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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3160 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3160 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 96, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 410, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
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Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 152, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 64)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 400, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 343, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 455, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 213, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 180, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 197, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)

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Journal Cover
African Journal of Emergency Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.296
Number of Followers: 6  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2211-419X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3160 journals]
  • Cola therapy for oesophageal food bolus impactions a case series

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Eva P. Baerends, Tom Boeije, Anna Van Capelle, Nieke E. Mullaart-Jansen, Michael D. Burg, Albert J. Bredenoord IntroductionThis retrospective case series describes the use of cola to immediately treat complete oesophageal food bolus obstructions in the emergency centre. Short of emergent endoscopy – which is invasive, expensive, not without adverse events, and often unavailable in low-resource settings – no other proven therapies exist to relieve oesophageal food impactions.MethodsWe performed a chart review of adults with complete oesophageal food bolus obstructions presenting to two Dutch emergency centres. Our primary outcome was cola’s success rate in resolving the obstruction. Our secondary outcome was adverse event occurrence.ResultsWe identified 22 cola interventions in 19 patients, the majority of whom (77.3%) were male. The median age was 59 years (IQR 29–73). All presentations were due to meat impaction. Endoscopy revealed relevant upper gastrointestinal pathology in 54.5%. When initiated in the emergency centre, cola successfully resolved 59% of complete oesophageal obstructions. No adverse events were reported in patients successfully treated with cola.DiscussionWhile keenly aware of our retrospective study’s limitations, we found a promising success rate for cola as an acute intervention for oesophageal food bolus impactions. We registered no adverse events attributable to cola. Also, given that cola is cheap, widely available and seemingly safe we believe it can be considered in patients with oesophageal obstructions due to food, either as pre-endoscopy treatment or in case endoscopy is not available at all. We think our findings provide an impetus for prospective research on this intervention.
       
  • Procedural sedation and analgesia practices in the emergency centre

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Delecia K. Wood-Thompson, Callistus O.A. Enyuma, Abdullah E. Laher IntroductionProcedural sedation and analgesia allows the clinician to safely and efficiently administer sedation, analgesia, anxiolysis and sometimes amnesia to facilitate the performance of various procedures in the emergency centre. The aim of this study is to determine current sedation practices, common indications and major obstacles in selected emergency centres across Southern Gauteng, South Africa, with a view to improving future standards and practices.MethodsThis was a prospective, questionnaire based, cross-sectional interview of emergency centre managers or their designee of selected private-sector and public-sector hospitals in Southern Gauteng.ResultsOverall, 17 hospitals completed the interview, nine (53%) public-sector and eight (47%) private-sector hospitals, with 36% of hospitals being aligned to an academic institute. All hospitals performed procedural sedation in their emergency centre. Forty seven percent of managers had between ten and 19 years of clinical experience post internship. Although eleven (64.7%) managers achieved a postgraduate qualification in emergency medicine, only seven (41%) were accredited with a Fellowship of the College of Emergency Medicine (FCEM) qualification and only three (17.7%) centres employed three or more specialists. The majority of centres (52.3%) performed between ten and 30 procedures per month requiring sedation. Staff training in the practice of procedural sedation was mostly obtained internally (52.9%), from in-house seniors. Essential drugs, procedure monitors, resuscitation equipment and protocols were all available in 70.6% of centres.ConclusionAlthough the safe practice and awareness of procedural sedation and analgesia in both public-sector and private-sector emergency centres in Southern Gauteng appears to be on the increase, there is still a need to enhance practitioner training and promote awareness of current local and international trends, protocols and recommendations.
       
  • Developing a South African Helicopter Emergency Medical Service Activation
           Screen (SAHAS): A Delphi study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Diane Laatz, Tyson Welzel, Willem Stassen IntroductionHelicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) are an expensive resource that should be utilised efficiently to optimise the cost-benefit ratio. This is especially true in resource-limited settings, such as South Africa. This may be achieved by implementing call-out criteria that are most appropriate to the healthcare system in which HEMS operate. Currently, there are no published evidence-based HEMS call-out criteria developed for South Africa. By identifying patients that are most likely to benefit from HEMS, their utilisation can be enhanced and adjusted to ensure optimal patient outcome. We aimed to systematically utilise expert opinions to reach consensus on HEMS call-out criteria that are contextual to the South African setting.MethodsA modified Delphi technique was used to develop call-out criteria, using current literature as the basis of the study. Purposive, snowball sampling was employed to identify a sample of 118 participants locally and internationally, of which 42 participated for all three rounds. Using an online survey platform, binary agreement/disagreement with each criterion was sought. Acceptable consensus was set at 75%. Statements were sent out in the third round ascertaining whether participants agreed with the analysis of the first two rounds.ResultsAfter two rounds, consensus was obtained for 63% (36/57) of criteria, while 64% of generated statements received consensus in the third round. Results emphasised the opinion that HEMS dispatch criteria relating to patient condition and incident locations were preferential to a comprehensive list. Through collation of these results and international literature, we present an initial concept for a South African HEMS Activation Screen (SAHAS), favouring inquiry on a case-by-case basis.DiscussionThe combination of existing literature and participant opinions, established that call-out criteria are most efficient when based on clinical parameters and geographic considerations, as opposed to a specified list of criteria. The initial concept of our SAHAS should be investigated further.
       
  • Acute mesenteric ischaemia: A case of expedited diagnosis and management
           using point-of-care ultrasound

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Jill Crosby, Dagmawi Werku, Tigist Zewdu, Grace Wanjiku, Jessica Schmidt IntroductionThe term acute abdomen refers to a clinical syndrome of sudden onset, severe abdominal pain. The differential diagnosis for this presentation is broad, but most cases require emergent medical or surgical management. Especially in cases of ischaemic bowel, time to diagnosis can mean the difference between survival and death. As a result, mortality remains high in resource-limited settings.Case reportWe describe the case of a 28-year-old male who presented to an urban Ethiopian emergency centre with three days of vomiting, bloody diarrhoea, and abdominal pain. He collapsed in triage with weak pulses and an undetectable blood pressure. Point-of-care ultrasound revealed a hyperechoic, mobile mass in the left ventricle of the heart. Small bowel dilation and thickening was visualised throughout the abdomen. Mesenteric ischaemia was rapidly identified as the working diagnosis, prompting early surgical consultation and aggressive, goal-directed resuscitation.DiscussionShort of elucidating a definitive diagnosis, ultrasound narrowed the focus of an undifferentiated presentation and supported mobilisation for exploratory laparotomy. Ultimately, this circumvented several hours of time which is conventionally required to obtain computed tomography at this institution. As demonstrated in this case, point-of-care ultrasound can be life-saving in resource-limited settings where acquisition time for definitive imaging is often prohibitive.
       
  • African Federation for Emergency Medicine’s Francophone Working
           Group – May 2018 Report

    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency Medicine, Volume 8, Issue 3Author(s): Müller M Mundenga, Ken Diango, Gabin Mbanjumucyo, Diulu Kabongo, Andrea G Tenner Even though the African Federation for Emergency Medicine (AFEM) has been successfully developing emergency care in Africa for the past nine years, a considerable amount of potential AFEM members from the African-Francophone countries are not able to access AFEM resources. In response, an AFEM Francophone Working Group has been created to coordinate all existing and new initiatives to promote emergency care in African-Francophone countries.
       
  • The case for investing in public health surveillance in low- and
           middle-income countries

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 July 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Kidist K. Bartolomeos Surveillance is central to public health. In the absence of comparable data from most low-income and middle-income countries, national and international agencies use estimates to monitor health targets. Although morbidity and mortality estimations generated by statistical modelling can fulfill national and global reporting requirements, locally generated data are needed to guide evidence-based local action. The focus on measurement around the sustainable development goals provides an opportunity for WHO and the global health community to make a case for increased investment by governments to strengthen local surveillance systems.
       
  • Chronic kidney disease in the emergency centre: A prospective
           observational study

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 July 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Babawale Taslim Bello, Olalekan Ezekiel Ojo, Olapeju Funke Oguntunde, Adedotun Ademola Adegboye IntroductionLate presentation, usually to the emergency centre (EC), is frequently reported among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in resource-limited settings, and is known to be associated with poor outcomes. This study aims to describe the pattern of EC presentation of adults with CKD in Southwest Nigeria.MethodsThis was a prospective observational study of 158 consecutively presenting CKD patients at the EC of two tertiary hospitals in Southwest Nigeria. Patients 18 years of age or older who were admitted into the EC at either study site with an admitting diagnosis of CKD and who consented to participate in the study were recruited. Socio-demographic characteristics, primary reason(s) for admission into the EC, requirement for dialysis, as well as the indication for dialysis were documented. The patients were followed-up for the duration of their stay in the EC and the outcome of EC admission documented.ResultsOverall, 54 (34.2%) were females, median age was 49 years and 74.1% were not known to have CKD prior to EC admission. The commonest indications for admission into the EC were uraemia, sepsis and hypertensive crisis, with 73.4% of the patients having at least one indication for dialysis at EC admission. The commonest indications for dialysis were uraemia, marked azotaemia and acute pulmonary oedema. The median time to first session of dialysis was 48 h and 24.1% of patients who required dialysis were not dialysed. Death during the period of EC admission occurred in 14 (8.9%) patients all of whom were not previously known to have CKD.DiscussionThere is a large pool of undiagnosed CKD among the general population. In many of these, the diagnosis will likely be made only when they present to the EC with complications. Late diagnosis is associated with worse outcomes.
       
  • Is there an association between central venous pressure measurement and
           ultrasound assessment of the inferior vena cava'

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 July 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): J. Govender, I. Postma, D. Wood, W. Sibanda IntroductionEarly assessment of volume status is paramount in critically ill patients. Central venous pressure (CVP) measurement and ultrasound assessment of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are both used for volume assessment in the emergency centre. Recent data is conflicting over whether there is a correlation between CVP and ultrasound assessment of the IVC.MethodsThis was a retrospective review of an audit previously performed in the Emergency Unit of Ngwelezane Hospital in Kwazulu-Natal. The audit involved measuring inferior vena cava collapsibility index (IVC-CI) within 5 min of CVP measurement. In this retrospective study, audit data were analysed to determine if an association exists.ResultsTwenty-four patients were included. The median age of participants was 36 (IQR 42) years (95% CI 33–56). The median time to ultrasound was 18.6 (52.5) h (95% CI 7.5–36.2). The mean CVP was 13.7 ± 7.7 cm H2O and mean IVC-CI was 39.4 ± 17.8%. Based on a Pearson correlation test, there was a weak negative correlation between CVP and IVC-CI, which was not statistically significant (r = −0.05, n = 24, p = 0.81, 95% CI −0.5 to 0.4) for all participants. However, among females there was a moderate negative correlation between CVP and IVC-CI, which was not statistically significant (r = −0.43, n = 7, p = 0.34, 95% CI −0.9 to 0.5), while among males there was a weak positive correlation, which was not statistically significant (r = 0.16, n = 17, p = 0.53, 95% CI −0.3 to 0.6).DiscussionThere is no significant correlation between CVP and IVC-CI. Further validation research is required to support our preliminary findings of no significant correlation between CVP measurement and ultrasound assessment of the IVC. CVP and IVC ultrasound should be used as clinical adjuncts, and not as stand-alone measures of volume assessment.
       
  • A descriptive analysis of endotracheal intubation in a South African
           Helicopter Emergency Medical Service

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Willem Stassen, Alastair Lithgow, Craig Wylie, Christopher Stein IntroductionHelicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) exists to supplement the operations of ground-based emergency care providers, mainly in high acuity cases. One of the important procedures frequently carried out by HEMS personnel is endotracheal intubation. Several HEMS providers exist in South Africa, with a mix of advanced life support personnel, however intubation success rates and adverse events have not been described in any local HEMS operation.MethodsThis was a retrospective chart review of intubation-related data collected by a HEMS operation based in Johannesburg over a 16-month period. First-pass and overall success rates were described, in addition to perceived airway difficulty, adverse events and other data.ResultsOf the 49 cases recorded in the study period, one was excluded leaving 48 cases for analysis. Most cases (n = 34, 71%) involved young male trauma patients who were intubated with rapid sequence intubation. The first pass success rate was 79% (n = 38) with an overall success rate of 98% (n = 47). At least one factor suggesting airway difficulty was present in 29% (n = 14) of cases, with most perceived airway difficulty related to the high prevalence of trauma cases. At least one adverse event occurred in 27% (n = 13) of cases with hypoxaemia, hypotension and bradycardia most prevalent.DiscussionIn this small sample of South African HEMS intubation cases, we found overall and first-pass success rates comparable to those reported in similar contexts.
       
  • Left pulmonary artery bullet embolism following a penetrating cardiac
           gunshot injury

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Anjana Bairagi, Timothy C. Hardcastle, David J.J. Muckart IntroductionBullet emboli occur when bullets migrate from an entry point to an abnormal endpoint via blood vessels or bowel. Most result from low-velocity, small calibre civilian gunshots. Although rare, when it does occur, it commonly embolises to the arterial system. Many times, these are amenable to removal and recovery.Case reportWe present a case of a haemodynamically unstable polytrauma patient with a pulmonary artery projectile embolus following a penetrating trans-thoracic cardiac gunshot wound.ConclusionA brief overview of the literature regarding bullet emboli is provided in light of this unusual case, focusing specifically on thoracic bullet emboli. A high index of suspicion should be raised when the number of entry and exit wounds are incongruent, bullet location does not align with anticipated trajectory, or serial radiographs demonstrate missile migration. Radiological evaluation and bullet retrieval are dependent on haemodynamic stability of the patient.
       
  • Intraoperative awareness and experience with a ketamine-based anaesthesia
           package to support emergency and essential surgery when no anaesthetist is
           available

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Sarah Villegas, Sebastian Suarez, Joseph Owuor, Gabriella M. Wuyke, Brett D. Nelson, Javan Imbamba, Debora Rogo, Khama Rogo, Thomas F. Burke IntroductionFive of the 7.2 billion people on earth have limited access to emergency and essential surgical procedures. The lack of safe, affordable and timely anaesthesia services are primary barriers to universal surgical coverage. The objective of this study was to assess intraoperative awareness when the ‘Every Second Matters for Emergency and Essential Surgery – Ketamine’ (ESM-Ketamine) package was used to support emergency and essential surgeries and painful procedures in rural Kenya when no anaesthetist was available.MethodsForty-seven consecutive adult patients that underwent an operative procedure under ESM-Ketamine at Sagam Community Hospital in Luanda, Kenya were enrolled. Participants underwent two semi-structured interviews that explored the patient’s experience with ESM-Ketamine both after the operative procedure and four to six weeks after surgery.ResultsForty-seven participants completed the first interview and 37 (78.7%) the second interview. Thirty-seven (78.7%) cases were procedural sedations and ten were (21.3%) emergency surgeries. Intraoperative awareness occurred in nine (24.3%) participants who underwent procedural sedation and two (20%) who underwent emergency surgery. Twenty-six (55.3%) participants reported dreams during the procedure. Thirty-two (86.5%) participants considered their experience positive, and 35 (95%) would recommend a procedure supported by ketamine to a friend.DiscussionMost patients whose painful procedures and emergency operations were supported by the ESM-Ketamine package when no anaesthetist was available reported favourable experiences.
       
  • The burden on emergency centres to provide care for critically ill
           patients in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Menbeu Sultan, Gelila Mengistu, Finot Debebe, Aklilu Azazh, Indi Trehan IntroductionGiven the scarcity of critical care hospital beds in Africa, emergency centres (ECs) are increasingly charged with caring for critically ill patients for extended periods of time. The objective of this study was to improve the understanding of the nature and outcomes of critically ill patients with prolonged treatment times of more than six hours in two ECs in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.MethodsThis study was conducted over three months in two ECs of urban tertiary care hospitals in Addis Ababa. Structured questionnaires were completed by six emergency and critical care nurses. EC patients were included if they met the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) intensive care unit (ICU) admission criteria and stayed in the EC for more than 6 h. We collected initial demographic and clinical information, data about the patients’ clinical course in the EC, and data regarding the patients’ disposition. We used descriptive statistics for analysis.ResultsA total of 291 patients, over the course of three months, had an EC stay that exceeded six hours. The median length of stay for these patients was 48 h (interquartile range: 25–72 h). The most common categories of illness were neurological disease in 87 patients (30%) and cardiovascular disease in 61 patients (21%). The most frequent aetiologies of critical illness were severe head trauma and severe sepsis with multi-organ failure (26 patients, 9% each). A total of 94 patients (32%) died in the EC, while 86 (30%) were discharged directly from the EC without hospital admission.DiscussionECs in Addis Ababa face a heavy burden in caring for a large number of critically ill patients over a long period of time, with relatively high mortality rates. These findings should promote supporting emergency centres to strengthen and expand ICU capacity to provide appropriate critical care services.
       
  • A cross-sectional survey of child abuse management knowledge among
           emergency medicine personnel in Cape Town, South Africa

    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency Medicine, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Bruna Dessena, Paul C. Mullan IntroductionChild abuse is a common condition in the emergency centres of South Africa. It is critical for both prehospital emergency care practitioners and emergency centre-based emergency medicine registrars to be competent in screening, diagnosing, treating, and documenting child abuse. Our goal was to assess the knowledge of child abuse management in a sample of prehospital emergency care practitioners and emergency medicine registrars in Cape Town, South Africa.MethodsA mixed-methods approach of quantitative and qualitative data was used to survey a sample of 120 participants (30 emergency medicine registrars and 90 prehospital emergency care practitioners: 30 Basic Life Support, 30 Intermediate Life Support, and 30 Advanced Life Support). An expert panel created the survey to ensure content validity and survey questions were designed to assess the perceived and actual knowledge of participants. We hypothesised that there would be significantly higher levels of perceived and actual knowledge in emergency medicine registrars compared to emergency care practitioners. An open-ended question on how participants felt dealing with child abuse was qualitatively analysed using thematic analysis.ResultsThere were significant differences in the levels of perceived knowledge (58% of emergency medicine registrars agreed that they felt adequately trained overall, versus 39% of emergency care practitioners; −19% difference, 95% CI −26% to −12%) and actual knowledge (83% of emergency medicine registrars with correct answers, versus 62% of emergency care practitioners; −21% difference, 95% CI −26% to −16%) among participants. Themes that emerged from qualitative analysis included personal distress, retaliation, frustration, medical system frustration, and personal competence concerns.DiscussionSignificant perceived and actual knowledge deficits of child abuse management exist among both emergency care practitioners and emergency medicine registrars in this setting. Future interventions should address the need for guidelines and increased training opportunities to ensure the health and safety of abused children.
       
  • Estimating children’s weight in a Rwandan emergency centre

    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency Medicine, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Appolinaire Manirafasha, Sojung Yi, Giles N. Cattermole IntroductionMost drugs, fluids and ventilator settings depend on the weight of a paediatric patient. However, knowledge of the weight is often unavailable as the urgency of the situation may impede measurement. The most common methods for paediatric weight estimation are based on height or age. This study aimed to compare the accuracy of various weight estimation methods and to derive a dedicated age-based tool within a Rwandan setting.MethodsThis was a retrospective study using age, weight and height data from randomly selected charts of Rwandan children, aged between one and ten years, who attended the paediatric emergency centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Kigali, Rwanda. Weights were estimated using four versions of the Broselow Tape and several age-based formulae. Linear regression was used to derive a new age-based weight estimation formula, the Rwanda Rule. Weight estimations were then compared with actual weight using Bland-Altman analysis, and the proportions of estimates within 10 and 20% of actual weight.ResultsThere were 327 children included in the study. The derived Rwanda Rule was: weight (kg) = [1.7 × age (years)] + 8. This formula and the original Advanced Paediatric Life Support formula (weight = [2 × age] + 8) performed similarly. Both were better than other age-based formulae (69% of estimates within 20% of actual weight). All editions of the Broselow Tape performed better than age-based rules. The 1998 version performed best with 84.8% of estimates within 20% of actual weight.DiscussionThis study is the first to compare paediatric weight estimation methods in Rwanda. Locally, and until we have evidence from further research that other methods are superior, we would advise use of the 1998 Broselow Tape in children aged one to ten years old. Where the Broselow Tape is not available, the original Advanced Paediatric Life Support formula should be used.
       
  • Paediatric weight estimation practices of advanced life support providers
           in Johannesburg, South Africa

    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency Medicine, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Mike Wells, Laurice Barnes, Craig Vincent-Lambert IntroductionThe choice of weight estimation method to use during prehospital paediatric emergency care is important because it needs to be both accurate and easy to use. Accuracy is important to ensure optimum drug dosing while ease-of-use is important to minimise user errors and the cognitive load experienced by healthcare providers. Little is known about which weight estimation systems are used in the prehospital environment anywhere in the world. This knowledge is important because if the use of inappropriate weight estimation practices is identified, it could be remedied through education and institutional policies.MethodsThis was a prospective questionnaire study conducted in Johannesburg, South Africa, which obtained information on the knowledge, attitude and practice of weight estimation amongst advanced life support (ALS) paramedics.ResultsForty participants were enrolled, from both the public and private sectors. The participants’ preferred method of weight estimation was visual estimation (7/40; 18%), age-based formulas (16/40; 40%), parental estimation (3/40; 8%), the Broselow tape (2/40; 5%) and the PAWPER tape (11/40; 28%). No participant was familiar with or used the Mercy method. All participants were very confident in the accuracy of their selected system.DiscussionThe knowledge and understanding of weight estimation systems by many advanced life support paramedics was poor and the use of inappropriate weight estimation systems was common. Further education and intervention is needed in order to change the sub-optimal weight estimation practices of ALS paramedics in Johannesburg.
       
  • The accuracy of paediatric weight estimation during simulated emergencies:
           The effects of patient position, patient cooperation, and human errors

    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency Medicine, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Mike Wells, Lara Nicole Goldstein, Alison Bentley IntroductionThe effect of patient position and patient cooperation on the accuracy of emergency weight estimation systems has not been evaluated previously. The objective of this study was to evaluate weight estimation accuracy of the Broselow tape, the PAWPER XL tape, the Mercy method, and a custom-designed mobile phone App in a variety of realistic simulated paediatric emergencies.MethodsThis was a prospective study in which 32 emergency medicine volunteers participated in eight simulations of common paediatric emergency conditions, using children models. The participants used each of the four methods to estimate the children’s weight. The accuracy of and time taken for the weight estimations were evaluated for each method. A regression analysis determined the effects of patient position and cooperation on weight estimation accuracy. Evaluation of subgroups of best-performers and worst-performers among the participants provided information on the effects of human user-error on weight estimation accuracy.ResultsThe Broselow tape, Mercy method, App and the PAWPER XL tape achieved percentages of weight estimation within 10% of actual weight in 47.7, 57.3, 68.1, and 73.0% of estimations, respectively. Patient position and cooperation strongly impacted the accuracy of the Broselow tape, had a minimal effect on the Mercy method and the App, and had no effect on the PAWPER XL tape. The best performing participants achieved very high accuracy with all methods except the Broselow tape.DiscussionThe Mercy method, the App, and the PAWPER XL tape achieved exceptionally high accuracy even in uncooperative and sub-optimally positioned children when used by the best-performing participants. Human error, from inexperience and inadequate training, had the most significant impact on accuracy. The Mercy method was the most subject to human error, and the PAWPER XL tape, the least. Adequate training in using weight estimation systems is essential for paediatric patient safety.
       
  • Freely Accessible Medical Education (FAME) for Africa

    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency Medicine, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Giles N. Cattermole, Appolinaire Manirafasha, Adam R. Aluisio, Gabin Mbanjumucyo
       
  • A qualitative study exploring nurses’ attitudes, confidence, and
           perceived barriers to implementing a traumatic brain injury nursing chart
           in Uganda

    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency Medicine, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Leslie Wynveen, Miriam Gamble, Josephine Nabulime, Tonny Luggya, Joseph K. Kalanzi, Hani Mowafi IntroductionIn Africa, traumatic brain injuries frequently result from road traffic injuries and assaults. Despite limited resources and the high costs of life-saving neurosurgical interventions, secondary brain injury prevention has the potential for improving outcomes. However, nurses and other medical personnel infrequently monitor vital signs, blood sugar, and pulse oximetry and only sporadically re-assess neurological status.MethodsIn one-on-one, semi-structured interviews, 27 nurses from Mulago Hospital’s emergency centre, a tertiary care trauma hospital in Kampala, Uganda, provided feedback regarding a traumatic brain injury-focused education session and use of a nursing chart for detecting secondary brain injury. The interviews explored the nurses’ confidence and perceived barriers to long-term chart implementation and traumatic brain injury care, as well as their ideas for improving this intervention. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded using ATLAS.ti: Qualitative Data Analysis and Research Software (Cleverbridge, Inc., Chicago, USA) and Microsoft Word and Excel (Microsoft Office, Redmond, USA) for thematic content analysis.ResultsKey findings identified in the interviews included the nurses’ attitudes toward the chart and their feelings of increased confidence in assessing and caring for these patients. The main barriers to continuous implementation included inadequate staffing and resources.ConclusionNurses were receptive to the education session and nursing chart, and felt that it increased their confidence and improved their ability to care for traumatic brain injured patients. However, lack of supplies, overwhelming numbers of patients, and inadequate staffing interfered with consistent monitoring of patients. The nurses offered various suggestions for improving traumatic brain injury care that should be further investigated. More research is needed to assess the applicability of a standardised traumatic brain injury nursing education and chart in a broader context.
       
  • Estimated injury-associated blood loss versus availability of emergency
           blood products at a district-level public hospital in Cape Town, South
           Africa

    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency Medicine, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Heinrich Weeber, Luke D. Hunter, Daniël J. van Hoving, Hendrick Lategan, Stevan R. Bruijns IntroductionInternational guidance suggests that injury-associated haemorrhagic shock should be resuscitated using blood products. However, in low- and middle-income countries resuscitation emphasises the use of crystalloids – mainly due to poor access to blood products. This study aimed to estimate the amount of blood loss from serious injury in relation to available emergency blood products at a secondary-level, public Cape Town hospital.MethodsThis retrospective, cross-sectional study included all injured patients cared for in the resuscitation area of Khayelitsha Hospital’s emergency centre over a fourteen-week period. Injuries were coded using the Abbreviated Injury Scale, which was then used to estimate blood loss for each patient using an algorithm from the Trauma Audit Research Network. Descriptive statistics were used to describe blood volume lost and blood units required to replace losses greater than 15% circulating blood volume. Four units of emergency blood are stored in a dedicated blood fridge in the emergency centre. Platelets and fresh plasma are not available.ResultsA total of 389 injury events were enrolled of which 93 were excluded due to absent clinic data. The mean age was 29 (±10) years. We estimated a median of one unit of blood requirement per week or weekend, up to a maximum of eight or six units, respectively. Most patients (n = 275, 94%) did not have sufficient injury to warrant transfusion. Overall, one person would require a transfusion for every 15 persons with a moderate to serious injury.ConclusionThe volume of available emergency blood appears inadequate for injury care, and doesn’t consider the need for other causes of acute haemorrhage (e.g. gastric, gynaecological, etc.). Furthermore, lack of other blood components (i.e. plasma and platelets) presents a challenge in this low-resourced setting. Further research is required to determine the appropriate management of injury-associated haemorrhage from a resource and budget perspective.
       
  • Emergency health education in a conflict stricken environment: A
           situational analysis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 May 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Ivy Muya, Joanne Garside, Marco Van-der Plas, Mohammed Ali Mohammed IntroductionBosasso General Hospital is located in Puntland Somalia, an area affected by prolonged civil conflict, terrorism, clan fighting and piracy. International evidence highlights that staff skills and competence may have a significant impact on patient outcomes however there has been little research on emergency education in such an austere and volatile environment. The purpose of this study therefore was to identify current practices and gaps in delivering emergency medicine education in this resource-deprived environment.MethodsA mixed methods approach was adopted to inform convergent parallel data collection techniques including questionnaire (n = 16), key informant (n = 5) and focus group interviews (n = 16). Data analysis, following data triangulation, produced descriptive quantitative statistics of themes such as emergency care, educational provision, enablers and barriers.ResultsThe research showed that among health care staff at the hospital, 19% of the nurses felt that visiting nurses offer some knowledge on emergency care, while 38% of knowledge was gained from visiting doctors. Regarding knowledge of emergency medicine, 88.9% of the nurses felt that emergency medicine is basically first aid.DiscussionEmergency care was perceived by the majority as essentially ‘first aid’. Many indicated that they received little or no regular or formal training on emergency care and related essential topics. In terms of challenges faced in delivering emergency care education demonstrated a common factor in the limited resources available which included lack of teaching materials, reading materials, online resources, health care professionals, equipment and mentors. Conclusions drawn suggest that the knowledge of emergency medicine by front line professionals is limited. Therefore, the development of field curricula, practical and theoretical training by visiting practitioners, provision of additional teaching aids, tools and equipment, integration of multiple disciplines in training and financial resource mobilisation would be beneficial in improving knowledge, attitudes and practices of emergency care.
       
  • A cross-sectional survey of burnout amongst doctors in a cohort of public
           sector emergency centres in Gauteng, South Africa

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 May 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Suma Rajan, Andreas Engelbrecht IntroductionWorking in emergency care is commonly regarded as highly stressful. This is also true in the African setting characterised by high patient loads and limited resources. As in other similarly demanding occupations, burnout can be anticipated. The aim of this study was to examine the level of burnout amongst doctors in a cohort of public sector emergency centres in Gauteng, South Africa.MethodsAn observational, cross-sectional design was employed, using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (which has been tested and validated in similar settings elsewhere). The study included a cohort of doctors working in the emergency centres of public sector hospitals in Gauteng, South Africa.ResultsOne hundred participants completed the questionnaire out of a possible 124 doctors working at the five centres. Ninety-three met the inclusion criteria and was further analysed. Seven respondents were specialist emergency physicians (7.5%), 36 were emergency medicine registrars (38.7%) and 50 were medical officers (53.8%). Fifty one respondents were female (55.0%). Analysis of burnout component scores showed a mean emotional exhaustion score of 31.69 (standard deviation, SD = 10.32), with 62 respondents (66.7%) in the high-risk group – from 86 (92.5%) at moderate to high risk. The mean de-personalisation score was 13.39 (SD = 6.21), with 50 respondents (53.8%) in the high-risk group – from 75 (80.7%) at moderate to high risk of burnout. The mean personal accomplishment score was 34.87 (SD = 6.54), with 21 respondents (22.6%) in the high-risk group – from 65 (69.9%) at moderate to high risk of burnout.DiscussionThe results indicate that a large proportion of the doctors who work in these emergency centres are at moderate to high risk of burnout. Based on our findings we recommend that interventions be introduced at the work place to reduce burnout in doctors and improve their mental well-being. This will ensure better service delivery to patients with emergencies. Further research into the causes of occupational burnout should be explored.
       
  • A low fidelity eye model for lateral canthotomy training

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 May 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Rodrigo Kong, Dersim Pascal Kaya, Eric Cioe-Pena, Josh Greenstein We introduce a low-fidelity, low-cost, reusable training model for the lateral canthotomy procedure. We believe that this trainer has the potential to improve clinicians’ knowledge and skill of the procedure, especially when cost or access to higher-fidelity trainers is prohibitive.
       
  • A description of the self-perceived educational needs of emergency nurses
           in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 May 2018Source: African Journal of Emergency MedicineAuthor(s): Reka Dulandas, Petra Brysiewicz IntroductionEmergency nurses are usually the first to interact with critically ill patients and victims of violence and injuries, and require advanced skills and knowledge to manage such patients. Inadequate training prevents nurses from providing optimal emergency care, and it is important to investigate if there are any skills and competencies lacking in these emergency nurses. We sought to describe the self-perceived educational needs of emergency nurses in Durban, South Africa.MethodsA descriptive quantitative survey was conducted with nurses working in four emergency centres (two state, and two privately funded hospitals) in Durban, South Africa.ResultsThe survey questionnaire was distributed with a response rate of 79% (n = 128). Almost half the respondents (48%, n = 61) scored less than the mean score of 29, thus indicating lower competency levels. The majority of respondents (67%, n = 85) perceived themselves as highly competent in basic skills (e.g. assess breathing, administer oxygen, assess circulation). Less than half the respondents (45%, n = 57) perceived themselves as highly competent in the intermediate skills (e.g. control haemorrhage, assist with endotracheal intubation, manage shock). A large number of respondents (46%, n = 59) perceived themselves as least competent in advanced skills (e.g. defibrillation/cardioversion, interpreting an echocardiogram [ECG]). The mean score obtained for educational need was 100, thus reflecting a high educational need, and more than half the respondents (62%, n = 79) scored higher than the mean score of 100 for educational needs. The lowest score was 41. Thirty percent (n = 38) of the respondents scored 117, indicating educational needs for all the competencies listed. Overall, 72% (n = 92) agreed that emergency education was a need.DiscussionThe study emphasises the need for support systems for educational development of emergency nurses. Further training in specific skills and competencies may enhance emergency care provided. There is a growing need for ongoing educational development of emergency nurses in South Africa.
       
 
 
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