for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3155 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3155 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 96, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 411, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 154, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 64)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 400, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 347, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 456, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 216, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 180, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
Acta Psychologica
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.331
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 28  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0001-6918
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3155 journals]
  • Lifting, tasting, and carrying: The interaction of magnitude and valence
           effects in time perception
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 193Author(s): Meichao Zhang, Aitao Lu, Bert H. Hodges Magnitude effects (e.g., heavier or faster is longer) and valence effects (e.g., negative > positive) are widely observed in time perception studies, but not well understood. In four experiments, we explored how different action contexts (e.g., tasting, lifting) affected magnitude and valence effects. In two experiments a valence effect occurred: Tasting a sweet food (watermelon) led to temporal underestimations relative to a neutral stimulus, while sour and bitter foods led to overestimations. However, when the same foods were presented in a lifting context a magnitude effect occurred: Reproduced times for the heavier food (watermelon) were overestimated relative to the lighter foods. In a fourth experiment magnitude and valence interacted: Imagining tasting increasing amounts of lemon or carrying increasing loads of lemon, both negative, yielded magnitude effects; however, imagining carrying lemons to feed malnourished people, which was positive, did not. Results present challenges for several common theoretical approaches (e.g., arousal, attention, common magnitude theory) but provide support for affordance theory and perceptual salience theory. Timing depends on action relevance and is jointly shaped by valence and magnitude.
       
  • A singleton distractor updates the inhibitory template for visual marking
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Kenji Yamauchi, Jun I. Kawahara Visual marking, which is based on the assumption that previewing some distractors increases the efficiency of subsequent visual searches, constitutes one of the most efficient inhibitions on visual searches. The preview search task consists of a display of a subset of distractors followed by an additional display containing the remaining distractors and a target. During the preview period, an inhibitory template is thought to be formed, resulting in the prioritization of the subsequently presented items and the inhibition of the previewed items. Although the previous studies have mainly examined the determinants that impair the inhibitory templates resulting in inefficient visual searches, the present study examined the possibility that the template could be updated to increase search efficiency. To this end, we used a preview search task and manipulated the presence of a singleton distractor in the display of the additional items. We examined whether the singleton increased the efficiency of the search performance by determining if the inhibitory template would be updated such that participants would treat the singleton as if it had been previewed. The results demonstrated that the response times were faster with the singleton included, suggesting that an inhibitory template for visual marking could be updated and lead to improved search performance.
       
  • Pedal and haptic estimates of slant suggest a common underlying
           representation
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Dennis M. Shaffer, Kirsten M. Greer, Jackson T. Schaffer, Meghan Burkhardt, Ky Mattingly, Brandon Short, Cage Cramer It is well known that people verbally exaggerate the slant of visually perceived geographical, virtual, and man-made hills. More recently it has been shown that haptic and verbal estimates of slant result in similar exaggerations, supporting the proprioception calibration hypothesis—that similar biases exist in both verbal estimates of visually perceived slant and proprioceptively perceived hand orientation. This seems to point to a common underlying representation of slant.However, it is unclear if and how manual proprioceptive estimates might be relevant for perception of ground surface slant or how this might translate to pedal perception of surface orientation. In the current work we tested whether pedal perception is systematically connected to a representational system shared by haptic and visual perception. We did this by having people orient their foot to four different orientations of a ramp (Experiment 1) or to a staircase (Experiment 2) and compared these to estimates made using a free hand measure as well as to verbal estimates. Our results show that verbal, haptic, and pedal measures of visually perceived surface orientation all result in similar estimates of slant and do so across different slanted surfaces. This suggests that verbal and haptic proprioceptive estimates tap into a representational system of visually perceived surface orientation that is relevant for walking up various surface orientations.
       
  • Can sustained attention adapt to prior cognitive effort' An evidence
           from experimental study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Anna Kamza, Marta Molińska, Nina Skrzypska, Piotr Długiewicz According to the limited resources paradigm, prior cognitive effort should result in a temporary depletion of available cognitive resources (Kahneman, 1973). Some recent evidence however has proved an opposite effect of increment in the availability of cognitive resources as a function of prior cognitive effort. In the current study the follow-up effect of cognitive effort on sustained attention was examined. Eighty-nine participants took part in the experiment. The cognitive load was manipulated between subjects using three versions of the DIVA Task (intensive warming-up condition, moderate warming-up condition and the control one). Following the experimental manipulation, the availability of cognitive resources during vigilance task was checked. Some significant effects of experimental manipulation were observed. First, in the context of overall task performance, subjects from the intensive warming-up condition obtained lower total errors rate than subjects from the control one. Some moderate effect of cognitive warming-up on time-on-task performance was also observed, although it was isolated to false alarms rate. Those results, tentatively suggesting the occurrence of the cognitive warming-up effect in vigilance performance, are then discussed.PsycINFO classification categories and codes2300 Human Experimental Psychology: 2346 Attention
       
  • Gaze-cueing and endogenous attention operate in parallel
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Gillian Slessor, Ailbhe Finnerty, Jessika Papp, Daniel T. Smith, Douglas Martin The present research assessed the nature of endogenous shifts of attention based on internally generated expectations (i.e., target location probability) and involuntary attention shifts following eye-gaze cues from line-drawings of schematic faces (Experiment 1) and photographs of real neutral faces (Experiment 2) and fearful faces (Experiment 3). The time-course of these two forms of attention was explored by manipulating the gaze-target SOA (i.e., 100 ms, 200 ms, 300 ms). In all three experiments, target location probability influenced responding at each SOA with faster responses to high probability than low probability targets. However, the time-course of involuntary attention shifts was dependent on the gaze-cueing stimulus employed. For photographs of neutral gaze, endogenous orienting of attention was most efficient at the briefest SOA with involuntary attention shifts emerging later. However, both schematic and fearful gaze-cues influenced responding across all SOAs, which is indicative of stronger gaze-cueing effects from these cues. At 200 ms there was an additive effect as responses were slowest when the target had been invalidly cued by neutral gaze and also appeared in the low probability location. Taken together these findings suggest that these forms of involuntary and endogenous attention can operate in parallel and relatively independently, but can show potentially differing levels of influence, dependent on the time course in which they take to operate.
       
  • Two components of the Indo-Arabic numerical size effect
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Petia Kojouharova, Attila Krajcsi In the symbolic number comparison task, the size effect (better performance for small than for large numbers) is usually interpreted as the result of the more general ratio effect, in line with Weber's law. In alternative models, the size effect might be a result of stimulus frequency: smaller numbers are more frequent, and more frequent stimuli are easier to process. It has been demonstrated earlier, that in artificial new number digits, the size effect reflects the frequencies of those digits. In the present work we investigate whether frequency also directs the size effect in Indo-Arabic numbers, in which notation, unlike in new symbols, the frequencies are already firmly established for the participants. We found that frequency has an effect on the size effect in Indo-Arabic notation, but this influence is limited. However, this limited size effect change is acquired fast at the beginning of the session. We argue that these results are more in line with the frequency-based accounts of the size effect.
       
  • Unpacking, summing and anchoring in retrospective time estimation
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Michael M. Roy, Tatem Burns, Joseph R. Radzevick We examined whether or not interventions that have been used to try to influence predictions of future task duration – unpacking, summing and anchoring – had a similar effect on retrospective estimations of duration. In three studies, participants experienced a number of short stimuli, such as watching videos, before estimating the duration for each of the stimuli and the overall duration. The first estimation given served as an anchor for all following estimates. If the first estimation was highly biased in one direction, then subsequent estimates were more likely to also be biased in the same direction. Additionally, separate estimates for a number of individual tasks differed from the estimates for all of the tasks combined. This incongruity happened even though all estimates were given in sequence. Overall, results indicated that memories of past task duration could be influenced by the manner in which they were elicited.
       
  • The sound of beauty: How complexity determines aesthetic preference
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Jeroen Delplanque, Esther De Loof, Clio Janssens, Tom Verguts Stimulus complexity is an important determinant of aesthetic preference. An influential idea is that increases in stimulus complexity lead to increased preference up to an optimal point after which preference decreases (inverted-U pattern). However, whereas some studies indeed observed this pattern, most studies instead showed an increased preference for more complexity. One complicating issue is that it remains unclear how to define complexity. To address this, we approached complexity and its relation to aesthetic preference from a predictive coding perspective. Here, low- and high-complexity stimuli would correspond to low and high levels of prediction errors, respectively. We expected participants to prefer stimuli which are neither too easy to predict (low prediction error), nor too difficult (high prediction error). To test this, we presented two sequences of tones on each trial that varied in predictability from highly regular (low prediction error) to completely random (high prediction error), and participants had to indicate which of the two sequences they preferred in a two-interval forced-choice task. The complexity of each tone sequence (amount of prediction error) was estimated using entropy. Results showed that participants tended to choose stimuli with intermediate complexity over those of high or low complexity. This confirms the century-old idea that stimulus complexity has an inverted-U relationship to aesthetic preference.
       
  • Facial expressions yielding Context-Dependent Effect: The additive
           contribution of eye movements
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Eli Vakil, Skye McDonald, Samantha K. Allen, Noa Vardi-Shapiro This study tested Context-Dependent Effect (CDE) on face recognition by viewing facial expressions as context and face identity as the target. Three groups were defined - Neutral, Happy and Angry, reflecting the facial expressions of the faces presented at the study phase. At the study phase, participants were presented with 42 color photos of faces for 5 s each. At the test phase, participants were presented with 84 pictures of faces, half of which had been viewed beforehand (old). One-third of the old and new faces displayed the same facial expression shown at study, and the remaining two-thirds had one of the other two expressions. Behavioral results show that consistency of facial expressions between study and test facilitated face recognition (i.e., CDE). Eye-tracking results showed that lengthier focus on a face at the study phase gives the participant an advantage only when the same face is presented again at the test phase. Angry expressions intensify binding more than happy or neutral expressions, resulting in higher costs when changing facial expression between study and test. The theoretical implications of these results in terms of the relationship between facial identity and facial expression are discussed. The practical implications, particularly for eyewitness memory literature, are also discussed.
       
  • Multiple representations in visual working memory simultaneously guide
           attention: The type of memory-matching representation matters
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Lingxia Fan, Mengdan Sun, Mengsi Xu, Zhiai Li, Liuting Diao, Xuemin Zhang Whether multiple visual working memory (VWM) representations can simultaneously become active templates to guide attention is controversial. The single-item-template hypothesis argues that only one VWM representation can be active at a time, whereas the multiple-item-template hypothesis argues that multiple VWM templates can simultaneously guide attention. The present study examined the two hypotheses in three (out of four) experiments, using three different types of memory objects: Experiment 1: shapes; Experiment 2: colors; and Experiment 3: colored shapes. Participants were required to hold one (memory-1) or two objects (memory-2) in VWM while performing a tilted line search task. Zero (match-0), one (match-1), or two (match-2) memory stimuli reappeared as distractors in the search array. Guidance effects were found for each type of memory stimuli. More importantly, the guidance effect for memory-2/match-2 trials was significantly larger than that for memory-2/match-1 and memory-1/match-1 trials when holding two colors or two colored shapes in VWM, which is in line with the multiple-item-template hypothesis. However, the pattern of simultaneous guidance effect is not perfectly found for two memory shapes, which may indicate that a reliable simultaneous guidance effect from two representations in VWM can be observed only when the memory-matching stimuli is more effective in guiding attention. Experiment 4 directly compared the guidance effect induced by feature-based matches (partial matching) with the guidance effect induced object-based matches (complete matching) in memory-set-size 2. Reliable guidance effects in match-1 and match-2 trials for object-based matches but not for feature-based matches confirmed the crucial role of the type of memory-matching stimuli in guiding attention.
       
  • What if my colleague was wrong and I was right' The impact of
           counterfactual mindsets and interpersonal focus on written communication
           and decision making in a hidden profile task
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Lara Ditrich, Florian Landkammer, Kai Sassenberg Past research on counterfactual mindsets (CFMs) has mainly focused on how those influence dealing with own information, without addressing the potential impact of CFMs on responses to others' information. Thus, this study examined how CFMs combined with an interpersonal focus influence responses to others' statements in a decision making context. Results reveal that a CFM combined with an interpersonal focus leads to more biased communication in response to others' information, thereby reinforcing own preferences. No such effect was observed in an intrapersonal focus or a control condition. A congruency between induction and application context thus seems to make the application of CFMs more likely. We discuss our findings in relation to previous work on counterfactual thinking and the mindset literature in general.
       
  • Reliability of triggering inhibitory process is a better predictor of
           impulsivity than SSRT
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Patrick Skippen, Dora Matzke, Andrew Heathcote, William Ross Fulham, Patricia Michie, Frini Karayanidis The ability to control behaviour is thought to rely at least partly on adequately suppressing impulsive responses to external stimuli. However, the evidence for a relationship between response inhibition ability and impulse control is weak and inconsistent. This study investigates the relationship between response inhibition and both self-report and behavioural measures of impulsivity as well as engagement in risky behaviours in a large community sample (N = 174) of healthy adolescents and young adults (15–35 years). Using a stop-signal paradigm with a number parity go task, we implemented a novel hierarchical Bayesian model of response inhibition that estimates stop-signal reaction time (SSRT) as a distribution and also accounts for failures to react to the stop-signal (i.e., “trigger failure”), and failure to react to the choice stimulus (i.e., “go failure” or omission errors). In line with previous studies, the model reduced estimates of SSRT by approximately 100 ms compared with traditional non-parametric SSRT estimation techniques. We found significant relationships between behavioural and self-report measures of impulsivity and traditionally estimated SSRT, that did not hold for the model-based SSRT estimates. Instead, behavioural impulsivity measures were correlated with rate of trigger failure. The relationship between trigger failure and impulsivity suggests that the former may index a higher order inhibition process, whereas SSRT may index a more automatic inhibition process. We suggest that the existence of distinct response inhibition processes that may be associated with different levels of cognitive control.
       
  • The modulation of the evaluative priming effect by phasic affect
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Aurore Lemonnier, Theodore Alexopoulos Previous research suggests that affect modulates the sequential priming effect such that positive affect yields robust sequential priming effects, whereas negative affect inhibits them. Although this observation has received substantial empirical support for semantic priming effects (i.e., faster responding to a target word following the earlier presentation of a meaningfully related prime), the evidence is rather scant concerning evaluative priming effects (i.e., faster and/or more accurate evaluative responding to a target word when it is preceded by an evaluatively consistent rather than an evaluatively inconsistent prime). The present research aimed at filling this gap, demonstrating the impact of phasic (temporally short-lived) affect on evaluative priming effects. In doing so, we addressed the shortcomings of previous research as we implemented affective contexts that changed from trial to trial in a within-participants design. In Experiments 1 and 2, brief positive music excerpts yielded a reliable evaluative priming effect, whereas brief negative excerpts inhibited it. In Experiment 3, we replicated and generalized these findings using a proprioceptive facial feedback procedure. Our results corroborate and extend previous research by showing that brief negative affect inhibits priming effects as compared to brief positive affect or a control condition. These findings attest to the flexibility of the evaluative priming effect and suggest it is permeable to subtle affective contexts that influence its magnitude.
       
  • The dynamic effect of context on interval timing in children and adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Quentin Hallez, Atser Damsma, Darren Rhodes, Hedderik van Rijn, Sylvie Droit-Volet Human reproductions of time intervals are often biased toward previously perceived durations, resulting in a central tendency effect. The aim of the current study was to compare this effect of temporal context on time reproductions within children and adults. Children aged from 5 to 7 years, as well as adults, performed a ready-set-go reproduction task with a short and a long duration distribution. A central tendency effect was observed both in children and adults, with no age-difference in the effect of global context on temporal performance. However, the analysis of the effect of local context (trial-by-trial) indicated that younger children relied more on the duration (objective duration) presented in the most recent trial than adults. In addition, statistical analyses of the influence on temporal performance of recently reproduced durations by subjects (subjective duration) revealed that temporal reproductions in adults were influenced by performance drifts, i.e., their evaluation of their temporal error, while children simply relied on the value of reproduced durations on the recent trials. We argue that the central tendency effect was larger in young children due to their noisier internal representation of durations: A noisy system led participants to base their estimation on experienced duration rather than on the evaluation of their judgment.
       
  • Optimizing memory strategy use in young and older adults: The role of
           metamemory and internal strategy use
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Lina Guerrero Sastoque, Badiâa Bouazzaoui, Lucile Burger, Charlotte Froger, Michel Isingrini, Laurence Taconnat We explored whether experiencing differential efficacy of reading and generation for memory in an initial learning trial led younger and older adults to improve recall of read items in a subsequent learning trial, leading to a reduction of the generation effect. In the first trial, generation improved the memory performance of both young and older adults. However, in Trial 2, the generation effect remained significant for older adults only, confirming that they did not change the way they processed read items, unlike the young adults. The older adults were also less spontaneously aware that generation led to better memory performance in the first trial, and, in contrast to the young adults, awareness did not result in a reduction of the generation effect. Moreover, the age-related differences in generation effect reduction were mediated by an independent measure of self-reported internal strategy use. However, when an appropriate environmental support was provided between both trials, older adults improved read items recall at the second trial as well as younger ones, leading to an elimination of the generation advantage for both groups. Environmental support reduced the implication of internal strategy use in the generation effect reduction, suggesting that age-related differences in the implementation of effective encoding processes in Trial 2 would be the consequence of a metamemory deficit, and reduced capacity to self-initiate internal strategies.
       
  • The effect of practice on inhibition in task switching: Controlling for
           episodic retrieval
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): James A. Grange, Paula Kedra, Alison Walker Previous work has shown that extended practice leads to a reduction in a key measure of cognitive inhibition during task switching: The n–2 task repetition cost. However, it has been demonstrated that this n–2 task repetition cost is increased by a non-inhibitory process—namely episodic retrieval—raising the question of whether the observed reduction of the cost with practice is driven by a reduction in inhibition, episodic retrieval effects, or a combination of both. The current study addresses this question by utilising a practice protocol using a task switching paradigm capable of controlling for episodic retrieval. The results showed a reduction in the n–2 task repetition cost with extended practice. The results also showed a clear increase of the n–2 task repetition cost due to episodic retrieval effects. The reduction of the cost with practice was driven by a reduction in inhibition and episodic retrieval contributions to the cost with practice, although there was a larger reduction in the episodic retrieval contribution with practice. The results are discussed with reference to current theoretical models of inhibition in task switching, which need to accommodate episodic retrieval and practice effects.
       
  • Thinking on your feet: An analysis of movement and cognition in a sit to
           stand task
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Cameron T. Gibbons, Polemnia G. Amazeen, Jen J. Jondac The maintenance of upright posture involves constant adjustment to external and internal perturbations. This balancing act is often assumed to be an automatic process, but studies suggest that cognitive processes, particularly attention, are necessary for the control of posture. The current study examines the role of attention in balance using a dual-task paradigm. Twenty-four healthy young adults performed a sit-to-stand (STS) task on either a stable or unstable platform while performing a secondary cognitive task of counting backwards aloud. Movement of the upper and lower body was analyzed using the largest Lyapunov exponent (λ1) and standard deviation (SD). Results replicated earlier findings (Gibbons, Amazeen, & Likens, 2018) that the transition from sit to stand was marked by increased variability and a temporary destabilization of postural control. Participants exhibited greater movement variability overall on the unstable platform (large SD), but small λ1 indicated that movement was controlled. During second task performance, SD increased for the upper body only. Further research is necessary to understand the interaction between attention and balance in young adults.
       
  • Everything is worth when it is close to my body: How spatial proximity and
           stimulus valence affect visuo-tactile integration
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): C. Spaccasassi, D. Romano, A. Maravita The peripersonal space (PPS) is the space surrounding our body, represented in a multisensory fashion by integrating stimuli of different modalities. Recently, it has been demonstrated that PPS is emotionally connoted, being sensitive to the different affective valence of the stimuli located inside it. However, how visuo-tactile interactions can be spatially shaped by intrinsic or acquired valence of stimuli is not clear. To investigate this, we conducted three experiments in which participants performed a visuo-tactile interaction task, while the intrinsic valence (Exp. 1 and 2) or the learned valence (Exp. 3) of visual stimuli was manipulated. Participants were asked to respond as fast as possible to a tactile stimulus that was delivered while a visual stimulus was approaching (Exp.1 and 3) or receding (Exp.2) from the hand. Touch was synchronized with different distances of the visual stimulus from the hand. We found that both the expectancy of stimulus and the distance of the visual one from the hand impact RTs to tactile targets. Crucially, we found that spatial modulation was also influenced by stimulus valence, but only for the approaching and not the receding stimuli. At far distances, neutral stimuli yielded overall slower RTs than intrinsically positive or negative stimuli (Experiment 1), while no modulation was exerted by the level of conditioning (Experiment 3). At near distances, response to touches accompanied by looming neutral stimuli became as fast as that occurring with positive and negative ones. Stimulus valence did not interact with the expectancy of a tactile stimulus (Experiment 2). Overall, these findings support the vision that visuo-tactile interactions can be dynamically modulated by the valence of looming visual stimuli when these are located at longer distances from the body. When closer to it, all stimuli acquire saliency, regardless of their intrinsic or acquired valence, due to their proximity, and then relevance, to the body. Overall, a view of PPS as a gradient modulating visuo-tactile integration, also based on stimulus valence, is discussed.
       
  • Turning distractors into targets increases the congruency sequence effect
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Lauren D. Grant, Daniel H. Weissman The congruency effect in distractor-interference tasks is typically smaller after incongruent trials than after congruent trials. Current views posit that this congruency sequence effect (CSE) reflects control processes that come into play when an irrelevant distractor cues a different response than a relevant target. However, the CSE is counterintuitively larger in the prime-probe task when the prime is occasionally a second target than when the prime is more frequently a distractor. In the present study, we investigated whether this effect occurs because the appearance of an occasional prime target (a) constitutes a rare, unexpected event that triggers heightened control or (b) allows participants to use the same task set (i.e., stimulus-response mapping) for the prime and probe in each trial. Consistent with the latter hypothesis, we observed this effect in Experiment 1 even when the critical trial types appeared equally often. Further, in Experiment 2, we extended this finding while ruling out perceptual differences between conditions as an alternative account. These findings provide novel support for the task set hypothesis and reveal that the CSE reflects control processes that do more than minimize distraction from irrelevant stimuli.
       
  • Multisensory processing in event-based prospective memory
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Ayla Barutchu, Aparna Sahu, Glyn W. Humphreys, Charles Spence Failures in prospective memory (PM) – that is, the failure to remember intended future actions – can have adverse consequences. It is therefore important to study those processes that may help to minimize such cognitive failures. Although multisensory integration has been shown to enhance a wide variety of behaviors, including perception, learning, and memory, its effect on prospective memory, in particular, is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of multisensory processing on two simultaneously-performed memory tasks: An ongoing 2- or 3-back working memory (WM) task (20% target ratio), and a PM task in which the participants had to respond to a rare predefined letter (8% target ratio). For PM trials, multisensory enhancement was observed for congruent multisensory signals; however, this effect did not generalize to the ongoing WM task. Participants were less likely to make errors for PM than for WM trials, thus suggesting that they may have biased their attention toward the PM task. Multisensory advantages on memory tasks, such as PM and WM, may be dependent on how attention resources are allocated across dual tasks.
       
  • Art expertise in construing meaning of representational and abstract
           artworks
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): David L. Bimler, Megan Snellock, Galina V. Paramei Aesthetic appraisal of artwork can present the observer with visual problems to solve in the process of grasping its meaning and ‘visual rightness’ (i.e. “good” structure; Locher, 2003), with an elaboration on perceptual, semantic and affective dimensions (e.g. Marković, 2011). Thus observer's expertise is a factor in aesthetic appraisal. To examine the influence of art training on the aesthetic response, and to clarify the nature of the Representational/ distinction, 30 Experts and 33 Non-experts (Art and Psychology students, respectively) were asked to rate 24 paintings on six affective and affective-evaluative semantic differential scales. Stimuli were images of paintings from the period 1900–1935, 12 broadly Representational and 12 broadly . Relative to Non-experts, Experts rated artworks as more Interesting, Beautiful, Informative and Sophisticated, distinguishing them less markedly from Representational artworks. Aggregate Expert and Non-expert ratings, processed by factor analysis, resulted in a two-factor solution. The first factor, contrasting and Representational artworks, appeared more salient for Non-experts. The second factor, Cool–Warm, separating vibrantly-colored paintings from those with a blue-dominated/dull palette, was more salient for Experts. While Non-experts exaggerated differences between and Representational paintings, Experts appraised these two types of art similarly, attending more to artwork collative properties. We conclude that appreciation of art by Experts involves ‘cognitive mastery’ (Leder, Belke, Oeberst, & Augustin, 2004), i.e. more complex, cues-based visual schemata which equip them with more sophisticated strategies for analysing collative properties and semantics of an artwork while parsing ‘visual rightness’ to unfold its visual meaning.
       
  • The time course of processing emotion-laden words during sentence reading:
           Evidence from eye movements
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Psychologica, Volume 192Author(s): Faye Knickerbocker, Rebecca L. Johnson, Emma L. Starr, Anna M. Hall, Daphne M. Preti, Sarah Rose Slate, Jeanette Altarriba While recent research has explored the effect that positive and negative emotion words (e.g., happy or sad) have on the eye-movement record during reading, the current study examined the effect of positive and negative emotion-laden words (e.g., birthday or funeral) on eye movements. Emotion-laden words do not express a state of mind but have emotional associations and connotations. The current results indicated that both positive and negative emotion-laden words have a processing advantage over neutral words, although the relative time-course of processing differs between words of positive and negative valence. Specifically, positive emotion-laden words showed advantages in early, late, and post-target measures, while negative emotion-laden words showed effects only in late and post-target measures.
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-