities between MGL_1304 and Mala s 8, MGL_1304 and Mala r 8, and Mala s 8 and Mala r 8 were 68%, 78%, and 76%, respectively, in protein sequences. Dot blot analysis revealed that the level of IgE binding to Mala s 8 was higher than that of MGL_1304. However, histamine release tests revealed that MGL_1304 and Mala r 8 possessed higher activity than Mala s 8. In addition, the crude lysate of M. globosa showed higher histamine release ability than that of M. sympodialis. Conclusions Patients with AD showed hypersensitivities against MGL_1304 and its homologs. However, the allergenicities of the homologs are variable and the histamine release activities may be different from the solid-phase binding activities for IgE. Sweat allergy should be carefully evaluated with biological activities of MGL_1304 and its homologs of other Malassezia fungi residing on the skin.

      PubDate: 2017-06-27T10:37:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.05.009
       
  • Obesity-related systemic oxidative stress: An important factor of poor
           asthma control

    • Authors: Masako To; Yuta Kono; Naoto Ogura; Shintaro Mikami; Natsue Honda; Akihiro Hitani; Ichino Kano; Kosuke Haruki; Yasuo To
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 June 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Masako To, Yuta Kono, Naoto Ogura, Shintaro Mikami, Natsue Honda, Akihiro Hitani, Ichino Kano, Kosuke Haruki, Yasuo To


      PubDate: 2017-06-27T10:37:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.06.002
       
  • Emerging roles of basophils in allergic inflammation

    • Authors: Kensuke Miyake; Hajime Karasuyama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Kensuke Miyake, Hajime Karasuyama
      Basophils have long been neglected in immunological studies because they were regarded as only minor relatives of mast cells. However, recent advances in analytical tools for basophils have clarified the non-redundant roles of basophils in allergic inflammation. Basophils play crucial roles in both IgE-dependent and -independent allergic inflammation, through their migration to the site of inflammation and secretion of various mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, and proteases. Basophils are known to produce large amounts of IL-4 in response to various stimuli. Basophil-derived IL-4 has recently been shown to play versatile roles in allergic inflammation by acting on various cell types, including macrophages, innate lymphoid cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Basophil-derived serine proteases are also crucial for the aggravation of allergic inflammation. Moreover, recent reports suggest the roles of basophils in modulating adaptive immune responses, particularly in the induction of Th2 differentiation and enhancement of humoral memory responses. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in understanding the roles of basophils in allergic inflammation.

      PubDate: 2017-05-16T10:46:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.04.007
       
  • T follicular helper and TH2 cells in allergic responses

    • Authors: Masato Kubo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 May 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Masato Kubo
      IL-4 is a cytokine commonly secreted by TH2 and follicular helper T (TFH) cells after antigenic sensitization. TH2 cells have been thought to be the major contributor of B cell help as a source of IL-4 responsible for class switch recombination to Immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and Immunoglobulin E (IgE). Importantly, there are some differences in transcriptional regulation between these two T cell subsets. The IL-4 production by TH2 and TFH cells is distinctively regulated by two pathways, GATA-3-mediated Il4-HS2 enhancer and Notch mediated Il4-CNS-2 enhancer. IgE and IgG1 antibody responses are mainly controlled by IL-4-secreting TFH cells, but not by TH2 cells. In this review, we discuss the role of TH2 and TFH cells in IgE production and allergic responses.

      PubDate: 2017-05-10T10:42:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.04.006
       
  • Maintenance of pathogenic Th2 cells in allergic disorders

    • Authors: Kenta Shinoda; Kiyoshi Hirahara; Toshinori Nakayama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2017
      Source:Allergology International
      Author(s): Kenta Shinoda, Kiyoshi Hirahara, Toshinori Nakayama
      Immunological memory is an important protective mechanism that enables host organisms to respond rapidly and vigorously to pathogens that have been previously encountered. In addition to the protective function, memory CD4+ T helper (Th) cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disorders, including asthma. Recently, several investigators have identified phenotypically and functionally distinct memory Th2 cell subsets that produce IL-5. These memory Th2 cell subsets play an important role in the pathology of allergic inflammation and function as memory-type “pathogenic Th2 (Tpath2) cells” both in mice and humans. We review the role of lung Tpath2 cells in the development of allergic inflammation and, in the context of recent findings, propose a mechanism by which Tpath2 cells not only survive but also continue to function at the sites where antigens were encountered. A greater understanding of the functional molecules or signaling pathways that regulate the inflammatory niche for Tpath2 cells may aid in the design of more effective treatments for chronic inflammatory disorders.

      PubDate: 2017-04-08T13:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alit.2017.03.005
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.196.105.189
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016