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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3185 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3185 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 100, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 427, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 293, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 179, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 66)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 414, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 469, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 232, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.591
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 62  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1043-4526
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3185 journals]
  • DMHF (2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone), a volatile food component
           with attractive sensory properties, brings physiological functions through
           inhalation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 May 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): K. Arihara, I. Yokoyama, M. Ohata 2,5-Dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) is an aroma compound found in various foods, and used widely in the flavor and perfume industry. Dilute DMHF solutions exhibit a strawberry-like flavor while DMHF concentrates have a caramel-like aroma. DMHF is an important flavor compound contributing to the sensory properties of various natural products and thermally processed foods. DMHF is generated by the Maillard reaction during cooking and processing and affects the palatability of foods. Although Maillard reaction products (e.g., melanoidins) have physiologically positive effects, effects of odors generated from by this reaction are relatively unknown. This chapter initially overviewed the Maillard reaction and the generation of volatile compounds. Then, properties of DMHF, which is an attractive volatile food component, is discussed. We focused particularly on bioactivities of DMHF inhalation in our previous studies.
       
  • Series Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition Research, Volume 88Author(s):
       
  • Food-derived bioactive peptides and their role in ameliorating
           hypertension and associated cardiovascular diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 May 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Advaita Ganguly, Kumakshi Sharma, Kaustav Majumder Non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and associated metabolic disorders are responsible for nearly 40 million deaths globally per year. Hypertension or high blood pressure (BP) is one of the primary reasons for the development of CVDs. A healthy nutritional strategy complementing with physical activity can substantially reduce high BP and prevent the occurrence of CVD-associated morbidity and mortality. Bioactive peptides currently are the next wave of the promising bench to clinic options for potential targeting chronic and acute health issues including hypertension. Peptides demonstrating anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and angiotensin-converting enzyme-I inhibitory activity are widely studied for the amelioration of hypertension and associated CVDs. Isolating these potent bioactive peptides from different food sources is a promising endeavor toward nutraceutical based dietary management and prevention of hypertension. Understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension and the action mechanisms of the bioactive peptides would complement in designing and characterizing more potent peptides and suitable comprehensive dietary plans for the prevention of hypertension and associated CVDs.
       
  • Is “nano safe to eat or not”' A review of the state-of-the art in
           soft engineered nanoparticle (sENP) formulation and delivery in foods
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 April 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Xiaobo Liu, Boce Zhang, Ikjot Singh Sohal, Dhimiter Bello, Hongda Chen With superior physicochemical properties, soft engineered nanoparticles (sENP) (protein, carbohydrate, lipids and other biomaterials) are widely used in foods. The preparation, functionalities, applications, transformations in gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and effects on gut microbiota of sENP directly incorporated for ingestion are reviewed herein. At the time of this review, there is no notable report of safety concerns of these nanomaterials found in the literature. Meanwhile, various beneficial effects have been demonstrated for the application of sENP. To address public perception and safety concerns of nanoscale materials in food, methodologies for evaluation of physiological effects of nanomaterials are reviewed. The combination of these complementary methods will be useful for the establishment of a comprehensive risk assessment system.
       
  • Genetic determinants of beverage consumption: Implications for nutrition
           and health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 April 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Marilyn C. Cornelis Beverages make important contributions to nutritional intake and their role in health has received much attention. This review focuses on the genetic determinants of common beverage consumption and how research in this field is contributing insight to what and how much we consume and why this genetic knowledge matters from a research and public health perspective. The earliest efforts in gene-beverage behavior mapping involved genetic linkage and candidate gene analysis but these approaches have been largely replaced by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). GWAS have identified biologically plausible loci underlying alcohol and coffee drinking behavior. No GWAS has identified variants specifically associated with consumption of tea, juice, soda, wine, beer, milk or any other common beverage. Thus far, GWAS highlight an important behavior-reward component (as opposed to taste) to beverage consumption which may serve as a potential barrier to dietary interventions. Loci identified have been used in Mendelian randomization and gene × beverage interaction analysis of disease but results have been mixed. This research is necessary as it informs the clinical relevance of SNP-beverage associations and thus genotype-based personalized nutrition, which is gaining interest in the commercial and public health sectors.
       
  • Natural antioxidants of plant origin
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Ryszard Amarowicz, Ronald B. Pegg Interest in the content of natural antioxidants in plant-based foods can be from the human health perspective, in terms of how these compounds might help promote one's health and wellness, or from the storage point-of-view, as the endogenous antioxidant constituents aid to extend a foodstuff's shelf-life. This chapter reports essential information about the mechanism of antioxidant action and methods employed for determination of their activity, classes of phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, lignans, stilbenes, tannins), sources of plant antioxidants (oil seeds, cereals, legumes, plants of the Lamiaceae family, tea and coffee, tree nuts, fruits, and berries), extraction strategies of phenolic compounds from plant material, and the influence of processing and storage on the content of natural antioxidants in foods and their antioxidant activity. Thermal processing, if not releasing bound phenolics from the structural matrices of the food, tends to decrease the antioxidant potential or, in the best case scenario, has no significant negative impact. Gentler sterilization processes such as high-pressure processing tend to better retain the antioxidant potential of a foodstuff than thermal treatments such as steaming, boiling, or frying. The impact of processing can be assessed by determining the antioxidant potential of foodstuffs either at the point of formulation or after different periods of storage under specified conditions.
       
  • Current feeding strategies to improve pork intramuscular fat content and
           its nutritional quality
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): C.M. Alfaia, P.A. Lopes, M.S. Madeira, J.M. Pestana, D. Coelho, F. Toldrá, J.A.M. Prates Pork, one of the most consumed meats worldwide, has been facing major challenges regarding its low sensory quality and unhealthy image of fat. This chapter addresses current feeding strategies to ameliorate pork sensory attributes and nutritional quality by increasing intramuscular fat deposition and improving fatty acid composition, respectively. Dietary protein reduction, alone or combined with some components, contributes to satisfy consumer requirements and enhances the competitiveness of the meat industry with higher pork quality and lower production costs. In addition, feeding sources of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids to pigs, mainly from marine origin (rich in eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids), increases their content in pork, thus improving the health value of its fatty acid profile. In the near future, the inclusion of microalgae and seaweeds in feed represents a promising approach for the maintenance and development of the livestock sector, as an environmental friendly alternative to balance food and feed industries.
       
  • Challenges and opportunities regarding the use of alternative protein
           sources: Aquaculture and insects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Belén Gómez, Paulo E.S. Munekata, Zhenzhou Zhu, Francisco J. Barba, Fidel Toldrá, Predrag Putnik, Danijela Bursać Kovačević, José M. Lorenzo The world population is constantly growing so that the needs of food, including protein sources, will also increase considerably in the coming years. Animal farming has been related to numerous environmental consequences such as soil erosion, exaggerated water consumption, generation of large quantities of waste and accumulation of greenhouse gases. This is a situation that demonstrates the suitability and importance of finding more sustainable protein alternatives without losing the quality and the nutritional benefits of current common protein sources. In this context, it is worth highlighting the potential of insects and products derived from aquaculture. Particularly, farmed aquatic food products can reduce the impact on wild fish stocks, whose overfishing may end up in an ecological collapse, and insects are easy to be reared and efficient in converting feed into biomass. However, there are still several challenges like the need to adapt technologies and methods for the production and well-characterization of the new ingredients, careful evaluation of the introduction of such new proteins in the diet and its safety of use, including potential allergies, and the acceptance by consumers.
       
  • Dairy foods and positive impact on the consumer's health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Silvani Verruck, Celso Fasura Balthazar, Silva Rocha Ramon, Silva Ramon, Erick Almeida Esmerino, Tatiana Colombo Pimentel, Mônica Queiroz Freitas, Marcia Cristina Silva, Adriano Gomes da Cruz, Elane Schwinden Prudencio The objective of the present chapter was to demonstrate the state of the art in the recent advances in nutritional and functional components of dairy products research. In this chapter, the main mechanisms responsible and essential for a better understanding of nutritional and functional values of the components of milk and dairy products are highlighted. It also includes a discussion about the positive impacts of fermented milk, cheese, butter, ice cream, and dairy desserts components on the consumer's health.
       
  • Nanoencapsulation of functional food ingredients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 April 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Jieyu Zhu, Qingrong Huang Many functional food ingredients are poorly soluble in water, susceptible to chemical degradation, and incompatible with surrounding food matrix. Other issues are related to limited oral bioavailability, unpleasant sensory properties, and poor release profiles. Nanoencapsulation of functional food ingredients can help increase their water solubility/dispersibility in foods and beverages, improve their bioavailability by exhibiting good dose-dependent functionalities, mask undesired flavors/tastes to reduce the adverse effect on mouth-feel, enhance shelf-life and compatibility during production, storage, transportation and utilization of food products, and control release rate or specific delivery environment for better performance on their functionalities. This chapter provides an overview of different delivery systems for different functional food ingredients, the types of materials suitable for wall materials or building blocks of nanocapsules, the fabrication methods to assemble different delivery systems and release these active ingredients under different physiological conditions.
       
  • Bioavailability of nanotechnology-based bioactives and nutraceuticals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Dena Jones, Sarah Caballero, Gabriel Davidov-Pardo Bioaccessibility and bioavailability of some hydrophobic bioactives (e.g., carotenoids, polyphenols, fat-soluble vitamins, phytosterols and fatty acids) are limited due to their low water solubility, and in some instances low chemical stability. Nanotechnology involving nanometric (r 
       
  • Terpene core in selected aromatic and edible plants: Natural health
           improving agents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Jovana Petrović, Dejan Stojković, Marina Soković Aromatic plants synthesize and produce aromatic molecules, among these compounds some of them belong to terpenes and terpenoids. Plant species have specific genes involved in secondary metabolism which allows them to synthesize various compounds with terpene core. These kinds of plant species are also known as herbal drugs and they are primarily used as components in medicinal products or simply as health foods. This chapter will focus on terpene and terpenoid compounds found in selected edible and aromatic plants belonging to several plant families. Selected plant species are briefly discussed. Biologically active compounds with terpene core are most frequently found in essential oils of the edible and aromatic species, as well as they are separately isolated and identified from the extracts. Health beneficial effects coming from terpene compounds found in edible and aromatic plants are further presented and include antimicrobial, antiviral, cytotoxic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory and many other pharmacological activities.
       
  • Electrospinning and electrospraying technologies for food applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Loong-Tak Lim, Ana C. Mendes, Ioannis S. Chronakis Electrospinning and electrospraying are versatile techniques for the production of nano- to micro-scale fibers and particles. Over the past 2 decades, significant progresses have been made to advance the fundamental understandings of these electrohydrodynamic processes. Researchers have investigated different polymeric and non-polymeric substrates for producing submicron electrospun/electrosprayed materials of unique morphologies and physicochemical properties. This chapter provides an overview on the basic principles of electrospinning and electrospraying, highlighting the effects of key processing and solution parameters. Electrohydrodynamic phenomena of edible substrates, including polysaccharides (xanthan, alginate, starch, cyclodextrin, pullulan, dextran, modified celluloses, and chitosan), proteins (zein, what gluten, whey protein, soy protein, gelatin, etc.), and phospholipids are reviewed. Selected examples are presented on how ultrafine fibers and particles derived from these substrates are being exploited for food and nutraceutical applications. Finally, the challenges and opportunities of the electrostatic methods are discussed.
       
  • Glucosinolates: Molecular structure, breakdown, genetic, bioavailability,
           properties and healthy and adverse effects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): M.A. Prieto, Cecilia Jiménez López, Jesus Simal-Gandara Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects and biologically active compounds. Glucosinolates are mainly found in cruciferous plants such as Brassicaceae family, including common edible plants such as broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata f. alba), cauliflower (B. oleracea var. botrytis), rapeseed (Brassica napus), mustard (Brassica nigra), and horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). If cruciferous plants are consumed without processing, myrosinase enzyme will hydrolyze the glucosinolates to various metabolites, such as isothiocyanates, nitriles, oxazolidine-2-thiones, and indole-3-carbinols. On the other hand, when cruciferous are cooked before consumption, myrosinase is inactivated and glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. This review paper summarizes the glucosinolate molecular breakdown, their genetic aspects from biosynthesis to precursors, their bioavailability (assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules), their sensory properties, identified healthy and adverse effects, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability.
       
  • Plant phenolics as functional food ingredients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Celestino Santos-Buelga, Ana M. González-Paramás, Taofiq Oludemi, Begoña Ayuda-Durán, Susana González-Manzano Phenolic compounds have attracted much attention in recent times as their dietary intake has been associated with the prevention of some chronic and degenerative diseases that constitute major causes of death and incapacity in developed countries, such as cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, some types of cancers or neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Nowadays it is considered that these compounds contribute, at least in part, for the protective effects of fruit and vegetable-rich diets, so that the study of their role in human nutrition has become a central issue in food research. This chapter reviews the current knowledge on the phenolic compounds as food components, namely their occurrence in the diet, bioavailability and metabolism, biological activities and mechanisms of action. Besides, the approaches for their extraction from plant matrices and technological improvements regarding their preparation, stability and bioavailability in order to be used as functional food ingredients are also reviewed, as well as their legal situation regarding the possibility of making “health claims” based on their presence in food and beverages.
       
  • Nano-scale polysaccharide materials in food and agricultural applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Elessandra da Rosa Zavareze, Dianini Hüttner Kringel, Alvaro Renato Guerra Dias Potential applications of nanotechnology in food and agriculture include: (1) the encapsulation of functional compounds; (2) production of reinforcing materials; (3) delivery of nutraceuticals in foods; (4) food safety, for detection and control of chemical and microbiological risks; (5) active and intelligent food packaging; (6) incorporation of protective substances of seeds; (7) addition of nutrients in the soil; (8) use of controlled release pesticides. Natural polysaccharides and their derivatives are widely used in the production of nano-scale materials. This chapter examines, the use of polysaccharides, such as starch, cellulose, lignin, pectin, gums, and cyclodextrins for the production of nano-scale materials, including nanocrystals, nanoemulsions, nanocomplexes, nanocapsules, and nanofibers.
       
  • Interaction of nanoclay-reinforced packaging nanocomposites with food
           simulants and compost environments
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Yining Xia, Maria Rubino, Rafael Auras The production of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has increased exponentially over the last few decades. ENMs, made from use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), have been applied to the food, agriculture, pharmaceutical, and automobile industries. Of particular interest are their applications in packaging nanocomposites for consumer and non-consumer goods. ENPs in nanocomposites are of interest as a packaging material because they reduce the amount of polymer needed, while improving the physical properties. However, the transformation of ENPs in nanocomposite production, their fate, and their toxicity remain unknown while in contact with the package content or after the end of life. The objectives of this chapter are (a) to provide an overview of the main nanoclays used in packaging; (b) to categorize the main polymeric packaging nanocomposites; (c) to provide an overview of the fate and mass transport of ENPs, especially nanoclays; (d) to describe the mass transfer of nanoclays in food simulants and in compost environments; and (e) to identify current and future research needs.
       
  • Impact of molecular interactions with phenolic compounds on food
           polysaccharides functionality
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Corrine C. Dobson, Walid Mottawea, Alexane Rodrigue, Bruna L. Buzati Pereira, Riadh Hammami, Krista A. Power, Nicolas Bordenave Commercial trends based of the emergence of plant-based functional foods lead to investigate the structure-function relationship of their main bioactive constituents and their interactions in the food matrix and throughout the gastro-intestinal tract. Among these bioactive constituents, dietary polysaccharides and polyphenols have shown to interact at the molecular level and these interactions may have consequences on the polysaccharides physical and nutritional properties. The methods of investigation and mechanisms of interactions between polysaccharides and polyphenols are reviewed in light of their respective technological and nutritional functionalities. Finally, the potential impact of the co-occurrence or co-ingestion of polyphenols and polysaccharides on the technological and nutritional functionality of the polysaccharides are investigated.
       
  • Dietary fiber sources and human benefits: The case study of cereal and
           pseudocereals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): María Ciudad-Mulero, Virginia Fernández-Ruiz, Mª Cruz Matallana-González, Patricia Morales Dietary fiber (DF) includes the remnants of the edible part of plants and analogous carbohydrates that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine with complete or partial fermentation in the human large intestine. DF can be classified into two main groups according to its solubility, namely insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) that mainly consists on cell wall components, including cellulose, some hemicelluloses, lignin and resistant starch, and soluble dietary fiber (SDF) that consists of non-cellulosic polysaccharides as non-digestible oligosaccharides, arabinoxylans (AX), β-glucans, some hemicelluloses, pectins, gums, mucilages and inulin. The intake of DF is associated with health benefits. IDF can contribute to the normal function of the intestinal tract and it has an important role in the prevention of colonic diverticulosis and constipation. SDF is extensively fermented by gut microbiota and it is associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, with important health benefits due to its hypocholesterolemic properties. Due to these nutritional and health properties, DF is widely used as functional ingredients in food industry, being whole grain cereals, pulses, fruits and vegetables the main sources of DF. Also some synthetic sources are employed, namely polydextrose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose or cyclodextrins. The DF content of cereals varies depending on cultivars, their botanical components (pericarp, emdosperm and germ) and the processing conditions they have undergone (baking, extrusion, etc.). In cereal grains, AX are the predominant non-cellulose DF polysaccharides followed by cellulose and β-glucans, while in pseudocereals, pectins are quantitatively predominant.
       
  • Mycotoxins in food and feed
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Jelka Pleadin, Jadranka Frece, Ksenija Markov Mycotoxins represent secondary fungal metabolites not essential to the normal growth and reproduction of a fungus, but capable of causing biochemical, physiological and pathological changes in many species. Harmful effects of mycotoxins observed in humans and animals include carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, immune toxicity, neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, indigestion and so forth. These substances can be found in a variety of very important agricultural and food products, primarily dependent of product moisture content, and its water activity, relative air humidity, temperature, pH value, composition of the food matrix, the degree of its physical damage, and the presence of mold spores. Given that industrial processing has no significant effect on their reduction and in order to be able to vouch for the absence of mycotoxins, it is necessary to process foodstuffs under standardized and well-controlled conditions and to control each and every loop of the food production and storage chain. Preventative measures capable of reducing the contamination to the minimum must be in place and should be exercised by all means. In case that contamination does happen, methods for mycotoxin reduction or elimination should be implemented in dependence on a number of parameters such as properties of food or feed. Further research is needed in order to identify conditions that facilitate the growth of mycotoxin-producing fungi and develop effective preventative measures that can reduce contamination of food and feed as also to recognize possible synergistic effects of different mycotoxins in organism.
       
  • Effects of phytochemicals against diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Merve Bacanli, Sevtap Aydin Dilsiz, Nurşen Başaran, A. Ahmet Başaran Diabetes mellitus, a chronic metabolic disease, characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose and insufficiency in production and action of insulin is the seventh leading cause of death worldwide. Numerous studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is associated with increased formation of free radicals and decrease in antioxidant potential. In the patients with diabetes mellitus, the levels of antioxidant parameters are found to decrease, hence in many studies phytochemicals which can exert antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities, are suggested to improve the insulin sensitivity. Several phytoactive compounds such as flavonoids, lignans, prophenylphenols, are also found to combat the complications of diabetes. This chapter mainly focuses on the relationship between diabetes mellitus and preventive roles of various phytochemicals on diabetes via their antioxidant properties.
       
  • Phytoestrogens, phytosteroids and saponins in vegetables: Biosynthesis,
           functions, health effects and practical applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Francesco Di Gioia, Spyridon A. Petropoulos Phytoestrogens are non-steroidal secondary metabolites with similarities in structure and biological activities with human estrogens divided into various classes of compounds, including lignans, isoflavones, ellagitannins, coumestans and stilbenes. Similarly, phytosteroids are steroidal compounds of plant origin which have estrogenic effects and can act as agonists, antagonists, or have a mixed agonistic/antagonistic activity to animal steroid receptors. On the other hand, saponins are widely distributed plant glucosides divided into triterpenoid and steroidal saponins that contribute to plant defense mechanism against herbivores. They present a great variation from a structural point of view, including compounds from different classes. In this chapter, the main vegetable sources of these compounds will be presented, while details regarding their biosynthesis and plant functions will be also discussed. Moreover, considering the significant bioactive properties that these compounds exhibit, special focus will be given on their health effects, either beneficial or adverse. The practical applications of these compounds in agriculture and phytomedicine will be also demonstrated, as well as the future prospects for related research.
       
  • Pigments and vitamins from plants as functional ingredients: Current
           trends and perspectives
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Rúbia Carvalho Gomes Corrêa, Jéssica Amanda Andrade Garcia, Vanesa Gesser Correa, Tatiane Francielli Vieira, Adelar Bracht, Rosane Marina Peralta The food manufacturing industry has increasingly focused in the development of wholesome and safer products, including certified labeled “super foods,” “healthy foods” and “functional foods,” which are currently under great demand worldwide. Plant pigments and vitamins are amidst the most common additives incorporated to foodstuff, not only for improving their nutritional status but also for coloration, preservation, and even therapeutic purposes. The recovery of pigments from agro industrial wastes using green emerging approaches is a current trend and clearly the best alternative to ensure their sustainable obtainment and make these ingredients more popular, although still full of challenging aspects. Stability and bioavailability limitations of these active molecules in food matrices have been increasingly studied, and a number of methods have been proposed to minimize these issues, among which the incorporation of a co-pigment, exclusion of O2 during processing and storage, and above all, microencapsulation and nanoencapsulation techniques. The most recent advances and challenges in the application of natural pigments and vitamins in functional foods, considering only reports of the last 5 years, were the focus of this chapter.
       
  • A comprehensive perspective of food nanomaterials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): I.J. Joye, M.G. Corradini, L.M. Duizer, B.M. Bohrer, G. LaPointe, J.M. Farber, P.A. Spagnuolo, M.A. Rogers Nanotechnology is a rapidly developing toolbox that provides solutions to numerous challenges in the food industry and meet public demands for healthier and safer food products. The diversity of nanostructures and their vast, tunable functionality drives their inclusion in food products and packaging materials to improve their nutritional quality through bioactive fortification and probiotics encapsulation, enhance their safety due to their antimicrobial and sensing capabilities and confer novel sensorial properties.In this food nanotechnology state-of-the-art communication, matrix materials with particular focus on food-grade components, existing and novel production techniques, and current and potential applications in the fields of food quality, safety and preservation, nutrient bioaccessibility and digestibility will be detailed. Additionally, a thorough analysis of potential strategies to assess the safety of these novel nanostructures is presented.
       
  • Assembled protein nanoparticles in food or nutrition applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Young-Hee Cho, Owen Griffith Jones Proteins are one of the essential components of nutritional food materials and an excellent source for food-grade nanomaterials. This review focuses on select examples of nanoparticles assembled naturally, found in food-relevant materials, major approaches in assembling nanoscale structure from proteins, and general applications of protein nanoparticles in food or nutrition. Animal-sourced casein and non-animal grain storage proteins and legume storage proteins are discussed in terms of their structural assemblies. Protein solubility is a key factor in assembling protein nanoparticles with desired functional properties. Desolvation is the most common technique to prepare protein nanoparticles for insoluble proteins. Well-hydrated protein assemblies have been extensively studied through electrostatic complexes, assembled with fatty acid and starch, reassembled protein structure, and nanogels. These protein-based nanoparticles have been utilized for filler materials of films, encapsulation of bioactive molecules, and stabilization of emulsions. Most studies exploiting protein-based nanoparticles have focused on developing technologies in extraction of proteins from sources and assembly of nanoparticles in different environmental conditions.
       
  • Series Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition Research, Volume 87Author(s):
       
  • Advanced Analysis of Roots and Tubers by Hyperspectral Techniques
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 December 2018Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Wen-Hao Su, Da-Wen Sun Hyperspectral techniques in terms of spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have become reliable analytical tools to effectively describe quality attributes of roots and tubers (such as potato, sweet potato, cassava, yam, taro, and sugar beet). In addition to the ability for obtaining rapid information about food external or internal defects including sprout, bruise, and hollow heart, and identifying different grades of food quality, such techniques have also been implemented to determine physical properties (such as color, texture, and specific gravity) and chemical constituents (such as protein, vitamins, and carotenoids) in root and tuber products with avoidance of extensive sample preparation. Developments of related quality evaluation systems based on hyperspectral data that determine food quality parameters would bring about economic and technical values to the food industry. Consequently, a comprehensive review of hyperspectral literature is carried out in this chapter. The spectral data acquired, the multivariate statistical methods used, and the main breakthroughs of recent studies on quality determinations of root and tuber products are discussed and summarized. The conclusion elaborates the promise of how hyperspectral techniques can be applied for non-invasive and rapid evaluations of tuber quality properties.
       
  • Microbial Ecology of Fermented Vegetables and Non-Alcoholic Drinks and
           Current Knowledge on Their Impact on Human Health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2018Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Laura Lavefve, Daya Marasini, Franck Carbonero Fermented foods are currently experiencing a re-discovery, largely driven by numerous health benefits claims. While fermented dairy, beer, and wine (and other alcoholic fermented beverages) have been the subject of intensive research, other plant-based fermented foods that are in some case widely consumed (kimchi/sauerkraut, pickles, kombucha) have received less scientific attention. In this chapter, the current knowledge on the microbiology and potential health benefits of such plant-based fermented foods are presented. Kimchi is the most studied, characterized by primarily acidic fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Anti-obesity and anti-hypertension properties have been reported for kimchi and other pickled vegetables. Kombucha is the most popular non-alcoholic fermented drink. Kombucha's microbiology is remarkable as it involves all fermenters described in known fermented foods: lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, fungi, and yeasts. While kombucha is often hyped as a “super-food,” only antioxidant and antimicrobial properties toward foodborne pathogens are well established; and it is unknown if these properties incur beneficial impact, even in vitro or in animal models. The mode of action that has been studied and demonstrated the most is the probiotic one. However, it can be expected that fermentation metabolites may be prebiotic, or influence host health directly. To conclude, plant-based fermented foods and drinks are usually safe products; few negative reports can be found, but more research, especially human dietary intervention studies, are warranted to substantiate any health claim.
       
  • Advances in Sheep and Goat Meat Products Research
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2018Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Alfredo Teixeira, Severiano Silva, Sandra Rodrigues The main goal of this chapter was to review the state of the art in the recent advances in sheep and goat meat products research. Research and innovation have been playing an important role in sheep and goat meat production and meat processing as well as food safety. Special emphasis will be placed on the imaging and spectroscopic methods for predicting body composition, carcass and meat quality. The physicochemical and sensory quality as well as food safety will be referenced to the new sheep and goat meat products. Finally, the future trends in sheep and goat meat products research will be pointed out.
       
  • Dietary Fatty Acids and the Metabolic Syndrome: A Personalized Nutrition
           Approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 September 2018Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Sarah O'Connor, Iwona Rudkowska Dietary fatty acids are present in a wide variety of foods and appear in different forms and lengths. The different fatty acids are known to have various effects on metabolic health. The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of risk factors of chronic diseases. The etiology of the MetS is represented by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Dietary fatty acids can be important contributors of the evolution or in prevention of the MetS; however, great interindividual variability exists in the response to fatty acids. The identification of genetic variants interacting with fatty acids might explain this heterogeneity in metabolic responses. This chapter reviews the mechanisms underlying the interactions between the different components of the MetS, dietary fatty acids and genes. Challenges surrounding the implementation of personalized nutrition are also covered.
       
  • Marine Waste Utilization as a Source of Functional and Health Compounds
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 September 2018Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Amin Shavandi, Yakun Hou, Alan Carne, Michelle McConnell, Alaa El-din A. Bekhit Consumer demand for convenience has led to large quantities of seafood being value-added processed before marketing, resulting in large amounts of marine by-products being generated by processing industries. Several bioconversion processes have been proposed to transform some of these by-products. In addition to their relatively low value conventional use as animal feed and fertilizers, several investigations have been reported that have demonstrated the potential to add value to viscera, heads, skins, fins, trimmings, and crab and shrimp shells by extraction of lipids, bioactive peptides, enzymes, and other functional proteins and chitin that can be used in food and pharmaceutical applications. This chapter is focused on reviewing the opportunities for utilization of these marine by-products. The chapter discusses the various products and bioactive compounds that can be obtained from seafood waste and describes various methods that can be used to produce these products with the aim of highlighting opportunities to add value to these marine waste streams.
       
  • Functions and Applications of Bioactive Peptides From Corn Gluten Meal
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 August 2018Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Guoming Li, Wenying Liu, Yuqing Wang, Fuhuai Jia, Yuchen Wang, Yong Ma, Ruizeng Gu, Jun Lu Corn protein has been identified as an important source of bioactive peptides. Such peptides can be released during hydrolysis induced by proteolytic enzymes or microbial fermentation. Corn peptides have been found to exhibit different functions in vitro and in vivo such as antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, anti-obesity, antimicrobial, antioxidative, mineral-binding and accelerating alcohol metabolism. To date, 22 sequences of bioactive corn peptides have already been identified. There is an increasing commercial interest in the production of corn peptides with the purpose of using them as active ingredients, which may find use in the treatment of liver injury, hypertension, dental carries, oxidative stress, mineral malabsorption and obesity. These bioactive peptides may be used in formulation of functional foods, nutraceuticals, and natural drugs because of their health benefit effects.
       
  • Particular Alimentations for Nutrition, Health and Pleasure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 August 2018Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): J.M. Aguilera, B.-K. Kim, D.J. Park People around the world select their foods and meals according to particular choices based on physiological disorders and diseases, traditions, lifestyles, beliefs, etc. In this chapter, two of these particular alimentations are reviewed: those of the gourmet and the frail elderly. They take place in an environment where food is usually synonymous of body health disregarding its effects on social, cultural and psychological aspects, including emotions. Based on an extensive literature review, it is proposed that the paradigm changes from food equals health to food means well-being, the latter encompassing physical and physiological aspects as well as psychological, emotional and social aspects at the individual and societal levels. The growing food and nutrition requirements of an aging population are reviewed and special nutritious and enjoyable products available for this group are discussed.
       
  • Meat as a Pharmakon: An Exploration of the Biosocial Complexities
           of Meat Consumption
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 August 2018Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Frédéric Leroy In contemporary dietary advice, meat is depicted as a pharmakon: it is believed to either heal or poison the human body (and mind). Often, it also serves as a scapegoat for a wide range of public health issues and other societal problems. Related attitudes, practices, and beliefs pertain to a demarcated mode of thinking or episteme that is characteristic for the so-called post-domestic or industrialized societies. The latter are not only typified by an abundant yet largely concealed production of meat, but increasingly also by moral crisis and confusion about its nutritional meaning. For an improved appreciation of the ambiguous position of meat in human health and disease, as well as the concomitant scattering into different subject positions (e.g., the omnivore, flexitarian, vegetarian, vegan, permaculturalist, and carnivore position), an interdisciplinary approach is required. To this end, the current study tentatively combines food research with a selection of (post-structuralist) concepts from the humanities. The aim is to outline a historical and biosocial need for meat (as well as its rejection) and to analyze how its transformative effects have contributed to a polarized discourse on diet and well-being in academia and society at large. Excessive categorization (for instance with respect to meat's alleged naturalness, normalness, necessity, and niceness) and Manichean thinking in binary opposites are among the key factors that lead to impassioned yet often sterile debates between the advocates and adversaries of meat eating in a post-truth context.
       
 
 
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