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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3183 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3183 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 101, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 433, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 177, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 418, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 373, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 468, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 241, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 64, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 206, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 210, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Allergology International
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.148
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 5  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1323-8930 - ISSN (Online) 1440-1592
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3183 journals]
  • Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis: Strain-specific cell wall
           proteins and skin immunity

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Kazumasa Iwamoto, Masaya Moriwaki, Ryu Miyake, Michihiro Hide Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic skin disease. The presence of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is frequently detected on skin affected with AD. In this review, we focused on the characteristics of S. aureus strains isolated from AD skin, particularly the proteins on the cell surface that modulates the interactions between Langerhans cell, keratinocyte, and S. aureus. The skin microbiome plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of the skin, and colonization of S. aureus in AD is considered to be deeply involved in the clinical manifestation and pathogenesis of skin flares. Colonizing S. aureus strains in AD harbor different surface proteins at the strain level, which are indicated as clonal complexes. Moreover, the cell wall proteins of S. aureus affect skin adhesion and induce altered immune responses. S. aureus from AD skin (AD strain) exhibits internalization into keratinocytes and induces imbalanced Th1/Th2 adaptive immune responses via Langerhans cells. AD strain-derived cell wall proteins and secreted virulence factors are expected to represent therapeutic targets. In addition, the microbiome on the AD skin surface is associated with skin immunity; thus, microbiome-based immunotherapy, whose mechanism of action completely differs from that of typical steroid ointments, are expected to be developed in the future.
       
  • Severe asthma in Japan

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Hiroyuki Nagase The characteristic phenotype of severe asthma in Japan seems to be distilled into the following two features: low incidence of obesity and high prevalence of patients with type 2 inflammation. Only 5–7% of Japanese severe asthma patients had a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2, and more than 80% of patients with severe asthma exhibited type 2 inflammation. Although the relationship between obesity and non-type 2 inflammation is complex, the low incidence of obesity might explain the prevalence of type 2 inflammation.Some asthma cohorts in Japan have investigated the roles of type 2 biomarkers extensively, including periostin, to identify a severe phenotype, suggesting the utility of combining biomarkers to identify an exacerbation-prone subgroup.Although the prevalence of severe asthma is comparable to Western countries, the rate of asthma death and disease burden seems to be lower in Japan. These trends might be due to the system of public health insurance for the whole nation, leading to good access to hospital and asthma specialists due to the geographically narrow country.In this review article, we will discuss the definition, epidemiology, comorbidities, biomarkers, specific phenotype, and current treatment for severe asthma in Japan.
       
  • Periostin as a predictor of prognosis in chronic bird-related
           hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Yoshihisa Nukui, Yasunari Miyazaki, Masahiro Masuo, Tsukasa Okamoto, Haruhiko Furusawa, Tomoya Tateishi, Mitsuhiro Kishino, Ukihide Tateishi, Junya Ono, Shoichiro Ohta, Kenji Izuhara, Naohiko Inase BackgroundPeriostin is an established biomarker of Th2 immune response and fibrogenesis. Recent research has indicated that periostin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. To clarify the relationship between periostin and pathogenesis in chronic bird-related hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) and to reveal the usefulness of serum periostin levels in diagnosing and managing chronic bird-related HP.MethodsWe measured serum periostin in 63 patients with chronic bird-related HP, 13 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and 113 healthy volunteers. We investigated the relationship between serum periostin and clinical parameters, and evaluated if the baseline serum periostin could predict the prognosis.ResultsSerum periostin was significantly higher in patients with chronic bird-related HP compared to the healthy volunteers. In chronic bird-related HP, serum periostin had significant positive correlations with serum KL-6 levels, the CD4/CD8 ratio in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and fibrosis score on HRCT, and a significant negative correlation with the diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide. Chronic bird-related HP patients with serum periostin levels exceeding ≥92.5 ng/mL and ≥89.5 ng/mL had a significantly worse prognosis and significantly higher frequency of acute exacerbation, respectively. Higher serum periostin (92.5 ng/mL or higher; binary response for serum periostin) was an independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis.ConclusionsSerum periostin may reflect the extent of lung fibrosis and play an important role in pathogenesis of chronic bird-related HP. Elevated serum periostin could be a predictor of prognosis in patients with chronic bird-related HP.
       
  • Egg antigen was more abundant than mite antigen in children's bedding:
           Findings of the pilot study of the Japan Environment and Children's Study
           (JECS)

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Hiroshi Kitazawa, Kiwako Yamamoto-Hanada, Mayako Saito-Abe, Tadayuki Ayabe, Hidetoshi Mezawa, Kazue Ishitsuka, Mizuho Konishi, Shoji F. Nakayama, Takehiro Michikawa, Ayako Senju, Mayumi Tsuji, Koichi Kusuhara, Masafumi Sanefuji, Shouichi Ohga, Masako Oda, Hiroshi Mitsubuchi, Takahiko Katoh, Akihiko Ikegami, Natan Mise, Kenji Matsumoto
       
  • Low-dose l-isoproterenol versus salbutamol in hospitalized pediatric
           patients with severe acute exacerbation of asthma: A double-blind,
           randomized controlled trial

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Toshio Katsunuma, Takao Fujisawa, Takanobu Maekawa, Kenichi Akashi, Yukihiro Ohya, Yuichi Adachi, Koji Hashimoto, Mihoko Mizuno, Takanori Imai, Mari S. Oba, Mayumi Sako, Yasuo Ohashi, Hidefumi Nakamura BackgroundAlthough the guidelines in most countries do not recommend continuous inhalation of l-isoproterenol to treat pediatric patients with acute severe exacerbation of asthma, lower dose of l-isoproterenol has been widely used in Japan. To determine whether the efficacy of low-dose l-isoproterenol was superior to that of salbutamol, we conducted a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.MethodsHospitalized patients aged 1–17 years were eligible if they had severe asthma exacerbation defined by the modified pulmonary index score (MPIS). Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive inhalation of l-isoproterenol (10 μg/kg/h) or salbutamol (500 μg/kg/h) for 12 hours via a large-volume nebulizer with oxygen. The primary outcome was the change in MPIS from baseline to 3 hours after starting inhalation. Trial registration number UMIN000001991.ResultsFrom December 2009 to October 2013, 83 patients (42 in the l-isoproterenol group and 41 in the salbutamol group) were enrolled into the study. Of these, one patient in the l-isoproterenol group did not receive the study drug and was excluded from the analysis. Compared with salbutamol, l-isoproterenol reduced MPIS more rapidly. Mean (SD) changes in MPIS at 3 hours were −2.9 (2.5) in the l-isoproterenol group and −0.9 (2.3) in the salbutamol group (difference −2.0, 95% confidence interval −3.1 to −0.9; P 
       
  • Sublingual administration of liposomes enclosing alpha-galactosylceramide
           as an effective adjuvant of allergen immunotherapy in a murine model of
           allergic rhinitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Satoshi Suzuki, Daiju Sakurai, Toshioki Sakurai, Syuji Yonekura, Tomohisa Iinuma, Yusuke Okuma, Fumie Ihara, Tomoyuki Arai, Toyoyuki Hanazawa, Emi Fukuda-Kawaguchi, Yasuyuki Ishii, Yoshitaka Okamoto BackgroundSublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is an established efficacious approach for the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). However, SLIT requires a long administration period to establish stable and adequate responses. This study investigated the efficacy of the sublingual administration of an allergen with liposomes enclosing α-GalCer (α-GC-liposome) as a potential adjuvant in mice with AR.MethodsMice with AR induced by OVA received the sublingual administration of OVA, α-GC-liposomes, or OVA plus α-GC-liposomes for 7 days. After nasal re-challenge with OVA, nasal symptoms were evaluated. The serum levels of OVA-specific Ig, the cytokine production of CD4+ T cells in the cultures of cervical lymph node (CLN) cells, and the gene expression of CLNs were analyzed.ResultsAlthough IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 production from CD4+ T cells in CLN cells was significantly inhibited by the sublingual administration of OVA alone in mice with AR induced by OVA, their nasal symptoms were not significantly diminished. However, the combined sublingual administration of α-GC-liposomes and OVA completely suppressed nasal symptoms, downregulated Th2 and Th17 type cytokine production in CD4+ T cells as well as Th2 and Th17 gene expressions, and upregulated Th1 type cytokine production as well as Th1 gene expressions in CLN cells. Additionally, the serum levels of specific IgG2a were promoted, and specific IgE and IgG1 were inhibited.ConclusionsOur findings suggest that the sublingual administration of an allergen with α-GC-liposomes as an adjuvant might increase the therapeutic efficacy and effectiveness of this treatment method.
       
  • Differentiation between control subjects and patients with chronic
           spontaneous urticaria based on the ability of anti-IgE autoantibodies
           (AAbs) to induce FcεRI crosslinking, as compared to anti-FcεRIα AAbs

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Satoshi Izaki, Shota Toyoshima, Takahiro Endo, Kazuko Kanegae, Satoshi Nunomura, Jun-ichi Kashiwakura, Tomomi Sasaki-Sakamoto, Ryosuke Nakamura, Haruyo Akiyama, Chisei Ra, Koremasa Hayama, Tadashi Terui, Yoshimichi Okayama BackgroundThe reported prevalences of IgG autoantibodies (AAbs) to FcεRIα and IgE in sera from patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) have varied, and these AAbs are also often observed in healthy control subjects. Regarding the histamine release activity of purified IgG from patients with CSU, the number of examined patients has been small. Thus, we sought to determine the prevalence and FcεRI crosslinking ability of these AAbs in a large number of patients with CSU and non-atopic control (NC) subjects.MethodsWe compared the concentrations of anti-IgE and anti-FcεRIα AAbs and the abilities of these AAbs to cause FcεRI aggregation in patients with CSU (n = 134) and NC subjects (n = 55) using ELISA and an in vitro elicitation test, respectively.ResultsThe concentration of anti-IgE AAbs was significantly different between the NC subjects and the CSU patients (P 
       
  • Biological treatments for severe asthma: A major advance in asthma care

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): William W. Busse Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with considerable variability noted in disease severity, patterns of airway inflammation, and achievement of disease control on current medications. An absence of disease control is most frequently noted in patients with severe asthma, and is defined as a lack of control while on high dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) plus a second controller medication. In part, this lack of control may relate to a diminished effect of current guideline-directed care on the existing pattern of airway inflammation in severe asthma.Airway inflammation in severe asthma has been arbitrarily divided into T (type) 2 high and T2 low. T2 high is characterized by the generation of key cytokines, interleukin (IL)-4, −5 and −13, which generate and regulate airway inflammation. Biomarkers to mark the presence of T2-high inflammation include eosinophils, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and immunoglobulin (Ig) E, whose presence arises from the action of IgE, IL-5, IL-4, and IL-13. In this review, treatment of severe asthma with monoclonal antibodies, i.e. biologics, which are directed against these inflammation generated pathways are reviewed. The available monoclonal antibodies include omalizumab (anti-IgE); mepolizumab, reslizumab and benralizumab (anti-IL-5 pathways), and dupilumab (anti-IL-4/IL-13).The use of these T2-high interventions has led to significant reductions in asthma symptoms, a decreased frequency of exacerbations, and improved lung function in many patients. Not only has the use of these monoclonal antibodies led to improved asthma control in patients with severe disease, their use has provided insight into mechanisms of severe asthma.
       
  • Basophil count is a sensitive marker for clinical progression in a chronic
           spontaneous urticaria patient treated with omalizumab

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Izumi Kishimoto, Naotomo Kambe, Nhung Thi My Ly, Chuyen Thi Hong Nguyen, Hiroyuki Okamoto
       
  • Forced oscillation technique may identify asthma-COPD overlap

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Toshihiro Shirai, Keita Hirai, Yasuhiro Gon, Shuichiro Maruoka, Kenji Mizumura, Mari Hikichi, Kunihiko Itoh, Shu Hashimoto
       
  • Association between chemical components of PM2.5 and children's primary
           care night-time visits due to asthma attacks: A case-crossover study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Shin Yamazaki, Masayuki Shima, Yoshiko Yoda, Fumitake Kurosaka, Toshio Isokawa, Shigeta Shimizu, Teruhiro Ogawa, Naohiro Kamiyoshi, Kunihiko Terada, Jittoku Nishikawa, Kenji Hanaoka, Taku Yamada, Shinro Matsuura, Akihiro Hongo, Ichiro Yamamoto BackgroundFew papers have examined the association between the chemical components of PM2.5 and health effects. The existence of an association is now under discussion.MethodsThis case-crossover study aimed to examine the association between the chemical components of PM2.5 and night-time primary care visits (PCVs) due to asthma attacks. The subjects were 1251 children aged 0–14 years who received medical care for asthma at a municipal emergency clinic. We measured daily average concentrations of hydrogen ion, sulfate ion, nitrate ion and water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs), which are components of PM2.5. We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) of PCVs per unit increment (inter quartile ranges) in each chemical component of PM2.5 for the subgroups of warmer months and colder months separately.ResultsNo association was seen between PCVs and PM2.5 mass concentrations the day before the PCVs in either warmer or colder months. In the warmer months, an association was seen with the concentrations of WSOCs and hydrogen ion the day before the PCVs (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.00–1.76, OR = 1.18; 95% CI: 1.02–1.36, respectively). Furthermore, a negative association was seen between sulfate ion and PCVs (OR = 0.85; 95%CI: 0.74–0.98). No associations were observed in the colder months.ConclusionsWe observed a positive association between PCVs and certain concentrations of WSOCs and hydrogen ions in warmer months. In contrast, sulfate ion showed a negative association.
       
  • Acute inflammatory and immunologic responses against antigen in chronic
           bird-related hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Yukihisa Inoue, Masahiro Ishizuka, Haruhiko Furusawa, Takayuki Honda, Tatsuo Kawahara, Tomoya Tateishi, Yasunari Miyazaki BackgroundHypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an immune-mediated lung disease induced by the inhalation of a wide variety of antigens and a persistent antigen exposure induces inevitably pulmonary fibrosis in chronic HP. Although neutrophils, Th1 and Th17 cells contribute to lung inflammation in acute phase of HP, there is no clear explanation as to how the immunological reaction occurs just after the inhalation of causative antigens in the chronic phase of HP.MethodsWe examined the inflammatory and immunologic profiles before and after the inhalation provocation test (IPT) in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with chronic bird-related HP (BRHP) and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). We analyzed BALF samples from 39 patients (19 BRHP and 20 other ILDs) and serum samples from 25 consecutive patients (20 BRHP and 5 other ILDs) who underwent the IPT.ResultsA significant increase of neutrophils was observed in the BALF from the BRHP patients following the IPT. Neutrophil chemoattractants, namely, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, and CXCL2 significantly increased in both the serum and BALF of the BRHP patients after the IPT. Serum IFN-γ and CXCL10, cytokines/chemokines that contributed to Th1 inflammation, were also significantly increased in BRHP following the IPT.ConclusionsThis study demonstrated the exposure to the causative antigen provoked acute neutrophilic and Th1 immunologic responses similar to acute HP even in the chronic phase of HP.
       
  • Development of conjunctivitis with a conjunctival proliferative lesion in
           a patient treated with dupilumab for atopic dermatitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Ken Fukuda, Waka Ishida, Tatsuma Kishimoto, Atsuki Fukushima
       
  • Development of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for
           quantification of the egg allergen ovalbumin in rat plasma

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Ryohei Ogino, Tomoharu Yokooji, Asahi Omoto, Takanori Taogoshi, Eishin Morita, Hiroaki Matsuo
       
  • Age-related changes in serum periostin level in allergic and non-allergic
           children

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Hiroko Fujitani, Saki Kasuga, Takuma Ishihara, Yusuke Higa, Shiori Fujikawa, Nobuo Ohta, Junya Ono, Kenji Izuhara, Haruo Shintaku
       
  • A very rare case of allergy to beluga caviar

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Ciara Jade Bansal, Amolak Singh Bansal
       
  • STAT6 decoy oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN)-containing ointment more potently
           inhibits mouse skin inflammation when formulated with ionic liquid
           technology than as a traditional Vaseline ointment

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 January 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Yutaro Handa, Tsukasa Ugajin, Ken Igawa, Hidetoshi Hamamoto, Katsunori Kobayashi, Takao Komatsuno, Toshinori Yamamoto, Kazuo Kawahara, Hiroo Yokozeki
       
  • Case series of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis treated
           successfully and safely with long-term mepolizumab

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 January 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Seiko Soeda, Masako To, Yuta Kono, Satoshi Yamawaki, Ryuta Tsuzuki, Otohiro Katsube, Naoto Watanabe, Yasuo To
       
  • Food allergy is linked to season of birth, sun exposure, and vitamin D
           deficiency

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 January 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Teruaki Matsui, Kajiyo Tanaka, Hirotaka Yamashita, Ken-ichi Saneyasu, Hiroyuki Tanaka, Yoshihiro Takasato, Shiro Sugiura, Naoki Inagaki, Komei Ito The season of birth and ultraviolet B exposure have been related to the occurrence of food allergy. The levels of vitamin D produced from skin by ultraviolet B exposure might reflect this relationship. Vitamin D is known to induce antimicrobial peptides, protect intestinal flora, enhance the gut epithelial barrier, suppress mast cell activation and IgE synthesis from B cells, and increase the number of tolerogenic dendritic cells and IL-10-producing regulatory T cells. Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to exacerbate sensitization and allergic symptoms in a murine model of food allergy. However, in clinical situations, contradictory observations have been reported regarding the relationship between food allergy and vitamin D deficiency/supplementation. In this review, we have explored the links between food allergy and vitamin D levels. One explanation for the discrepant findings is confounding factors such as race, age, residency, skin color, and epigenetic changes that contribute to vitamin D levels. In addition, the season of birth influences the development of atopic dermatitis, which could lead to food sensitization. Finally, ultraviolet radiation could lead to regulatory T cell expansion and immunosuppression, irrespective of vitamin D status. Based on our current understanding, we believe that correction of vitamin D deficiency by supplementation, appropriate skin care, and sufficient ultraviolet radiation exposure could alter the prognosis of food allergy. To identify potential treatment strategies for food allergy, it is essential to gain a better understanding of the appropriate levels of vitamin D and ultraviolet radiation exposure.
       
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in succession to chronic
           eosinophilic pneumonia

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 January 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Takao Mochimaru, Koichi Fukunaga, Soichiro Ueda, Aoi Kuroda, Risa Watanabe, Shotaro Chubachi, Tomoko Betsuyaku
       
  • Severe asthma in children: Evaluation and management

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Mehtap Haktanir Abul, Wanda Phipatanakul Severe asthma in children is associated with significant morbidity. Children with severe asthma are at increased risk for adverse outcomes including medication-related side effects, life-threatening exacerbations, and impaired quality of life. It is important to differentiate between severe therapy resistant asthma and difficult-to-treat asthma due to comorbidities. The most common problems that need to be excluded before a diagnosis of severe asthma can be made are poor medication adherence, poor medication technique or incorrect diagnosis of asthma. Difficult to treat asthma is a much more common reason for persistent symptoms and exacerbations and can be managed if comorbidities are clearly addressed. Children with persistent symptoms and exacerbations despite correct inhaler technique and good medical adherence to standard Step 4 asthma therapies according to the guidelines1,2, should be referred to an asthma specialist with expertise in severe asthma.
       
  • Bidirectional roles of IL-22 in the pathogenesis of allergic airway
           inflammation

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Takashi Ito, Koichi Hirose, Hiroshi Nakajima Asthma is the most prevalent allergic disease of the airway, which is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hyperproduction, and airway hyper-responsiveness. Although these pathognomonic features are mainly mediated by antigen-specific Th2 cells and their cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, recent studies have revealed that other inflammatory cells, including Th17 cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), also play a critical role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL-22, one of the cytokines produced by Th17 cells and type 3 ILCs, has distinct functional properties, as IL-22 exclusively acts on non-hematopoietic cells including epithelial cells of mucosal surface and exhibits a broad range of action in regeneration and host protection. In accordance with the fact that lung epithelial cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of asthma, we and other groups have shown that IL-22 is involved in the regulation of allergic airway inflammation. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the biology of IL-22 and its involvement in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation.
       
  • New trends in mucosal immunology and allergy

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Hiroshi Kiyono, Kenji Izuhara
       
  • Immediate anaphylaxis due to beef intestine following tick bites

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Michimasa Fujiwara, Tooru Araki
       
  • Anaphylaxis to xylitol diagnosed by skin prick test and basophil
           activation test

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Kaoru Okamoto, Michiko Kagami, Manabu Kawai, Yuji Mori, Kazuo Yamawaki, Yoichi Nakajima, Yasuto Kondo, Ikuya Tsuge
       
  • Mal d 1 and Bet v 1 sensitization pattern in children with Pollen Food
           Syndrome

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Roberta Olcese, Michela Silvestri, Paolo Del Barba, Noemi Brolatti, Salvatore Barberi, Maria Angela Tosca, Giorgio Ciprandi
       
  • Mast cell activation syndrome: High frequency of skin manifestations and
           anaphylactic shock

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Eline A. Casassa, Claire Mailhol, Emilie Tournier, Camille Laurent, Yannick Degboe, Marine Eischen, Natalia Kirsten, Jacques Moreau, Solène M. Evrard, Véronique Mansat-De Mas, Laurence Lamant, Patrice Dubreuil, Pol André Apoil, Olivier Hermine, Carle Paul, Cristinai Bulai Livideanu
       
  • Pediatric case with rice bran allergy induced by epicutaneous
           sensitization in a family rice shop

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Yui Togashi, Naoko Inomata, Aki Suzuki, Amiko Hakuta, Michiko Aihara
       
  • Contact dermatitis with concomitant contact urticaria syndrome due to
           multiple ingredients of oxidative hair dye

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Jun-ichi Iwata, Naoko Inomata, Megumi Sato, Mami Miyakawa, Toshiko Kawaguchi, Michiko Aihara
       
  • Quantification of the ω5- and γ-gliadin content in wheat flour and rat
           plasma with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antibodies specific
           to their IgE-binding epitopes

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Tomoharu Yokooji, Hitomi Nouma, Ryohei Ogino, Takanori Taogoshi, Eishin Morita, Hiroaki Matsuo
       
  • Central suppressant therapies in unexplained chronic cough patients whose
           sputum cultures yielded Bjerkandera adusta

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Haruhiko Ogawa, Kazuya Tone, Masaki Fujimura, Koichi Makimura
       
  • Three cases of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome caused by egg
           yolk

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Masaki Shimomura, Hiroki Tanaka, Takaaki Meguro, Mitsuaki Kimura
       
  • CISH is a negative regulator of IL-13-induced CCL26 production in lung
           fibroblasts

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Hideyuki Takeshima, Masafumi Horie, Yu Mikami, Kosuke Makita, Naoya Miyashita, Hirotaka Matsuzaki, Satoshi Noguchi, Hirokazu Urushiyama, Yoshihisa Hiraishi, Akihisa Mitani, Zea Borok, Takahide Nagase, Yasuhiro Yamauchi BackgroundBronchial asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by eosinophilic airway inflammation. Lung fibroblasts activated by IL-13 serve as important sources of chemokines, such as eotaxins, contributing to persistent eosinophilic inflammation. Src-homology 2-containing protein (CISH), belonging to the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family, acts as a negative regulator of cytokine induction. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of CISH in the production of eosinophil chemotactic chemokines in human lung fibroblasts.MethodsNormal human lung fibroblasts were stimulated by IL-13, and global gene expression profile was assessed by cDNA microarray. Expression changes and downstream of IL-13 signaling were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR, ELISA or western blotting. Loss- and gain-of-function analyses of CISH were performed by small interfering RNA and vector overexpression, respectively.ResultsIngenuity pathway analysis revealed that IL-13 induced chemokine signaling, including the eotaxin family, while significantly suppressing IFN-α/β signaling. Among eight SOCS family members, CISH was most strongly induced by IL-13 via phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Loss- and gain-of-function studies demonstrated that CISH negatively regulated the expression of CCL26.ConclusionsThese findings suggest that CISH plays a key role in the eosinophilic inflammation associated with bronchial asthma by regulating IL-13-induced CCL26 production. Augmentation of CISH function could be a novel approach for treating eosinophilic inflammation in severe asthma.
       
  • Usefulness of serum biopterin as a predictive biomarker for childhood
           asthma control: A prospective cohort study

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Saki Kasuga, Daijiro Kabata, Tomoko Sakaguchi, Satoshi Kudoh, Satsuki Nishigaki, Yusuke Higa, Shiori Fujikawa, Hiroko Fujitani, Ayumi Shintani, Takashi Hamazaki, Haruo Shintaku BackgroundPteridines are metabolites of tetrahydrobiopterin, which serves as co-enzyme of nitric oxide synthase. We sought to investigate the usefulness of pteridines as biomarkers for childhood asthma control.MethodsWe conducted a single-center prospective cohort study involving 168 asthmatic children aged 4–17 years who visited the periodical asthma checkup program. Serum neopterin and biopterin levels were measured as pteridines at each visit along with measurement of FeNO, respiratory function tests, nasal eosinophil test, blood eosinophil count, and IgE level. We calculated coefficients for relation between pteridines and asthma control, which was assessed by questionnaires (JPAC: Japanese Pediatric Asthma Control Program).ResultsA total of 168 participants aged 10.3 ± 3.39 years (mean ± SD) with asthma were recruited. The participants in this study contained 58 patients (34.5%) of complete-controlled based on JPAC, 132 patients (76.0%) of well-controlled group based on GINA. FeNO and serum neopterin level did not correlate with following period's JPAC scores. In contrast, serum biopterin level significantly correlated with following period's JPAC total score (Coefficients 0.398; 95% CI 0.164 to 0.632; p value 0.001) and frequency of wheezing during exercise (Coefficients 0.272; 95% CI 0.217 to 0.328; p value 
       
  • Characteristics of breath sound in infants with risk factors for asthma
           development

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Hiromi Shioya, Hiromi Tadaki, Fusae Yamazaki, Manabu Miyamoto, Shigemi Yoshihara, Mayumi Enseki, Hideyuki Tabata, Kota Hirai, Hiroyuki Furuya, Masahiko Kato, Shuichi Ito, Hiroyuki Mochizuki BackgroundBreath sound parameters have been suggested as biomarkers of the airway narrowing in children. Using a commercially available breath sound analyzer, the characteristics of the airway condition were investigated in infants with the risk factors for asthma development.MethodsA total of 443 infants (mean age, 9.9 months; range, 3–24 months) were included in the present study. The breath sound parameters of the frequency limiting 99% of the power spectrum (F99), the roll-off from 600 to 1200 Hz (Slope) and spectrum curve indices, the total area under the curve of the dBm data (A3/AT) and the ratio of power and frequency at 50% and 75% of the highest frequency of the power spectrum (RPF75 and RPF50), were evaluated. Using an ATS-DLD based original Japanese questionnaire, we examined the characteristics of airway condition of infants.ResultsFinally, 283 infants in good health were included in the present study. The RPF75, RPF50, Slope and F99 in infants with positive results of allergy and atopic dermatitis were significantly increased more than those in the infants with negative result.ConclusionsOur data highlight the characteristics of breath sounds in infants with risk factors for asthma. The breath sound analysis may be useful for assessing the airways of infants for asthma development.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Role of whole saliva in the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy in
           seasonal allergic rhinitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Takenori Haruna, Shin Kariya, Tazuko Fujiwara, Atsushi Yuta, Takaya Higaki, Pengfei Zhao, Yukiko Ogawa, Kengo Kanai, Yuji Hirata, Aiko Oka, Kazunori Nishizaki, Mitsuhiro Okano BackgroundThe development of methods to predict the clinical effectiveness of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for allergic diseases is a crucial matter. We sought to determine whether whole saliva, which is the first body component that contacts allergen extracts during SLIT, is associated with the clinical effectiveness of SLIT in Japanese cedar pollinosis.MethodsBlood monocytes or monocytic THP-1 cells were cultured in the presence or absence of either whole saliva or pure saliva with or without treatments including filtration and blockade of TLR2 and/or TLR4 signaling. IL-10 levels in the supernatants were then measured. Whole saliva-induced IL-10 production by THP-1 cells was compared between asymptomatic and disease-onset patients during peak pollen dispersal after SLIT.ResultsBoth monocytes and THP-1 cells produced substantial amounts of IL-10 in response to whole saliva. IL-10 production was significantly reduced in response to pure saliva and 0.2 μm-filtered saliva. Simultaneous treatment with polymyxin B and TL2.1, a neutralizing antibody against TLR2, also reduced IL-10 production. IL-10 levels produced by THP-1 cells in response to whole saliva collected prior to SLIT were significantly higher in asymptomatic patients determined by symptom-medication scores than disease-onset patients following SLIT. Such differences were not seen in saliva collected 3 months after the initiation of SLIT or saliva collected during peak pollen dispersal.ConclusionsOur results provide a basis for why the sublingual route is effective and preferable in allergen immunotherapy. Saliva-induced IL-10 levels produced by THP-1 cells may be a predictive marker for clinical remission after SLIT.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Association analyses of eQTLs of the TYRO3 gene and allergic diseases in
           Japanese populations

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Jun Kanazawa, Hironori Masuko, Yohei Yatagai, Tohru Sakamoto, Hideyasu Yamada, Haruna Kitazawa, Hiroaki Iijima, Takashi Naito, Takefumi Saito, Emiko Noguchi, Tomomitsu Hirota, Mayumi Tamari, Nobuyuki Hizawa BackgroundTYRO3 is a member of the TAM (TYRO3, AXL, MERTK) receptor tyrosine kinase family and functions to limit type 2 immune responses implicated in allergic sensitization. Recent studies have shown that multiple intronic variants of TYRO3 were associated with asthma, implying that genetic variation could contribute to errant immune activation. We therefore hypothesized that expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) of the TYRO3 gene influence the development of allergic diseases (including asthma and allergic rhinitis) in Japanese populations.MethodsWe performed a candidate gene case–control association study of 8 eQTLs of TYRO3 on atopy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis using 1168 unrelated Japanese adults who had GWAS genotyping. We then examined the genetic impact of rs2297377 (TYRO3) on atopy and allergic rhinitis in 2 other independent Japanese populations.ResultsA meta-analysis of 3 Japanese populations (a total of 2403 Japanese adults) revealed that rs2297377 was associated with atopy and allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.29 and 1.31; P = 0.00041 and 0.0010, respectively). The risk allele at rs2297377 correlated with decreased expression of TYRO3 mRNA. The gene–gene interaction between HLA-DPB1 and TYRO3 was not significant with regard to sensitization. The estimated proportion of atopy and allergic rhinitis cases attributable to the risk genotype was 14% and 16%, respectively.ConclusionsOur study identified TYRO3 as an important susceptibility gene to atopy and allergic rhinitis in Japanese.
       
  • Efficacy and safety of rupatadine in Japanese adult and adolescent
           patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria: A double-blind, randomized,
           multicenter, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Michihiro Hide, Takamasa Suzuki, Ayaka Tanaka, Hiroshi Aoki BackgroundRupatadine, a novel nonsedating second-generation H1-antihistamine with antiplatelet-activating factor activity, has been used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria in European countries since 2003. However, its efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) are unknown.MethodsWe conducted a prospective, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study in adolescent and adult CSU outpatients aged 12 to 
       
  • Natural course of new-onset urticaria: Results of a 10-year follow-up,
           nationwide, population-based study

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Sang Jun Eun, Jin Yong Lee, Do-Yeop Kim, Hyun-Sun Yoon BackgroundPrevious epidemiologic studies of the natural course of urticaria mainly focused on chronic spontaneous urticaria and were conducted at hospitals. The natural course of new-onset urticaria in the general population is unknown.MethodsPatients with new-onset urticaria were identified from the National Health Insurance Service–National Sample Cohort data. Patients who had at least one visit for urticaria in 2002 and 2003 were excluded and the study cohort consisted of 1,027,620 subjects with no history of urticaria. We analyzed cumulative incidences of urticaria, chronic urticaria, and chronic urticaria remission using the life table estimation method from 2004 to 2013. Their association with related factors was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards analysis.ResultsFrom 2004 to 2013, a total of 49,129 patients with new-onset urticaria were identified. The 10-year cumulative incidence rate of urticaria for the general population was 4.9% and that of chronic urticaria among patients with new-onset urticaria was 7.8%. Remission rates of chronic urticaria were 52.6% at 1 year and 88.9% at 5 years. Age, sex, residential area, and autoimmune thyroid disease were significantly associated with urticaria or chronic urticaria, but not with chronic urticaria remission, after adjusting for covariates. Female individuals were more likely to have new-onset urticaria but less likely to develop chronic urticaria compared with male individuals.ConclusionsDuring the 10-year follow-up period, only a small proportion of patients with new-onset urticaria developed chronic urticaria. Remission was achieved in the majority of patients with chronic urticaria regardless of demographic characteristics or accompanying thyroid disease.
       
  • Analysis of factors associated with cedar pollen sensitization and
           development of pollinosis in a young Japanese adult population

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Satoshi Nakamura, Sachiko Tsunoda, Hiroshi Sakaida, Sawako Masuda, Ahamad Shah Said, Kazuhiko Takeuchi BackgroundGenetic and environmental factors are proposed to be involved in cedar pollen allergy sensitization and onset. The impact of these factors will provide key information for the prevention of cedar pollen sensitization and allergy onset, which we investigated in this cross-sectional study.MethodsSubjects were 382 young adult volunteers who completed a self-administered questionnaire on self-reported subjective symptoms of pollinosis, physician-diagnosed pollinosis, and background factors. We also measured their serum IgE antibody titers specific for cedar, cypress, and mites. Factors associated with subjective symptoms, physician diagnosis, and the three specific antigens were determined using both univariate and multivariate analyses.ResultsSensitization to cedar, cypress, and mites, defined as specific IgE levels of class 1 or above, was found in 78.8%, 64.4%, and 56.0% of subjects, respectively. The prevalence of cedar pollinosis was 41.2% based on subjective symptoms and 22.2% based on physician diagnosis. Factors associated with increased cedar pollen sensitization were mite sensitization, comorbid allergic rhinitis, and family history of cedar pollinosis. Risk-reducing factors for cedar pollen sensitization were keeping a cat, number of common colds, and hours of sleep. Risk-increasing factors for both subjective pollinosis symptoms and physician-diagnosed pollinosis were comorbid allergic rhinitis and family history of cedar pollinosis.ConclusionsSensitization to cedar pollen in this population was extremely high. Both common and distinct factors were associated with sensitization to pollen and with the development of pollinosis. The distinct factors were associated with sensitization to cedar and cypress antigens.
       
  • A breath sound analysis in children with cough variant asthma

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Mayumi Enseki, Mariko Nukaga, Hiromi Tadaki, Hideyuki Tabata, Kota Hirai, Masahiko Kato, Hiroyuki Mochizuki BackgroundCough variant asthma (CVA) is characterized by a chronic cough and bronchial hyperresponsiveness without confirmation of wheezing. Using a breath sound analyzer, we evaluate the characteristics of breath sound in children with CVA.MethodsNine children with CVA (median age, 7.0 years) participated. The existence of breath sounds was confirmed by sound spectrogram. Breath sound parameters, the frequency limiting 50% and 99% of the power spectrum (F50 and F99), the roll-off from 600 to 1200 Hz (Slope) and spectrum curve indices, the ratio of the third and fourth area to the total area of the power spectrum (P3/PT and P4/PT) and the ratio of power and frequency at 50% and 75% of the highest frequency of the power spectrum (RPF75 and RPF50) were calculated before and after β2 agonist inhalation. A spirogram and/or forced oscillation technique were performed in all subjects.ResultsOn a sound spectrogram, wheezing was confirmed in seven of nine patients. All wheezing on the image was polyphonic, and they almost disappeared after β2 agonist inhalation. An analysis of the breath sound spectrum showed that PT, P3/PT, P4/PT, RPF50 and RPF75 were significantly increased after β2 agonist inhalation.ConclusionsChildren with CVA showed a high rate of inaudible wheezing that disappeared after β2 agonist inhalation. Changes in the spectrum curve indices also indicated the bronchial reversibility. These results may suggest the characteristics of CVA in children.
       
  • An independent relation of atopic dermatitis to exercise-induced wheezing
           in asthmatic children

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Satoshi Honjo, Yoko Murakami, Hiroshi Odajima, Yuichi Adachi, Koichi Yoshida, Yukihiro Ohya, Akira Akasawa BackgroundAtopic dermatitis (AD) and exercise-induced asthma (EIA) are common in asthmatic children, and exercise is the most common trigger other than infection for acute onset asthma attack in children. We examined whether AD is related to exercise-induced wheezing (EIW), some proxy for EIA.MethodsJapanese version of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaires were used. For 12,405 asthmatic school children, AD was defined as itchy rash coming and going for at least 6 months at any time in the last 12 months with affecting places of flexural parts of body, and severity of AD was rated according to frequency of being kept awake at night with the itch as follows: never in the past 12 months, less than one night per week and one or more nights per week.ResultsAdjusted for frequency of asthma attack, odds ratios (OR) of children with current AD as compared to those without AD for having EIW were 1.32 (95% confidence interval = 1.15–1.52), 1.35 (1.14–1.68) and 1.10 (0.92–1.31) for primary school, junior high school and high school children, respectively. EIW was more likely observed in accordance with increasing severity of AD in the primary school children with ORs of 1.12, 1.59 and 1.54 (p for trend 
       
  • A comprehensive understanding of the gut mucosal immune system in allergic
           inflammation

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Daisuke Tokuhara, Yosuke Kurashima, Mariko Kamioka, Toshinori Nakayama, Peter Ernst, Hiroshi Kiyono Despite its direct exposure to huge amounts of microorganisms and foreign and dietary antigens, the gut mucosa maintains intestinal homeostasis by utilizing the mucosal immune system. The gut mucosal immune system protects the host from the invasion of infectious pathogens and eliminates harmful non-self antigens, but it allows the cohabitation of commensal bacteria in the gut and the entry of dietary non-self antigens into the body via the mucosal surface. These physiological and immunological activities are regulated by the ingenious gut mucosal immune network, comprising such features as gut-associated lymphoid tissue, mucosal immune cells, cytokines, chemokines, antimicrobial peptides, secretory IgA, and commensal bacteria. The gut mucosal immune network keeps a fine tuned balance between active immunity (against pathogens and harmful non-self antigens) and immune tolerance (to commensal microbiota and dietary antigens), thus maintaining intestinal healthy homeostasis. Disruption of gut homeostasis results in persistent or severe gastrointestinal infection, inflammatory bowel disease, or allergic inflammation. In this review, we comprehensively introduce current knowledge of the gut mucosal immune system, focusing on its interaction with allergic inflammation.
       
  • Airway innate lymphoid cells in the induction and regulation of allergy

    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Allergology International, Volume 68, Issue 1Author(s): Taylor A. Doherty, David H. Broide The recent discovery of innate lymphoid cells has revolutionized our understanding of the pathogenesis of immune diseases including allergy and asthma. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a heterogeneous collection of lymphocytes that lack antigen-specificity (non-T, non-B cells) and potently produce characteristic cytokines of T cell subsets (Th1, Th2, Th17). ILCs are divided into group 1 (ILC1s), group 2 (ILC2s), or group 3 (ILC3s). Similar to Th2 cells, ILC2s produce IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, among others, and are present in increased numbers in samples from patients with many allergic disorders including asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Animal models have identified that ILC2s contribute to eosinophilic tissue infiltration, airway hyperresponsiveness, mucus production, as well as coordinate adaptive immune responses. Finally, recent studies support regulation of ILC2s by neuro-immune mechanisms as well as demonstrate a significant degree of plasticity between ILC subsets that may impact the immune responses in asthma and allergic airway diseases. Here, we review the current literature on ILC2s in human asthma and allergic airway diseases, as well as highlight some recent mechanistic insights into ILC2 function from in vitro studies and in vivo animal models.
       
  • Thermography: High sensitivity and specificity diagnosing contact
           dermatitis in patch testing

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 December 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Florian Anzengruber, Fayez Alotaibi, Lilian S. Kaufmann, Adhideb Ghosh, Martin R. Oswald, Julia-Tatjana Maul, Barbara Meier, Lars E. French, Mathias Bonmarin, Alexander A. Navarini BackgroundPatch testing of contact allergens to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a traditional, useful tool. The most important decision is the distinction between allergic and irritant reactions, as this has direct implications on diagnosis and management. Our objective was to evaluate a new method of non-contact infrared reading of patch tests. Secondary objectives included a possible correlation between the intensity of the patch test reaction and temperature change.Methods420 positive reactions from patients were included in our study. An independent patch test reader assessed the positive reactions and classified them as allergic (of intensity + to +++) or irritant (IR). At the same time, a forward-looking infrared (FLIR) camera attachment for an iPhone was used to acquire infrared thermal images of the patch tests, and images were analyzed using the FLIR ONE app.ResultsAllergic patch test reactions were characterized by temperature increases of 0.72 ± 0.67 °C compared to surrounding skin. Irritant reactions only resulted in 0.17 ± 0.31 °C temperature increase. The mean temperature difference between the two groups was highly significant (p 
       
  • Non-type 2 inflammation in severe asthma is propelled by neutrophil
           cytoplasts and maintained by defective resolution

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 December 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Melody G. Duvall, Nandini Krishnamoorthy, Bruce D. Levy Asthma is a highly prevalent heterogeneous inflammatory disorder of the airways. Not all patients respond to anti-inflammatory treatment with corticosteroids, leading to significant morbidity in severe asthma. Much attention has been paid to defining the cellular and molecular mechanisms of type 2 inflammation that are operative in asthma. Development of targeted therapies for pathologic type 2 inflammation is opening a new approach to asthma treatment; however, not all asthmatics have type 2 airway inflammation, especially those with severe corticosteroid-refractory asthma. Much less is known about non-type 2 immunological mechanisms in asthma. In health, inflammation triggers resolution mechanisms that control immune (type 1 and type 2) responses and enable the restoration of tissue homeostasis. The resolution response is comprised of cellular and molecular events, including production of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs). SPMs halt leukocyte recruitment, promote macrophage efferocytosis, and restore epithelial barrier integrity, all of which are critical to resolution of inflammation in the lungs. Here, we review recent insights into the disruption of these homeostatic mechanisms and their contributions to non-type 2 inflammation in severe asthma immunopathogenesis.
       
  • Intestinal absorption of the wheat allergen gliadin in rats

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 December 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Tomoharu Yokooji, Takahiro Fukushima, Koh Hamura, Naoki Ninomiya, Ryo Ohashi, Takanori Taogoshi, Hiroaki Matsuo BackgroundAspirin enhances food allergy symptoms by increasing absorption of ingested allergens. The objective of this study is to elucidate the role of aspirin in facilitating intestinal absorption of the wheat allergen, gliadin, in rats.MethodsPlasma concentrations of gliadin were determined after oral administration by gavage or administration into a closed intestinal loop in rats. We used an in situ intestinal re-circulating perfusion experiment to examine the effect of pepsin on aspirin-facilitated gliadin absorption. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran-40 (FD-40) was used as a marker of non-specific absorption. The molecular size of gliadin and its allergenicity in plasma were examined using immunoblot analysis and intradermal reaction tests with Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation, respectively.ResultsAspirin increased plasma concentrations of gliadin after oral administration but had no effect in the closed intestinal loop study. An in situ intestinal re-circulating perfusion study showed that FITC-labeled gliadin was absorbed similarly to FD-40. Aspirin increased absorption of both intact and pepsin-digested gliadin, with a more significant effect on absorption of pepsin-treated gliadin. Immunoblotting showed that most gliadin was absorbed in intact form. When the gliadin fraction was extracted from rat plasma after gavage and injected intradermally into gliadin-sensitized rats, EBD extravasation was observed at injection sites in a gliadin dose-dependent manner.ConclusionsAspirin increased the absorption of intact and pepsin-digested gliadin via the paracellular pathway, maintaining their allergenicity. Moreover, the effect of aspirin on gliadin absorption was enhanced by modification and digestion of gliadin in the stomach.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • The Urticaria Control Test and Urticaria Activity Score correlate with
           quality of life in adult Japanese patients with chronic spontaneous
           urticaria

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Shoko Nakatani, Yoshiko Oda, Ken Washio, Atsushi Fukunaga, Chikako Nishigori
       
  • Bird-egg syndrome induced by α-livetin sensitization in a budgerigar
           keeper: Successful induction of tolerance by avoiding exposure to avians

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Naoko Inomata, Katsuyuki Kawano, Michiko Aihara
       
  • Obesity and severe asthma

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Hiroki Tashiro, Stephanie A. Shore Obesity is an important global health issue for both children and adults. Obesity increases the prevalence and incidence of asthma and also increases the risk for severe asthma. Here we describe the features of severe asthma phenotypes for which obesity is a defining characteristic, including steroid resistance, airway inflammation, and co-morbidities. We also review current concepts regarding the mechanistic basis for the impact of obesity in severe asthma, including possible roles for vitamin D deficiency, systemic inflammation, and the microbiome. Finally, we describe data indicating a role for diet, weight loss, and exercise in the treatment of severe asthma with obesity. Better understanding of the mechanistic basis for the role of obesity in severe asthma could lead to new therapeutic options for this population.
       
  • Critical role of platelets in the production of thymus and
           activation-regulated chemokine in children: A case series study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Yuka Okura, Yutaka Takahashi, Ichiro Kobayashi
       
  • Periostin deletion suppresses late-phase response in mouse experimental
           allergic conjunctivitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Yosuke Asada, Mikiko Okano, Waka Ishida, Satoshi Iwamoto, Ken Fukuda, Toshiaki Hirakata, Norihiro Tada, Atsuki Fukushima, Nobuyuki Ebihara, Akira Kudo, Akira Matsuda BackgroundTo investigate the potential roles of periostin (POSTN), an extracellular matrix preferentially expressed in Th2-skewed conditions in the pathophysiology of allergic conjunctivitis.MethodsThe roles of POSTN in ragweed-induced experimental allergic conjunctivitis (RW-EAC) were evaluated using both POSTN-knockout (KO) and congenic BALB/c wild-type mice. Histological analysis was carried out to enumerate eosinophils/basophils in the conjunctival tissue. Th2 cytokine expression was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR), and microarray analysis was performed to elucidate genes differentially expressed in POSTN-KO and wild-type mice in the RW-EAC model.ResultsUpregulation of POSTN expression and eosinophil infiltration was observed in subconjunctival tissue of RW-EAC in the wild-type mice. The number of infiltrating eosinophils in the conjunctivae of RW-EAC was diminished in POSTN-KO mice compared to wild-type mice. Q-PCR analysis of conjunctival tissue showed induction of Th2 cytokine (Ccl5, Il4, Il5, Il13) expression in the RW-EAC and attenuated Ccl5, Il4, Il13 mRNA expression in the conjunctivae of the RW-EAC using POSTN-KO mice. Microarray analysis and immunohistochemical analysis showed diminished basophil marker (Mcpt8) expression and reduced numbers of infiltrating basophils in the conjunctivae of RW-EAC in POSTN-KO mice.ConclusionsPOSTN expression in conjunctival tissue plays an indispensable role in the late-phase reaction of the RW-EAC model by facilitating eosinophil/basophil infiltration and augmenting Th2 cytokine expression.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Efficacy and safety of rupatadine in Japanese patients with seasonal
           allergic rhinitis: A double-blind, randomized, multicenter,
           placebo-controlled clinical trial

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Kimihiro Okubo, Takamasa Suzuki, Ayaka Tanaka, Hiroshi Aoki BackgroundRupatadine is a novel non-sedating second-generation H1-antihistamine with antiplatelet-activating factor activity, first marketed in Spain in 2003. It is used for treating allergic rhinitis in more than 80 countries. This study investigated its efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR).MethodsThis was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study conducted at 4 medical institutions in Japan (JapicCTI-152785). Adolescent and adult SAR outpatients aged 12–64 years entered a 1-week placebo run-in period. After eligibility was confirmed, patients orally received placebo, rupatadine 10 mg, or 20 mg once daily for 2 weeks. The primary endpoint was a change from baseline to second week of treatment in total 4 nasal symptom score (T4NSS).ResultsNine hundred patients were randomly assigned to placebo, rupatadine 10 mg, or rupatadine 20 mg (302, 298, and 300 patients, respectively). The least squares mean difference in the primary endpoint between rupatadine and placebo was −1.085 for 10 mg, and −1.415 for 20 mg (analysis of covariance, both P 
       
  • Identification of biomarkers for predicting the response to cyclosporine A
           therapy in patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 October 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Takahiro Endo, Shota Toyoshima, Kazuko Kanegae, Satoshi Izaki, Nobuyuki Nishimori, Mana Ito, Kazuko Sugai, Koremasa Hayama, Tadashi Terui, Yoshimichi Okayama
       
  • SEMA4A promotes eosinophil survival and contributes to eosinophil-mediated
           allergic diseases

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 October 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Yohei Maeda, Takeshi Tsuda, Yoshito Takeda, Shohei Koyama, Yoshitomo Hayama, Satoshi Nojima, Tetsuya Kimura, Daisuke Ito, Hyota Takamatsu, Sujin Kang, Masayuki Nishide, Keiko Morimoto, Takashi Hosokawa, Yuhei Kinehara, Yasuhiro Kato, Takeshi Nakatani, Kazuya Takeda, Masaki Hayama, Sho Obata, Hitoshi Akazawa
       
  • Reduced nasal nitric oxide levels in patients with eosinophilic chronic
           rhinosinusitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 October 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Kanako Yoshida, Tetsuji Takabayashi, Yoshimasa Imoto, Masafumi Sakashita, Norihiko Narita, Shigeharu Fujieda BackgroundIn Eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (ECRS), it is difficult to estimate the refractoriness and recurrence risk for each patient. Fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is known as a biomarker of eosinophilic inflammation in lower airway. It has been reported that nasal NO has some crucial functions in the upper and lower airways. However, in upper airway, paranasal sinuses, the usefulness of NO measurement remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to identify the usefulness of nasal NO measurement in ECRS and the involvement of nasal NO in the pathogenesis of ECRS.MethodsWe compared the nasal NO levels of ECRS, non-ECRS, and normal control groups. Correlation between nasal NO levels and clinical findings were observed. Then, we compared nasal NO levels before and after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). We also examine whether nasal NO levels might discriminate ECRS by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis.ResultsNasal NO levels were significantly decreased in ECRS compared to the other two groups. Moreover, nasal NO levels in ECRS significantly and negatively correlated with eosinophil levels and CT score. However, they did not correlate with the nasal polyp score. Nasal NO levels were not upregulated soon after opening the sinus ostium by ESS. The ROC curves for nasal NO levels were used to discriminate all CRS patients and ECRS patients from normal controls.ConclusionsNasal NO may be useful as a marker of ECRS severity and low nasal NO levels in ECRS may contribute to its pathogenesis.
       
  • Efficacy of a short pretreatment with omalizumab in children with
           anaphylaxis to hymenoptera venom immunotherapy: A report of three cases

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Catherine Droitcourt, Claude Ponvert, Alain Dupuy, Pierre Scheinmann, Rola Abou-Taam, Jacques de Blic, Guillaume Lezmi
       
  • Significance of IgG4-positive cells in severe eosinophilic chronic
           rhinosinusitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 October 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Takahisa Koyama, Shin Kariya, Yasuharu Sato, Yuka Gion, Takaya Higaki, Takenori Haruna, Tazuko Fujiwara, Akira Minoura, Soshi Takao, Yorihisa Orita, Kengo Kanai, Masami Taniguchi, Kazunori Nishizaki, Mitsuhiro Okano BackgroundIgG4 production is regulated by type 2 (IL-4 and IL-13) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines involved in the pathophysiology of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). We sought to determine the pathophysiological characteristics of IgG4-positive cells in sinonasal tissues in CRS, especially eosinophilic CRS (ECRS).MethodsIgG4-positive cells in uncinate tissues (UT) and nasal polyps (NP) were examined by immunohistochemistry. Associations between the number of IgG4-positive cells and clinicopathological factors were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the cut-off value of IgG4-positive cells in tissue that can predict the post-operative course.ResultsIgG4 was mainly expressed in infiltrating plasma and plasmacytoid cells, and the number of IgG4-positive cells was significantly higher in NP, especially those from severe ECRS patients, than in UT. In CRS patients, the number of IgG4-positive cells significantly and positively correlated with blood and tissue eosinophilia, radiological severity, and serum level of total IgE. The number of infiltrating IgG4-positive cells was significantly higher in patients with a poor post-operative course (sustained sinus shadow 6 months after surgery) than in those with a good one. The number of IgG4-positive cells in NP could discriminate patients with a good or a poor post-operative course (area under the curve: 0.769). Also, 73.3% sensitivity and 82.5% specificity were achieved when the cut-off value was set at 17 cells/high-power field.ConclusionsOur results suggest that the local expression of IgG4 on cells may be used as a biomarker that reflects the pathophysiology of CRS, including the post-operative course.
       
  • Sweat is a most efficient natural moisturizer providing protective
           immunity at points of allergen entry

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Tetsuo Shiohara, Yoshiko Mizukawa, Yurie Shimoda-Komatsu, Yumi Aoyama Although there is a growing acceptance that sweat could play a detrimental role in various allergic skin diseases, the possibility that sweat is also involved in maintenance of skin hydration and skin-specific immune responses has not been acknowledged. We initially describe physiological role of sweat in both maintaining skin hydration and thermoregulation. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with objective evidence that sweating is intimately linked to vital stratum corneum barrier function and usefulness of application of moisturizers in clinical care of allergic skin diseases. This review also covers how sweating disturbance would leave the skin vulnerable to the development of various allergic skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis. New therapeutic approaches would specifically target such sweating disturbance in these allergic skin diseases.
       
  • Sweat allergy

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Shunsuke Takahagi, Akio Tanaka, Michihiro Hide Sweat allergy is defined as a type I hypersensitivity against the contents of sweat, and is specifically observed in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and cholinergic urticaria (CholU). The allergic reaction is clinically revealed by positive reactions in the intradermal skin test and the basophil histamine release assay by sweat. A major histamine-releasing antigen in sweat, MGL_1304, has been identified. MGL_1304 is produced at a size of 29 kDa by Malassezia (M.) globosa and secreted into sweat after being processed and converted into the mature form of 17 kDa. It induces significant histamine release from basophils of patients with AD and/or CholU with MGL_1304-specific IgE, which is detected in their sera. Patients with AD also show cross-reactivity to MGL_1304-homologs in Malassezia restricta and Malassezia sympodialis, but MGL_1304 does not share cross antigenicity with human intrinsic proteins. Malassezia or its components may penetrate the damaged epidermis of AD lesions and interact with the skin immune system, resulting in the sensitization and reaction to the fungal antigen. As well as the improvement of impaired barrier functions by topical interventions, approaches such as anti-microbial treatment, the induction of tolerance and antibody/substance neutralizing the sweat antigen may be beneficial for the patients with intractable AD or CholU due to sweat allergy. The identification of antigens other than MGL_1304 in sweat should be the scope for future studies, which may lead to better understanding of sweat allergy and therapeutic innovations.
       
  • Two facets of sweat: A defensive factor in skin tissues and an
           accelerating factor for allergic skin diseases

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Hiroo Yokozeki, Kenji Izuhara
       
  • Kimishige Ishizaka (1925–2018)

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Hirohisa Saito
       
  • Acquisition of tolerance to egg allergy in a child with repeated
           egg-induced acute pancreatitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Ken-ichi Nagakura, Noriyuki Yanagida, Sakura Sato, Kiyotake Ogura, Motohiro Ebisawa
       
  • Darier's sign in urticaria pigmentosa–significance of perivascular
           eosinophilic infiltration

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Eriko Maehara, Makiko Kido-Nakahara, Takamichi Ito, Hiroshi Uchi, Masutaka Furue
       
  • Three cases of adult-onset atopic dermatitis after hematopoietic stem cell
           transplantation

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Nobutoshi Take, Takeshi Nakahara, Makiko Kido-Nakahara, Masutaka Furue
       
  • Generalized urticaria caused by ingestion of sweet potato cake

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): David El-Qutob, Fernando Pineda, Isabela Raducan, Miriam Castillo
       
  • The role of adenosine for IgE receptor-dependent degranulation of human
           peripheral basophils and skin mast cells

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Yoshimi Matsuo, Yuhki Yanase, Reiko Irifuku, Kaori Ishii, Tomoko Kawaguchi, Shunsuke Takahagi, Izumi Hide, Michihiro Hide
       
  • Severe asthma concomitant with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis
           successfully treated with mepolizumab

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Naohiro Oda, Nobuaki Miyahara, Satoru Senoo, Junko Itano, Akihiko Taniguchi, Daisuke Morichika, Utako Fujii, Yoshinobu Maeda, Katsuyuki Kiura, Arihiko Kanehiro
       
  • The relationship between complement levels and disease activity in
           Japanese family cases of hereditary angioedema with C1-INH deficiency

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Atsushi Fukunaga, Shinji Tsuchiyama, Kasumi Lee, Ken Washio, Chinami Hashimura, Takahiko Horiuchi, Chikako Nishigori
       
  • Development of eosinophilic esophagitis following sublingual immunotherapy
           with cedar pollen extract: A case report

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Kousaku Kawashima, Shunji Ishihara, Masaaki Masuhara, Hironobu Mikami, Eiko Okimoto, Naoki Oshima, Norihisa Ishimura, Asuka Araki, Riruke Maruyama, Yoshikazu Kinoshita
       
  • Immune suppression of food allergy by maternal IgG in murine models

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Hirotaka Yamashita, Tadamasa Hayashi, Kenichi Saneyasu, Hiroki Matsuhara, Teruaki Matsui, Hiroyuki Tanaka, Naoki Inagaki BackgroundMost of the patients develop food allergy early in life. The factors related to parental immune condition might be one of the conceivable causes.MethodsWe reported murine models of food allergy and oral OVA tolerance. To investigate the influence of parental immune condition on infant food allergy, female and male mice with food allergy or oral tolerance were mated with each other.ResultsFood allergy was suppressed by decreased IgE production in the offspring of mice with food allergy. On the contrary, anaphylaxis for OVA was induced in the offspring of mice with oral tolerance. The suppression of food allergy being dependent on a maternal factor was revealed in the offspring after cross-mating mice with food allergy and oral tolerance. Because OVA-specific IgG, presumed to be from the allergic mother, was detected in the serum of naïve infants from mothers allergic to food, we assumed that the suppression was dependent on a specific IgG. The serum IgG purified by a G-protein column was administered before OVA sensitization in the food allergy model, and OVA-specific IgE production was found to be diminished in the administered mice. However, OVA-specific monoclonal IgG1 and IgG2a administration could not suppress food allergy. Because we detected OVA-IgG immune complex in the serum of mothers allergic to food, it might be a cause of maternal immune suppression.ConclusionsWe demonstrated that maternal specific IgG conjugated food antigen is an important factor related to the development of food allergy and acquiring tolerance.
       
  • Cochineal dye-induced immediate allergy: Review of Japanese cases and
           proposed new diagnostic chart

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Naoko Takeo, Masashi Nakamura, Satoshi Nakayama, Osamu Okamoto, Naoki Sugimoto, Shinichi Sugiura, Nayu Sato, Susumu Harada, Masao Yamaguchi, Naoya Mitsui, Yumiko Kubota, Kayoko Suzuki, Makoto Terada, Akiyo Nagai, Junko Sowa-Osako, Yutaka Hatano, Hiroshi Akiyama, Akiko Yagami, Sakuhei Fujiwara, Kayoko Matsunaga BackgroundCochineal dye is used worldwide as a red coloring in foods, drinks, cosmetics, quasi-drugs, and drugs. The main component of the red color is carminic acid (CA). Carmine is an aluminum- or calcium-chelated product of CA. CA and carmine usually contain contaminating proteins, including a 38-kDa protein thought to be the primary allergen. Severe allergic reactions manifest as anaphylaxis. The aim of this study was to review all Japanese reported cases and propose useful diagnostic chart.MethodsAll reported Japanese cases of cochineal dye-induced immediate allergy were reviewed, and newly registered cases were examined by skin prick test (SPT) with cochineal extract (CE) and measurement of CE and carmine-specific serum IgE test. Two-dimensional (2D) western blotting using patient serum was conducted to identify the antigen.ResultsTwenty-two Japanese cases have been reported. SPT and the level of specific IgE test indicated that six cases should be newly registered as cochineal dye allergy. All cases were adult females, and all cases except three involved anaphylaxis; 13 cases involved past history of local symptoms associated with cosmetics use. Japanese strawberry juice and fish-meat sausage, and European processed foods (especially macarons made in France) and drinks were recent major sources of allergen. 2D western blotting showed that patient IgE reacted to the 38-kDa protein and other proteins. Serum from healthy controls also weakly reacted with these proteins.ConclusionsSPT with CE and determination of the level of CE and carmine-specific IgE test are useful methods for the diagnosis of cochineal dye allergy.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • TARC expression in the circulation and cutaneous granulomas correlates
           with disease severity and indicates Th2-mediated progression in patients
           with sarcoidosis

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Chuyen Thi Hong Nguyen, Naotomo Kambe, Ikuko Ueda-Hayakawa, Izumi Kishimoto, Nhung Thi My Ly, Kana Mizuno, Hiroyuki Okamoto BackgroundSarcoidosis is a systemic disorder characterized by the accumulation of lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophage lineage cells that results in the formation of non-caseating granulomas. Thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC)/CCL17 is an important chemokine in the amplification of Th2 responses, which are achieved by recruiting CCR4-expressing CD4+ T lymphocytes. TARC concentrations are known to increase in the serum of sarcoidosis patients; however, its role in the assessment of severity and prognosis of sarcoidosis remains unknown. The objective of this study is to elucidate the role of TARC in sarcoidosis by investigating its expression in peripheral blood and at inflammatory sites. We also examined its relationship with clinical features.MethodsSerum levels of TARC, soluble interleukin 2 receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and lysozyme were measured in 82 sarcoidosis patients. The Th1 and Th2 balance in circulating CD4+ T cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. The immunohistochemical staining of TARC and CCR4 was performed in order to identify the source of TARC in affected skin tissues.ResultsTARC serum levels were elevated in 78% of patients and correlated with disease severity. The percentage of CCR4+ cells and the CCR4+/CXCR3+ cell ratios were significantly higher in sarcoidosis patients than in normal subjects (P = 0.002 and P = 0.015, respectively). Moreover, TARC was expressed by monocyte/macrophage lineage cells within granulomas. The abundancy as well as distribution of TARC staining correlated with its serum levels.ConclusionsThe present results suggest that elevations in TARC drive an imbalanced Th2- weighted immune reaction and might facilitate prolonged inflammatory reactions in sarcoidosis.
       
  • Identification of Cha o 3 homolog Cry j 4 from Cryptomeria japonica
           (Japanese cedar) pollen: Limitation of the present Japanese
           cedar–specific ASIT

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Toshihiro Osada, Yuki Tanaka, Akira Yamada, Eiji Sasaki, Teruhiro Utsugi BackgroundAbout one-third of the Japanese population suffers from Japanese cedar pollinosis, which is frequently accompanied by Japanese cypress pollinosis. Recently, a novel major Japanese cypress pollen allergen, Cha o 3, was discovered. However, whether a Cha o 3 homolog is present in Japanese cedar pollen remains to be determined.MethodsWestern blot analysis was performed using Cha o 3–specific antiserum. In addition, cloning of the gene encoding Cry j 4 was conducted using total cDNA from the male flower of Japanese cedar trees. Allergen potency and cross-reactivity were investigated using a T-cell proliferation assay, basophil activation test, and ImmunoCAP inhibition assay.ResultsA low amount of Cha o 3 homolog protein was detected in Japanese cedar pollen extract. The deduced amino acid sequence of Cry j 4 showed 84% identity to that of Cha o 3. Cross-reactivity between Cry j 4 and Cha o 3 was observed at the T cell and IgE levels.ConclusionsCry j 4 was discovered as a counterpart allergen of Cha o 3 in Japanese cedar pollen, with a relationship similar to that between Cry j 1–Cha o 1 and Cry j 2–Cha o 2. Our findings also suggest that allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) using Japanese cedar pollen extract does not induce adequate immune tolerance to Cha o 3 due to the low amount of Cry j 4 in Japanese cedar pollen. Therefore, ASIT using Cha o 3 or cypress pollen extract coupled with Japanese cedar pollen extract is required in order to optimally control allergy symptoms during Japanese cypress pollen season.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Possible involvement of acetylcholine-mediated inflammation in airway
           diseases

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Akira Koarai, Masakazu Ichinose Inhaled bronchodilator treatment with a long acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) reduces symptoms and the risk of exacerbations in COPD and asthma. However, increasing evidence from cell culture and animal studies suggests that anti-muscarinic drugs could also possess anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies have revealed that acetylcholine (ACh) can be synthesized and released from both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, and the released ACh can potentiate airway inflammation and remodeling in airway diseases. However, these anti-inflammatory effects of anti-muscarinic drugs have not yet been confirmed in COPD and asthma patients. This review will focus on recent findings about the possible involvement of ACh in airway inflammation and remodeling, and the anti-inflammatory effect of anti-muscarinic drugs in airway diseases. Clarifying the acetylcholine-mediated inflammation could provide insights into the mechanisms of airway diseases, which could lead to future therapeutic strategies for inhibiting the disease progression and exacerbations.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Sweat in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Hiroyuki Murota, Kosuke Yamaga, Emi Ono, Ichiro Katayama Sweat is a transparent hypotonic body fluid made from eccrine sweat glands. Various ingredients contained in sweat are involved in a broad sense in skin homeostasis including temperature regulation, skin moisture, and immune functions. Thus, sweat plays a major role in maintaining skin homeostasis. Therefore, abnormal sweating easily compromises human health. For example, in atopic dermatitis (AD), perspiration stagnation accompanying sweat tube or sweat pore blockage, leakage of perspiration from the sweat gland to the outside tissue, and impaired secretion of sweat from the sweat gland are confirmed. In recent years, the hypothesis that atopic dermatitis is a sweat stasis syndrome has been clarified by the establishment of a sweat and sweat gland dynamic analysis technique. Secretion of sweat and leakage into tissues is caused by dermatitis and is thought to promote itching. Furthermore, from the metabolomic analysis of sweat of patients with atopic dermatitis, it was confirmed that the glucose concentration in AD sweat increased according to severity and skin phenotype, suggesting that elevated glucose affected the homeostasis of the skin. Multifaceted analyses of sweat from subjects with AD have revealed new aspects of the pathology, and appropriate measures to treat sweat can be expected to contribute to long-term control of AD.
       
  • Dry skin manifestations in Sjögren syndrome and atopic dermatitis related
           to aberrant sudomotor function in inflammatory allergic skin diseases

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Allergology International, Volume 67, Issue 4Author(s): Ichiro Katayama We have reported characteristic cutaneous manifestations of Sjögren syndrome (SS) with special references to autoimmune anhidrosis or hypoidrosis and related mucocutaenous manifestations in addition to annular erythema or cutaneous vasculitis. Although significance of cutaneous manifestations of SS has been gradually recognized in rheumatologists, sudomotor function has not been fully evaluated and recognized in the diagnosis of SS except for dermatologists. SS is a relatively underestimated collagen disease in contrast to SLE, systemic sclerosis, or dermatomyositis, special care should be needed not to make misdiagnosis of SS when we see the patients with common skin disease such as, drug eruption, infections skin disease or xerosis in the daily practice. In contrast to pathomechanisms of dry skin observed in SS, we recently reported that reduced sweating function and dry skin seen in atopic dermatitis (AD) are mediated by histamine or substance P, those are usually restored to normal levels after improvement of the dermatitis by topical corticosteroid ointment with or without oral anti-histamine. Therefore, xerotic skin lesions seen in SS and AD might be attributable to different pathomechanisms with similar dry skin manifestations. We recently reported that SS promotes dry skin when complicated with AD possibly due to acceleration of hypoidrosis. In this review, we would like to summarize our recent understanding of regulatory mechanism of impaired sweating function in allergic inflammatory skin diseases by introducing clinical presentations of AD/SS overlap cases as the model of hypoidrotic inflammatory skin diseases.
       
  • Sensitization to Api m 1, Api m 2, and Api m 4 in Japanese beekeepers who
           had experienced systemic reactions to honeybee stings

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 September 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Hirokuni Hirata, Kozo Sato, Takeshi Ogasawara, Tatsuo Funakoshi, Daisuke Shima, Masamitsu Tatewaki, Sadaaki Shiromori, Ryosuke Souma, Hideyuki Satoh, Kumiya Sugiyama, Masafumi Arima, Kazuhiro Kurasawa, Takeshi Fukuda, Yasutsugu Fukushima
       
  • Ultrasonographic study of intestinal Doppler blood flow in infantile
           non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 September 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Keisuke Jimbo, Yoshikazu Ohtsuka, Tatsuo Kono, Nobuyasu Arai, Reiko Kyoudo, Kenji Hosoi, Yo Aoyagi, Takahiro Kudo, Nobuyoshi Asai, Toshiaki Shimizu BackgroundAlthough non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy has increased rapidly in Japan, a small number of reports has evaluated B-mode and Doppler ultrasonographic findings in the acute phase of infantile gastrointestinal milk allergy. The aim of the present study was to compare the diagnostic utility of ultrasonographic findings and laboratory allergic data in non-IgE-mediated infantile gastrointestinal milk allergy.MethodsSixteen cases of active non-IgE-mediated infantile gastrointestinal milk allergy, diagnosed by food elimination tests and oral food challenge tests (OFCTs) (group A), 15 cases of acute viral gastroenteritis (AGE) (group B), and 15 controls (group C) were enrolled. 1) B-mode abdominal ultrasound findings, 2) laboratory allergic data including eosinophil counts (Eos), serum IgE, and the antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation test (ALPT) against milk protein, and 3) vessel density (VD) indirectly quantified by gastrointestinal Doppler flow at jejunum, ileum, and sigmoid colonic mucosae were evaluated and compared among the groups.ResultsIn the small intestine, wall thickening, dilation, mesenteric thickening, and poor peristalsis were found in 100%, 62.5%, 93.7%, and 100%, respectively, in group A. Eos, IgE, ALPT, and VD were positive in 25.0%, 0%, 87.5%, and 100%, respectively, in group A. Small intestinal VD was significantly greater in group A than in groups B (jejunum p 
       
  • Severity scales of non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergies in
           neonates and infants

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 September 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Hisako Yagi, Takumi Takizawa, Koichiro Sato, Takaharu Inoue, Yutaka Nishida, Takashi Ishige, Maiko Tatsuki, Reiko Hatori, Yasuko Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki Yamada, Hirokazu Arakawa BackgroundNon-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergies (non-IgE-GI-FAs) are one type of food allergy found in neonates and infants. Few reports have defined the severity of non-IgE-GI-FAs in these populations.MethodsGrading scales of the severity of non-IgE-GI-FAs according to extra-GI symptoms, such as poor weight gain, as well as systemic symptoms, including fever and shock, were developed and retrospectively applied to patients with non-IgE-GI-FAs. The relationship between the severity of non-IgE-GI-FAs and both clinical and laboratory findings were examined.ResultsElevation of C-reactive protein levels and a decrease in total protein and albumin were observed in accordance with allergy severity. In an endoscopic examination, inflammatory findings were confirmed in large areas of the colonic mucosa in case of higher severity levels, and infiltration of inflammatory cells other than eosinophils was found in the severest grade. Extensively hydrolyzed milk or amino acid-based milk was required for all patients with the severest grade. In addition, the timing of acquiring tolerance tended to be late for this grade.ConclusionsClassification and determination of the severity of non-IgE-GI-FAs in neonates and infants may not only contribute to elucidation of the pathogenesis but may also be useful in the clinical setting.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Stem cell factor suppressed IL-33-induced MHC class II expression in
           murine bone marrow-derived mast cells

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Tomonobu Ito, Chizu Egusa, Tatsuo Maeda, Takafumi Numata, Nobuhiro Nakano, Chiharu Nishiyama, Ryoji Tsuboi
       
  • Factors determining parenting stress in mothers of children with atopic
           dermatitis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 September 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Chikae Yamaguchi, Takeshi Ebara, Rikuya Hosokawa, Masaki Futamura, Yukihiro Ohya, Midori Asano BackgroundAtopic dermatitis (AD) influences a child's emotional and social well-being, as well as his or her physical health. The influence of AD on the daily lives of parents and caregivers has also been documented. This study examined how parenting stress is affected by demographic background, characteristics of children's AD, and their family systems.MethodsThe participants were mothers of children, aged 2–6 years old, who had been diagnosed with AD. The predictive power of a model of parenting stress was examined using multiple regression analysis (stepwise), with parenting stress (PSI-SF) as the dependent variable, and children's demographics, including characteristics of AD; parents' demographics; QoL of families of children with AD (JCMV-CADIS); and family functioning (FAI) as independent variables. We handled missing values using a multiple imputation method.ResultsThe pooled coefficients obtained from the multiple regression analysis after multiple imputation indicated that “family cohesion,” “family system flexibility,” “emotions related to social factors” and “occupation of mother” determined parenting stress. Lower family cohesion and family system flexibility predicted higher parenting stress. The high impact of “emotions related to social factors” on families’ QoL predicted higher parenting stress. Full-time work by mothers predicted lower parenting stress.ConclusionsThe current results reveal that “family cohesion,” “family system flexibility,” “emotions related to social factors” and “full-time work by mothers” predicted parenting stress of mothers who had children with AD.
       
  • A case of human seminal plasma allergy sensitized with dog prostatic
           kallikrein, Can f 5

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2018Source: Allergology InternationalAuthor(s): Mari Tanaka, Yukinobu Nakagawa, Yorihisa Kotobuki, Ichiro Katayama
       
 
 
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