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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3049 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3049 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 86, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 365, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 229, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 362, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 333, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 418, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 168, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)

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Journal Cover Acute Pain
  [13 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1366-0071
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3049 journals]
  • Randomized clinical trial comparing a patient-driven titration protocol of
           intravenous hydromorphone with traditional physician-driven management of
           emergency department patients with acute severe pain
    • Authors: Andrew K. Chang; Polly E. Bijur; Michelle Davitt; E. John Gallagher
      Pages: 561 - 567.e2
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): A.K. Chang, P.E. Bijur, M. Davitt, E.J. Gallagher


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2009.05.003
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Premature termination of epidural analgesia—A prospective analysis
           to improve quality
    • Authors: F. Heid; T. Piepho; S. Stengel; A. Hofmann; J. Jage
      Pages: 75 - 81
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): F. Heid, T. Piepho, S. Stengel, A. Hofmann, J. Jage
      Background and objective Epidural analgesia (EA) is a gold-standard in post-operative pain control. Therefore, modern treatment concepts targeting early patient recovery regularly implement EA. Due to its increasing impact, EA should meet high quality standards in respect to application and maintenance. Though, daily practice often reveals EA-related problems, our investigation aimed to improve EA quality by assessing incidence and reasons of undeliberate, premature termination of post-operative EA. Methods In the first step all patients with post-operative EA were retrospectively studied covering a 6-month period (group 1). We analysed incidences and reasons of undeliberate termination of EA. Thereafter we modified our treatment protocols (preferential thoracic EA, continuous peripheral blocks, low concentrated local anaesthetic solutions, standardized co-medication). This was followed by a prospective analysis of all EA patients for another 6 months (group 2). Results 777 patients were included (group 1 n =400, group 2 n =377). Undeliberate termination of post-operative EA was documented in 24.3% of group 1 patients (group 2: 14.1%; p <0.05). In all patients, pain was the leading reason of premature termination (group 1: 52%; group 2: 68%), followed by motor block (group 1: 21%; group 2: 7.5%) and catheter dislocation (group 1: 10%; group 2: 16.7%). Discussion Modified treatment protocols reduced the rate of premature termination of EA from 24% to 14%. Particularly, we noted less motor impairment but still this rate is disappointing. The increasing rate of catheter dislocations underlines that a continuous analysis of all treatment aspects must be compulsatory.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.07.001
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Anaesthesiologist-associated risk factors for inadequate postoperative
           pain management
    • Authors: YuSheng Liu; QingSong Zhao; XiRong Guo; XiaoFeng Shen; YuZhu Peng; ShiQin Xu; XiaoHong Li; ShanWu Feng; FuZhou Wang
      Pages: 83 - 91
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): YuSheng Liu, QingSong Zhao, XiRong Guo, XiaoFeng Shen, YuZhu Peng, ShiQin Xu, XiaoHong Li, ShanWu Feng, FuZhou Wang
      Background Issues associated with the analgesic failure are major contributors to diminished postoperative health quality. The aim of this survey was to investigate the risk factors associated with anaesthesiologists for inadequate postoperative pain management, i.e. ≥3cm in a 10cm gauge of Visual Analog Scale. Methods A total of 1162 confidential questionnaires were sent by mail to anaesthesiologists in clinical hospitals. Information was queried on the incidence of inadequate postoperative pain management with different length of experience in anaesthesia, reasons for such incidence and possible rescue treatments after the occurrence of the incidence, and knowledge in terms of analgesia protocols. Education background and working settings were requested as the contributing factors. Results In 813 returned questionnaires, 798 were completed and the data were valid for analysis (68.7% valid response rate). Approximately 43% reported encountered at least one or more incidents of inadequate postoperative analgesia. All positive answers indicated inadequate postoperative analgesia was related to types of surgery. A multiple logistic regression (r 2 =0.74, P <0.0001) analysis revealed that age, length of anaesthesia experience, education background and work environment are four risk factors in contributing to the incidence. Patient-controlled analgesia is the first choice for postoperative pain therapy, and opioids are preferred as the rescue drugs for inadequate postoperative analgesia. Conclusions Inadequate postoperative analgesia occurs widely. Age, length of anaesthesia experience, education background and the working environment of anaesthesiologists are risk factors for inadequate postoperative pain control.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.07.003
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of fentanyl and butorphanol for postoperative pain relief with
           intravenous patient controlled analgesia
    • Authors: Bhoomika Thakore; Jacqueline D’Mello; Shalini Saksena; Manju Butani
      Pages: 93 - 99
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Bhoomika Thakore, Jacqueline D’Mello, Shalini Saksena, Manju Butani
      Background Opioids are very effective as postoperative analgesics, influencing emotional aspects of pain as well as reducing the actual pain threshold. Fentanyl, a phenylpiperidine derivative and potent opioid agonist, has already been studied for postoperative analgesia. Butorphanol, a synthetic morphinan derivative – agonist–antagonist, has few studies to substantiate its use. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of the two drugs on postoperative pain relief in terms of efficacy and safety. Methods A prospective, randomized controlled study of 100 patients [ASA I and II] undergoing total abdominal hysterectomies was conducted. Group F of 50 patients received fentanyl [0.4μg/kg/h] and group B received butorphanol [4μg/kg/h] as postoperative pain treatment via intravenous patient controlled analgesia [i.v. PCA]. Parameters monitored were pain score [VAS], pulse, blood pressure, respiratory rate, sedation score and side effects. The infusion rate, number of boluses, PCA demands and requirement of rescue analgesia were noted. Results Butorphanol had a better maintenance phase than fentanyl. The VAS scores were found to be reduced in the butorphanol group when compared with fentanyl group, significantly at 8h [F: 1.16±1.037; B: 0.78±0.582; p-value: 0.026]. The incidences of complications were comparable in both the groups. Conclusion Both the drugs are equally effective and safe as postoperative analgesics with i.v. PCA. The dose of 4μg/kg/h of butorphanol appeared effective but the dosage of fentanyl used, 0.4μg/kg/h, was not as effective as evidenced by the increased number of boluses taken by patients and needs to be increased.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.09.001
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Electrical punctual stimulation (P-STIM) with ear acupuncture following
           tonsillectomy, a randomised, controlled pilot study
    • Authors: H. Kager; R. Likar; H. Jabarzadeh; R. Sittl; C. Breschan; J. Szeles
      Pages: 101 - 106
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): H. Kager, R. Likar, H. Jabarzadeh, R. Sittl, C. Breschan, J. Szeles
      Background We examined whether P-STIM, administered pre- and postoperatively after tonsillectomies, resulted in a lower consumption of analgesics and an improvement of pain scores compared to sham acupuncture. Methods This study was carried out in a randomised, double-blind, controlled fashion. Thirty-three patients were randomised into 2 groups. All patients had P-STIM applied to them beginning 30min preoperatively. The stimulation was applied over the following 96h. The P-STIM-Verum group received sub-threshold stimulation. No stimulation was applied in the P-STIM-Placebo group. Premedication and anaesthesia were applied in a standardised fashion. The efficacy of P-STIM application was evaluated postoperatively using numeric and visual analogue scales at rest and with exertion and by measuring postoperative analgesic consumption. Results At almost all the measured time points the median pain score was less in the P-STIM-Verum group than in the P-STIM-Placebo group. The VAS scores at rest and with exertion were also significantly less in the P-STIM-Verum group at certain time points. Analgesic consumption in the P-STIM-Verum group was also less than in the P-STIM-Placebo group; however the difference did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions We were able to demonstrate in our study, that P-STIM applied pre- and postoperatively following tonsillectomies, is a simple method that seems to be effective and has few side-effects.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.001
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Postoperative opioid usage in children receiving Remifentanil vs.
           sufentanil
    • Authors: Tara M. Doherty; Terri Voepel-Lewis; Robert E. Christensen; Shobha Malviya
      Pages: 107 - 111
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Tara M. Doherty, Terri Voepel-Lewis, Robert E. Christensen, Shobha Malviya
      Background Studies have found a 30–50% increase in postoperative opioid demand following intraoperative use of remifentanil infusion, suggesting development of acute opioid tolerance. This study was undertaken to compare postoperative opioid requirements in children who received remifentanil versus sufentanil infusions during spine fusion. Methods A secondary review of data from children 8–18 years of age, who had undergone spine fusion was conducted. Patients who had received remifentanil infusions were matched by age, procedure, and duration of anaesthesia to those who received sufentanil infusions. Data included patient demographics, total intraoperative and postoperative opioids, and self-reported pain scores. Postoperative pain was managed with morphine patient controlled analgesia, and acetaminophen and diazepam as needed. Results Forty-four children (13.5±3 years) were included. Demographic and procedural data were similar between groups. There were no differences between remifentanil or sufentanil groups in high pain scores (5.3±2.4 vs. 5.7±2.6, respectively) or cumulative morphine requirements (1.02±0.32mg/kg vs. 1.07±0.48mg/kg) during the first 24h after surgery. Conclusion This study found no difference in opioid consumption between children who received remifentanil versus sufentanil infusions. Findings suggest that these short-acting potent opioids similarly affect morphine requirements following spine fusion.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.002
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Effects of cognitive pain coping strategies and locus of control on
           perception of cold pressor pain in healthy individuals: Experimental study
           
    • Authors: Natasa Jokic-Begic; Dragutin Ivanec; Dragana Markanovic
      Pages: 113 - 120
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Natasa Jokic-Begic, Dragutin Ivanec, Dragana Markanovic
      Background The aim of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of the coping strategies – distraction and redefining – on pain experience in individuals with internal vs. external locus of control. Method The participants were exposed to pain induced by cold pressor procedure. Pain tolerance, pain intensity, and objective and subjective duration of pain were measured in three different situations. In the control situation, the participants did not use any cognitive pain coping strategy. In two other situations, they used distraction and redefining strategies, respectively. Results Internally- and externally-oriented participants did not differ in pain tolerance, pain intensity ratings, and subjective duration of painful stimulation in any of the three situations. The use of cognitive pain coping strategies increased pain tolerance in both groups in comparison with the control situation. In both situations, the participants underestimated the duration of pain tolerance. There was no difference between the effectiveness of distraction and redefining strategies on pain tolerance and pain intensity ratings. Conclusion Cognitive pain coping strategies increase the duration of pain tolerance irrespective of the individual's locus of control, but have no effect on pain intensity rating.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.003
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Contralateral limb movement modulates cold pressor pain
    • Authors: Eric E. Brodie; Fiona M.A. Kane; Karel Gijsbers; Catherine A. Niven
      Pages: 121 - 128
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Eric E. Brodie, Fiona M.A. Kane, Karel Gijsbers, Catherine A. Niven
      Background Many studies investigating the attenuation of pain by psychological means have confounded cognitive factors with motoric factors. Two experiments were performed to investigate the extent to which intentional movements alone can attenuate experimental pain. Methods In experiment 1, tolerance and intensity of cold pressor pain administered to the non-dominant hand was measured for two movement conditions, reciprocal eye movements and reciprocal finger movements of the dominant hand. In experiment 2, tolerance and intensity was measured for two reciprocal finger movement conditions, when visual attention was directed to the dominant hand and when visual attention was directed to the location of the noxiously stimulated non-dominant hand. Results Reciprocal finger movements of the limb contralateral to a noxiously stimulated limb were found to result in significantly longer tolerance times and significantly lower pain intensity ratings when visual attention was directed to and away from the spatial location of the noxious stimulation. Conclusion These results confirm that movement of the limb contralateral to a noxiously stimulated limb attenuates experimental pain. Further research is required to ascertain whether movement alone attenuates non-experimental pain.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.07.002
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • In search of an ideal analgesic for common acute pain
    • Authors: Nicholas D. Moore
      Pages: 129 - 137
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Nicholas D. Moore
      The choice of an oral analgesic is an important determinant in achieving effective pain relief. Properties of an ‘ideal analgesic’ required for the management of acute pain are discussed and current evidence for the suitability of available analgesics – acetaminophen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (such as ibuprofen), opioids and combination therapy – is reviewed. The hypothesis that an ‘ideal analgesic’ for acute pain should have a rapid onset of action, act over an extended period of time, reduce awareness of pain quickly and minimise interruption by pain, be well tolerated and produce analgesia over a wide range of pain types in different patient populations, is proposed herein. Currently available analgesics may fulfil only some of these characteristics and, because individual patient response also varies, the challenge is to define what constitutes an acceptable analgesic for a specific patient or pain type. Various tools for measurement of each of these characteristics exist, but there is currently no single measure to determine the ‘ideal analgesic’ for a specific patient with a specific pain type that takes into account all the characteristics of an ‘ideal analgesic’ and provides an overall measure to quantify the quality of relief produced.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.09.003
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Phantom limb like pain and sensations in an intact lower extremity
    • Authors: Suparna Saha; Eldor L. Brish; Krishna Boddu
      Pages: 139 - 141
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Suparna Saha, Eldor L. Brish, Krishna Boddu
      Phantom limb pain is defined as pain localised in a body part that is no longer there (Mishra et al. [1]; Flor et al. [2]; Mayo Clinic Staff [3]). It is believed that amputation of an extremity is required for phantom pain and sensations to occur (Nikolajsen and Jensen [5]). However, we report a case in which a severed nerve to an “intact extremity” resulted in phantom limb-like pains and sensations which responded to a treatment regimen identical to that for phantom limb pain. It is important for clinicians to entertain the idea of phantom limb-like pain in cases when a nerve is severed to any extremity and as such, provide pain relief to this subgroup of patients.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.07.004
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Continuing use of droperidol in patient-controlled analgesia with morphine
    • Authors: C.M. Ball; P. Claydon
      Pages: 143 - 144
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): C.M. Ball, P. Claydon


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.09.002
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Multimodal analgesia for controlling acute postoperative pain
    • Authors: A. Buvanendran; K.S. Kroin
      Pages: 145 - 146
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): A. Buvanendran, K.S. Kroin


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.006
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Acute pain management in patients with fibromyalgia and other diffuse
           chronic pain syndromes
    • Authors: E.M. Pogatzki-Zahn; J.S. Englbrecht; S.A. Schug
      First page: 146
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): E.M. Pogatzki-Zahn, J.S. Englbrecht, S.A. Schug


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.007
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Gabapentin decreases morphine consumption and improves functional recovery
           following total knee arthroplasty
    • Authors: H. Clarke; S. Pereira; D. Kennedy; I. Gilron; J. Katz; J. Gollish; J. Kay
      Pages: 146 - 147
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): H. Clarke, S. Pereira, D. Kennedy, I. Gilron, J. Katz, J. Gollish, J. Kay


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.008
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Predictive factors of postoperative pain after day-case surgery
    • Authors: H.F. Gramke; J.M. de Rijke; M. van Kleef; A.G. Kessels; M.L. Peters; M. Sommer; M.A. Marcus
      First page: 147
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): H.F. Gramke, J.M. de Rijke, M. van Kleef, A.G. Kessels, M.L. Peters, M. Sommer, M.A. Marcus


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.009
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • The analgesic properties of scalp infiltrations with ropivacaine after
           intracranial tumoral resection
    • Authors: H. Batoz; O. Verdonck; C. Pellerin; G. Roux; P. Maurette
      Pages: 147 - 148
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): H. Batoz, O. Verdonck, C. Pellerin, G. Roux, P. Maurette


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.010
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Randomised clinical trial of the influence of local subcutaneous
           infiltration versus subcutaneous and deep infiltration of local
           anaesthetic on pain after appendicectomy
    • Authors: J.K. Randall; A. Goede; P. Morgan-Warren; S.B. Middleton
      First page: 148
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): J.K. Randall, A. Goede, P. Morgan-Warren, S.B. Middleton


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.011
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Randomized double-blind placebo controlled crossover study of
           acetaminophen, ibuprofen, acetaminophen/hydrocodone, and placebo for the
           relief of pain from a standard painful stimulus
    • Authors: J.R. Miner
      Pages: 148 - 149
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): J.R. Miner


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.012
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • New and emerging analgesics and analgesic technologies for acute pain
           management
    • Authors: J.W. Heitz; T.A. Witkowski; E.R. Viscusi
      First page: 149
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): J.W. Heitz, T.A. Witkowski, E.R. Viscusi


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.013
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Two milligrams i.v. hydromorphone is efficacious for treating pain but is
           associated with oxygen desaturation
    • Authors: A.K. Chang; P.E. Bijur; A. Napolitano; J. Lupow; E.J. Gallagher
      First page: 149
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): A.K. Chang, P.E. Bijur, A. Napolitano, J. Lupow, E.J. Gallagher


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.014
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to
           pain: A combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance
           imaging study
    • Authors: R. Kupers; F.C. Schneider; R. Christensen; A. Naert; H. Husted; O.B. Paulson; H. Kehlet
      First page: 150
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): R. Kupers, F.C. Schneider, R. Christensen, A. Naert, H. Husted, O.B. Paulson, H. Kehlet


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.015
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Mu-opioid receptor (A118G) single-nucleotide polymorphism affects
           alfentanil requirements for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: A
           pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic study
    • Authors: Y. Ginosar; E.M. Davidson; Y. Meroz; S. Blotnick; M. Shacham; Y. Caraco
      First page: 150
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Y. Ginosar, E.M. Davidson, Y. Meroz, S. Blotnick, M. Shacham, Y. Caraco


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.016
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Does the presence of psychosocial “yellow flags” alter
           patient–provider communication for work-related, acute low back
           pain'
    • Authors: W.S. Shaw; G. Pransky; T. Winters; T.H. Tveito; S.M. Larson; D.L. Roter
      First page: 151
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): W.S. Shaw, G. Pransky, T. Winters, T.H. Tveito, S.M. Larson, D.L. Roter


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.017
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Acute pain and availability of analgesia in the prehospital emergency
           setting in Italy: A problem to be solved
    • Authors: F. Marinangeli; C. Narducci; M.L. Ursini; A. Paladini; A. Pasqualucci; A. Gatti; G. Varrassi
      First page: 151
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): F. Marinangeli, C. Narducci, M.L. Ursini, A. Paladini, A. Pasqualucci, A. Gatti, G. Varrassi


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.018
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • A multicenter, open-label, exploratory dose-ranging trial of intranasal
           hydromorphone for managing acute pain from traumatic injury
    • Authors: D.P. Wermeling; T. Clinch; A.C. Rudy; D. Dreitlein; S. Suner; P.G. Lacouture
      Pages: 151 - 152
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): D.P. Wermeling, T. Clinch, A.C. Rudy, D. Dreitlein, S. Suner, P.G. Lacouture


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.019
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Acute pain assessment and pharmacological management practices for the
           older adult with a hip fracture: Review of ED trends
    • Authors: K. Herr; M. Titler
      First page: 152
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): K. Herr, M. Titler


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.020
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Medical students retain pain assessment and management skills long after
           an experiential curriculum: A controlled study
    • Authors: D.L. Stevens; D. King; R. Laponis; K. Hanley; S. Zabar; A.L. Kalet; C. Gillespie
      First page: 153
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): D.L. Stevens, D. King, R. Laponis, K. Hanley, S. Zabar, A.L. Kalet, C. Gillespie


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.022
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Measuring acute pain in the prehospital setting
    • Authors: P.A. Jennings; P. Cameron; S. Bernard
      First page: 153
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): P.A. Jennings, P. Cameron, S. Bernard


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.023
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Ibuprofen provides analgesia equivalent to acetaminophen-codeine in the
           treatment of acute pain in children with extremity injuries: A randomized
           clinical trial
    • Authors: J.H. Friday; J.T. Kanegaye; I. McCaslin; A. Zheng; J.R. Harley
      Pages: 154 - 155
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): J.H. Friday, J.T. Kanegaye, I. McCaslin, A. Zheng, J.R. Harley


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.025
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Managing pain using heat and cold therapy
    • Authors: E. Lane; T. Latham
      First page: 155
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): E. Lane, T. Latham


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.026
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Nebulized fentanyl versus intravenous morphine in children with suspected
           
    • Authors: J.S. Furyk; W.J. Grabowski; L.H. Black
      First page: 155
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): J.S. Furyk, W.J. Grabowski, L.H. Black


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.10.027
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3-4 (2017)
       
  • Analgesic effectiveness of flurbiprofen axetil after uterine curettage on
           abortion: A randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: FuZhou Wang; XiaoFeng Shen; XiRong Guo; ShiQin Xu; LiangLiang He; YuSheng Liu
      Pages: 43 - 50
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 2
      Author(s): FuZhou Wang, XiaoFeng Shen, XiRong Guo, ShiQin Xu, LiangLiang He, YuSheng Liu
      Background Pain after uterine curettage has not been clearly evaluated. This study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that flurbiprofen axetil used prior to curettage on abortion could decrease 50% pain from uterine contraction. Methods Ninety seven ASA physical status I–II patients, undergoing elective uterine apoxesis, were allocated to this randomized double-blind controlled study and assigned into one of two groups (n =45). In the flurbiprofen group, patients received an i.v. injection of flurbiprofen 50mg in 5ml 10min prior to propofol anesthesia. The control group received the same volume of saline injection. Morphine 0.04mg/kg was used as the rescue drug for uncontrolled pain. Visual analog scale for analgesia at rest, satisfaction with analgesia, morphine consumption and side effects were recorded. Results A total of 87 patients completed the study. The intention-to-treat number of patients was 45 in each group. Flurbiprofen group evidenced effective analgesia (vs. saline P =0.019), with better satisfaction (P =0.015), lower incidence of nausea, dizziness and drowsiness, pruritus, dry mouth and uterine bleeding than the saline control. The flurbiprofen group consumed less morphine in 1h 0.6mg (interquartile 0.1–1.2), vs. saline group 3.7mg (interquartile 1.5–4.6) (P =0.049). The number of patients needed to treat was 2 in the flurbiprofen group. Conclusion Preoperative flurbiprofen axetil 50mg is a clinically effective analgesic means after uterine curettage on abortion.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.02.001
       
  • Misinterpretation of the Faces Pain Scale-Revised in adult clinical
           practice
    • Authors: Grazyna Jastrzab; Susie Kerr; Greg Fairbrother
      Pages: 51 - 55
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 2
      Author(s): Grazyna Jastrzab, Susie Kerr, Greg Fairbrother
      Background The Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) is commonly used for measuring pain intensity in paediatric and adult populations. When applied in a clinical setting, this scale may not always be used correctly as a patient self-report. Methods A sample of 99 nurses was selected at random from medical, surgical, critical care and aged care units over a 1-week snapshot period in 2002. This group of nurses was surveyed via open-ended questioning to assess their knowledge about applying the FPS-R, when measuring pain in adult patients who are able to communicate. Following the survey, a range of ongoing education strategies was implemented. Three years later, the survey was repeated using the same process (n =101). Results In the initial survey, 52% of respondents gave a correct answer, stating that they would ask the patient to choose the face representing their level of pain. The second survey yielded a similar result with 55% of answers coded as correct by the investigators. Conclusion A substantial proportion of surveyed nurses were unable to describe the correct use of the FPS-R at either point of knowledge canvassing. In practice, it would appear that these nurses, if using the FPS-R, would not ask the patient about the intensity of their pain in situations when the patient is capable of a self-report. Implemented education strategies did not contribute to the correct application of FPS-R tool. Clinicians need to be aware of the possibility of misinterpreted application of self-reporting pain intensity measurement tools which employ a facial expression.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.03.001
       
  • Preoperative gabapentin in patients undergoing primary total knee
           arthroplasty
    • Authors: Cassie C. Dietrich; Michelle A. Kinney; Juan N. Pulido; Sheila L. Hoehn; Laurence C. Torsher; Edward D. Frie; James R. Hebl; Carlos B. Mantilla
      Pages: 57 - 63
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 2
      Author(s): Cassie C. Dietrich, Michelle A. Kinney, Juan N. Pulido, Sheila L. Hoehn, Laurence C. Torsher, Edward D. Frie, James R. Hebl, Carlos B. Mantilla
      Background Patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty usually receive a multimodal analgesic regimen including peripheral nerve blockade, but may still experience significant pain. This study examined whether preoperative gabapentin decreases acute postoperative pain and opioid consumption in this setting. Methods Retrospective chart review of single institution, hospital-based orthopaedic practice. Consecutive patients undergoing unilateral elective primary knee arthroplasty were evaluated for perioperative gabapentin use. Sixty-one consecutive patients received gabapentin; for each, an age- and gender-matched control was identified. Results Patients in both groups demonstrated similar demographics, all received lumbar plexus blockade. Catheters were removed on postoperative day 2 (95%). There were no differences in postoperative pain scores or opioid use between groups. Overall, median verbal pain scores (IQR) were 0(1), 0(3), 1(3) and 3(3) in the post-anaesthesia care unit and postoperative days 0, 1 and 2, respectively. Postoperative consumption of other analgesics was not different across groups. Patients in the gabapentin group received a single-injection sciatic nerve block less often than patients in the control group (77% vs. 94%, respectively; p <0.05). Conclusions Patients undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty experience low pain scores utilizing a multimodal analgesic regimen including continuous lumbar plexus blockade independent of gabapentin use.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.03.002
       
  • Efficacy of fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system in postoperative
           pain—A meta-analysis
    • Authors: Keah-How Poon; Kian-Hian Tan; Kok-Yuen Ho
      Pages: 65 - 74
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 2
      Author(s): Keah-How Poon, Kian-Hian Tan, Kok-Yuen Ho
      Background Postoperative analgesic modalities include patient-controlled techniques via various routes such as intravenous and epidural. A transdermal delivery route using iontophoretic technology appears promising. Recent randomised controlled trials have suggested that fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) was of equivalent efficacy to intravenous morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy and safety of this system in the management of acute postoperative pain. Methods A meta-analysis of two placebo-controlled and four active-controlled randomised trials which satisfied the inclusion criteria was performed according to the QUOROM guidelines. Results Fentanyl ITS was superior to placebo for postoperative analgesia using withdrawal secondary to inadequate analgesia and pain scores as outcome measures. Fentanyl ITS was equivalent to morphine PCA when Patient Global Assessment was used as primary outcome measure. However, there were significantly more patients in the fentanyl ITS group who withdrew due to inadequate analgesia. This may be related to the pharmacokinetic profile of fentanyl ITS. Adverse effect and safety profile seemed favourable. Conclusions Fentanyl ITS is a promising novel modality for postoperative analgesia that is superior to placebo but may not be equivalent to morphine PCA as claimed by individual trials and recent reviews. Its use appears to be safe.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.05.001
       
  • Acute and chronic pain following breast surgery
    • Authors: Serene H. Chang; Vivek Mehta; Richard M. Langford
      Pages: 1 - 14
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 1
      Author(s): Serene H. Chang, Vivek Mehta, Richard M. Langford
      Background Successful acute pain management after breast surgery remains challenging, and if not achieved, may increase the likelihood of subsequent chronic pain. Aims This article aimed to evaluate the evidence for varied techniques described for peri-operative pain management in breast surgery, and to review the literature on chronic pain after breast surgery and particularly ‘post-mastectomy pain syndrome’. Method A Pubmed search was performed, with the key words “mastectomy” and “pain” for articles in the English language in the adult human population (age>19 years), looking specifically for different analgesic techniques that have been evaluated. Results Thirty-three peer-reviewed publications with pain outcome data were included, ranging from 15 to 289 patients per study (total n =2104). Twenty three were randomised controlled trials and the rest were prospective or retrospective audits and case series. Inconsistent trial methodology precluded a meta-analysis. Paravertebral local anaesthetic nerve blockade resulted in lower pain scores and fewer side effects than opioid-based regimens. Three risk factors emerged predicting chronic pain post-mastectomy: higher post-operative pain scores, age <65 years and inclusion of major reconstructive surgery. Conclusion Paravertebral block should be considered for use in major breast surgery. Pain control should be optimised/a priority for both acute care and to potentially reduce chronic pain.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2009.01.001
       
  • Dyloject®, a novel injectable diclofenac solubilised with cyclodextrin:
           Reduced incidence of thrombophlebitis compared to injectable diclofenac
           solubilised with polyethylene glycol and benzyl alcohol
    • Authors: Robert D. Colucci; Curtis Wright; Fred H. Mermelstein; Daniel G. Gawarecki; Daniel B. Carr
      Pages: 15 - 21
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 1
      Author(s): Robert D. Colucci, Curtis Wright, Fred H. Mermelstein, Daniel G. Gawarecki, Daniel B. Carr
      Background Thrombophlebitis is a common complication of a widely used formulation of injectable diclofenac that employs propylene glycol and benzyl alcohol (PG–BA) as solvents. Initial studies of Dyloject®, a novel injectable diclofenac solubilised with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), suggested that this complication occurred less frequently and with lower severity with the newer formulation. Methods We conducted a safety analysis of seven single-dose clinical trials that enrolled 531 patients receiving either a rapid intravenous (IV) bolus of Dyloject® or a 30min IV infusion of PG–BA diclofenac. Results The incidence of thrombophlebitis observed as an adverse event following Dyloject® treatment was 1.2% (5 of 423) versus 6.5% (7 of 108) following PG–BA diclofenac (p <0.01). In a subset of clinical studies that included an observer-rated thrombophlebitis assessment, the incidence of mild irritation was similar for both products (5.4% for Dyloject® and 4.9% for PG–BA diclofenac). Differences between the formulations were most evident in the higher incidence of moderate to severe thrombophlebitis after PG–BA diclofenac (2.4% incidence) compared to Dyloject® (0% incidence). Conclusion HPβCD, the solubilising agent in Dyloject®, may be less irritating and result in less clinical thrombophlebitis than the cosolvents propylene glycol and benzyl alcohol used in PG–BA diclofenac.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2008.11.001
       
  • Can ropivacaine be effectively and safely used in analgesia after
           laparoscopically assisted gastrointestinal surgery'
    • Authors: Jun Yan; Jue Jin; Min-hua Zheng; Bu-wei Yu
      Pages: 23 - 29
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jun Yan, Jue Jin, Min-hua Zheng, Bu-wei Yu
      Objective This prospective observer-blinded clinical trial is designed to evaluate the effectiveness and the safety of 0.5% ropivacaine 30ml (150mg) administrated via subcutaneous infiltration at incision with or without combination of intraperitoneal spray for analgesia after laparoscopically assisted gastrointestinal surgery. Methods Ninety ASA grade I–III patients were randomized into three groups: Group R1 (29 patients) in which patients received infiltration of 0.5% ropivacaine 30ml at all incision sites before the suturing, Group R2 (31 patients) in which patients received 0.5% ropivacaine 20ml at all incision sites and intraperitoneal spray of 0.5% ropivacaine 10ml before the suturing and Group C (30 patients) in which patients received no ropivacaine as control. VAS scores at rest and during coughing were recorded immediately after emergence (H0), at 2h (H2), 4h (H4), 6h (H6) and 24h (H24) after operation. Serum cortisol concentration of cortisol was measured preoperatively (F0) and 2h after operation (F2). Subcutaneous pethidine blouses given for additional pain treatment were counted for the first 24h after operation and follow-up examination of incisions were performed at the 1st, 4th, 7th day after operation. Results Within 6h postoperatively, the patients in Groups R1 and R2 reported significantly lower VAS scores at rest and during coughing than those in Group C (P <0.05). Serum cortisol concentrations at 2h (F2) after operation were significantly lower in Group R2 than in Group C. There was no difference among the three groups in administration of pethidine boluses within 6h and 24h after the surgery. In this trial, no neurological or cardiac complications were observed in any patient. Conclusion Thirty millilitres of 0.5% ropivacaine can be used effectively and safely for pain control in the early hours after laparoscopically assisted gastrointestinal surgery and subcutaneous infiltration at incision sites combined with intraperitoneal spray can provide more complete analgesia. However, analgesia provided by ropivacaine via subcutaneous infiltration at incision sites with or without intraperitoneal spray would gradually become less effective 6h after the operation, hence requiring additional pain treatment.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2008.10.002
       
  • Postoperative analgesic and adverse effects of two low doses of
           intrathecal neostigmine and its influence on spinal bupivacaine
           anaesthesia after knee arthroscopy
    • Authors: Azim Honarmand; Mohammad Reza Safavi; Mohammad Reza Habibzadeh
      Pages: 31 - 37
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 1
      Author(s): Azim Honarmand, Mohammad Reza Safavi, Mohammad Reza Habibzadeh
      Background Neostigmine is a spinal analgesic that could be a useful adjunct. This study was conducted to evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy and the safety of two low doses of intrathecal (IT) neostigmine in patients undergoing knee arthroscopy under spinal bupivacaine anaesthesia. Methods By using a double-blinded study design, 80 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy during spinal anaesthesia were divided into four groups: bupivacaine group (Group B) received 15mg hyperbaric bupivacaine; bupivacaine+fentanyl group (Group BF) received 15mg hyperbaric bupivacaine mixed with 25μg fentanyl; bupivacaine+neostigmine group 1 (Group BN1) received 15mg hyperbaric bupivacaine mixed with 25μg neostigmine; bupivacaine+neostigmine group 2 (Group BN2) received 15mg hyperbaric bupivacaine mixed with 35μg neostigmine. The postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) and the incidence of adverse effects were recorded for 24h after administration of study drugs. Results VAS scores were significantly lower in group BN2 compared with group B, group BF and group BN1 at 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24h after operation (P <0.05). The time to the first patients’ demand for morphine administration after surgery was significantly prolonged in group BN2 compared with group B or group BN1 (P <0.05). There was no significant difference between four groups in incidence of nausea and vomiting. Conclusion Our study showed that IT neostigmine (35μg) enhanced bupivacaine spinal anaesthesia (15mg) and produced prolonged postoperative analgesia for about 24h without producing significant more adverse effects such as nausea and vomiting.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2008.10.001
       
  • Thoracic paravertebral block for treatment of postembolization syndrome
    • Authors: Joseph Atallah; Jihad Abbas; Steven H. Selman; Simmone S. Cooper; Vivian Onyewuche; Patricia Weis; Thomas J. Papadimos; Brenda G. Fahy
      Pages: 39 - 42
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 1
      Author(s): Joseph Atallah, Jihad Abbas, Steven H. Selman, Simmone S. Cooper, Vivian Onyewuche, Patricia Weis, Thomas J. Papadimos, Brenda G. Fahy
      Renal artery embolization (angio-infarction) of a large renal cell carcinoma, prior to excision, is an acceptable surgical option. It may reduce the tumour's size and vascularity. However, postembolization syndrome, as characterized by flank pain, fever, nausea, and/or vomiting, is a potential complication of such an approach. The flank pain of this syndrome may be resistant to conventional opioid therapy. Here we report the successful use of a unilateral paravertabral block for the control of the unilateral flank pain of postembolization syndrome secondary to renal artery embolization.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acpain.2008.11.002
       
  • Announcement
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
       
  • Bacterial contamination of PCA and epidural infusion devices
    • Authors: Rothwell Pearson; Wright Barlow
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): M. Rothwell, D. Pearson, K. Wright, D. Barlow


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
       
  • Monitoring electrical skin conductance: A tool for the assessment of
           postoperative pain in children'
    • Authors: Hullett Chambers; Preuss Zamudio Lange Pascoe Ledowski
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): B. Hullett, N. Chambers, J. Preuss, I. Zamudio, J. Lange, E. Pascoe, T. Ledowski


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
       
  • Retraction Notice
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
       
  • Conference Calendar
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issues 3–4


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
       
  • Conference Calendar
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
       
  • Conference Calander
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2009
      Source:Acute Pain, Volume 11, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-08-28T01:38:41Z
       
 
 
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