Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3206 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3206 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 106, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 450, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 333, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 193, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Clinical Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Cosmetic Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Family Practice Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Ophthalmology and Optometry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 434, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 397, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 485, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 274, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 219, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Acta Psychologica
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.331
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 26  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0001-6918 - ISSN (Online) 0001-6918
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3206 journals]
  • Susceptibility to the fusion illusion is modulated during both action
           execution and action observation
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Timothy N. Welsh, Connor Reid, Gerome Manson, Merryn D. Constable, Luc TremblayAbstractMany researchers have proposed that when an individual observes the actions of another individual, the observer simulates the action using many of the same neural areas that are involved in action production. The present study was designed to test this simulation hypothesis by comparing the perception of multisensory stimuli during both the execution and observation of an aiming action. The present work used the fusion illusion - an audio-visual illusion in which two visual stimuli presented with one auditory stimulus are erroneously perceived as being one visual stimulus. Previous research has shown that, during action execution, susceptibly to this illusion is reduced early in the execution of the movement when visual information may be more highly weighted than other sensory information. We sought to determine whether or not a non-acting observer of an action showed a similar reduction in susceptibility to the fusion illusion. Participants fixated a target and either executed or observed a manual aiming movement to that target. Audiovisual stimuli were presented at 0, 100, or 200 ms relative to movement onset and participants reported the number of perceived flashes after the movement was completed. Analysis of perceived flashes revealed that participants were less susceptible to the fusion illusion when the stimuli were presented early (100 ms) relative to later in the movement (200 ms). Critically, this pattern emerged in both execution and observation tasks. These findings support the hypothesis that observers simulate the performance of the actor and experience comparable real-time alterations in multisensory processing.
       
  • Taking time to take perspective' Rapidly changing reference frames in
           the avatar-Simon task
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Christian Böffel, Jochen MüsselerAbstractThe avatar-Simon task demonstrates that even task irrelevant avatars cause compatibility effects from their point of view, a result that can be interpreted within the frameworks of spontaneous spatial perspective taking and referential coding. In the present study, we used an avatar-Simon task with rapidly changing avatar positions and with simultaneous and non-simultaneous presentations to investigate the time course of this phenomenon. The results showed that participants took the avatar's perspective into account even when the avatar's position was randomized on a trial-by-trial basis. This avatar-compatibility effect was also observed when avatar and stimulus were presented simultaneously, even though the participants had no time to adopt the avatar's perspective in advance. However, the effect was much more pronounced when a delay between avatar and stimulus presentation was in place.
       
  • Interindividual differences in the capability to change automatized
           movement patterns
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Laura Sperl, Rouwen Cañal-BrulandAbstractWhen modifying established, automatized skills, performers often experience proactive interference resulting in initial performance decrements. Notably, individuals seem to differ quite largely with respect to their interference susceptibility. The aim of the present study was to scrutinize the roots of these interindividual differences by examining the role of executive functions, age, baseline performance and gaze behavior applying a motor skill change task. As the ability to deal with proactive interference seems to be particularly linked to inhibitory mechanisms, we also assessed whether the application of a motor restriction which prevents unwanted movements may facilitate inhibition and hence result in less proactive interference. To this end, skilled touch-typists were confronted with a rule change that prohibited the left index finger for subsequent typing which immediately disrupted participants' automatized typing fluency. Regression analyses revealed that the amount of interference was significantly related to age and that the application of a motor restriction tended to predict less proactive interference. Additional correlation analyses revealed that a higher amount of proactive interference was also associated with higher baseline performance and lower prepotent response inhibition abilities. However, none of the remaining executive functions could explain the amount of interference. It follows that individual factors such as age, baseline performance and prepotent response inhibition as well as the physical option to execute a certain movement may play important roles in overcoming proactive interference when changing automatized skills.
       
  • Searching for emotion: A top-down set governs attentional orienting to
           facial expressions
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Hannah L. Delchau, Bruce K. Christensen, Ottmar V. Lipp, Richard O'Kearney, Kavindu H. Bandara, Nicole Tan, Hana Yabuki, Stephanie C. GoodhewAbstractResearch indicates that humans orient attention toward facial expressions of emotion. Orienting to facial expressions has typically been conceptualised as due to bottom-up attentional capture. However, this overlooks the contributions of top-down attention and selection history. In the present study, across four experiments, these three attentional processes were differentiated using a variation of the dot-probe task, in which participants were cued to attend to a happy or angry face on each trial. Results show that attention toward facial expressions was not exclusively driven by bottom-up attentional capture; instead, participants could shift their attention toward both happy and angry faces in a top-down manner. This effect was not found when the faces were inverted, indicating that top-down attention relies on holistic processing of the face. In addition, no evidence of selection history was found (i.e., no improvement on repeated trials or blocks of trials in which the task was to orient to the same expression). Altogether, these results suggest that humans can use top-down attentional control to rapidly orient attention to emotional faces.
       
  • Automatic imitation does not predict levels of prosocial behaviour in a
           modified dictator game
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Carl Michael Galang, Sukhvinder S. ObhiAbstractAutomatic imitation refers to the automatic tendency to imitate observed actions. Previous research on automatic imitation has linked it to a wide variety of social cognitive processes and functions, although the evidence is mixed and suggestive. However, no study to date has looked at the downstream behavioural effects of automatic imitation. The current research addresses this gap in the literature by exploring the possible relationship between trait-levels of automatic imitation, as measured by the automatic imitation task (AIT), and explicit prosocial behaviours, as measured by a modified dictator game (DG). Contrary to our expectations, AIT effects did not correlate with DG scores. This conclusion is supported by both equivalence tests and Bayesian analysis. However, we discuss a number of alternative explanations for our results, and caution against strong interpretations from a single study. We further discuss the implications of this finding in relation to the widespread notion that automatic imitation, and self-other control more generally, underlie social cognitive functions.
       
  • Applying the verifiability approach to deception detection in alibi
           witness situations
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Zarah Vernham, Aldert Vrij, Galit Nahari, Sharon Leal, Samantha Mann, Liam Satchell, Robin OrtheyAbstractThe application of alibi witness scenarios to deception detection has been overlooked. Experiment 1 was a study of the verifiability approach in which truth-telling pairs completed a mission together, whereas in lying pairs one individual completed this mission alone and the other individual committed a mock theft. All pairs were instructed to convince the interviewer that they completed the mission together by writing individual statements on their own followed by a collective statement together as a pair. In the individual statements, truth-telling pairs provided more checkable details that demonstrated they completed the mission together than lying pairs, whereas lying pairs provided more uncheckable details than truth-telling pairs. The collective statements made truth-telling pairs provide significantly more checkable details that demonstrated they were together in comparison to the individual statements, whereas no effect was obtained for lying pairs. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves revealed high accuracy rates for discriminating between truths and lies using the verifiability approach across all statement types. Experiment 2 was a lie detection study whereby observers' abilities to discriminate between truths and lies using the verifiability approach were examined. This revealed that applying the verifiability approach to collective statements improved observers' ability to accurately detect deceit. We suggest that the verifiability approach could be used as a lie detection technique and that law enforcement policies should consider implementing collective interviewing.
       
  • Text segmentation ability predicts future reading efficiency in
           Spanish-speaking children
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Rosario Torres-Díaz, Raysil Mosquera Suárez, Marlis Ontivero Ortega, Yuniel Romero Quintana, Eduardo González Alemañy, Aymee Alvarez-Rivero, José A. Ojeda Núñez, Brenda Peón López, Belkis Recio Morales, Mitchell Valdés-SosaAbstractCan the ability to parse unspaced texts (measured by a Text Segmentation Task, TST) index and predict reading efficiency in Spanish-speaking children' A sample of 1112 children (1st to 6th grade) was assessed. Additionally, two subsamples (51 children of 4th–5th grades and 71 children of 1st grade) were followed up. Our results indicate that the TST: a) reflects the acquisition of reading over primary school grades; b) reflects the teacher's judgment about the child's reading development; c) accurately predicts oral reading efficiency one and four years later year, in the former case even after removing the contributions of the IQ and oral reading speed. These results indicate that TST can be used to both index present -and predict future- reading achievements.
       
  • Judging the order of numbers relies on familiarity rather than activating
           the mental number line
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Francesco Sella, Delphine Sasanguie, Bert ReynvoetAbstractA series of effects characterises the processing of symbolic numbers (i.e., distance effect, size effect, SNARC effect, size congruency effect). The combination of these effects supports the view that numbers are represented on a compressed and spatially oriented mental number line (MNL) as well as the presence of an interaction between numerical and other magnitude representations. However, when individuals process the order of digits, response times are faster when the distance between digits is small (e.g., 1-2-3) compared to large (e.g., 1-3-5; i.e., reversed distance effect), suggesting that the processing of magnitude and order may be distinct. Here, we investigated whether the effects related to the MNL also emerge in the processing of symbolic number ordering. In Experiment 1, participants judged whether three digits were presented in order while spatial distance, numerical distance, numerical size, and the side of presentation were manipulated. Participants were faster in determining the ascending order of small triplets compared to large ones (i.e., size effect) and faster when the numerical distance between digits was small (i.e., reversed distance effect). In Experiment 2, we explored the size effect across all possible consecutive triplets between 1 and 9 and the effect that physical size has on order processing. Participants showed faster reactions times only for the triplet 1-2-3 compared to the other triplets, and the effect of physical magnitude was negligible. Symbolic order processing lacks the signatures of the MNL and suggests the presence of a familiarity effect related to well-known consecutive triplets in the long-term memory.
       
  • You may be more original than you think: Predictable biases in
           self-assessment of originality
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Yael Sidi, Ilan Torgovitsky, Daniela Soibelman, Ella Miron-Spektor, Rakefet AckermanAbstractHow accurate are individuals in judging the originality of their own ideas' Most metacognitive research has focused on well-defined tasks, such as learning, memory, and problem solving, providing limited insight into ill-defined tasks. The present study introduces a novel metacognitive self-judgment of originality, defined as assessments of the uniqueness of an idea in a given context. In three experiments, we examined the reliability, potential biases, and factors affecting originality judgments. Using an ideation task, designed to assess the ability to generate multiple divergent ideas, we show that people accurately acknowledge the serial order effect—judging later ideas as more original than earlier ideas. However, they systematically underestimate their ideas' originality. We employed a manipulation for affecting actual originality level, which did not affect originality judgments, and another one designed to affect originality judgments, which did not affect actual originality performance. This double dissociation between judgments and performance calls for future research to expose additional factors underlying originality judgments.
       
  • Local context effects in the magnitude-duration illusion: Size but not
           numerical value sequentially alters perceived duration
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Jordan J. Wehrman, David M. Kaplan, Paul F. SowmanAbstractMany aspects of an event can change perceived duration. A common example of this is the magnitude-duration illusion, in which a high magnitude (e.g. large or high value) stimulus will be perceived to last longer than a low magnitude stimulus. The effects of magnitude on perceived duration are normally considered in terms of global context effects; what is large depends on the stimuli used throughout the experiment. In the current article, we examine local context effects in the magnitude-duration illusion, how trial-by-trial changes in magnitude affect the subjective duration of an event. We performed two experiments in which numerical magnitude and stimulus size were varied within either the example phase or reproduction phase of a temporal reproduction task. We showed that in the current trial the combined value-size magnitude presented in the example phase affected subsequent reproductions, while the magnitude presented in the reproduction phase did not. The size magnitude presented in the reproduction phase also affected the reproduction in the following trial, such that a larger stimulus in the current reproduction phase resulted in shorter reproductions in the next reproduction phase. This indicates that low level stimulus properties (i.e. size) can act to contextualize subsequent stimulus properties, which in turn affect perceived duration. The findings of our experiments add local, low-level, context effects to the known modifiers of perceived duration, as well as provide evidence with regards to the role of magnitude in interval timing.
       
  • Time for a true display of skill: Top players in League of Legends have
           better executive control
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 204Author(s): Xiangqian Li, Liang Huang, Bingxin Li, Haoran Wang, Chengyang HanAbstractResearch into the effects of action video gaming on cognition has largely relied on self-reported action video game experience and extended video game training. Only a few studies have focused on participants' actual gaming skills. However, whether superior players and average players have different executive control is still not fully demonstrated. This study had top-ranking League of Legends players (global top 0.17%; N = 35) and average-ranking League of Legends players (N = 35) perform two cognitive tasks that aimed to measure three aspects of executive functioning: cognitive flexibility, interference control, and impulsive control. We controlled self-reported gaming experience, so that top-ranking players and average-ranking players had similar years of play and hours of play per week. We found that compared to a group of average players, top players showed smaller task-switching costs and smaller response-congruency effects in a Stroop-switching test. In a continuous performance test, top players indicated higher hit rates and lower false alarm rates as compared to average players. These findings suggest that top players have better cognitive flexibility and more accurate control of interference in the context of task-switching. Moreover, top players exhibit better impulsive control. The present study provides evidence that players' gaming skills rather than gaming experience are related to cognitive abilities, which may explain why previous studies on self-reported gaming experience and those assessing supervised training and cognitive performance have shown inconsistent results.
       
  • Involuntary attentional shifts as a function of set and processing fluency
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Katelyn Gardner, Erica B. Walker, Yanming Li, Adam Gazzaley, Ezequiel MorsellaAbstractIn laboratory tasks, involuntary cognitions of various kinds (e.g., mental imagery) have been elicited by external stimuli. These effects reveal, among other things, the capacities of involuntary processes. In most cases, these cognitions do not require, for their generation, executive functions such as a shift in selective attention. In Experiment 1, subjects were presented with a clock of 12 words in the stead of numbers and were instructed to focus on the center of the screen and to not count the number of letters of a word at a certain location. Involuntary counting of the critical word occurred on 39% of the trials. This effect requires an involuntary shift of attention. Experiment 2, involving Chinese ideographs, concerned the effect of stimulus fidelity and processing fluency. Native English speakers and a separate group of subjects who could read Chinese ideographs were presented with an array similar to that of Experiment 1 and instructed to not read any of the words. Some words were easy to read (e.g., regular Chinese words and English words), and some words were more difficult to read (e.g., Chinese “loan” words and English pseudowords). For the subjects who could read Chinese ideographs, more involuntary reading occurred for regular ideographs than for loan words. For the Native English speakers, comparable effects were found with the English stimuli. Together, these studies reveal that attentional phenomena of this kind can be influenced involuntarily and systematically through external control.
       
  • Do my hands prime your hands' The hand-to-response correspondence
           effect
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Elisa Scerrati, Cristina Iani, Luisa Lugli, Roberto Nicoletti, Sandro RubichiAbstractPrevious research has shown an effect of handle-response correspondence on key-press responses when participants judged the upright or inverted orientation of photographed one-handled graspable objects. In three experiments, we explored whether this effect still holds for symmetric graspable objects that are usually grasped by two hands (i.e. two-handled objects; e.g. shears). In Experiments 1 and 2, participants were required to perform a between-hand response in order to categorize cooking or amusement objects appearing as grasped from either an allocentric (Experiment 1) or an egocentric perspective (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, they were required to perform a within-hand response to categorize the same stimuli appearing as grasped from an egocentric perspective. Across all three experiments, results showed that categorization was more difficult when the objects were displayed as grasped on the opposite side than the response rather than on the same side. We discuss the implications of these results for theories of action potentiation and spatial coding and suggest that different mechanisms may be recruited depending on the required action (i.e. response mode).
       
  • Sex differences in implicit motor imagery: Evidence from the hand
           laterality task
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Massimiliano Conson, Francesco De Bellis, Chiara Baiano, Isa Zappullo, Gennaro Raimo, Carmela Finelli, Ines Ruggiero, Monica Positano, The UNICAMPSY18 group, Luigi TrojanoAbstractBehavioural evidence suggest that males outperform females in mentally transforming objects, whereas whether sex differences exist in mentally transforming body part images (implicit motor imagery) is an open issue. The aim of the present study was to fill this gap testing performance of 360 healthy participants on a classical behavioural measure of implicit motor imagery: the hand laterality task. Participants had to judge handedness of hand images portrayed from back and palm and presented in different spatial orientations. Two main findings emerged. First, males were significantly faster than females in judging hands portrayed from palm, in particular left palms at 0°, 90° and 180° orientation, whereas females were faster than males in judging backs, in particular left and right backs at 0° and the left back at 90°. Second, both males and females showed a significant biomechanical effect (faster responses for hands portrayed in medial vs. lateral positions) while judging palms, albeit the effect was stronger in males, whereas only females showed a significant biomechanical effect when judging backs. Thus, males and females seem to differently exploit motor simulation processes during mental transformation of hand images depending on a specific familiarity with body parts portrayed from different views. This result might be taken into account when tailoring motor imagery tasks in applied contexts, as motor rehabilitation.
       
  • Are Superficially Dissimilar Analogs better retrieved than Superficially
           Similar Disanalogs'
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Lucas Raynal, Evelyne Clément, Emmanuel SanderAbstractIn the present study, we tested the assumption that structural similarity overcomes surface similarity in the retrieval of past events, by observing whether structural similarity alone is a better cue than surface similarity alone. To do so, in four story-recall experiments, we provided the participants with multiple source stories and then with a target cue story. This target cue only shared either surface or structural similarity with the source stories. In Experiment 1A, a Superficially Similar Disanalog source story (SSD) and a Superficially Dissimilar Analog source story (SDA) were presented among Superficially Dissimilar Disanalog source stories (SDDs). A soundness rating task was used in Experiment 1B to control the absence of structural similarity among the SSDs presented in Experiment 1A. In Experiment 2, the number of SSDs was increased in the aim to reproduce more ecological conditions. In two further experiments, a five minute (Experiment 3) and a 45 minute (Experiment 4) delay was introduced, and supplementary source stories were presented, in order to make the study more similar to previous story-recall paradigms. The results of the four story-recall experiments support the dominance of structural over surface similarities in analogical retrieval. The role of a structurally-based access regarding the retrieval of Superficially Similar Analogs (SSAs) and SDAs is discussed, as well as the factors underlying the rare occurrence of SDAs retrievals in previous experiments.
       
  • How readers process syntactic input depends on their goals
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Aaron Vandendaele, Mathieu Declerck, Jonathan Grainger, Joshua SnellAbstractDuring reading, the recognition of words is influenced by the syntactic compatibility of surrounding words: a sentence-superiority effect. However, when the goal is to make syntactic categorization decisions about single target words, these decisions are influenced by the syntactic congruency rather than compatibility of surrounding words. Although both these premises imply that readers can extract syntactic information from multiple words in parallel, they also suggest that how the brain organizes syntactic input—and consequently how surrounding stimuli affect word recognition—depends on the reader's top-down goals. The present study provides a direct test of this conception. Participants were offered nouns and verbs amidst a grammatical context (‘this horse fell’) and ungrammatical context (‘fell horse this’). Using a conditional task setup, we manipulated the amount of emphasis put on respectively sentences and single words. In two blocks readers were instructed to make sentence grammaticality judgments only if the middle word was respectively noun or verb; in two other blocks readers were instructed to syntactically categorize the middle word only if the sentence was respectively correct or incorrect. We established an interaction effect whereby the impact of grammatical correctness on syntactic categorization decisions was greater than the effect of grammatical correctness per se. This first sentence-superiority effect in the categorization of single words, combined with the absence of this effect in prior flanker studies, leads us to surmise that word-to-word syntactic constraints only operate if the reader is engaged in sentence processing.
       
  • Cognitive load reduces interference by head fakes in basketball
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Iris Güldenpenning, Wilfried Kunde, Matthias WeigeltAbstractThe head fake in basketball is a deceptive action in sports, where an attacking basketball player gazes in one direction (irrelevant component), but passes the ball to the opposite direction (relevant component). A defending player, who aims to respond to the relevant information displayed by the opponent, faces a situation conceptually similar to well-known interference paradigms (e.g., Stroop task, Eriksen flanker task). Previous research has shown that responses to pass directions are slower and more error prone for head fakes than for direct passes (so called head-fake effect). The head-fake effect depends on participants' ability to focus attention on the relevant stimulus feature. As maintaining this attentional focus conceivably bears on limited capacities, we tested if taxing these capacities by a cognitively demanding concurrent task would change the impact of task-irrelevant information and thus, the size of the head-fake effect. Moreover, we investigated the impact of such a concurrent task on post-conflict control (i.e., the congruency sequence effect). The results show that a concurrent task reduces the head-fake effect, while post-conflict control was unaffected. We discuss these findings with regard to the relationship of working memory processes and selective attention.
       
  • Combining visual and haptic practice significantly reduced deviations in
           haptic parallelity matching
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Hanneke I. Van MierAbstractNumerous studies have shown that making two bars parallel to each other in the haptic domain results in (often) large and systematic errors. This is most likely due to the biasing influence of the egocentric reference frame. Even presenting participants with either haptic or visual information about parallelity or direct error feedback did not result in veridical performance. The present study was set up to assess to what extent haptic performance could be improved by providing combined visual and haptic practice. Thirty-two participants (sixteen females and males) used their dominant hand to make a test bar parallel to a reference bar located at the side of the non-dominant hand. Haptic sessions (in which participants were blindfolded and had to perceive parallelity using their hands) were alternated with visual sessions (in which they could physically see both bars and could also use their eyes to perceive parallelity on the test bar without feeling the reference bar) over a series of eleven sessions. Results showed that performance in the haptic condition significantly improved as an effect of visual practice. This effect was similar in both genders. While gender differences were significant in the haptic condition, with male participants outperforming female participants, this was not the case in the visual condition. However, veridical performance was not obtained in the haptic condition for each gender and deviations were significantly larger than in the visual condition, replicating earlier findings of a rather robust influence of the egocentric reference frame in haptic parallelity matching.
       
  • On the time course of spatial cueing: Dissociating between a set for fast
           reorienting and a set for cue-target segregation
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Elisa Martín-Arévalo, María Jesús Funes, Juan LupiáñezAbstractThe present study tests whether two different manipulations leading to an earlier appearance of Inhibition of Return might operate by setting the system in different ways. Whereas the use of a range of very long SOAs has been proposed to set the system for an early reorienting of attention (Cheal & Chastain, 2002), introducing a distractor at the location opposite the target seems to induce a set to represent the cue and the target as separated events instead of the same event (Lupiáñez et al., 1999, 2001). The effects of these two manipulations were directly compared by using a spatial stroop paradigm. Although both manipulations altered the time course of cueing effects, we report here a pattern of critical dissociations: (i) the distractor manipulation was unique in introducing a shift towards more negative cueing affecting generally all levels of SOA, including the shortest 100 ms SOA; and (ii) the distractor manipulation, but not the range of SOAs, was also able to prevent the expected interaction between spatial stroop effects and cueing effects at the shortest SOA, typically found in previous experiments in the absence of a distractor (Funes et al., 2003). This pattern of dissociations is well accommodated into the hypothesis that these two attentional sets are different in nature.
       
  • The motor system (partially) deceives body representation biases in
           absence of visual correcting cues
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Valeria Peviani, Jessica Liotta, Gabriella BottiniAbstractThe internal models of our body dimensions are prone to bias, but little evidence exists to explain how the motor system achieves fine-grained control despite these distortions. Previous work showed that the hand representation, assessed in a dynamic task (Proprioceptive Matching Task), was less distorted compared to that measured through a static body representation task (Localization Task), suggesting that either the hand representation was updated or the motor trajectory was adjusted during movement. The present study set out to shed light on this phenomenon by administering the Localization Task before and after either the Proprioceptive Matching Task or a control condition in a within-subjects design. Our results showed that hand map biases decreased during the Proprioceptive Matching Task, but that this increase in accuracy did not carry over to the Localization Task. In other words, more accurate performance in the dynamic body representation task does not reflect a change in how the hand is represented. Rather, it likely reflects a refinement of the motor trajectory, due to the integration of multisensory information, providing interesting insights into how the motor system partially overcomes biases in body representations.
       
  • Higher-order processing and change-to-automaticity as explanations of the
           item-position effect in reasoning tests
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Karl Schweizer, Florian Zeller, Siegbert ReißAbstractHigher-order processing and learning are two alternative explanations of the item-position effect. Whereas higher-order processing as explanation emphasizes the recruitment of executive processes, learning as explanation highlights the improvement in performance due to repetition and is specified as change-to-automaticity. In a sample of 287 participants the item-position effect was captured by means of Advanced Progressive Matrices. Higher-order processing was inferred from rule acquisition, and change-to-automaticity was derived from sustained attention data. The results of independent investigations revealed that both higher-order processing and change-to-automaticity contributed to the occurrence of the item-position effect.
       
  • The self-generated full body illusion is accompanied by impaired detection
           of somatosensory stimuli
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Lieke M.J. Swinkels, Hein T. van Schie, Harm Veling, Arjan C. ter Horst, Ap DijksterhuisAbstractResearch has found that body illusions may be accompanied by consequences for the real body whereby various somatosensory and homeostatic bodily functions may be impaired. These findings stem from research where an experimenter induced the body illusions. In line with advances in the domains of videogames and virtual reality where the real body is used as a controller we investigate if these consequences also accompany self-generated body illusions. In two preregistered experiments we made use of a head-mounted display set-up to induce the full body illusion (FBI) whereby touch is felt to originate from a 3PP body, and examined effects in the simple detection of supra-threshold vibrotactile stimuli presented to the participants' back and head. Results of both experiments indicate that it is possible to induce a FBI through self-stroking of the neck and that the FBI is accompanied by reduced accuracy and delayed reaction times in detection of somatosensory stimuli. In an additional preregistered control experiment the alternative explanation that a difference in motion presented in the conditions was responsible for these findings was ruled out. Our findings corroborate previous studies that have found body illusions to be accompanied by bodily consequences and further extend these findings to the domain of self-induced body illusions. These results are relevant for video games and VR setups that are geared towards virtual embodiment as they advance our understanding of the conditions and mechanisms in which bodily consequences may express themselves.
       
  • The form of a ‘half-baked’ creative idea: Empirical explorations into
           the structure of ill-defined mental representations
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Victoria S. Scotney, Jasmine Schwartz, Nicole Carbert, Adam Saab, Liane GaboraAbstractCreative thought is conventionally believed to involve searching memory and generating multiple independent candidate ideas followed by selection and refinement of the most promising. Honing theory, which grew out of the quantum approach to describing how concepts interact, posits that what appears to be discrete, separate ideas are actually different projections of the same underlying mental representation, which can be described as a superposition state, and which may take different outward forms when reflected upon from different perspectives. As creative thought proceeds, this representation loses potentiality to be viewed from different perspectives and manifest as different outcomes. Honing theory yields different predictions from conventional theories about the mental representation of an idea midway through the creative process. These predictions were pitted against one another in two studies: one closed-ended and one open-ended. In the first study, participants were interrupted midway through solving an analogy problem and wrote down what they were thinking in terms of a solution. In the second, participants were instructed to create a painting that expressed their true essence and describe how they conceived of the painting. For both studies, naïve judges categorized these responses as supportive of either the conventional view or the honing theory view. The results of both studies were significantly more consistent with the predictions of honing theory. Some implications for creative cognition, and cognition in general, are discussed.
       
  • The relationships between musical expertise and divergent thinking
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Massimiliano Palmiero, Paola Guariglia, Rosalia Crivello, Laura PiccardiAbstractMusical expertise has positive effects on cognition, especially on verbal and linguistic processing. In this study the relationships between musical expertise, not involving improvisation training, and divergent thinking were explored. Expert and self-taught musicians were tested in musical, verbal and visual divergent thinking, and were compared with a group of non-musicians in verbal and visual divergent thinking. The musical task required to generate many different pieces of music using the incipit of ‘Happy Birthday’ as a starting point; the verbal task required to list unusual uses for a cardboard box; the visual task asked to complete drawings adding details to basic stimuli. For each task fluency flexibility and originality scores were measured. Based on these scores, musical, verbal and visual creative indices were computed. In general, expert musicians showed higher creative indices in musical and verbal domains than self-taught musicians and in verbal creative index than non-musicians. No group difference was found in terms of visual creative index. These findings confirm that musical expertise enhances not only musical divergent thinking but also verbal divergent thinking, probably supporting the semantic associative modes of processing and improving verbal working memory, which facilitates the online recombination of information in new ways. This effect seems to be specifically supported by formal musical training. The lack of the association between musical expertise and visual divergent thinking, as well as future research directions, are discussed.
       
  • Long-lasting positive effects of collaborative remembering on false
           assents to misleading questions
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Clelia Rossi-Arnaud, Pietro Spataro, Divya Bhatia, Fabrizio Doricchi, Serena Mastroberardino, Vincenzo CestariAbstractPrevious studies showed that collaborative remembering can reduce false memories through a process of mutual error checking, although conclusions were limited by the nature of the memory tasks (very few errors). The present experiments extend these findings to eyewitness memory by using a paradigm designed to increase the frequency of memory errors. Collaborative and nominal pairs viewed a video-clip illustrating a bank robbery, provided an immediate free recall, were forced to confabulate answers to false-event questions, and, after a short- (1 h: Experiment 1) or a long-term delay (1 week: Experiment 2), were administered a yes/no recognition task in which the misleading statements either matched the questions presented in the confabulation phase (answered questions) or not (control questions). Collaborative pairs recalled fewer correct details in the immediate free recall task, replicating the negative effects of collaborative inhibition. Most importantly, in the final recognition test, collaborative pairs were less likely to provide false assents to misleading statements, regardless of whether they had provided a response to the related false-event questions 1 h or 1 week earlier. Our results suggest that collaboration can increase the eyewitnesses' tendency to check the accuracy of others' responses and reject false memories through discussion.
       
  • Sandwiched visual stimuli are perceived as shorter than the stimulus alone
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Riku AsaokaAbstractA visual stimulus is perceived as shorter when a short sound is presented immediately before and after the visual target than when the visual target appears alone. It remains unclear whether the time compression occurs in an intramodal condition. Therefore, the present study examined how and when non-target sandwiching stimuli affect the perceived filled duration of target visual stimuli. We further hypothesized that this effect could be modulated by temporal and spatial proximity between the target and non-target stimuli. Experiments 1a, 1b, and 2 showed that non-target stimuli could decrease the perceived duration only when the inter-stimulus interval between these stimuli was 0 ms, using time reproduction and category estimation methods. Experiments 3 revealed that the time compression effect did not occur when both the non-target preceding and trailing stimuli were spatially distinct from the target. Experiment 4 demonstrated that either the preceding or trailing stimulus induced the time compression effect when the non-target stimuli were presented at the same position as the target stimuli. We discuss the implications of the time compression effect induced by non-target sandwiching stimuli with reference to the Scalar Expectancy Theory and the Neural Readout Model. We speculated that the attenuation of neural responses to the target via visual masking or perceptual grouping may be attributable to the time compression effect.
       
  • Failures of executive function when at a height: Negative height-related
           appraisals are associated with poor executive function during a virtual
           height stressor
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Vera E. Newman, Belinda J. Liddell, Tom Beesley, Steven B. MostAbstractIt is difficult to maintain cognitive functioning in threatening contexts, even when it is imperative to do so. Research indicates that precarious situations can impair subsequent executive functioning, depending on whether they are appraised as threatening. Here, we used virtual reality to place participants at ground level or at a virtual height in order to examine the impact of a threat-related context on concurrent executive function and whether this relationship was modulated by negative appraisals of heights. Executive function was assessed via the Go/NoGo and N-Back tasks, indexing response inhibition and working memory updating respectively. Participants with negative appraisals of heights exhibited impaired executive function on both tasks when performing at a virtual height (i.e., a threat-related context) but not at ground-level, demonstrating the importance of considering the cognitive consequences of individual differences in negative interpretations of emotionally-evocative situations. We suggest that a virtual reality approach holds practical benefits for understanding how individuals are able to maintain cognitive ability when embedded within threatening situations.
       
  • Approach motivational orientation enhances malevolent creativity
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 203Author(s): Ning Hao, Xinuo Qiao, Rui Cheng, Kelong Lu, Mengying Tang, Mark A. RuncoAbstractThree studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between motivation and malevolent creativity (MC). In Study 1, participants completed motivation scales and a measure of MC in online formats. Results showed that approach motivation accurately predicted MC, whereas avoidance motivation was negatively related to MC. In Study 2, participants solved MC problems in either approach or avoidance motivation conditions. Analyses revealed higher MC in the approach than in the avoidance motivation condition. In Study 3, participants were further asked to solve MC problems in one of the following conditions: approach-success/approach-failure/avoidance-success/avoidance-failure. The beneficial effects of approach motivation over avoidance motivation were again observed. Moreover, the experience of ‘no closure’ (failure in doing something) enhanced individual MC performance and counteracted the negative impact of avoidance motivation on MC. These findings indicate that individual MC performance might be enhanced by approach motivation and the experience of ‘no closure’.
       
 
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