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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3163 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3163 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 88, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 395, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 242, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.732, CiteScore: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 137, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 337, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 437, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 175, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)

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Journal Cover
Addictive Behaviors
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.29
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0306-4603
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3163 journals]
  • Healthcare provider counseling to quit smoking and patient desire to quit:
           The role of negative smoking outcome expectancies
    • Authors: Joan S. Tucker; Brian D. Stucky; Maria Orlando Edelen; William G. Shadel; David J. Klein
      Pages: 8 - 13
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 85
      Author(s): Joan S. Tucker, Brian D. Stucky, Maria Orlando Edelen, William G. Shadel, David J. Klein
      Aims The U.S. Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guideline on treating tobacco use and dependence recommends providing advice to quit to every tobacco user seen in a healthcare setting. However, the mechanism through which counseling encourages patients to quit has not been adequately studied. This study tests whether the association between receiving healthcare provider counseling and desire to quit is accounted for by negative health and psychosocial outcome expectancies of smoking. Methods Data were collected online from 721 adult smokers who had seen a healthcare provider in the past 12 months. Associations between counseling to quit, negative outcome expectancies of smoking, and desire to quit were tested, as well as whether outcome expectancies and desire to quit differed by type of counseling (counseling only vs. counseling plus assistance) and level of smoking. Results Bivariate associations indicated a stronger desire to quit among patients receiving counseling, particularly when it included healthcare provider assistance to quit. SEM results indicated that the association between counseling and desire to quit was fully accounted for by patients' negative health and psychosocial outcome expectancies for smoking. These associations were found across levels of smoking in the case of health expectancies, but were limited to moderate and heavy smokers in the case of psychosocial expectancies. Conclusion Results suggest that the time devoted to counseling patients about smoking should include providing some assistance to quit, such as recommending a product, prescription or program. Regardless of smoking level, this counseling should incorporate techniques to elicit patients' negative health and psychosocial expectancies of smoking.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.008
      Issue No: Vol. 85 (2018)
       
  • The role of depressive symptoms in treatment of adolescent cannabis use
           disorder with N-Acetylcysteine
    • Authors: Rachel L. Tomko; Amanda K. Gilmore; Kevin M. Gray
      Pages: 26 - 30
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 85
      Author(s): Rachel L. Tomko, Amanda K. Gilmore, Kevin M. Gray
      Relative to adults, adolescents are at greater risk of developing a cannabis use disorder (CUD) and risk may be exacerbated by co-occurring depressive symptoms. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), an over-the-counter antioxidant, is thought to normalize glutamate transmission. Oxidative stress and glutamate transmission are disrupted in both depression and CUD. Thus, NAC may be particularly effective at promoting cannabis abstinence among adolescents with elevated depressive symptoms. Secondary analyses were conducted using a sub-sample of adolescents with CUD (N = 74) who participated in an 8-week randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial examining the efficacy of NAC for cannabis cessation. It was hypothesized that NAC would reduce severity of depressive symptoms, and that decreases depressive symptom severity would mediate decreases in positive weekly urine cannabinoid tests (11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol). Additionally, it was expected that adolescents with greater severity of baseline depressive symptoms would be more likely to become abstinent when assigned NAC relative to placebo. Results from linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations did not suggest that NAC reduced severity of depressive symptoms, and the hypothesis that NAC's effect on cannabis cessation would be mediated by reduced depressive symptoms was not supported. However, an interaction between treatment condition and baseline severity of depressive symptoms as a predictor of weekly urine cannabinoid tests was significant, suggesting that NAC was more effective at promoting abstinence among adolescents with heightened baseline depressive symptoms. These secondary findings, though preliminary, suggest a need for further examination of the role of depressive symptoms in treatment of adolescent CUD with NAC.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.014
      Issue No: Vol. 85 (2018)
       
  • Collecting outcome data of a text messaging smoking cessation intervention
           with in-program text assessments: How reliable are the results'
    • Authors: Johannes Thrul; Judith A. Mendel; Samuel J. Simmens; Lorien C. Abroms
      Pages: 31 - 37
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 85
      Author(s): Johannes Thrul, Judith A. Mendel, Samuel J. Simmens, Lorien C. Abroms
      Background Text messaging interventions have shown promise in helping people quit smoking. Texting programs periodically survey participants about their smoking status. This study examined the consistency of participant self-reported smoking between external surveys and internal program text message assessments. Methods Participants in Text2Quit program were surveyed about their past 7-day smoking at one, three, and six months post-enrollment using different survey modes (external surveys and internal program text message assessments) and responses were compared for consistency. The first set of analyses was conducted for participants responding on both modes (n = 45 at one month; n = 50 at three months; n = 42 at six months). Additional analyses, assuming missing = smoking, were conducted with the full sample of 262 smokers (68.7% female, mean age = 35.8 years) and compared to saliva-confirmed abstinence rates. Results Participants responding to both modes consistently reported smoking status at one (88.9%), three (88.0%) and six (88.1%) months post-enrollment, with fair to substantial levels of agreement (one month: κ = 0.24; three months: κ = 0.63; six months: κ = 0.66). Participants responding to both modes reported high rates of abstinence. In missing = smoking analyses, significant differences in abstinence rates reported across modes were detected at each timepoint (one month: external = 30.5%, internal = 16.4%; three months: external = 33.2%, internal = 16.0%; six months: external = 31.7%, internal = 12.2%; all p < .001). Moderate levels of agreement were found between the two modes. At 6 months, abstinence rates obtained via internal data were closer to those biochemically verified (15.7%) compared to external surveys. Conclusions Results provide initial support for the use of internal program assessments in text messaging programs with missing = smoking assumptions in order to gather outcome data on smoking behavior.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.012
      Issue No: Vol. 85 (2018)
       
  • Perceived family relationship quality and use of poly-tobacco products
           during early and late adolescence
    • Authors: Tzu Tsun Luk; Man Ping Wang; Lok Tung Leung; Jianjiu Chen; Yongda Wu; Tai Hing Lam; Sai Yin Ho
      Pages: 38 - 42
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 85
      Author(s): Tzu Tsun Luk, Man Ping Wang, Lok Tung Leung, Jianjiu Chen, Yongda Wu, Tai Hing Lam, Sai Yin Ho
      Background The role of family relationship in adolescent use of emerging tobacco products, which have become increasingly popular, is unknown. We examined the associations of perceived family relationship quality with current use of poly-tobacco products including cigarettes, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), waterpipe and smokeless tobacco in adolescents. Methods Data from a representative sample of 42,250 US grade 7–12 equivalent students (mean ± SD age 14.6 ± 1.9 years; 51.3% boys) from 75 randomly selected secondary schools in Hong Kong (2012−13) were analysed. Logistic regressions yielded adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for current (past 30-day) use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, waterpipe, smokeless tobacco and poly-tobacco (≥2 products) in relation to perceived family relationship quality, adjusted for age, sex, perceived family affluence, parental education, family structure, parental and sibling smoking and secondhand smoke exposure at home. Subgroup analyses were conducted to compare the associations in early (aged ≤14 years) versus late (>14) adolescents. Results The odds of current use increased with worse perceived family relationship quality with AORs (95% confidence interval) of up to 2.92 (2.32–3.68) for cigarettes, 7.28 (4.71–11.2) for e-cigarettes, 5.04 (3.44–7.40) for waterpipe, 8.09 (4.87–13.4) for smokeless tobacco and 5.25 (3.45–8.01) for poly-tobacco products use (all P for trend <.001). The associations for all tobacco use outcomes were stronger in early than late adolescents (all P for interaction <.001). Conclusions Dose-response relationships were found between negatively perceived family relationship quality and current poly- and individual tobacco product use by Hong Kong Chinese secondary students. The associations were stronger for alternative tobacco products and in early adolescents.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.011
      Issue No: Vol. 85 (2018)
       
  • Transition to drug co-use among adolescent cannabis users: The role of
           decision-making and mental health
    • Authors: Catalina Lopez-Quintero; Karen Granja; Samuel Hawes; Jacqueline C. Duperrouzel; Ileana Pacheco-Colón; Raul Gonzalez
      Pages: 43 - 50
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 85
      Author(s): Catalina Lopez-Quintero, Karen Granja, Samuel Hawes, Jacqueline C. Duperrouzel, Ileana Pacheco-Colón, Raul Gonzalez
      Background Co-use of cannabis and drugs other than cannabis (DOTC) influences the risk of experiencing cannabis disorders. Accordingly, we explored whether speed of transition to drug co-use, the number of DOTC used, and/or being an experimental cannabis-only user, a regular cannabis-only user, or a regular cannabis user who co-uses DOTC (i.e., cannabis-plus user) were associated with decision-making (DM), mental health disorder symptoms, or cannabis use-related characteristics. Methods We analyzed baseline data from a sub-sample of 266 adolescent (ages 14 to 16) cannabis users (CU) participating in an ongoing longitudinal study. Assessments included semi-structured interviews, self-report questionnaires, and measures of drug use, DM (measured via the Iowa Gambling Task), mental health disorders, and cannabis use-related problems. Results Endorsing a larger number of mood disorders symptoms was associated with being a regular cannabis-plus user rather than a regular cannabis-only user (AOR = 1.08, C.I.95% 1.01, 1.15). Poorer DM was associated with a faster transition to co-use, such that for each one unit increase in DM performance, the years to onset of drug co-use increased by 1% (p = 0.032). Endorsing a larger number of cannabis use-related problems was positively associated with endorsing a larger number of DOTC used (p = 0.001). Conclusions This study provides new evidence on the process of drug co-use among CU. Specifically, mood disorder symptoms were associated with use of DOTC among regular CU. Furthermore, poorer DM was associated with a faster transition to drug co-use. Poorer DM and mood disorder symptoms may aggravate or accelerate the onset of adverse consequences among adolescent CU.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.010
      Issue No: Vol. 85 (2018)
       
  • Metacognitive beliefs in addictive behaviours: A systematic review
    • Authors: Tristan Hamonniere; Isabelle Varescon
      Pages: 51 - 63
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 85
      Author(s): Tristan Hamonniere, Isabelle Varescon
      A wide research base has shown the link between metacognitive beliefs and psychopathology and there is currently evidence that elevated levels of maladaptive metacognitive beliefs are present in the majority of psychological disorders. An increasing body of evidence also suggests that metacognitive beliefs may play a role in alcohol use, nicotine use, gambling, online gaming and problematic internet use. This article provides a systematic review of empirical studies that have examined metacognitive beliefs and addictive behaviours. Thirty-eight studies were included, with results showing a significant positive association between metacognitive beliefs and addictive behaviours. These results are consistent with the metacognitive model of addictive behaviour that supports the central role of metacognitive beliefs in the development and maintenance of addictive behaviours. However, our review highlights the paucity of longitudinal and experimental studies, preventing the determination of the causal status of metacognitive beliefs in addictive behaviours. Despite this limitation, the current evidence has important treatment implications because it suggests that interventions that target metacognitive beliefs could be beneficial for people presenting with addictive behaviours.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.018
      Issue No: Vol. 85 (2018)
       
  • Client and clinician-rated characteristics of problem gamblers with and
           without history of gambling-related illegal behaviors
    • Authors: Jennifer D. Ellis; Jamey J. Lister; Cara A. Struble; Molly Cairncross; Meagan M. Carr; David M. Ledgerwood
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Jennifer D. Ellis, Jamey J. Lister, Cara A. Struble, Molly Cairncross, Meagan M. Carr, David M. Ledgerwood
      Individuals with gambling disorder are at an elevated risk for engaging in gambling-related illegal behaviors. The present study examined client (N = 88) and clinician ratings (N = 30) of client characteristics associated with a history of gambling-related illegal behaviors. We also examined client characteristics associated with history of arrest for a gambling-related crime. Gambling-related illegal behaviors and arrest were common (57.3% and 23.9%, respectively) in the present sample. Clients of younger age, and those with greater gambling-related financial consequences, lifetime alcohol problems, impulsivity, mood symptoms, and daily living role difficulties were more likely to report gambling-related illegal behaviors. Clients who had been arrested for a gambling-related crime were more likely to report daily living and role functioning difficulties and lifetime alcohol problems. Clinicians rated clients with a history of gambling-related illegal behaviors and/or gambling-related arrests as more impulsive, and clinicians also endorsed higher rates of treatment failure among these clients. Both client and clinician report suggested that clients with a history of illegal behaviors may have a variety of comorbid problems that may be a focus of clinical intervention.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.017
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Intolerance for smoking abstinence among nicotine-deprived,
           treatment-seeking smokers
    • Authors: Lisa J. Germeroth; Nathaniel L. Baker; Michael E. Saladin
      Pages: 13 - 19
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Lisa J. Germeroth, Nathaniel L. Baker, Michael E. Saladin
      Introduction The Intolerance for Smoking Abstinence Discomfort Questionnaire (IDQ-S) assesses distress tolerance specific to nicotine withdrawal. Though developed to assess withdrawal-related distress, the IDQ-S has not been validated among nicotine-deprived, treatment-seeking smokers. The present study extended previous research by examining the predictive utility of the IDQ-S among abstinent, motivated-to-quit smokers. Methods Abstinent, treatment-seeking smokers completed the IDQ-S Withdrawal Intolerance and Lack of Cognitive Coping scales, assessments of nicotine dependence and reinforcement, and smoking history at baseline. At baseline and at 24-h, 2-week, and 1-month follow-up, participants completed a smoking cue-reactivity task (collection of cue-elicited craving and negative affect), and assessments of cigarettes per day (CPD; daily diaries at follow-up), carbon monoxide (CO), and cotinine. Results Greater IDQ-S Withdrawal Intolerance was associated with younger age, higher nicotine dependence and reinforcement, and less smoking years (ps < .03). Greater IDQ-S Lack of Cognitive Coping was associated with less education, lower nicotine dependence and reinforcement, higher baseline CPD, and no prior quit attempts (ps < .04). IDQ-S scales did not significantly predict cue-elicited craving or negative affect, CPD, CO, or cotinine levels at follow-up (ps > .10). Conclusions Withdrawal intolerance and lack of cognitive coping did not predict smoking outcomes among nicotine-deprived, treatment-seeking smokers, but were associated with smoking characteristics, including nicotine dependence and reinforcement. Withdrawal intolerance and lack of cognitive coping may not be especially useful in predicting craving and smoking behavior, but future studies should replicate the present study's findings and assess the stability of the IDQ-S before forming firm conclusions about its predictive utility.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.019
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Varenicline for smoking reduction in smokers not yet ready to quit: A
           double-blind, proof-of-concept randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Marc L. Steinberg; Shou-En Lu; Jill M. Williams
      Pages: 20 - 26
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Marc L. Steinberg, Shou-En Lu, Jill M. Williams
      Background Varenicline has demonstrated efficacy for quitting smoking. Its agonist and antagonist effects suggest that it would be efficacious for reducing cigarettes per day in smokers not yet ready to quit. Objectives To conduct a proof-of-concept placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of varenicline for smokers willing to reduce, but not quit smoking. Methods Smokers (N = 53) were randomized to receive 28-days of varenicline plus brief counseling or 28-days of placebo plus brief counseling. They were instructed to reduce their cigarettes per day with the goal of reducing by 50% from baseline to end-of-treatment. Results Most (82.7%) participants attended all four counseling sessions and more than half took their medication as prescribed on at least 80% of days. Approximately half of our participants reported at least one adverse event, but no serious adverse events were reported or discovered. Although twice as many smokers receiving varenicline made a quit attempt as compared to those receiving placebo, the data did not support the hypothesis that taking varenicline would have a benefit over placebo in meeting a 50% smoking reduction goal. Those who reduced their cigarettes per day by at least 50% and those who reduced their CO intake by at least 50% from baseline to end-of-treatment showed higher self-efficacy for quitting at end-of-treatment, however. Conclusions These data support the proof-of-concept that smokers not ready to quit are willing to use varenicline while reducing the number of cigarettes smoked per day, and that successful reduction is associated with increased self-efficacy for later quitting.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.026
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Smoking-related health beliefs and smoking behavior in the National Lung
           Screening Trial
    • Authors: Annette R. Kaufman; Laura A. Dwyer; Stephanie R. Land; William M.P. Klein; Elyse R. Park
      Pages: 27 - 32
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Annette R. Kaufman, Laura A. Dwyer, Stephanie R. Land, William M.P. Klein, Elyse R. Park
      Understanding the association between smoking-related health beliefs and smoking cessation in the context of lung screening is important for effective cessation treatment. The purpose of the current study is to explore how current smokers' self-reported smoking-related health cognitions (e.g., self-efficacy) and emotions (e.g., worry) are related to cessation. This study utilized longitudinal data from current smokers (age 55–74) in a sub-study of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST; 2002–2006; N = 2738). Logistic regression analyses examined associations of cessation at last assessment with smoking-related health cognitions and emotions, demographics, and two-way interactions among smoking-related health cognition and emotion variables, gender, and age. Over 37% (n = 1028) of smokers had quit at their last assessment of smoking status. Simple logistic regressions showed the likelihood of quitting was greater among participants reporting higher perceived severity of smoking-related diseases (OR = 1.17, p = .04), greater self-efficacy for quitting (OR = 1.32, p < .001), and fewer perceived barriers to quitting (OR = 0.82, p = .01). Likelihood of quitting was lower among non-Hispanic Black participants (versus non-Hispanic White participants) (OR = 0.68, p = .04) and higher among older participants (OR = 1.03, p = .002). Multiple logistic regression showed that participants reporting greater self-efficacy for quitting (B = 0.09, p = .05), fewer perceived barriers to quitting (B = −0.22, p = .01), and who were older (B = 0.03, p < .01) were more likely to quit smoking. These results suggest that, among heavy smokers undergoing lung screening, smoking-related health cognitions and emotions are associated with smoking cessation. These health beliefs must be considered an integral component of cessation in screening settings.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.015
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Electrophysiological activity is associated with vulnerability of Internet
           addiction in non-clinical population
    • Authors: Grace Y. Wang; Inga Griskova-Bulanova
      Pages: 33 - 39
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Grace Y. Wang, Inga Griskova-Bulanova
      This study investigated the electrophysiological activity associated with vulnerability of problematic Internet use in non-clinical population. The resting EEG spectrum of alpha (8–13 Hz) rhythm was measured in 22 healthy subjects who have used the Internet for recreational purpose. The vulnerability of Internet addiction was assessed using Young's Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and Assessment for Computer and Internet Addiction-Screener (AICA-S) respectively. Depression and impulsivity were also measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11(BIS-11) respectively. The IAT was positively correlated with alpha power obtained during eyes closed (EC, r = 0.50, p = 0.02) but not during eyes open (EO). This was further supported by a negative correlation (r = −0.48, p = 0.02) between IAT scores and alpha desynchronization (EO-EC). These relationships remained significant following correction for multiple comparisons. Furthermore, The BDI score showed positive correlation with alpha asymmetry at mid-lateral (r = 0.54, p = 0.01) and mid-frontal (r = 0.46, p = 0.03) regions during EC, and at mid-frontal (r = 0.53, p = 0.01) region during EO. The current findings suggest that there are associations between neural activity and the vulnerability of problematic Internet use. Understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying problematic Internet use would contribute to improved early intervention and treatment.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.025
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Parents' drinking motives and problem drinking predict their children's
           drinking motives, alcohol use and substance misuse
    • Authors: Claudia Marino; Antony C. Moss; Alessio Vieno; Ian P. Albery; Daniel Frings; Marcantonio M. Spada
      Pages: 40 - 44
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Claudia Marino, Antony C. Moss, Alessio Vieno, Ian P. Albery, Daniel Frings, Marcantonio M. Spada
      The aim of the current study was to test the direct and indirect influence of parents' drinking motives and problem drinking on their children's drinking motives, alcohol use and substance misuse. Cross-sectional analysis of parent and child drinking patterns and motives, derived from the nationally representative Drinkaware Monitor panel survey. The sample comprised a total of 148 couples of parents and child. Path analysis revealed that children's alcohol use and substance misuse were influenced by their own drinking motives and parents' problem drinking. Parents' conformity motives were linked to their children's conformity motives. Finally, parental drinking problems mediated the effect of their coping motives on their childrens' alcohol use and substance misuse. In conclusion, parental drinking styles relate to their children's alcohol use and substance misuse through problem drinking and drinking motives.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.028
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Difficulties regulating positive emotions and alcohol and drug misuse: A
           path analysis
    • Authors: Nicole H. Weiss; Shannon R. Forkus; Ateka A. Contractor; Melissa R. Schick
      Pages: 45 - 52
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Nicole H. Weiss, Shannon R. Forkus, Ateka A. Contractor, Melissa R. Schick
      Introduction Alcohol and drugs are widely used among college students. Emotion dysregulation has been identified as a key mechanism in the etiology, maintenance, and treatment of alcohol and drug misuse. Yet, research in this area has been limited by its narrow focus on dysregulation stemming from negative emotions. The goal of the current study was to extend past research by examining the relation of difficulties regulating positive emotions to alcohol and drug misuse. Methods Participants were 311 college students (M age = 19.24; 66.1% female; 66.0% White) who completed measures assessing difficulties regulating positive emotions and alcohol and drug misuse. Results Structural equational modeling was used to model the relation between difficulties regulating positive emotions and alcohol and drug misuse. In a hypothesized structural model, higher levels of difficulties regulating positive emotions were found to relate to greater alcohol and drug misuse. Moreover, an alternative model provided support for an association of greater drug (but not alcohol) misuse to higher levels of difficulties regulating positive emotions. Conclusions If replicated, findings may suggest the utility of targeting difficulties regulating positive emotions in treatments aimed at reducing alcohol and drug misuse among college students.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.027
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Mindfulness buffers the effects of cue-induced craving on alcohol demand
           in college drinkers
    • Authors: Ariel Hochster; Jennifer Block-Lerner; Donald R. Marks; Joel Erblich
      Pages: 53 - 56
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Ariel Hochster, Jennifer Block-Lerner, Donald R. Marks, Joel Erblich
      Alcohol consumption among young adult college students represents a significant public health problem. The presence of alcohol-related cues in drinkers' environments can trigger powerful alcohol cravings, which may influence drinking outcomes. Less is known about how this cue-induced craving influences behavioral economic demand for alcohol. In addition, research has suggested that trait mindfulness may be an important buffer of the effects of internal states of craving on drinking decisions. Based on this literature, we hypothesized that cue-induced cravings would be associated with increased alcohol demand, an effect that would be attenuated among drinkers who have higher levels of mindfulness. Young adult college student drinkers (n = 69) completed a laboratory-based cue-induced craving assessment, a self-report assessment of trait mindfulness, and an alcohol purchase task. Findings revealed that cue-induced craving was related to higher alcohol demand. Consistent with the study hypothesis, acceptance, a component of mindfulness, buffered the effects of cue-induced craving on alcohol demand. Results raise the possibility that mindfulness-based interventions may be useful in helping disrupt the link between internal states of craving and drinking decisions in young adult college student drinkers.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.013
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • E-cigarette- specific symptoms of nicotine dependence among Texas
           adolescents
    • Authors: Kathleen R. Case; Dale S. Mantey; MeLisa R. Creamer; Melissa B. Harrell; Steven H. Kelder; Cheryl L. Perry
      Pages: 57 - 61
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Kathleen R. Case, Dale S. Mantey, MeLisa R. Creamer, Melissa B. Harrell, Steven H. Kelder, Cheryl L. Perry
      Introduction The potential of e-cigarettes to elicit symptoms of nicotine dependence has not been adequately studied, particularly in adolescent populations. The present study examined the prevalence of e-cigarette-specific symptoms of nicotine dependence (“symptoms of e-cigarette dependence”) and the associations between these symptoms, e-cigarette usage group, and e-cigarette cessation-related items among Texas adolescents. Methods This study involved a cross-sectional analysis of adolescents from Wave 4 of the Texas Adolescent Tobacco and Marketing Surveillance System (TATAMS) (n = 2891/N = 461,069). Chi-Square analyses examined differences in the prevalence of symptoms of dependence by e-cigarette usage group (exclusive versus dual users of e-cigarettes and combustible tobacco products) and demographic characteristics. Weighted multivariable logistic regression analyses examined the associations between symptoms of e-cigarette dependence, e-cigarette usage group, and e-cigarette cessation items. Results Exclusive e-cigarette users experienced symptoms of e-cigarette dependence, although the prevalence of most of the symptoms was higher for dual users. Adolescents who reported more symptoms of dependence were less likely to report both wanting to quit e-cigarettes and a past-year quit attempt for e-cigarettes (adjusted odds ratio “AOR” = 0.61 (95% CI = 0.41, 0.92) and AOR = 0.52 (95% CI = 0.30, 0.92), respectively). Conclusions This study is the first to demonstrate that adolescent e-cigarette users are experiencing symptoms of dependence specific to e-cigarettes. In addition, symptoms of dependence may be barriers to e-cigarette cessation. Future research is needed to determine if characteristics of e-cigarette use (e.g. frequency and intensity) are associated with dependence.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.032
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • The psychometric properties of the Persian version of the metacognitions
           about Smoking Questionnaire among smokers
    • Authors: Mahmoud Najafi; Vahid Khosravani; Meysam Shahhosseini; Amirhossein Afshari
      Pages: 62 - 68
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Mahmoud Najafi, Vahid Khosravani, Meysam Shahhosseini, Amirhossein Afshari
      Objectives It has been shown that smoking may be affected by metacognitions. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure, reliability and validity of the Persian version of the Metacognitions about Smoking Questionnaire (MSQ) among a sample of Iranian male smokers. Methods When the English to Persian translation of the MSQ was performed, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were completed according to the four-factor solution of the original MSQ. Three hundred male treatment-seeking smokers (mean age = 41.37, SD = 15.90) filled out the Persian-translated version of the MSQ, the Smoking Effects Questionnaire (SEQ), and the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale (NDSS). Results The results of EFA revealed that the Persian version of the MSQ had a four-factor structure named positive metacognitions about cognitive regulation (PM-CR), positive metacognitions about emotional regulation (PM-ER), negative metacognitions about uncontrollability (NM-U), and negative metacognitions about cognitive interference (NM-CI). The findings of CFA also indicated that the four-factor structure of the Persian version of the MSQ had appropriate fit. Validity and reliability of the Persian version of the MSQ were found to be good. Negative metacognitions about smoking predicted nicotine dependence over and above smoking outcome expectancies. Positive metacognitions about emotion regulation explained daily cigarette use independent of smoking outcome expectancies. Conclusions The findings suggested that the Persian version of the MSQ had adequate psychometric properties among Iranian male treatment-seeking smokers.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.016
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • The association between e-cigarette use characteristics and combustible
           cigarette consumption and dependence symptoms: Results from a national
           longitudinal study
    • Authors: Anne Buu; Yi-Han Hu; Megan E. Piper; Hsien-Chang Lin
      Pages: 69 - 74
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Anne Buu, Yi-Han Hu, Megan E. Piper, Hsien-Chang Lin
      Background Existing longitudinal surveys focused on the association between ever use of e-cigarettes and combustible cigarette consumption, making it difficult to infer what characteristics of e-cigarette use could potentially change combustible cigarette use behavior, which may have long-term health consequences. Although e-cigarettes' efficacy of alleviating dependence symptoms was supported by studies conducted in laboratory settings, whether the results can be translated into symptom reduction in the real world and over time is an open question. Methods This study conducted secondary analysis on the Waves 1-2 data of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study to examine the association between e-cigarette use characteristics (frequency, flavoring, and voltage adjustment) and combustible cigarette use outcomes (frequency, quantity, and symptoms), using the Heckman 2-step selection procedure with the selection bias controlled. The inclusion criteria ensured that we followed an adult cohort of exclusive combustible cigarette users at Wave 1. Results The result shows that higher frequency of e-cigarette use was associated with lower combustible cigarette consumption and dependence symptoms, controlling for the corresponding baseline cigarette use variable and other confounders. Given the frequency of e-cigarette use, the feature of voltage adjustment was not significantly associated with any of the cigarette use outcomes. Flavoring, on the other hand, was associated with lower quantity of cigarette use. Conclusions Exclusive smokers who start using e-cigarettes do indeed change the frequency and quantity with which they smoke cigarettes. E-cigarette use may also help reduce dependence symptoms.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.035
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Anxiety sensitivity moderates drug cravings in response to induced
           negative affect in opioid dependent outpatients
    • Authors: Georgia Stathopoulou; Mark H. Pollack; Michael W. Otto
      Pages: 75 - 78
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Georgia Stathopoulou, Mark H. Pollack, Michael W. Otto


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.020
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Social cognitive mediators of the relationship between impulsivity traits
           and adolescent alcohol use: Identifying unique targets for prevention
    • Authors: Kiri A. Patton; Matthew J. Gullo; Jason P. Connor; Gary C.K. Chan; Adrian B. Kelly; Richard F. Catalano; John W. Toumbourou
      Pages: 79 - 85
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Kiri A. Patton, Matthew J. Gullo, Jason P. Connor, Gary C.K. Chan, Adrian B. Kelly, Richard F. Catalano, John W. Toumbourou


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.031
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Negative attentional bias for positive recovery-related words as a
           predictor of treatment success among individuals with an alcohol use
           disorder
    • Authors: Hannah C. Rettie; Lee M. Hogan; W. Miles Cox
      Pages: 86 - 91
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Hannah C. Rettie, Lee M. Hogan, W. Miles Cox
      Introduction This study assessed relationships between clients' attentional bias (AB) for different types of stimuli and their treatment outcomes. Alcohol AB during detoxification has previously been shown to predict relapse, but further research was needed to clarify this relationship. The current study determined whether AB for recovery-related words would also predict treatment outcome. Methods Participants were 45 clients undergoing alcohol detoxification, and a control group of 36 staff members. They rated words for personal relevance in four categories (alcohol-related, neutral, positive change-related, and negative change-related). Participants completed an individualized Stroop task containing their chosen words. They were also assessed on readiness-to-change, difficulties with emotion regulation, drinking problems, anxiety, and depression. Clients were interviewed at a three-month follow-up to determine their treatment outcome. Results As predicted, questionnaire measures did not predict clients' treatment outcome (p > .05). A logistic regression model indicated that the best predictor of treatment outcome was AB for positive change-related words (p = .048), with successful individuals having less AB for these words than for the other word categories. Although this finding was unexpected, it was supported by significant relationships between positive change-related interference scores and continuous measures of drinking at follow-up [i.e. number of units drunk (p = .039) and number of drinking days (p = .018)]. Conclusions The results suggest that positive change-related words are a better predictor of treatment outcome than are either alcohol-related words or negative change-related words.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.034
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Mindfulness as a mediator of the association between adverse childhood
           experiences and alcohol use and consequences
    • Authors: Emma I. Brett; Hannah C. Espeleta; Susanna V. Lopez; Eleanor L.S. Leavens; Thad R. Leffingwell
      Pages: 92 - 98
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Emma I. Brett, Hannah C. Espeleta, Susanna V. Lopez, Eleanor L.S. Leavens, Thad R. Leffingwell
      One-third of college students report past-year heavy episodic drinking, making college student alcohol use an important area for continued research. Research has consistently linked early experiences of adversity to problematic substance use in adolescence and adulthood. Given the negative health consequences associated with heavy episodic drinking, it is imperative to identify mechanisms that contribute to this relation. Low levels of mindfulness have been linked to early adversity as well as impulsivity and alcohol use, therefore, the current study aims to examine the mediating role of mindfulness in the relation between early adversity and current alcohol use and consequences. Undergraduate students (N = 385) at a Midwestern university completed an online questionnaire assessing experiences of childhood adversity, trait mindfulness, and current alcohol use and related consequences. Results indicated that increased adverse experiences and lower levels of mindfulness predicted both increased alcohol consumption and consequences (ps < 0.025), with mindfulness mediating the relationships. Mindfulness is a predictor of alcohol outcomes and appears to mediate the relation between early adversity and alcohol use and consequences. Findings suggest that students with a history of adversity are more likely to exhibit lower levels of mindfulness, which may lead to an increase in alcohol consumption and consequences in early adulthood. Targeted alcohol intervention efforts that incorporate mindfulness skills may be particularly beneficial for those who have experienced early adversity.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.002
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Understanding the link between contingency management and smoking
           cessation: The roles of sex and self-efficacy
    • Authors: Aaron F. Waters; Michael S. Businelle; Summer G. Frank; Emily T. Hébert; Darla E. Kendzor
      Pages: 99 - 105
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Aaron F. Waters, Michael S. Businelle, Summer G. Frank, Emily T. Hébert, Darla E. Kendzor
      Introduction Little is known about the mechanisms linking contingency management (CM) treatment with smoking cessation, and recent research suggests that the CM approach is associated with better smoking cessation outcomes among females than males. The current study investigated self-efficacy as a potential mechanism through which CM treatment influences smoking cessation, and explored whether these relationships differed by sex. Methods Participants (N = 139) were primarily Black (63.3%) and female (57.6%) adults enrolled in a safety-net hospital smoking cessation program. Participants received usual care (UC), which included pharmacotherapy and counseling sessions (n = 66) or a CM intervention (UC + 4 weeks of small, abstinence contingent financial incentives; n = 73). Self-efficacy for quitting was measured on the day after quitting with the Self-Efficacy Scale/Confidence (SESC) questionnaire. Mediation analyses were conducted to evaluate the indirect effects of treatment group on biochemically-verified abstinence (4-weeks post-quit) via self-efficacy, and moderated mediation analyses were conducted to evaluate the moderating role of sex. Results Self-efficacy was not found to mediate the relations between CM treatment and smoking cessation in the overall sample. However, analyses indicated a significant moderating effect of sex on the indirect effect of treatment group on smoking cessation through self-efficacy (each of the 3 SESC subscales). Specifically, there was a stronger association between CM and greater self-efficacy among females than males. Conclusion Findings suggest that CM treatment had a differing impact on self-efficacy among males and females, which in turn influenced the likelihood of smoking cessation.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.018
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Factors associated with hazardous alcohol use and motivation to reduce
           drinking among HIV primary care patients: Baseline findings from the
           Health & Motivation study
    • Authors: Michael J. Silverberg; Wendy A. Leyden; Amy Leibowitz; C. Bradley Hare; Hannah J. Jang; Stacy Sterling; Sheryl L. Catz; Sujaya Parthasarathy; Michael A. Horberg; Derek D. Satre
      Pages: 110 - 117
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Michael J. Silverberg, Wendy A. Leyden, Amy Leibowitz, C. Bradley Hare, Hannah J. Jang, Stacy Sterling, Sheryl L. Catz, Sujaya Parthasarathy, Michael A. Horberg, Derek D. Satre
      Background Limited primary care-based research has examined hazardous drinking risk factors and motivation to reduce use in persons with HIV (PWH). Methods We computed prevalence ratios (PR) for factors associated with recent (<30 days) hazardous alcohol use (i.e., 4+/5+ drinks in a single day for women/men), elevated Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores, and importance and confidence (1–10 Likert scales) to reduce drinking among PWH in primary care. Results Of 614 participants, 48% reported recent hazardous drinking and 12% reported high alcohol use severity (i.e., AUDIT zone 3 or higher). Factors associated with greater alcohol severity included moderate/severe anxiety (PR: 2.07; 95% CI: 1.18, 3.63), tobacco use (PR: 1.79; 1.11, 2.88), and other substance use (PR: 1.72; 1.04, 2.83). Factors associated with lower alcohol severity included age 50–59 years (PR: 0.46; 0.22, 2.00) compared with age 20–39 years, and having some college/college degree (PR: 0.61; 0.38, 0.97) compared with ≤high school. Factors associated with greater importance to reduce drinking (scores >5) included: moderate/severe depression (PR: 1.43; 1.03, 2.00) and other substance use (PR: 1.49; 1.11, 2.01). Lower importance was associated with incomes above $50,000 (PR: 0.65; 0.46, 0.91) and marijuana use (PR: 0.65; 0.49, 0.87). HIV-specific factors (e.g., CD4 and HIV RNA levels) were not associated with alcohol outcomes. Conclusions This study identified modifiable participant characteristics associated with alcohol outcomes in PWH, including anxiety and depression severity, tobacco use, and other substance use.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T05:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.033
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Methodological factors as a potential source of discordance between
           
    • Authors: Jarrod M. Ellingson; Marc N. Potenza; Godfrey D. Pearlson
      Pages: 126 - 130
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Jarrod M. Ellingson, Marc N. Potenza, Godfrey D. Pearlson
      There is a consistent but poorly understood finding that self-report and behavioral measures of impulsivity are weakly correlated or uncorrelated. There are many possible explanations for this observation, including differences in how these instruments are administered and scored. The present study examined the utility of alternative scoring algorithms for self-report measures that aim to identify participants' peak impulsivity (or self-control), informed by estimates of item difficulty from Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses. College students were administered self-report questionnaires (Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale [ZSS], Barratt Impulsiveness Scale [BIS-11], behavioral measures related to risk-taking and impulsivity (Balloon Analog Risk Task [BART], Experiential Discounting Task [EDT]), and the substance use module of a clinical interview (past-six-month alcohol and marijuana use). IRT analyses were conducted on self-report measures to estimate item difficulty. Scoring algorithms ranked items by difficulty and scored items based on consecutive items endorsed or denied. A maximal scoring algorithm increased the concordance between the BIS-11 and BART (r = 0.08 vs. −0.07), but there was no evidence of increased incremental validity for substance-use. Findings suggest that methodological factors may help explain the poor concordance of self-report and behavioral measures of impulsivity, but the magnitude of these correlations remained quite small. Further, alternative scoring algorithms were correlated with substance use but did not explain any variance that was distinct from typical algorithms. Future directions are discussed for elucidating the discrepancy between self-report and behavioral measures of impulsivity-related constructs, such as using large self-report item pools to develop computer adaptive tests.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.005
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Testing a motivational model of delivery modality and incentives on
           participation in a brief alcohol intervention
    • Authors: Clayton Neighbors; Lindsey M. Rodriguez; Lorra Garey; Mary M. Tomkins
      Pages: 131 - 138
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Clayton Neighbors, Lindsey M. Rodriguez, Lorra Garey, Mary M. Tomkins
      Objectives The current research evaluated delivery modality and incentive as factors affecting recruitment into a personalized normative feedback (PNF) alcohol intervention for heavy drinking college students. We also evaluated whether these factors were differentially associated with participation based on relevance of the intervention (via participants' drinking levels). Method College students aged 18–26 who endorsed at least one heavy drinking episode and one alcohol-related consequence in the past month (N = 2059; 59.1% female) were invited to participate in a PNF intervention study. In this 2 × 2 design, participants were randomized to: (1) complete the computer-based baseline survey and intervention procedure remotely (i.e., at a time and location of their convenience) or in-person in the laboratory, and (2) receive an incentive ($30) for their participation in the baseline/intervention procedure or no incentive. Results Consistent with hypotheses, students were more likely to participate when participation occurred remotely (OR = 1.87, p < .001) and when an incentive (OR = 1.64, p = .007) was provided. Moderation analyses suggested that incentives were only associated with higher recruitment rates among remote participants (OR = 2.10, p < .001), consistent with cognitive evaluation theory. Moreover, heavier drinkers were more likely to participate if doing so remotely, whereas drinking was not associated with likelihood of participation among in-person participants. Discussion The present results showed a strong selection bias for participation in a web-based intervention study relative to one in which participants were required to participate in-person. Results have implications for researchers recruiting college students for alcohol interventions.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.030
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Regular past year cannabis use in women veterans and associations with
           sexual trauma
    • Authors: Kendall C. Browne; Marketa Dolan; Tracy L. Simpson; John C. Fortney; Keren Lehavot
      Pages: 144 - 150
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Kendall C. Browne, Marketa Dolan, Tracy L. Simpson, John C. Fortney, Keren Lehavot
      Introduction This study sought to describe the prevalence of regular past year cannabis use (i.e., at least monthly use) in women veterans, to characterize women veterans reporting this level of use, and to examine the independent contributions of sexual trauma across the lifespan on regular past year cannabis use. Methods A national online survey on women veterans' health, with targeted oversampling of lesbian and bisexual women, collected data from US armed forces women veterans, 18 or older, living in the US (N = 636). Results Eleven percent of women reported regular cannabis use (5% heterosexual women; 21% lesbian/bisexual women). In bivariate analysis, identifying as a sexual and/or racial ethnic minority, younger age, being unmarried, reporting lower income, receiving VA services, smoking tobacco, and screening positive for alcohol misuse were positively associated with regular cannabis use. Additionally, a greater percentage of cannabis users reported experiencing childhood and adult sexual trauma and screened positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) when compared to peers who did not use any drugs. In a multivariate model, the number of life eras women endorsed experiencing sexual trauma was significantly associated with regular cannabis use even when adjusting for demographic variables and PTSD symptoms. Conclusions Among women veterans, regular cannabis use is fairly common among those who are sexual and racial/ethnic minorities, younger, unmarried, receiving VA services, and reporting alcohol or tobacco use, PTSD symptoms, and/or multiple sexual traumas across the lifespan. Screening and assessment may be important to consider in healthcare settings serving this veteran population.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.007
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Poor mental health, peer drinking norms, and alcohol risk in a social
           network of first-year college students
    • Authors: Shannon R. Kenney; Graham T. DiGuiseppi; Matthew K. Meisel; Sara G. Balestrieri; Nancy P. Barnett
      Pages: 151 - 159
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Shannon R. Kenney, Graham T. DiGuiseppi, Matthew K. Meisel, Sara G. Balestrieri, Nancy P. Barnett
      Objective College students with anxiety and depressive symptomatology face escalated risk for alcohol-related negative consequences. While it is well-established that normative perceptions of proximal peers' drinking behaviors influence students' own drinking behaviors, it is not clear how mental health status impacts this association. In the current study, we examined cross-sectional relationships between anxiety and depressed mood, perceived drinking behaviors and attitudes of important peers, and past month alcohol consumption and related problems in a first-semester college student social network. Method Participants (N = 1254, 55% female, 47% non-Hispanic White) were first-year students residing on campus at a single university who completed a web-based survey assessing alcohol use, mental health, and social connections among first-year student peers. Network autocorrelation models were used to examine the independent and interactive associations between mental health and perceptions of close peers' drinking on drinking outcomes, controlling for important variables. Results Mental health interacted with perceptions to predict past-month drinking outcomes, such that higher anxiety and higher perceptions that peers drink heavily was associated with more drinks consumed and consequences, and higher depression and perceptions was associated with more drinks consumed, heavy drinking frequency, and consequences. Attitudes that peers approve of heavy drinking were associated with more drinks consumed and heavy drinking frequency among students with lower (vs. higher) depressed mood. Conclusions This study provides strong evidence that perceiving that close peers drink heavily is particularly risk-enhancing for anxious and depressed college students, and offers implications about alcohol intervention targeted at these subgroups.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.012
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Peer victimization and substance use: Understanding the indirect effect of
           depressive symptomatology across gender
    • Authors: Tamika C.B. Zapolski; Alia T. Rowe; Sycarah Fisher; Devon J. Hensel; Jessica Barnes-Najor
      Pages: 160 - 166
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Tamika C.B. Zapolski, Alia T. Rowe, Sycarah Fisher, Devon J. Hensel, Jessica Barnes-Najor
      Objective Peer victimization in school is common, with emerging literature suggesting that it may also increase risk for substance abuse. Yet, little is known about the underlying mechanisms within this risk pathway. The objective of this study is to use a prospective 3-wave design to examine the mediating role of depressive symptomatology on the relationship between peer victimization and substance use, as well as examine if the pathway varies based on gender. Method 801 youth between 6th and 12th grade completed surveys across three years, which included measures on school peer victimization, depression symptomatology and substance use. Models tested the mediational pathway between victimization, depressive symptoms, and substance use. Models were stratified by gender. Results Controlling for grade and the effect of each variable across waves, a significant indirect effect of peer victimization on substance use through depressive symptoms was found for females, with a non-significant indirect effect for males. Conclusion Results suggest that female youth who are victimized by peers engage in substance use behaviors, at least in part, due to increases in depressive symptoms. Given its effect on depression, female victims may therefore benefit from coping skills training that targets emotion regulation and distress tolerance skills in order to combat increased risk for substance use behaviors as a coping response to their victimization. Further research is warranted to better understand the risk pathway for male youth who also experience peer victimization.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.010
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Parent-adolescent relationship and adolescent internet addiction: A
           moderated mediation model
    • Authors: Wei Wang; Dongping Li; Xian Li; Yanhui Wang; Wenqiang Sun; Liyan Zhao; Lilan Qiu
      Pages: 171 - 177
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Wei Wang, Dongping Li, Xian Li, Yanhui Wang, Wenqiang Sun, Liyan Zhao, Lilan Qiu
      Substantial research has found that positive parent-adolescent relationship is associated with low levels of adolescent Internet addiction (IA). However, little is known about the mediating and moderating mechanisms underlying this relation. The present study examined a moderated mediation model that included the parent-adolescent relationship (predictor variable), emotion regulation ability (mediator), stressful life events (moderator), and IA (outcome variable) simultaneously. A total of 998 (M age = 15.15 years, SD = 1.57) Chinese adolescents completed the Parent-Adolescent Relationship Scale, Emotion Regulation Ability Scale, Adolescent Stressful Life Events Scale, and Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire. After controlling for adolescent gender, age, and family socioeconomic status, results revealed that good parent-adolescent relationship was positively associated with adolescent emotion regulation ability, which in turn was negatively associated with their IA. Moreover, stressful life events moderated the second part of the mediation process. In accordance with the reverse stress-buffering model, the relation between emotion regulation ability and adolescent IA was stronger for adolescents who experienced lower levels of stressful life events. The findings and their implications are discussed and a resilient contextual perspective proposed.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.015
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Familial alcohol supply, adolescent drinking and early alcohol onset in 45
           low and middle income countries
    • Authors: Gary C.K. Chan; Janni Leung; Adrian B. Kelly; Jason Connor; Stephanie Edward; Wayne Hall; Louisa Degenhardt; Vivian Chiu; George Patton
      Pages: 178 - 185
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Gary C.K. Chan, Janni Leung, Adrian B. Kelly, Jason Connor, Stephanie Edward, Wayne Hall, Louisa Degenhardt, Vivian Chiu, George Patton
      Aims This study estimated the extent of familial alcohol supply in 45 low and middle income countries (LMIC), and examined the country-level effects of familial alcohol supply on adolescents’ alcohol use. Method We used data from 45 LMICs that participated in the Global School-Based Student Health Survey (GSHS) between 2003 and 2013 (n = 139,840). The weighted prevalence of familial alcohol supply in each country was estimated. Multilevel binary and ordinal logistic regression analyses were used to examine the country-level effect of familial alcohol supply on early onset of alcohol use (first alcohol before 12), past 30-day alcohol use, lifetime drunkenness and alcohol-related social problems. Results There were large variations between LMICs in the prevalence of familial alcohol supply and pattern of adolescent alcohol use. The prevalence of familial supply ranged from 0.1% in Tajikistan to 23.8% in St Lucia. It was estimated that a one percentage change in prevalence of familial alcohol supply was associated with 10%, 12% and 12% change in the odds of lifetime drunkenness (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = [1.04, 1.16]), early onset of alcohol use (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = [1.07, 1.08]) and more frequent drinking in the past month (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = [1.04, 1.20]). Conclusion There were large variations in the prevalence of familial alcohol supply and adolescent alcohol use among LMICs. Adolescents in countries with higher prevalence of familial alcohol supply were more likely to start using alcohol at an earlier age, to have used alcohol in the past 30 days and experience intoxication.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.014
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Role of smoking intention in tobacco use reduction: A mediation analysis
           of an effective classroom-based prevention/cessation intervention for
           adolescents
    • Authors: María T. Gonzálvez; Alexandra Morales; Mireia Orgilés; Steve Sussman; José P. Espada
      Pages: 186 - 192
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): María T. Gonzálvez, Alexandra Morales, Mireia Orgilés, Steve Sussman, José P. Espada
      Introduction Although some school-based tobacco cessation and prevention programs have been proven to be effective, there remains a lack of understanding of how these programs succeed. Methods This longitudinal study aimed to test smoking intention as a mediator of Project EX's intervention efficacy to reduce tobacco use. Using a computerized random number generator, six high schools located in the Mediterranean coast were randomly selected to participate in the program condition (Spanish version of Project EX) or the waiting-list control group with baseline, immediate-posttest, and 12-month follow-up assessments. At baseline, 685 adolescents aged 14–20 years (mean age: 14.87; SD = 0.92; 47.4% were females) were evaluated using self-administered tests of tobacco, and smoking intention. A biomarker of smoke inhalation, a measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (ECM), was used. Mediation analyses were conducted using the PROCESS v2.12 macro for Windows. Results Project EX had a significant effect on smoking intention. Indirect effects indicated that Project EX reduced the ECM level, and number of cigarettes used. Conclusions: This is the first Spanish study that explored intention as a mediator of the long-term efficacy of Project EX to reduce tobacco use in adolescents. Results suggested that interventions that reduce consumption intention at short-term are more likely to be successful in decreasing tobacco use in the long-term.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.013
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Development and psychometric evaluation of the Pornography Purchase Task
    • Authors: Kyler Mulhauser; Emily Miller Short; Jeremiah Weinstock
      Pages: 207 - 214
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Kyler Mulhauser, Emily Miller Short, Jeremiah Weinstock
      Excessive pornography use and hypersexuality are frequently evaluated via direct self-report of problem severity and negative consequences associated with these behaviors. These face-valid assessments may be less sensitive to problems of hypersexuality in persons with low insight into their condition or in persons with motivation to minimize the negative impact of their pornography use. Demand for addictive substances has been effectively evaluated through a behavioral economic framework using a hypothetical purchase task, in which respondents are asked to report their degree of engagement with the substance as the financial costs associated with use increase. The present study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the Pornography Purchase Task (PPT), a novel hypothetical purchase task for internet pornography use, in both a general population sample of adults (Study 1) and a clinical sample of men seeking hypersexuality treatment (Study 2). Overall, results showed good test-retest reliability of the PPT and the exponential-demand equation provided an excellent fit to responses on the PPT. The demand characteristic Intensity was most strongly related to concurrent indicators of hypersexuality and differentiated participants in Study 1. A similar pattern of results was observed in Study 2, with markedly stronger associations between most measures of demand for pornography and measures of hypersexuality for persons with recent use of pornography. Research and clinical implications of the PPT are discussed.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.016
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Income as a moderator of psychological stress and nicotine dependence
           among adult smokers
    • Authors: Andréa L. Hobkirk; Nicolle M. Krebs; Joshua E. Muscat
      Pages: 215 - 223
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Andréa L. Hobkirk, Nicolle M. Krebs, Joshua E. Muscat
      Background Perceived stress and psychological distress are associated with more cigarette craving and withdrawal, higher nicotine dependence, and less success during quit attempts. Low income smokers have disproportionately higher rates of smoking and may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of stress on smoking dependence. The aim of the current study was to assess if lower income smokers have a stronger association between stress and nicotine dependence than higher income smokers. Methods Data were obtained from the Pennsylvania Adult Smoking Study, which included 351 daily smokers. Subjects completed PhenX Toolkit and other self-report measures of socioeconomic factors, the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale, Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6), Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), and the Hooked on Nicotine Checklist (HONC). Moderation analyses using linear regression examined income-related differences in the association between stress and nicotine dependence. Results Income groups were categorized by an annual household income of $50,000 based on visual-inspection of scatter plots of income by nicotine dependence. Compared to higher income smokers, lower income smokers had significantly higher mean levels of nicotine dependence on the FTND [3.74 vs. 4.79, p < 0.001], perceived stress [15.63 vs. 17.95, p = 0.004], and psychological distress [5.30 vs. 6.86, p = 0.001], respectively. There were interaction effects, such that lower income smokers had a strong, positive associations between FTND and perceived stress (B = −0.11, CI = −0.17 to −0.04, p = 0.002) and psychological distress (B = −0.13, CI = −0.25 to −0.02, p = 0.022) whereas no association was found in higher income smokers. No significant moderation effects were found for the HONC or when income groups were categorized by U.S. federal poverty level. Conclusions The results highlight that the relationship between increasing stress and FTND was found in lower but not higher income groups. Future research should examine socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors that may facilitate increased smoking during stress-induced craving.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.021
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • The role of nicotinic receptor genes (CHRN) in the pathways of prenatal
           tobacco exposure on smoking behavior among young adult light smokers
    • Authors: Arielle S. Selya; Dale S. Cannon; Robert B. Weiss; Lauren S. Wakschlag; Jennifer S. Rose; Lisa Dierker; Donald Hedeker; Robin J. Mermelstein
      Pages: 231 - 237
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Arielle S. Selya, Dale S. Cannon, Robert B. Weiss, Lauren S. Wakschlag, Jennifer S. Rose, Lisa Dierker, Donald Hedeker, Robin J. Mermelstein
      Background Prenatal tobacco exposure (PTE) is associated with more frequent smoking among young, light smokers. Little is known about how nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRN) genes may contribute to this relationship. Methods Data were drawn from a longitudinal cohort of young light smokers of European ancestry (N = 511). Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among offspring, rs16969968 and rs6495308 in CHRNA5A3B4 and rs2304297 in CHRNB3A6, were analyzed with respect to whether they 1) predict PTE status; 2) confound the previously-reported effects of PTE on future smoking; 3) have effects on youth smoking frequency that are mediated through PTE; and 4) have effects that are moderated by PTE. Results rs2304297 and rs6495308 were associated with increased likelihood and severity of PTE, respectively. In a path analysis, rs16969968 directly predicted more frequent smoking in young adulthood (B = 1.50, p = .044); this association was independent of, and not mediated by, PTE. The risk of rs16969968 (IRR = 1.07, p = .015) and the protective effect of rs2304297 (IRR = 0.84, p < .001) on smoking frequency were not moderated by PTE. PTE moderated the effect of rs6495308, such that these alleles were protective against later smoking frequency only among non-exposed youth (IRR = 0.85, p < .001). Conclusions The association between offspring CHRNB3A6 and PTE is a novel finding. The risk of rs16969968 on youth smoking is independent and unrelated to that of PTE among young, light smokers. PTE moderates the protective effect of rs6495308 on youth smoking frequency. However, PTE's pathway to youth smoking behavior was not explained by these genetic factors, leaving its mechanism(s) of action unclear.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.001
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder and tobacco use: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis
    • Authors: Irene Pericot-Valverde; Rebecca J. Elliott; Mollie E. Miller; Jennifer W. Tidey; Diann E. Gaalema
      Pages: 238 - 247
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Irene Pericot-Valverde, Rebecca J. Elliott, Mollie E. Miller, Jennifer W. Tidey, Diann E. Gaalema
      Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and tobacco use are prevalent conditions that co-occur at striking rates in the US. Previous reviews examined prevalence and factors associated with cigarette smoking among individuals with PTSD but have not been summarized since 2007. Moreover, none explored rates and factors associated with the use of other tobacco products. This study aimed to systematically review the most recent literature examining the comorbidity of PTSD and tobacco use to provide prevalence rates, as well as summarize the literature exploring other factors associated with tobacco use among individuals with PTSD. Studies were identified using a systematic search of keywords related to tobacco use and PTSD within the following databases: PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, PsycARTICLES, and Cochrane Clinical Trials Library. The studies included in this review (N = 66) showed that the prevalence of current use of tobacco products in individuals with PTSD was 24.0% and the rate of PTSD among users of tobacco products was 20.2%. Additionally, results demonstrated that individuals with PTSD present with high levels of nicotine dependence and heavy use of tobacco products, as well as underscore the importance of negative emotional states as a contributing factor to tobacco use among individuals with PTSD. It is imperative that future studies continue monitoring tobacco use among individuals with PTSD while also assessing factors identified as having a prominent role in tobacco use among individuals with PTSD. These findings also demonstrate the need for more innovative approaches to reduce the pervasive tobacco use among individuals with PTSD.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.024
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Predicting risky health behaviors 35 years later: Are parents or
           teacher's reports of childhood behavior problems a better judge of
           outcomes'
    • Authors: Jaimee Stuart
      Pages: 255 - 262
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Jaimee Stuart
      Objectives This study sought to understand (1) whether parents and teachers reports of childhood behavioral problems could predict smoking and alcohol consumption 35 years later, and (2) whether propensity for smoking and alcohol consumption differed on the basis of informant agreement in their classification of behavioral syndromes. Methods Participants included those from the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s study (ACONF) with full childhood information as well as self-reports in adulthood (n = 1342). Latent Class Analysis was conducted to identify patterns of childhood problem behaviors as rated by teachers and parents. Regression models were then conducted predicting adulthood smoking and alcohol consumption. Informant agreement categories were constructed and differences across categories in both smoking and alcohol consumption were tested. Results Three subtypes of childhood behavior problems were identified by both teachers and parents: “Normative,” “Externalizing,” and “Internalizing,”. Parents also identified a distinct fourth group “Mixed”. Teacher's classification of the child as externalizing significantly predicted greater likelihood of being a current smoker, and parents' classification as internalizing predicted lower likelihood of being an ex-smoker. Parents' ratings as externalizing and mixed also predicted lower levels of alcohol consumption, which was opposite to the predicted effect. Additionally, informant agreement of externalizing indicated a greater propensity of smoking in adulthood, but did not indicate differences in alcohol consumption. Conclusions This study suggests that it is important to consider additive information from multiple informants when examining the life-course effects of childhood behavioral problems on risky health behaviors in adulthood.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.023
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Predictors of reduced smoking quantity among recovering alcohol dependent
           men in a smoking cessation trial
    • Authors: Matthew J. Worley; Melodie Isgro; Jaimee L. Heffner; Soo Yong Lee; Belinda E. Daniel; Robert M. Anthenelli
      Pages: 263 - 270
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Matthew J. Worley, Melodie Isgro, Jaimee L. Heffner, Soo Yong Lee, Belinda E. Daniel, Robert M. Anthenelli
      Introduction Adults with alcohol dependence (AD) have exceptionally high smoking rates and poor smoking cessation outcomes. Discovery of factors that predict reduced smoking among AD smokers may help improve treatment. This study examined baseline predictors of smoking quantity among AD smokers in a pharmacotherapy trial for smoking cessation. Methods The sample includes male, AD smokers (N = 129) with 1–32 months of alcohol abstinence who participated in a 12-week trial of medication (topiramate vs. placebo) and adjunct counseling with 6 months of follow-up. Baseline measures of nicotine dependence, AD severity, psychopathology, motivation to quit smoking, and smoking-related cognitions were used to predict smoking quantity (cigarettes per day) at post-treatment and follow-up. Results Overall, the sample had statistically significant reductions in smoking quantity. Greater nicotine dependence (Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) = 0.82–0.90), motivation to quit (IRRs = 0.65–0.85), and intrinsic reasons for quitting (IRRs = 0.96–0.98) predicted fewer cigarettes/day. Conversely, greater lifetime AD severity (IRR = 1.02), depression severity (IRRs = 1.05–1.07), impulsivity (IRRs = 1.01–1.03), weight-control expectancies (IRRs = 1.10–1.15), and childhood sexual abuse (IRRs = 1.03–1.07) predicted more cigarettes/day. Conclusions Smokers with AD can achieve large reductions in smoking quantity during treatment, and factors that predict smoking outcomes in the general population also predict greater smoking reductions in AD smokers. Treatment providers can use severity of nicotine dependence and AD, motivation to quit, smoking-related cognitions, and severity of depression to guide treatment and improve outcomes among AD smokers.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.004
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
  • Gender- and age-varying associations of sensation seeking and substance
           use across young adulthood
    • Authors: Rebecca J. Evans-Polce; Megan S. Schuler; John E. Schulenberg; Megan E. Patrick
      Pages: 271 - 277
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Addictive Behaviors, Volume 84
      Author(s): Rebecca J. Evans-Polce, Megan S. Schuler, John E. Schulenberg, Megan E. Patrick
      Introduction Sensation seeking is associated with elevated risk for substance use among adolescents and young adults. However, whether these associations vary across age for young men and women is not well characterized. Methods Using data from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) panel study, we examine the age-varying associations of sensation seeking and three types of substance use behavior (binge drinking, cigarette use, and marijuana use) across ages 18 to 30 using time-varying effect modeling. Analyses include participants in the eleven most recent MTF cohorts (12th-graders in 1994–2004), who are eligible to respond through age 29/30 (N = 6338 people; 30,237 observations). Results While sensation seeking levels and substance use are lower among women, the magnitude of the association of sensation seeking with binge drinking and with marijuana use among women exceeds that of men in the later 20s. Differential age trends were observed; among men, the associations generally decreased or remained constant with age. Yet among women, the associations decayed more slowly or even increased with age. Specifically, the association of sensation seeking with marijuana use among women increased during the late 20s, such that the association at age 30 exceeded that in the early 20s. Conclusions The significantly stronger associations of sensation seeking with binge drinking and marijuana use observed among women compared to men during the mid- to late-20s suggests divergent risk factors across genders for substance use during young adulthood, with sensation seeking remaining a strong risk factor for women but not men.

      PubDate: 2018-06-01T04:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.003
      Issue No: Vol. 84 (2018)
       
 
 
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