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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3157 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3157 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 96, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 416, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 261, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 160, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 64)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 403, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 349, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 456, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 221, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 182, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)

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Journal Cover
Acta Oecologica
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.834
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1146-609X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3157 journals]
  • Fungi to bacteria ratio: Historical misinterpretations and potential
           implications
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Acta Oecologica, Volume 95Author(s): Xiaoli Wang, Weixin Zhang, Yuanhu Shao, Jie Zhao, Lixia Zhou, Xiaoming Zou, Shenglei Fu Bacteria and fungi are the primary consumers and, thus, the decomposition pathways are described accordingly as bacterial-based or fungal-based energy channels. However, the fungi to bacteria ratios (F: B), which indicated either by microbial biomass, respiration, or growth, represents only a snapshot of the whole energy channel during a given period rather than the cumulative contribution. Even the energy channel biomass only takes into account one dimension without considering the time. We believe that the F: B ratio has been misinterpreted in an ecological sense due to a lack of a clear definition. Here, we estimated the F: B biomass ratios, production ratios (microbial biomass multiplied by the turnover rate) and assimilation ratios (the sum of microbial production and respiration) using a dataset from 192 relevant studies. The F: B biomass ratios varied from 0.106 to 9.080, depending on the methods used. Based on direct microscopy method, the fungal/(fungal + bacterial) production and assimilation ratios ranged from 0.39 to 54.78% and 0.25–45.05%, respectively; while, those ratios based on phospholipids fatty acids (PLFAs) method were 0.06–5.51% and 0.04–0.66%, respectively. We conclude that bacteria contributes greater to the energy flow in terrestrial ecosystems compared with fungi based on the F: B assimilation. The relative contribution of bacteria and fungi can be better evaluated using the F: B assimilation ratio, rather than the biomass ratio or production ratio. Nevertheless, there are still uncertainties in the estimations of microbial production and assimilation due to their complicated responses to soil fauna activities. The regulation of soil fauna on microbial biomass, turnover rate and respiration, and associated changes in the energy allocations in the soil food web should be emphasised in future studies.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Understanding the influence of non-wealth factors in determining bushmeat
           consumption: Results from four West African countries
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Oecologica, Volume 94Author(s): Luca Luiselli, Emmanuel M. Hema, Gabriel Hoinsoudé Segniagbeto, Valy Ouattara, Edem A. Eniang, Massimiliano Di Vittorio, Nioking Amadi, Gnoumou Parfait, Nic Pacini, Godfrey C. Akani, Djidama Sirima, Wendengoudi Guenda, Barineme B. Fakae, Daniele Dendi, John E. Fa The meat of wild animals (bushmeat) is consumed extensively in many tropical regions. Over the past few decades bushmeat consumption has greatly increased, threatening the survival of some hunted species and the supply of animal protein to countless numbers of people. Understanding patterns of bushmeat consumption is thus vital to ensure the sustainable use of this resource. Although the economic drivers of bushmeat consumption have been well studied, non-wealth correlates have been poorly considered. Here, we analyse how variables such as age and gender may influence bushmeat consumption in four West African countries, within the Guinean forests (Togo and Nigeria) and Sahel (Burkina Faso and Niger). We interviewed a total of 2453 persons (1253 urban, 1200 in rural areas) to determine frequency of consumption of bushmeat as well as the main species eaten. We found significant differences in bushmeat consumption between rural and urban areas in all four countries. In particular, the proportion of persons not consuming any bushmeat was highest in urban areas. Gender differences in bushmeat consumption were not generally important but young people consistently avoided eating bushmeat, especially in Togo and Nigeria, and in urban areas. The complicated interplay between tradition and evolution of social systems (especially the trends towards westernization) may explain the different perceptions that people may have towards consuming bushmeat in the four studied countries. In addition, we found considerable variation in types of bushmeat eaten, with antelopes and large rodents eaten by the great majority of interviewees, but bats, monkeys, and snakes being avoided, especially in urban settlements.
       
  • Keep it simple' Dispersal abilities can explain why species range
           sizes differ, the case study of West African amphibians
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Oecologica, Volume 94Author(s): Johannes Penner, Mark-Oliver Rödel A well-known positive correlation between niche breadth and range size exists across a number of animal and plant taxa. A relatively more simple explanation, range size being connected to differing dispersal abilities, was recently presented for passerine birds. Unfortunately, respective datasets are not easily available for other taxonomic groups. We circumvented this problem by developing a simple dispersal index, incorporating niche information (body size, litter size, preferred habitats of adults and offspring, ecotype of adults) which can be collected straightforwardly for most animal taxa. We tested this dispersal index for species which are generally considered poor dispersers, amphibians. Our results from West Africa revealed a positive correlation between the dispersal index and range size (p 
       
  • Modelling the spatial baseline for amphibian conservation in West Africa
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Oecologica, Volume 94Author(s): Johannes Penner, Moritz Augustin, Mark-Oliver Rödel To answer questions such as whether the existing network of protected areas is sufficient, conservation needs data covering complete taxonomic groups and large geographic areas. However, most distributional data sets are either coarse, patchy and/or based solely on expert opinion which is often hard to verify. In addition, not all regions are equally well studied. For example sub-Saharan Africa remains comparatively under-sampled for most taxa, especially Central and Western Africa. However, these regions contain many threatened species, including a high diversity of highly threatened vertebrates - amphibians. To fill this knowledge gap, we extrapolated species occurrence records (n = 15,944) on a 30 arc-seconds grid for most known West African amphibian taxa (92%), using environmental niche modelling and employing relevant environmental parameters (climate, vegetation, elevation & distance to rivers).We provide, for the first time, a fine scale distribution map of amphibian alpha diversity for the entire West African region. Already known centres of high biodiversity were confirmed (e.g. south-western Ghana and south-eastern Côte d’Ivoire) and new ones were identified (e.g. northern Liberia and the borders of Liberia with Guinea and Sierra Leone). Diversity analyses focusing on unique amphibians, i.e. threatened, endemic and evolutionary distinct species', revealed that areas of high diversity also contained many high conservation-priority species. Herewith, we offer a comprehensive baseline for identifying those areas which are important for amphibian conservation for one of the most periled regions on the continent. Those areas of high diversity were only partly in accordance with previous analyses such as the hotspot definitions, the ecoregion analyses, or analyses of other taxa, highlighting the added new value of our approach. The most outstanding areas of amphibian diversity were only partly covered by the existing network of protected areas. Thus there is an urgent need to devise a regional conservation concept to protect West African amphibians from extinction.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Freshwater fishes of Lower Guinean forest streams: Aquaculture heavily
           impacts the structure and diversity of communities
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Acta Oecologica, Volume 94Author(s): Nioking Amadi, Fabio Petrozzi, Godfrey C. Akani, Daniele Dendi, Barineme B. Fakae, Luca Luiselli, Nic Pacini Little is known about fish diversity in the coastal streams south-eastern Nigeria in this world-renowned biodiversity hotspot. In these ecosystems, the combination of seasonal changes in hydrology as well as the presence of coastal forests provides a greater biotope diversity, food and shelter for many fish species. Currently, however, deforestation, pollution and exotic species invasions impact the system's hydrology, water quality ultimately changing fish assemblage composition. In this paper, we describe the current status of fish diversity in the forested coastal streams of south-eastern Nigerian based on recent collections and data drawn from selected scientific publications. We found a total of 88 fish species from 27 families in 10 orders. . Fish assemblages were generally characterised by a low evenness, with 90% of specimens belonging to over a quarter of the overall number of taxa, and strongly dominated by species of aquaculture interest, such as tilapiine cichlids. The studied stations had a high heterogeneity and non-comparable diversity profiles; stressing the role played by local conditions. Stations closer to the River Niger Delta differed significantly from the remaining large relatively homogeneous cluster. We found that the spatial turnover components of β-diversity were significant, and this was related to longitudinal distance, and not to species replacement by ecological vicariants. The observed species composition and the diversity patterns are consistent with a scenario whereby an originally high biodiversity is being eroded because of habitat degradation and the impact of alien species.
       
  • Spatial variation in sex ratio and density explains subtle changes in the
           strength of size-assortative mating in Edessa contermina (Hemiptera:
           Pentatomidae)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 December 2018Source: Acta OecologicaAuthor(s): Rafael R. Moura, Marcelo O. Gonzaga Size-assortative mating (SAM) is usually explained by the mate-choice hypothesis. However, this hypothesis does not consider the effects of variations in the intensity of mating competition on mate choice and SAM. For example, in populations with male-biased operational sex ratios (OSR) and high densities, large males will have more advantages during mating competition and will have access to the most mating opportunities with large, preferred females (i.e. mating competition hypothesis). In this study, we investigated the effects of mating competition and mate choice on the strength of SAM in Edessa contermina (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). We also described sexual size dimorphism and the mating system of this Neotropical stink bug in a conservation area of the Brazilian savanna. We used density as a proxy for mating competition intensity because it was positively correlated with OSR. Size-assortative mating was more consistent under intense mating competition. However, males copulated with relatively larger females as population density increased. Males assortatively mated based on size in the first and second copulation events observed, while both female matings were random. Thus, male mate choice may promote SAM in E. contermina, but its strength is affected by variations in the intensity of mating competition. Hence, we provided empirical support for mating competition as a potential mechanism promoting subtle changes in SAM. We discussed potential implications of this mechanism on the mating patterns of pentatomids.
       
  • Ecological role of a flower-dwelling predator in a tri-trophic interaction
           in northwestern Patagonia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2018Source: Acta OecologicaAuthor(s): Sabrina S. Gavini, Carolina Quintero, Mariana Tadey Flower-dwelling predators may play several ecological roles depending on their effects on the reproductive success of the plants that they use to forage. However, tri-trophic interactions often are context-dependent highlighting the importance of assessing both the overall top-down effect on plant fitness and predator behavioral and physiological attributes that shape that outcome. We studied the effect of the flower-dwelling crab spider Misumenops pallidus on the perennial herb Anemone multifida in a low-thicket in Northwestern Patagonia. We measured pollinator visitation frequency, florivory rate, plant fitness, spider abundance, and spider's physiological (e.g. camouflage) and behavioral attributes (e.g. host selection, fidelity) that aid to define its possible ecological role. Misumenops pallidus showed a generalist diet (mostly pollinators), camouflage strategies, and intraspecific selection for plants bearing higher number and longer trichomes. Additionally, it displayed host-fidelity with long periods of permanence in the selected host plant, occupying ∼25% of plant population. However, the presence of these spiders did not affect pollinator visitation rate, florivory or plant fitness, indicating a commensalism role. Our findings suggested that the asymmetric benefit in this plant-spider association may be attributed to a combination of factors. In particular, the low-to-moderate spider abundance, generalist diet and cryptic camouflage; all of which weaken the top-down effect on pollinators and plant fitness, especially whenever ecological redundant pollinators are present. However, temporal and/or spatial variation on spider population might enhance this asymmetric benefit for the spider, potentially changing its role from commensalism to antagonism.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Grazing intensity modulates carbohydrate storage pattern in five grass
           species from temperate grasslands
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2018Source: Acta OecologicaAuthor(s): Marie-Lise Benot, Annette Morvan-Bertrand, Cendrine Mony, Julia Huet, Cécile Sulmon, Marie-Laure Decau, Marie-Pascale Prud'homme, Anne Bonis Regrowth after defoliation is an essential mechanism of plant tolerance to grazing. In grasses, non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) contained in tiller bases constitute a major substrate for regrowth after defoliation. Using a multi-specific approach, the present study aimed at testing the effect of grazing intensity on NSC concentration in tiller bases. We selected five grazing-tolerant grass species (Agrostis stolonifera, Cynosurus cristatus, Hordeum secalinum, Lolium perenne and Poa trivialis) and collected plants in a grassland subjected to two cattle grazing intensities (intensive versus moderate) for years. We measured NSC concentrations (starch, fructans, sucrose, glucose and fructose) in tiller bases. We found that fructan and sucrose concentrations before the grazing season (April) were higher under intensive than moderate grazing. By contrast, no significant effect of the grazing intensity on these NSC concentrations in tiller bases remained at the end of the grazing season (October). These results suggest that the level of reserves available before the onset of disturbance caused by grazing as well as the reserve replenishment capacity during the grazing season are modified by the intensity of grazing.
       
  • Interindividual variations in plant and fruit traits affect the structure
           of a plant-frugivore network
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2018Source: Acta OecologicaAuthor(s): A.C. Crestani, M.A.R. Mello, E. Cazetta Frugivores select their food in a hierarchical way, from plants to individual fruits, to meet their nutritional requirements. According to the optimal diet theory, finding, handling, and digesting fruits is costly, thus plant species that increase attractiveness and reward are usually preferred by frugivores. The same should be expected for individual plants of the same population, which differ from one another in traits related to frugivore attraction. We tested the hypothesis that plant traits that increase attractiveness and reward to frugivores would be strongly selected by birds in a population of Henriettea succosa (Melastomataceae). In 20 h of focal observation in 19 individual trees (380 h in total), we measured plant and fruit traits known to influence frugivore attraction and reward: plant height, fruit size, and fruit sugar content. In addition, we recorded bird behaviour during fruit consumption. We built two weighted networks of birds and individual plants: one monolayer network and a multilayer network with four layers, one for each type of behaviour. First, we evaluated three weighted descriptors of network structure: nestedness, modularity, and specialization. Then, we calculated metrics of centrality and correlated them with plant traits. We recorded 271 visits by 22 bird species of eight families. The network is modular and specialized, showing that subgroups of H. succosa trees with different trait combinations attract different subsets of bird species, in a way that specialist trees are not connected to a subset of the bird species that visit generalist trees. We also found that centrality metrics reached higher scores in plants with lower height, larger fruits, and intermediate sucrose content. Fruit handling was the predominant foraging behaviour in the multilayer network and represented 90 percent of the interactions. Downscaling a plant-frugivore network to its individual trees showed that the structure of the system is influenced by interindividual variations in the tree population, in which individuals with the best combination of traits occupied central positions in the network.
       
  • Are small abandoned plantations a threat for protected areas in Andean
           forests' The potential invasion of non-native cultivated species
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2018Source: Acta OecologicaAuthor(s): Susana P. Bravo, Matias O. Berrondo, Victor R. Cueto Abandoned farms with small fruit plantations of the non-native species Prunus cerasus and Malus domestica are common in protected areas of the temperate forests of southern South America (TFSA), in Patagonia. Our aims were to determine whether an invasion of P. cerasus and M. domestica might be starting in protected areas, and whether either native or alien animal species are involved in the dispersal process. We evaluated sapling and seed spread, adult tree distribution in three habitats, and seed dispersal vectors of P. cerasus and M. domestica in “Los Alerces” National Park (Argentina). We sampled mature trees, saplings and seeds of P. cerasus and M. domesticain in two plots located next to plantations. Adult trees and mammal faeces also were searched for on roads, hiking trails, deforested areas, plots and transects opened by us. We monitored fruiting trees with cameras and we caught birds to obtain faeces. Saplings of P. cerasus were abundant and their locations were not related to adult locations, but saplings of M. domestica were rare. Ninety-two percent of P. cerasus adult trees were found in successional forest, whereas 99% of M. domestica trees were in deforested areas. Faeces of native foxes contained high number of intact seeds of both plant species studied, but we did not find any in the bird faeces. Our results indicates that P. cerasus has been invading natural habitats in protected areas of TFSA, and that foxes can be the major dispersal vectors. Further, successional forest is the most invasible habitat.
       
  • Using functional responses to quantify notonectid predatory impacts across
           increasingly complex environments
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2018Source: Acta OecologicaAuthor(s): Ross N. Cuthbert, Tatenda Dalu, Ryan J. Wasserman, Amanda Callaghan, Olaf L.F. Weyl, Jaimie T.A. Dick Predation is a key biotic interaction that influences both the structure and functioning of ecosystems, and is relevant in the biological control context. Levels of habitat complexity in aquatic ecosystems are highly variable and can profoundly affect predator-prey interactions through the presence of prey refugia, which can in turn reduce predatory efficacy. Here, we use functional responses (FRs, resource use under different resource densities) to quantify the predatory impact of the notonectid Anisops debilis towards larvae of the mosquito Culex pipiens under a habitat complexity gradient. Anisops debilis displayed a potentially population-destabilising Type II FR towards larval C. pipiens prey across the habitat complexity gradient. Attack rates were highest in simple environments, however handling times were not significantly affected by habitat complexity. Maximum feeding rates of A. debilis towards C. pipiens larvae were thus robust to habitat complexity variations. Our results demonstrate the substantial predatory impacts of notonectids towards larval mosquito prey irrespective of habitat complexities, which may assist in the biological control of pests and vectors in aquatic systems.
       
  • Ecology and conservation of West African forests: An introduction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 May 2018Source: Acta OecologicaAuthor(s): Luca Luiselli, John E. Fa
       
  • Environmental filtering determines patterns of tree species composition in
           small mountains of Atlantic Central African forests
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 April 2018Source: Acta OecologicaAuthor(s): Christelle Gonmadje, Charles Doumenge, Terry Sunderland, Doyle McKey The determinants of patterns of plant species composition on small mountains are poorly known, especially in Central Africa. We aimed here to identify variation in tree species composition throughout the Ngovayang Massif (southern Cameroon) and determine the relative contributions of environmental factors and spatial autocorrelation in shaping tree species composition. Vegetation surveys were conducted in fifteen 1-ha (100 m × 100 m) permanent plots established along a transect from lowland (200 m) to submontane forests (900 m) in which all trees with a diameter (dbh) ≥ 10 cm were inventoried. Data were investigated using ordination methods (Correspondence Analysis and Canonical Correspondence Analysis). At the local scale, the most important variable in determining tree species composition patterns was slope exposure, followed by distance from the ocean and altitude. Together, these environmental variables explained 28% of floristic variation among plots, and the spatial structure almost disappeared when the effects of these variables were removed. Spatial autocorrelation analysis showed that spatial variables (geographic coordinates of the plots) or geographic distance between plots explained only 1% of the total initial variance. Residual spatial variation not explained by the environmental variables probably reflects the history of vegetation and the effects of other climatic variables that were not included in this study. Floristic variation in the Ngovayang Massif is due to strong environmental heterogeneity. The sensitivity of floristic composition to environmental variables such as slope orientation and altitude suggests that tree species composition may shift with expected climate changes, such as changes in the movement of air masses, increase in mean annual temperatures or increasing severity of the dry season. Our study highlights the need for systematic on-the-ground measurements of climate variables in tropical montane areas in order to better understand the current climate regime and serve as a basis for modelling future changes.
       
  • Effect of heat on soil seedbank of three contrasting physiognomies in
           Shasha forest reserve, Southwestern Nigeria
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2018Source: Acta OecologicaAuthor(s): D.S. Akinyemi, S.R. Oseni, S.O. Oke The effects of soil heating which usually occur during forest fires on the floristic composition and seed density of the soil seed bank of Shasha forest reserve in Southwestern Nigeria was investigated and the potential of the soil seedbank in forest restoration process (especially after a fire) was examined. Three distinct sites (Regrowth forest, Gmelina and Pinus plantations) were selected in the forest reserve. Species enumeration, identification and distribution into families of the standing vegetation were carried out. Soil samples were collected at 0–15 cm depth from each plot in March 2012. One set of replicate samples was heated in an oven until the soil reached 80 °C (to simulate typical temperature at soil surface during forest fires) while the other serves as a control. They were subjected to seedling emergence for six months to determine the density and species composition of the seed banks of the study sites. Seedling emergence result for heated and unheated soil samples showed that the seedbank density was higher in control than heated samples in the three sites. Few woody species emerged from the soil seedbank of three study sites and in both control and heated samples. There was a significant difference in total seed density when treatments were compared (P  0.05) when sites were compared. Diversity and evenness indices follow the order Regrowth forest > Pinus plantation > Gmelina plantation. NMDS (non-metric multi-dimensional scaling) ordination revealed low similarity in the species composition of extant vegetation and seedbank. The potential of vegetation restoration of the disturbed forest reserve from seed bank is limited, and heat from fire had negative effects on the seed bank characteristics of the forest but selectively enhanced the emergence of species like Pinus carribaea.
       
 
 
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