Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3206 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3206 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 106, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 449, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 338, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 194, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Clinical Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Cosmetic Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Family Practice Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Ophthalmology and Optometry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 433, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 398, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 485, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 276, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 223, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.591
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 69  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1043-4526
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3206 journals]
  • Aquaculture and its by-products as a source of nutrients and bioactive
           compounds
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2020Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Fadila Al Khawli, Francisco J. Marti-Quijal, Emilia Ferrer, María-José Ruiz, Houda Berrada, Mohsen Gavahian, Francisco J. Barba, Beatriz de la FuenteAbstractUnderutilized marine resources (e.g., algae, fish, and shellfish processing by-products), as sustainable alternatives to livestock protein and interesting sources of bioactive compounds, have attracted the attention of the researchers. Aquatic products processing industries are growing globally and producing huge amounts of by-products that often discarded as waste. However, recent studies pointed out that marine waste contains several valuable components including high-quality proteins, lipids, minerals, vitamins, enzymes, and bioactive compounds that can be used against cancer and some cardiovascular disorders. Besides, previously conducted studies on algae have shown the presence of some unique biologically active compounds and valuable proteins. Hence, this chapter points out recent advances in this area of research and discusses the importance of aquaculture and fish processing by-products as alternative sources of proteins and bioactive compounds.
       
  • Chemical composition and health properties of coffee and coffee
           by-products
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2020Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Gilberto V. de Melo Pereira, Dão Pedro de Carvalho Neto, Antonio I. Magalhães Júnior, Fernanda Guilherme do Prado, Maria Giovana B. Pagnoncelli, Susan Grace Karp, Carlos Ricardo SoccolAbstractCoffee can be an ally in the fight against diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, hepatic injury, cirrhosis, depression, suicidal behavior, and neurological and cardiovascular disorders. The properties of coffee also favor gastrointestinal tract and gut microbiota establishment. Coffee bioactive components include phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acids, cafestol and kahweol), alkaloids (caffeine and trigonelin), diterpenes (cafestol and kahweol) and other secondary metabolites. The image of coffee as a super functional food has helped to increase coffee consumption across the globe. This chapter addresses the main health promotion mechanisms associated with coffee consumption. Related topics on coffee production chain, world consumption and reuse of coffee by-products in the production of high-value-adding molecules with potential applications in the food industry are addressed and discussed.
       
  • Scaling-up processes: Patents and commercial applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Beatriz de la Fuente, Adrián Tornos, Andrea Príncep, Jose M. Lorenzo, Mirian Pateiro, Houda Berrada, Francisco J. Barba, María-José Ruiz, Francisco J. Martí-QuijalAbstractThere is currently a great demand for fish and seafood products. However, their high consumption produces large quantities of by-products that can be an ecological problem. That is why it is necessary to look for alternatives to revalue these products and give them a second life, thus reducing their environmental impact. In this sense, several investigations have been carried out in laboratories around the world to extract compounds from marine processing industry for the final high added-value products. Some of these compounds are collagen, omega 3 fatty acids, protein concentrates or chitin/chitosan, among others. Nevertheless, one of the critical steps for obtaining these compounds at the industrial level is the scale-up. Much of this research does not progress at the industrial level due to the complications of its large-scale research and use. However, the advances in technology entail that more research studies achieve to reach the industrial development phase. Once a product or process has been developed, it should be patented to protect its intellectual property. This chapter gives an overview of this entire process, showing some examples of patents or products from seafood by-products already marketed and providing some details of the corresponding legislation.
       
  • Alternative extraction techniques to obtain, isolate and purify proteins
           and bioactive from aquaculture and by-products
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 December 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Khadijeh Abhari, Amin Mousavi KhaneghahAbstractOceans cover more than 70% of the earth's surface and provide a great ecosystem for habitat of a large divers of marine species. The marine species are rich sources of bioactive compound that can be applied in medicine, pharmacology and food industry. Besides the marine species, fish processing industry also produces substantial volumes of by-products that can be used for a variety of purposes. Thus, it is important to find approaches to access to these valuable compounds. Nowadays, more factors have been considered in selecting an appropriate method for extraction of bioactive compounds such as consume less time and solvent, to be fast and ecofriendly. Concerns regarding entering the pollutions to the environment resulted to invest on the methods practicable with less chemical solvents and even green ones, however, implementation of stricter regulations and policies is required to encourage researchers to set up the procedures with reduced toxic agents to guarantee the environmental safety. In the current chapter the most common marine derived compounds and innovative methods for their extraction will be discussed.
       
  • Development of new food and pharmaceutical products: Nutraceuticals and
           food additives
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 December 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Paulo E.S. Munekata, Mirian Pateiro, Francisco J. Barba, Rubén Dominguéz, Mohammed Gagaoua, José M. LorenzoAbstractThe market of nutraceuticals and foods elaborated with natural additives are constantly growing and leading researchers and professionals of pharmaceutical and food industry to develop new products and reconsider the formulation of processed food. However, these products can only be insert into the market after extensive and well-performed scientific studies that clarify the mechanisms by which bioactive compounds can improve health status beyond nutrition or can replace conventional food additives perceived as “unhealthy” or “unfamiliar” by consumers. Therefore, scientific evidence regarding the actual health benefits and preservation/enhancement of food attributes are the crucial step in the exploration of nutraceuticals and natural food additives. In this context, several studies have been carried to identify and characterize natural bioactive compounds in aquaculture and related by-products for further production of nutraceuticals and food additives. The main purpose of this chapter is to highlight the most recent advances to explore extracts and isolated compounds from aquaculture and by-products to develop nutraceuticals and food additives.
       
  • Evaluation of the protein and bioactive compound
           bioaccessibility/bioavailability and cytotoxicity of the extracts obtained
           from aquaculture and fisheries by-products
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Mirian Pateiro, Paulo E.S. Munekata, Christos Tsatsanis, Rubén Domínguez, Wangang Zhang, Francisco J. Barba, José M. LorenzoAbstractBioavailability, bioaccessibility, bioactivity and cytotoxicity define if a bioactive compound obtained from aquaculture and associated by-products can be assimilated and used for the body in a safe and efficient way. Four models are used to evaluate the bioavailability: in vitro (simulated gastrointestinal digestion using intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell cultures); ex vivo (gastrointestinal organs or organoids in laboratory conditions); in situ (intestinal perfusion in animals) and in vivo (animal studies and human studies). In vitro models are very effective, predicting in vivo actions since they evaluate multiple conditions regardless physiological effects. However, in vivo systems are essential for the validation of the results. The use of a combined model between human digestion and cell culture-based models would solve these difficulties, allowing valid conclusions. These studies must be completed with the evaluation of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress markers, providing most accurate results regarding the adverse effect on the body. These methods would test the effect of food structure, food composition, dietary factors and the effect of food processing on bioavailability. Further studies should be carried out to establish a standardized method and achieve a balance between the use of in vivo and in vitro systems.
       
  • Legal regulations and consumer attitudes regarding the use of products
           obtained from aquaculture
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Belén Gómez, Mirian Pateiro, Francisco J. Barba, Krystian Marszałek, Czesław Puchalski, Włodziemierz Lewandowski, Jesus Simal-Gandara, José M. LorenzoAbstractAquaculture is an industrial activity that not only aims to be a source of quality food, but also is a way to restock fish populations and to conserve the biodiversity of our oceans. On the other hand, the production system can influence the consumer perceptions about what is purchased and consumed, as well as the subsequent environmental and social effects. Fish feeding production is affected by the growth of aquaculture and the increasing demand that have let to deficit, high prices, and low ecological safety of fish meal and oil. In this regard, the use of microbial biomass obtained from a variety of microorganisms has been reported as a potential substitute for plant- and animal-derived ingredients, satisfying the requirements in protein and energy and even adding functional properties. In addition, microalgae can increase the nutritional value of animal feed, play a key role in the physiological growth and external appearance of aquatic animals. Finally, politicians, industry and society in general should be careful with the numerous uncertainties still present in the sector that can weaken its sustainability from environmental, social and economic perspectives.
       
  • Seaweed and seaweed-derived metabolites as prebiotics
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 December 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Suvimol Charoensiddhi, Reinu E. Abraham, Peng Su, Wei ZhangAbstractSeaweeds and their bioactive compounds, particularly polysaccharides and phenolics can be regarded as great dietary supplements with gut health benefits and prebiotics. These components are resistant to digestion by enzymes present in the human gastrointestinal tract, also selectively stimulate the growth of beneficial gut bacteria and the production of fermentation products such as short chain fatty acids. Commonly, the health benefits of seaweed components are assessed by including them in an in vitro anaerobic fermentation system containing human fecal inocula that mimics the environment of the human large bowel. Regarding to the complex interactions between dietary components, gastrointestinal physiological processes, and gut microbiota are difficult to model in vitro. Consequently it is important to follow up the promising in vitro results with in vivo animal or human testing. The aim of this chapter is to have a comprehensive review on the application of seaweeds and seaweed-derived metabolites as prebiotics, and understand the trends, gaps and future directions of both scientific and industrial developments. This work contributes to develop and expand new platform of seaweed utilization for higher-value products, particularly to functional food and nutraceutical industries in order to serve the social demand for health awareness and support economic development.
       
  • Aquaculture and by-products: Challenges and opportunities in the use of
           alternative protein sources and bioactive compounds
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): María López-Pedrouso, José M. Lorenzo, Jesús Cantalapiedra, Carlos Zapata, José M. Franco, Daniel FrancoAbstractThere is a growing concern about chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cancer and cardiovascular diseases resulting from profound changes in the western lifestyle. Aquaculture by-products are generated in large quantities and they can be profitably recycled through their bioactive compounds used for health or food supplements. Improving waste utilization in the field of aquaculture is essential for a sustainable industry to prevent or minimize the environmental impact. In this sense fish by-products are a great source of protein and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids which are particularly studied on Atlantic salmon or rainbow trout. Fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) obtained from chemical, enzymatical and microbial hydrolysis of processing by-products are being used as a source of amino acids and peptides with high digestibility, fast absorption and important biological activities. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) from fish discards have been reported to decrease postprandial triacylglycerol levels, reduction of blood pressure, platelet aggregation and the inflammatory response. Crustacean by-products can also be used to produce chitosan with antioxidant and antimicrobial activity for food and pharmaceutical industries and carotenoids with important biological activity. Seaweeds are rich in bioactive compounds such as alginate, carrageenan, agar, carotenoids and polyphenols with different biological activities such as antioxidant, anticancer, antidiabetic, antimicrobial or anti-inflammatory activity. Finally, regarding harvest microalgae, during the past decades, they were mainly used in the healthy food market, with> 75% of the annual microalgal biomass production, used for the manufacture of powders, tablets, capsules or pills. We will report and discuss the present and future role of aquaculture by-products as sources of biomolecules for the design and development of functional foods/beverages. This chapter will focus on the main bioactive compounds from aquaculture by-products as functional compounds in food and their applications in biomedicine for the prevention and treatment of diseases.
       
  • High-throughput sequencing and food microbiology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Narciso M. Quijada, Marta Hernández, David Rodríguez-LázaroAbstractMassive parallel sequencing (High-Throughput Sequencing, HTS) permits reading of sequenced millions to billions short DNAs in parallel (reads) and is revolutionizing microbiology and food safety research from the laboratory methods to computational analysis, with the inevitable use of Bioinformatics. The time and cost reduction of microbiota, microbiome and metagenome studies allows the rapid progress in diagnosis, taxonomy, epidemiology, comparative genomics, virulence, discovery of genes or variants of interest and the association of microorganisms with food spoilage and foodborne infections.
       
  • Ohmic heating as a promising technique for extraction of herbal essential
           oils: Understanding mechanisms, recent findings, and associated challenges
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Mohsen Gavahian, Sudhir Sastry, Reza Farhoosh, Asgar FarahnakyAbstractThe applicability of ohmic heating, as a volumetric heating technique, has been explored in various sectors of the food industry. The use of ohmic heating for essential oil extraction is among its emerging applications. This chapter overviews the recent progress in this area of research, discusses the mechanisms involved in ohmic-based essential oil extraction processes, explains the effective process parameters, highlights their benefits, and explains the considerations to address the obstacles to industrial implementation. Ohmic-assisted hydrodistillation (OAHD) and ohmic-accelerated steam distillation (OASD) systems were proposed as alternatives to conventional hydrodistillation and steam distillation, respectively. These techniques have successfully extracted essential oils from several aromatic plants (e.g., thyme, peppermint, citronella, and lavender). Both OAHD and OASD possess a number of benefits, such as reducing the extraction time and energy consumption, compared to classical extraction methods. However, these techniques are in their infancy and further economic and upscaling studies are required for their industrial adaptation.
       
  • Protein and amino acids for skeletal muscle health in aging
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 October 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Anna Thalacker-Mercer, Emily Riddle, Laura BarreAbstractProteins and its building blocks, amino acids, have many physiological roles in the body. While some amino acids can be synthesized endogenously, exogenous protein and amino acids are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Because skeletal muscle contains a large portion of endogenous protein and plays important roles in movement, regulation, and metabolism, imbalanced protein and amino acid availability may result in clinical conditions including skeletal muscle atrophy, impaired muscle growth or regrowth, and functional decline. Aging is associated with changes in protein metabolism and multiple physiological and functional alterations in the skeletal muscle that are accentuated by decreased dietary protein intake and impaired anabolic responses to stimuli. Inactivity and chronically elevated inflammation of the skeletal muscle can initiate and/or augment pathological remodeling of the tissue (i.e., increase of fat and fibrotic tissues and atrophy of the muscle). Defining an adequate amount of dietary protein that is appropriate to maintain the availability of amino acids for biological needs is necessary but is still widely debated for older adults. This chapter will provide (i) an overview of dietary protein and amino acids and their role in skeletal muscle health; (ii) an overview of skeletal muscle structure and function and the deterioration of muscle that occurs with advancing age; (iii) a discussion of the relationship between protein/amino acid metabolism and skeletal muscle decline with aging; and (iv) a brief discussion of optimal protein intakes for older adults to maintain skeletal muscle health in aging.
       
  • Series Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition Research, Volume 90Author(s):
       
  • Polyphenols in the management of brain disorders: Modulation of the
           microbiota-gut-brain axis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Diana Serra, Leonor M. Almeida, Teresa C.P. DinisAbstractThe modulation of the microbiota-gut-brain axis with a view to preventing and treating brain disorders became recently a hot topic for the scientific community.Dietary polyphenols are multifaceted compounds that have demonstrated to be highly advantageous to counteract inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration, among other pathological conditions, being useful in the prevention and treatment of several chronic disorders. The potential of these compounds to prevent and treat brain disorders has not been only related to their capacity to reach the brain, depending on their chemical structure, and interact directly with brain cells, but also to their ability to modulate the communication between the brain and the gut, interfering with multiple branches of this axis.Preclinical studies have demonstrated the potential of these food bioactive compounds in brain diseases, namely, neurodevelopmental, such as Down's syndrome and Autism spectrum disorder, neurodegenerative, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, and psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Until now, dietary polyphenols have been recognized as promising nutraceuticals to combat brain disorders. However, the impact of these compounds on the gut-brain interconnection remains poorly elucidated. Also, clinical assays are crucial to further support the beneficial effects of these compounds as demonstrated in preclinical research.
       
  • Bioactive potential of fruit and vegetable wastes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Vasile Coman, Bernadette-Emőke Teleky, Laura Mitrea, Gheorghe Adrian Martău, Katalin Szabo, Lavinia-Florina Călinoiu, Dan Cristian VodnarAbstractFruits and vegetables are essential for human nutrition, delivering a substantial proportion of vitamins, minerals, and fibers in our daily diet. Unfortunately, half the fruits and vegetables produced worldwide end up as wastes, generating environmental issues caused mainly by microbial degradation. Most wastes are generated by industrial processing, the so-called by-products. These by-products still contain many bioactive compounds post-processing, such as macronutrients (proteins and carbohydrates) and phytochemicals (polyphenols and carotenoids). Recently, the recovery of these bioactive compounds from industry by-products has received significant attention, mainly due to their possible health benefits for humans. This chapter focuses on the bioactive potential of fruit and vegetable by-products with possible applications in the food industry (functional foods) and in the health sector (nutraceuticals).
       
  • Advanced lipid based biosensors for food analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Georgia-Paraskevi NikoleliAbstractThe investigation of lipid films for the construction of nanosensors has recently given the opportunity to manufacture devices to selectively determine a wide range of food toxicants. Biosensor miniaturization using recent advances in nanotechnology has given the opportunity to investigate novel techniques to immobilize a wide range of enzymes, antibodies and receptors within the lipid film. This chapter reviews novel revent platforms in nanobiosensors based on lipid membranes that are used in food chemistry to determine various food toxicants. Examples of applications are described with an emphasis on novel systems, sensing techniques and nanotechnology-based transduction schemes. The compounds that can be monitored are insecticides, pesticides, herbicides, metals, toxins, hormones, etc. Finally, limitations and future prospects are presented herein on the evaluation/validation and eventually commercialization of the proposed sensors.
       
  • Natural antioxidants of plant origin
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Ryszard Amarowicz, Ronald B. PeggAbstractInterest in the content of natural antioxidants in plant-based foods can be from the human health perspective, in terms of how these compounds might help promote one's health and wellness, or from the storage point-of-view, as the endogenous antioxidant constituents aid to extend a foodstuff's shelf-life. This chapter reports essential information about the mechanism of antioxidant action and methods employed for determination of their activity, classes of phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, lignans, stilbenes, tannins), sources of plant antioxidants (oil seeds, cereals, legumes, plants of the Lamiaceae family, tea and coffee, tree nuts, fruits, and berries), extraction strategies of phenolic compounds from plant material, and the influence of processing and storage on the content of natural antioxidants in foods and their antioxidant activity. Thermal processing, if not releasing bound phenolics from the structural matrices of the food, tends to decrease the antioxidant potential or, in the best case scenario, has no significant negative impact. Gentler sterilization processes such as high-pressure processing tend to better retain the antioxidant potential of a foodstuff than thermal treatments such as steaming, boiling, or frying. The impact of processing can be assessed by determining the antioxidant potential of foodstuffs either at the point of formulation or after different periods of storage under specified conditions.
       
  • Terpene core in selected aromatic and edible plants: Natural health
           improving agents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Jovana Petrović, Dejan Stojković, Marina SokovićAbstractAromatic plants synthesize and produce aromatic molecules, among these compounds some of them belong to terpenes and terpenoids. Plant species have specific genes involved in secondary metabolism which allows them to synthesize various compounds with terpene core. These kinds of plant species are also known as herbal drugs and they are primarily used as components in medicinal products or simply as health foods. This chapter will focus on terpene and terpenoid compounds found in selected edible and aromatic plants belonging to several plant families. Selected plant species are briefly discussed. Biologically active compounds with terpene core are most frequently found in essential oils of the edible and aromatic species, as well as they are separately isolated and identified from the extracts. Health beneficial effects coming from terpene compounds found in edible and aromatic plants are further presented and include antimicrobial, antiviral, cytotoxic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory and many other pharmacological activities.
       
  • Glucosinolates: Molecular structure, breakdown, genetic, bioavailability,
           properties and healthy and adverse effects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): M.A. Prieto, Cecilia Jiménez López, Jesus Simal-GandaraAbstractGlucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects and biologically active compounds. Glucosinolates are mainly found in cruciferous plants such as Brassicaceae family, including common edible plants such as broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata f. alba), cauliflower (B. oleracea var. botrytis), rapeseed (Brassica napus), mustard (Brassica nigra), and horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). If cruciferous plants are consumed without processing, myrosinase enzyme will hydrolyze the glucosinolates to various metabolites, such as isothiocyanates, nitriles, oxazolidine-2-thiones, and indole-3-carbinols. On the other hand, when cruciferous are cooked before consumption, myrosinase is inactivated and glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. This review paper summarizes the glucosinolate molecular breakdown, their genetic aspects from biosynthesis to precursors, their bioavailability (assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules), their sensory properties, identified healthy and adverse effects, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability.
       
  • Plant phenolics as functional food ingredients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Celestino Santos-Buelga, Ana M. González-Paramás, Taofiq Oludemi, Begoña Ayuda-Durán, Susana González-ManzanoAbstractPhenolic compounds have attracted much attention in recent times as their dietary intake has been associated with the prevention of some chronic and degenerative diseases that constitute major causes of death and incapacity in developed countries, such as cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, some types of cancers or neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Nowadays it is considered that these compounds contribute, at least in part, for the protective effects of fruit and vegetable-rich diets, so that the study of their role in human nutrition has become a central issue in food research. This chapter reviews the current knowledge on the phenolic compounds as food components, namely their occurrence in the diet, bioavailability and metabolism, biological activities and mechanisms of action. Besides, the approaches for their extraction from plant matrices and technological improvements regarding their preparation, stability and bioavailability in order to be used as functional food ingredients are also reviewed, as well as their legal situation regarding the possibility of making “health claims” based on their presence in food and beverages.
       
  • Impact of molecular interactions with phenolic compounds on food
           polysaccharides functionality
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Corrine C. Dobson, Walid Mottawea, Alexane Rodrigue, Bruna L. Buzati Pereira, Riadh Hammami, Krista A. Power, Nicolas BordenaveAbstractCommercial trends based of the emergence of plant-based functional foods lead to investigate the structure-function relationship of their main bioactive constituents and their interactions in the food matrix and throughout the gastro-intestinal tract. Among these bioactive constituents, dietary polysaccharides and polyphenols have shown to interact at the molecular level and these interactions may have consequences on the polysaccharides physical and nutritional properties. The methods of investigation and mechanisms of interactions between polysaccharides and polyphenols are reviewed in light of their respective technological and nutritional functionalities. Finally, the potential impact of the co-occurrence or co-ingestion of polyphenols and polysaccharides on the technological and nutritional functionality of the polysaccharides are investigated.
       
  • Dietary fiber sources and human benefits: The case study of cereal and
           pseudocereals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): María Ciudad-Mulero, Virginia Fernández-Ruiz, Mª Cruz Matallana-González, Patricia MoralesAbstractDietary fiber (DF) includes the remnants of the edible part of plants and analogous carbohydrates that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine with complete or partial fermentation in the human large intestine. DF can be classified into two main groups according to its solubility, namely insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) that mainly consists on cell wall components, including cellulose, some hemicelluloses, lignin and resistant starch, and soluble dietary fiber (SDF) that consists of non-cellulosic polysaccharides as non-digestible oligosaccharides, arabinoxylans (AX), β-glucans, some hemicelluloses, pectins, gums, mucilages and inulin. The intake of DF is associated with health benefits. IDF can contribute to the normal function of the intestinal tract and it has an important role in the prevention of colonic diverticulosis and constipation. SDF is extensively fermented by gut microbiota and it is associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, with important health benefits due to its hypocholesterolemic properties. Due to these nutritional and health properties, DF is widely used as functional ingredients in food industry, being whole grain cereals, pulses, fruits and vegetables the main sources of DF. Also some synthetic sources are employed, namely polydextrose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose or cyclodextrins. The DF content of cereals varies depending on cultivars, their botanical components (pericarp, emdosperm and germ) and the processing conditions they have undergone (baking, extrusion, etc.). In cereal grains, AX are the predominant non-cellulose DF polysaccharides followed by cellulose and β-glucans, while in pseudocereals, pectins are quantitatively predominant.
       
  • Phytoestrogens, phytosteroids and saponins in vegetables: Biosynthesis,
           functions, health effects and practical applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 March 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Francesco Di Gioia, Spyridon A. PetropoulosAbstractPhytoestrogens are non-steroidal secondary metabolites with similarities in structure and biological activities with human estrogens divided into various classes of compounds, including lignans, isoflavones, ellagitannins, coumestans and stilbenes. Similarly, phytosteroids are steroidal compounds of plant origin which have estrogenic effects and can act as agonists, antagonists, or have a mixed agonistic/antagonistic activity to animal steroid receptors. On the other hand, saponins are widely distributed plant glucosides divided into triterpenoid and steroidal saponins that contribute to plant defense mechanism against herbivores. They present a great variation from a structural point of view, including compounds from different classes. In this chapter, the main vegetable sources of these compounds will be presented, while details regarding their biosynthesis and plant functions will be also discussed. Moreover, considering the significant bioactive properties that these compounds exhibit, special focus will be given on their health effects, either beneficial or adverse. The practical applications of these compounds in agriculture and phytomedicine will be also demonstrated, as well as the future prospects for related research.
       
  • Pigments and vitamins from plants as functional ingredients: Current
           trends and perspectives
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2019Source: Advances in Food and Nutrition ResearchAuthor(s): Rúbia Carvalho Gomes Corrêa, Jéssica Amanda Andrade Garcia, Vanesa Gesser Correa, Tatiane Francielli Vieira, Adelar Bracht, Rosane Marina PeraltaAbstractThe food manufacturing industry has increasingly focused in the development of wholesome and safer products, including certified labeled “super foods,” “healthy foods” and “functional foods,” which are currently under great demand worldwide. Plant pigments and vitamins are amidst the most common additives incorporated to foodstuff, not only for improving their nutritional status but also for coloration, preservation, and even therapeutic purposes. The recovery of pigments from agro industrial wastes using green emerging approaches is a current trend and clearly the best alternative to ensure their sustainable obtainment and make these ingredients more popular, although still full of challenging aspects. Stability and bioavailability limitations of these active molecules in food matrices have been increasingly studied, and a number of methods have been proposed to minimize these issues, among which the incorporation of a co-pigment, exclusion of O2 during processing and storage, and above all, microencapsulation and nanoencapsulation techniques. The most recent advances and challenges in the application of natural pigments and vitamins in functional foods, considering only reports of the last 5 years, were the focus of this chapter.
       
 
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