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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3163 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3163 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 88, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 394, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 244, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.732, CiteScore: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 335, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 436, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)

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Journal Cover
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.524
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1064-7481 - ISSN (Online) 1545-7214
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3163 journals]
  • Self-Perceived Health and Sleep Quality of Community Older Adults after
           Acupunch Exercises
    • Authors: Chih-Yin Hsiao; Kuei-Min Chen; Han-Ya Tsai; Hsin-Ting Huang; Yin-Yin Cheng; Athena Yijung Tsai
      Pages: 511 - 520
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Chih-Yin Hsiao, Kuei-Min Chen, Han-Ya Tsai, Hsin-Ting Huang, Yin-Yin Cheng, Athena Yijung Tsai
      Objectives To test the long-term effects of the 12-month Healthy Beat Acupunch (HBA) exercise program on the self-perceived health and sleep quality of older adults in community care centers, and to compare the effects of two delivery methods: instructor-led HBA for the first 6 months and DVD-guided HBA for another 6 months. Design Cluster-randomized controlled trial. Setting Eight community care centers. Participants In total, 232 participants were recruited from eight community care centers, and cluster-randomized to the experimental (4 centers, N = 113) and control (4 centers, N = 119) groups. Intervention The experimental group received the instructor-led HBA program 3 times weekly for the first 6 months, followed by the DVD-guided HBA program for another 6 months. Measurements Self-perceived health and sleep quality were assessed using the Short Form Health Survey and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, respectively, at baseline and every 3 months for 1 year. Results The experimental group reported more favorable self-perceived physical and mental health, higher subjective sleep quality, and less daytime dysfunction than did the control group. Effect sizes of physical health and sleep quality increased from the instructor-led stage to the DVD-guided stage; the effect size of physical health showed the most significant change, increasing from 0.38 in the instructor-led stage to 0.55 in the DVD-guided stage. Conclusions The exercise program consisting of the instructor-led class, followed by the DVD-guided class, was an effective and feasible longitudinal program for older adults in community care centers.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.01.199
       
  • Community-Based Acupunch Exercise Program Improves Physical Health and
           Quality of Sleep in Taiwanese Older Adults
    • Authors: Helen Lavretsky; Ryan Abbott
      Pages: 521 - 522
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Helen Lavretsky, Ryan Abbott


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.01.207
       
  • Assessing the Decision-Making Capacity of Terminally Ill Patients with
           Cancer
    • Authors: Elissa Kolva; Barry Rosenfeld; Rebecca Saracino
      Pages: 523 - 531
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Elissa Kolva, Barry Rosenfeld, Rebecca Saracino
      Objective Despite the clinical, ethical, and legal magnitude of end-of-life decision-making, the capacity of terminally ill patients to make the medical decisions they often face is largely unknown. In practice, clinicians are responsible for determining when their patients are no longer competent to make treatment decisions, yet the accuracy of these assessments is unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore decision-making capacity and its assessment in terminally ill cancer patients. Methods Fifty-five patients with advanced cancer receiving inpatient palliative care and 50 healthy adults were administered the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T) to evaluate decision-making capacity with regard to the four most commonly used legal standards: Choice, Understanding, Appreciation, and Reasoning. Participants made a hypothetical treatment decision about whether to accept artificial nutrition and hydration for treatment of cachexia. Participants' physicians independently rated their decision-making capacity. Results Terminally ill participants were significantly more impaired than healthy adults on all MacCAT-T subscales. Most terminally ill participants were able to express a treatment choice (85.7%), but impairment was common on the Understanding (44.2%), Appreciation (49.0%), and Reasoning (85.4%) subscales. Agreement between physician-rated capacity and performance on the MacCAT-T subscales was poor. Conclusions The use of the MacCAT-T revealed high rates of decisional impairment in terminally ill participants. Participants' physicians infrequently detected impairment identified by the MacCAT-T. The findings from the present study reinforce the need for engagement in advance care planning for patients with advanced cancer.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.11.012
       
  • Invited Perspective on “Assessing the Decision Making Capacity of
           Terminally Ill Patients with Cancer
    • Authors: Jennifer B. Seaman
      Pages: 532 - 533
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Jennifer B. Seaman


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.12.010
       
  • Prevalence of Mental Health Disorders in Elderly U.S. Military Veterans: A
           Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review
    • Authors: Victoria Williamson; Sharon A.M. Stevelink; Karla Greenberg; Neil Greenberg
      Pages: 534 - 545
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Victoria Williamson, Sharon A.M. Stevelink, Karla Greenberg, Neil Greenberg
      Objective Older veterans may be vulnerable to mental health problems. Meta-analytic and systematic review methods sought to determine the prevalence rate of mental health disorders in older military veterans (≥65 years). Methods Eleven studies were eligible, and meta-analyses of veteran depression, substance abuse, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, dementia, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia were conducted. Results Although conducted exclusively with U.S. veterans, high prevalence rates of substance (5.7%) and alcohol use disorders (5.4%) in older veterans were found. However, the prevalence of other mental health disorders, including PTSD and depression, in older veterans was not markedly high. Conclusion The rates of disorder prevalence observed indicates a need for continued awareness of mental health difficulties, particularly substance and alcohol use disorders, in older veterans. In the future studies with non-U.S. military samples using a longitudinal design are required to further understand the prevalence of mental health disorders in geriatric veterans.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.11.001
       
  • Prevalence of Mental Health Disorders in Geriatric U.S. Military Veterans
    • Authors: John T. Little
      Pages: 546 - 547
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): John T. Little


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.01.204
       
  • “The Filter is Kind of Broken”: Family Caregivers' Attributions About
           Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia
    • Authors: Courtney A. Polenick; Laura M. Struble; Barbara Stanislawski; Molly Turnwald; Brianna Broderick; Laura N. Gitlin; Helen C. Kales
      Pages: 548 - 556
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Courtney A. Polenick, Laura M. Struble, Barbara Stanislawski, Molly Turnwald, Brianna Broderick, Laura N. Gitlin, Helen C. Kales
      Objectives Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are common, often challenging to manage, and may erode caregivers' well-being. Few studies have explored caregivers' perspectives of what causes these behaviors, but such attributions may be important—particularly if they negatively impact the care dyad. This study examined causal attributions about BPSD among individuals caring for a family member with dementia. Design In-depth qualitative data were obtained from family caregivers of older adults with dementia. Setting As part of a larger study (NINR R01NR014200), four focus groups were conducted with caregivers by an experienced facilitator. Participants A total of 26 family caregivers participated in the four focus groups. Measurements Caregivers reported their own attributions about the causes of their care recipient's BPSD. Sessions were audio-recorded. Data were transcribed, coded to determine relevant concepts, and reduced to identify major categories. Results Five categories were determined. Caregivers attributed BPSD to: 1) neurobiological disease factors; 2) physical symptoms or comorbid health conditions; 3) psychological reactions to dementia; 4) shifting social roles and relationships following dementia onset; and 5) environmental changes such as lack of routine and medical transitions (e.g., hospitalization). Despite this seemingly multifactorial attribution to BPSD etiology, a number of respondents also indicated that BPSD were at least partly within the care recipient's control. Conclusions Family caregivers attribute BPSD to a range of care recipient and environmental factors. Caregivers' own causal beliefs about BPSD may reflect unmet educational needs that should be considered in the development of targeted interventions to minimize caregiving stress.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.12.004
       
  • Late-Life Depressive Symptoms as Partial Mediators in the Associations
           between Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease with Onset of Mild Cognitive
           Impairment and Dementia
    • Authors: Nicole M. Armstrong; Michelle C. Carlson; Jennifer Schrack; Qian-Li Xue; Mercedes R. Carnethon; Caterina Rosano; Paulo H.M. Chaves; Alden L. Gross
      Pages: 559 - 568
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Nicole M. Armstrong, Michelle C. Carlson, Jennifer Schrack, Qian-Li Xue, Mercedes R. Carnethon, Caterina Rosano, Paulo H.M. Chaves, Alden L. Gross
      Objective To study whether depression contributes to the association between subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) and dementia, and identify the contribution's magnitude. Methods Among participants from the Cardiovascular Health Study Cognition Study who did not have baseline CVD-related events (N = 2,450), causal mediation methodology was implemented to examine whether late-life depressive symptoms, defined as 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (mCES-D) Scale scores ≥8 from 2 to 3 years after baseline, partially mediated the association of baseline subclinical CVD (CAC, carotid intimal medial thickness, stenosis, and ankle brachial index) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/dementia onset occurring between 5 and 10 years from baseline. The total effect was decomposed into direct and indirect effects (via late-life depressive symptoms), obtained from an accelerated failure time model with weights derived from multivariable logistic regression of late-life depressive symptoms on subclinical CVD. Analyses were adjusted by baseline covariates: age, race, sex, poverty status, marital status, body mass index, smoking status, ApoE4 status, and mCES-D. Results Participants contributed 20,994 person-years of follow-up with a median follow-up time of 9.4 years. Subclinical CVD was associated with 12% faster time to MCI/dementia (time ratio [TR]: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.93). The total effect of subclinical CVD on MCI/dementia onset was decomposed into a direct effect (TR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92, 0.98) and indirect effect (TR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.97); 64.5% of the total effect was mediated by late-life depressive symptoms. Conclusions These data suggest late-life depressive symptoms partially mediate the association of subclinical CVD with MCI/dementia onset.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.11.004
       
  • Social Cognition Differentiates Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia
           From Other Neurodegenerative Diseases and Psychiatric Disorders
    • Authors: Flora Gossink; Sigfried Schouws; Welmoed Krudop; Philip Scheltens; Max Stek; Yolande Pijnenburg; Annemiek Dols
      Pages: 569 - 579
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Flora Gossink, Sigfried Schouws, Welmoed Krudop, Philip Scheltens, Max Stek, Yolande Pijnenburg, Annemiek Dols
      Objective Although deficits in social cognition are established as core features in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), it remains unresolved if impaired social cognition distinguishes bvFTD from the broad differential diagnoses in clinical practice. Our aim was to study whether social cognition discriminates bvFTD from other neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders in patients presenting with late-onset frontal symptoms. Next, we studied the association of social cognition with frontal symptoms and cognitive functioning. Methods In this longitudinal multicenter study, besides clinical rating scales for frontal symptoms, social cognition was determined by Ekman 60 Faces test and Faux Pas in addition to neuropsychological tests for other cognitive domains in patients with probable and definite bvFTD (N = 22), other neurodegenerative diseases (N = 24), and psychiatric disorders (N = 33). Median symptom duration was 2.8 years, and patients were prospectively followed over 2 years. Results Total scores from Ekman 60 Faces test were significantly lower in bvFTD than in other neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Ekman 60 Faces test explained 91.2% of the variance of psychiatric disorders and other neurodegenerative diseases versus bvFTD (χ2 = 11.02, df = 1, p = 0.001) and was associated with all other cognitive domains. Faux Pas and the other cognitive domains did not differ between these diagnostic groups. Conclusion In this clinical sample Ekman 60 Faces test distinguished bvFTD successfully from other neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Although associated with social cognition, other cognitive domains were not discriminative. This study provides arguments to add the Ekman 60 Faces test to the neuropsychological examination in the diagnostic procedure of bvFTD.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.12.008
       
  • Walking While Talking and Risk of Incident Dementia
    • Authors: Mirnova E. Ceïde; Emmeline I. Ayers; Richard Lipton; Joe Verghese
      Pages: 580 - 588
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Mirnova E. Ceïde, Emmeline I. Ayers, Richard Lipton, Joe Verghese
      Introduction Walking while talking (WWT) is a performance-based test of divided attention that examines cognitive–motor interactions. The purpose of this study is to examine the predictive validity of WWT for dementia and dementia subtypes. Methods We prospectively studied the associations of WWT performance at baseline with risk of developing incident dementia in 1,156 older adults (mean age: 78.28 ± 5.27 years, 60.7% female) enrolled in the Einstein Aging Study using Cox proportional hazard models. Associations were reported as hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Over a median follow-up of 1.90 years (interquartile range: 4.70 years), 85 participants developed incident dementia (53 Alzheimer dementia [AD] and 26 vascular dementia [VaD]). Three gait domains were derived using principal component analysis. Only variability, which loaded heavily for swing time standard deviation (SD) and step time SD, was associated with an increased risk of incident dementia per 1 point increase (HR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02–1.54) and VaD (HR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.06–2.12) after adjusting for demographics, disease burden, mental status, and normal walking velocity. Among eight individual gait variables, only swing time variability SD was associated with increased risk for both incident dementia (HR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.03–1.77) and VaD (HR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.12–2.83). Variability and swing time SD were not significantly associated with risk of incident AD. Conclusions Complex walking as assessed by the WWT task is a simple and pragmatic tool for assessing risk of developing dementia, especially VaD, in older adults.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.12.009
       
  • Medical Care Tasks among Spousal Dementia Caregivers: Links to
           Care-Related Sleep Disturbances
    • Authors: Courtney A. Polenick; Amanda N. Leggett; Donovan T. Maust; Helen C. Kales
      Pages: 589 - 597
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Courtney A. Polenick, Amanda N. Leggett, Donovan T. Maust, Helen C. Kales
      Objective Medical care tasks are commonly provided by spouses caring for persons living with dementia (PLWDs). These tasks reflect complex care demands that may interfere with sleep, yet their implications for caregivers' sleep outcomes are unknown. The authors evaluated the association between caregivers' medical/nursing tasks (keeping track of medications; managing tasks such as ostomy care, intravenous lines, or blood testing; giving shots/injections; and caring for skin wounds/sores) and care-related sleep disturbances. Methods A retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study and National Study of Caregiving was conducted. Spousal caregivers and PLWDs/proxies were interviewed by telephone at home. The U.S. sample included 104 community-dwelling spousal caregivers and PLWDs. Caregivers reported on their sociodemographic and health characteristics, caregiving stressors, negative caregiving relationship quality, and sleep disturbances. PLWDs (or proxies) reported on their health conditions and sleep problems. Results Caregivers who performed a higher number of medical/nursing tasks reported significantly more frequent care-related sleep disturbances, controlling for sociodemographic and health characteristics, caregiving stressors, negative caregiving relationship quality, and PLWDs' sleep problems and health conditions. Post hoc tests showed that wound care was independently associated with more frequent care-related sleep disturbances after accounting for the other medical/nursing tasks and covariates. Conclusion Spousal caregivers of PLWDs who perform medical/nursing tasks may be at heightened risk for sleep disturbances and associated adverse health consequences. Interventions to promote the well-being of both care partners may benefit from directly addressing caregivers' needs and concerns about their provision of medical/nursing care.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.01.206
       
  • Bright Light as a Preventive Intervention for Depression in Late-Life: A
           Pilot Study on Feasibility, Acceptability, and Symptom Improvement
    • Authors: Amanda N. Leggett; Deirdre A. Conroy; Frederic C. Blow; Helen C. Kales
      Pages: 598 - 602
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Amanda N. Leggett, Deirdre A. Conroy, Frederic C. Blow, Helen C. Kales
      Objectives We examined the feasibility and acceptability of a portable bright light intervention and its impact on sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms in older adults. Methods One-arm prevention intervention pilot study of the Re-Timer (Re-Timer Pty Ltd, Adelaide, Australia) bright light device (worn 30 minutes daily for 2 weeks) in 1 older adults (age 65 + years) with subsyndromal symptoms of depression and poor sleep quality. Participants were assessed on intervention acceptability and adherence, depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire- 9), and sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, actigraphy and daily diary reports). Results The Re-Timer device was rated positively by participants, and, on average, participants only missed 1 day of utilization. Although depressive symptoms declined and self-reported sleep improved, improvement was seen largely before the start of intervention. Conclusions An effective preventive intervention that is targeted towards a high risk group of older adults has the potential to reduce distress and costly health service use.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.11.007
       
  • The Thick of It: Freely Wandering in Academic Medicine
    • Authors: Paul R. Duberstein
      Pages: 603 - 609
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Paul R. Duberstein


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.12.001
       
  • Emerging Trends in Undergraduate Medical Education: Implications for
           Geriatric Psychiatry
    • Authors: Kirsten M. Wilkins; Deborah Wagenaar; William B. Brooks
      Pages: 610 - 613
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Kirsten M. Wilkins, Deborah Wagenaar, William B. Brooks


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.10.017
       
  • Finding Meaning during Times of Anguish in Later Life
    • Authors: Oliver M. Glass
      Pages: 614 - 615
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): Oliver M. Glass


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.11.005
       
  • June Solstice
    • Authors: David L. Coulter
      First page: 616
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5
      Author(s): David L. Coulter


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.10.013
       
  • A Palliative Approach to Falls in Advanced Dementia
    • Authors: Andrea Iaboni; Karen Van Ooteghem; Meghan N. Marcil; Amy Cockburn; Alastair J. Flint; Daphna Grossman; Ron Keren
      Pages: 407 - 415
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 4
      Author(s): Andrea Iaboni, Karen Van Ooteghem, Meghan N. Marcil, Amy Cockburn, Alastair J. Flint, Daphna Grossman, Ron Keren
      Falls are viewed as a preventable cause of injury, functional loss, and death in older adults with dementia, and have been used as a marker of quality of care in long-term care facilities. Despite intensive intervention around fall prevention in these settings, falls and injury remain frequent, particularly among residents in the advanced stages of dementia. In this clinical review, we consider the common challenges and pitfalls in both the management of falls and the provision of palliative care in advanced dementia. We then describe a palliative approach to falls in advanced dementia that involves identifying individuals who would benefit from this care approach, framing falls and loss of mobility as a quality of life issue, and devising an individualized symptom assessment and management plan. A palliative approach can lead to recognition and acceptance that recurrent falls are often symptomatic of advanced dementia, and that not all falls are preventable. We conclude that falls in the advanced stage of dementia can be sentinel events indicating the need for a palliative approach to care. Rather than replace falls prevention activities, a palliative approach to falls prompts us to select dementia stage-appropriate interventions with a focus on symptom management, comfort, and dignity.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T18:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.11.014
       
  • Advanced Dementia in Long-Term Care: Avoiding the Pitfalls of Fall
           Prevention
    • Authors: Eran D. Metzger; Annie M. Racine; Sharon K. Inouye
      Pages: 416 - 418
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 4
      Author(s): Eran D. Metzger, Annie M. Racine, Sharon K. Inouye


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T18:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.12.007
       
  • Electroconvulsive Therapy for Agitation and Aggression in Dementia: A
           Systematic Review
    • Authors: Julia F. van den Berg; Henk C. Kruithof; Rob M. Kok; Esmée Verwijk; Harm-Pieter Spaans
      Pages: 419 - 434
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 4
      Author(s): Julia F. van den Berg, Henk C. Kruithof, Rob M. Kok, Esmée Verwijk, Harm-Pieter Spaans
      Objectives Many patients with dementia develop agitation or aggression in the course of their disease. In some severe cases, behavioral, environmental, and pharmacological interventions are not sufficient to alleviate these potentially life-threatening symptoms. It has been suggested that in those cases, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) could be an option. This review summarizes the scientific literature on ECT for agitation and aggression in dementia. Methods We performed a systematic review in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. A search was conducted in Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO. Two reviewers extracted the following data from the retrieved articles: number of patients and their age, gender, diagnoses, types of problem behavior, treatments tried before ECT, specifications of the ECT treatment, use of rating scales, treatment results, follow-up data, and adverse effects. Results The initial search yielded 264 articles, 17 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of these studies, one was a prospective cohort study, one was a case-control study, and the others were retrospective chart reviews, case series, or case reports. Clinically significant improvement was observed in the majority (88%) of the 122 patients described, often early in the treatment course. Adverse effects were most commonly mild, transient, or not reported. Conclusions The reviewed articles suggest that ECT could be an effective treatment for severe and treatment-refractory agitation and aggression in dementia, with few adverse consequences. Nevertheless, because of the substantial risk of selection bias, the designs of the studies reviewed, and their small number, further prospective studies are needed to substantiate these preliminary positive results.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T18:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.09.023
       
  • Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Dementia Risk among Individuals with Low
           Education
    • Authors: Francisca S. Rodriguez; María P. Aranda; Donald A. Lloyd; William A. Vega
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Francisca S. Rodriguez, María P. Aranda, Donald A. Lloyd, William A. Vega
      Introduction As higher dementia prevalence in ethnic minority groups could be attributed to low education, we studied individuals with low education and explored potential factors driving dementia disparities. Methods We examined differences in dementia risk between low educated Non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanics, and African-Americans and the impact of lifetime risk factors using data from the nationally representative Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS, n=819). Results As indicated by Cox regression modelling, dementia risk of low-educated individuals was not significantly different between ethnic groups but related to having an APOE e4 allele (HR 1.89), depression (HR 1.67), stroke (HR 1.60), and smoking (HR 1.32). Further, even in people with low education, every additional year of education decreased dementia risk (HR 0.95). Discussion Our findings imply that higher dementia prevalence in ethnic minorities may be attributable to low education, especially among Hispanics, in addition to other risk factors.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.05.011
       
  • A Six-Year Prospective Study of the Prognosis and Predictors in Patients
           with Late-Life Depression.
    • Authors: Hans W. Jeuring; Max L. Stek; Martijn Huisman; Richard C. Oude Voshaar; Paul Naarding; Rose M. Collard; Roos C. van der Mast; Rob M. Kok; Aartjan T.F. Beekman; Hannie C. Comijs
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Hans W. Jeuring, Max L. Stek, Martijn Huisman, Richard C. Oude Voshaar, Paul Naarding, Rose M. Collard, Roos C. van der Mast, Rob M. Kok, Aartjan T.F. Beekman, Hannie C. Comijs
      Objectives To examine the six-year prognosis of patients with late-life depression and to identify prognostic factors of an unfavorable course. Design and setting The Netherlands Study of Depression in Older persons (NESDO) is a multi-site naturalistic prospective cohort study with six-year follow-up. Participants 378 clinically depressed patients according to DSM-IV-TR criteria and 132 non-depressed comparisons were included at baseline between 2007-2010. Measurements Depression was measured by the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms at six-month intervals and a diagnostic interview at two-year and six-year follow-up. Multinomial regression and mixed model analyses were both used to identify depression-related clinical, health and psychosocial prognostic factors of an unfavorable course. Results Among depressed patients at baseline, 46.8% were loss to follow-up, 15.9% had an unfavorable course, i.e. chronic or recurrent, 24.6% had partial remission, and 12.7% had full remission, at six-year follow-up. The relative risk (RR) of mortality in depressed patients was 2.5 (95%-CI:1.26-4.81) when compared with non-depressed comparisons. An unfavorable course of depression was associated with a younger age of depression onset, higher symptom severity of depression, pain, neuroticism, and loneliness at baseline. Additionally, partial remission was associated with chronic diseases, and loneliness at baseline when compared with full remission. Conclusions The long-term prognosis of late-life depression is poor with regard to mortality and course of depression. Chronic diseases, loneliness, and pain may be used as putative targets for optimizing prevention and treatment strategies of relapse and chronicity.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.05.005
       
  • Understanding Disproportionate Fear of Falling in Older Adults:
           Implications for Intervention Development
    • Authors: Sarah T. Stahl; Steven M. Albert
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Sarah T. Stahl, Steven M. Albert


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.05.003
       
  • Depression and Risk of Alzheimer's Dementia: a Longitudinal Analysis to
           Determine Predictors of Increased Risk among Older Adults with Depression.
           
    • Authors: Damien Gallagher; Alex Kiss; Krista Lanctot; Nathan Herrmann
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Damien Gallagher, Alex Kiss, Krista Lanctot, Nathan Herrmann
      Objective: Older adults with depression are at increased risk of Alzheimer's dementia (AD) but predictors of increased risk remain incompletely understood. We aim to identify characteristics of older adults with depression most at most risk of progressing to AD. Identification of high-risk subgroups could facilitate future interventional strategies to reduce risk of AD in older adults with depression. Methods: Using data from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Centre, 1965 participants with clinically defined depression and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) at baseline were followed until development of AD or loss to follow up. Results: 780 (39.7%) developed AD over a median follow up duration of 27 months. In survival analyses age (HR 1.04, 95% 1.03 – 1.05), baseline MMSE (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.83 – 0.87), amnestic subtype of MCI (HR 1.66, 95% 1.30 – 2.12), presence of APOE e4 allele (HR 1.99, 1.69 – 2.36) and presence of active depression within the last 2 years (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.16 – 1.79) were all independently associated with increased risk of AD. 656 (41.7%) participants with MCI and active depression within the last 2 years developed AD compared to 120 (31.6%) of those with a more remote history of depression. Conclusion: Older adults with depression and MCI demonstrated a high rate of progression to AD over a relatively short duration of follow up. Individuals with a combination of MCI and recently active depression are a particularly high-risk subgroup.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.05.002
       
  • Unsolicited Patient Complaints Identify Physicians with Evidence of
           Neurocognitive Disorders
    • Authors: William O. Cooper; William Martinez; Henry J. Domenico; S. Todd Callahan; Brian P. Kirkby; Alistair J.R. Finlayson; Jody J. Foster; Theodore M. Johnson; Frank M. Longo; Douglas G. Merrill; Monica L. Jacobs; James W. Pichert; Thomas F. Catron; Ilene N. Moore; Lynn E. Webb; Jan Karrass; Gerald B. Hickson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): William O. Cooper, William Martinez, Henry J. Domenico, S. Todd Callahan, Brian P. Kirkby, Alistair J.R. Finlayson, Jody J. Foster, Theodore M. Johnson, Frank M. Longo, Douglas G. Merrill, Monica L. Jacobs, James W. Pichert, Thomas F. Catron, Ilene N. Moore, Lynn E. Webb, Jan Karrass, Gerald B. Hickson
      Objectives Determine whether words contained in unsolicited patient complaints differentiate physicians with and without neurocognitive disorders (NCD). Methods We conducted a nested case-control study using data from 144 healthcare organizations that participate in the Patient Advocacy Reporting System (PARS®) program. Cases (physicians with probable or possible NCD) and two comparison groups of 60 physicians each (matched for age/sex and site/number of unsolicited patient complaints) were identified from 33,814 physicians practicing at study sites. We compared the frequency of words in patient complaints related to an NCD diagnostic domain between cases and our two comparison groups. Results Individual words were all statistically more likely to appear in patient complaints for cases (73% of cases had at least one such word) compared to age/sex matched (8%, p<.001using Pearson's chi-squared test, χ2 = 30.21, d.f. = 1) and site/complaint matched comparisons (18%, p<.001using Pearson's chi-squared test, χ2 = 17.51, d.f. = 1). Cases were significantly more likely to have at least one complaint with any word describing NCD than the two comparison groups combined (conditional logistic model adjusted odds ratio 20.0 (95% confidence interval 4.9-81.7)). Conclusions Analysis of words in unsolicited patient complaints found that descriptions of interactions with physicians with NCD were significantly more likely to include words from one of the diagnostic domains for NCD than were two different comparison groups. Further research is needed to understand whether patients might provide information for healthcare organizations interested in identifying professionals with evidence of cognitive impairment.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.04.005
       
  • Subsyndromal Depression among People Aged 85+ Linked to Higher Monthly
           Healthcare Spending
    • Authors: Priscilla Novak; Jie Chen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Priscilla Novak, Jie Chen


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.019
       
  • The Relationship of Current Cognitive Activity to Brain Amyloid-Beta
           Burden and Glucose Metabolism
    • Authors: Clayton E. Lyons; Dana Tudorascu; Beth E. Snitz; Julie Price; Howard Aizenstein; Oscar Lopez; Brian Lopresti; Charles Laymon; Davneet Minhas; Ilyas Kamboh; Chester Mathis; William Klunk; Ann D. Cohen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Clayton E. Lyons, Dana Tudorascu, Beth E. Snitz, Julie Price, Howard Aizenstein, Oscar Lopez, Brian Lopresti, Charles Laymon, Davneet Minhas, Ilyas Kamboh, Chester Mathis, William Klunk, Ann D. Cohen
      Several studies have investigated how lifetime cognitive engagement affects levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition in the brain. However, there has been some disagreement leaving the relationship of cognitive activity (CA) to Aβ a largely open question. The present study investigated the relationship between CA, Aβ deposition and glucose metabolism. One hundred and twelve cognitively normal participants underwent PiB and FDG-PET and completed a questionnaire designed to measure current CA. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in PiB retention between those in the high and low CA group. Linear regression models revealed a significant negative relationship between PiB retention and CA and a significant positive relationship between glucose metabolism and CA. These data suggest that CA may have a direct beneficial effect on the pathophysiology of AD or reflects another underlying process that results in both higher CA and lower AD pathophysiology.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.018
       
  • Transitioning the Health Care System to Effectively Work with Older
           Transgender Persons
    • Authors: Maria D. Llorente
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Maria D. Llorente


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.002
       
  • The Impact of Awareness of and Concern About Memory Performance on the
           Prediction of Progression From Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's
           Disease Dementia
    • Authors: Catherine E. Munro; Nancy J. Donovan; Rebecca E. Amariglio; Kate V. Papp; Gad A. Marshall; Dorene M. Rentz; Alvaro Pascual-Leone; Reisa A. Sperling; Joseph J. Locascio; Patrizia Vannini
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Catherine E. Munro, Nancy J. Donovan, Rebecca E. Amariglio, Kate V. Papp, Gad A. Marshall, Dorene M. Rentz, Alvaro Pascual-Leone, Reisa A. Sperling, Joseph J. Locascio, Patrizia Vannini
      Objective To investigate the relationship of awareness of and concern about memory performance to progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. Methods Participants (n=33) had a diagnosis of MCI at baseline and a diagnosis of MCI or AD-dementia at follow-up. Participants were categorized as “Stable-MCI” if they retained a diagnosis of MCI at follow-up (mean follow-up=18.0 months), or “Progressor-MCI” if they received a diagnosis of AD-dementia at follow-up (mean follow-up=21.6 months). Awareness was measured using the residual from regressing a participant's objective memory score onto their subjective complaint score (i.e., residual <0 indicates overestimation of performance). Concern was assessed using a questionnaire examining the degree of concern when forgetting. Logistic regression was used to determine whether the presence of these syndromes could predict future diagnosis of AD-dementia, and repeated-measures ANCOVAs were used to examine longitudinal patterns of these syndromes. Results Baseline anosognosia was apparent in the Progressor-MCI group, whereas the Stable-MCI group demonstrated relative awareness of their memory performance. Baseline awareness scores successfully predicted whether an individual would progress to AD dementia. Neither group showed change in awareness of performance over time. Neither group showed differences in concern about memory performance at baseline or change in concern about performance over time. Conclusions These data suggest that anosognosia may appear prior to the onset of AD-dementia, while anosodiaphoria likely does not appear until later in the AD continuum. Additionally, neither group showed significant changes in awareness or concern over time, suggesting that change in these variables may happen over longer periods.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.04.008
       
  • Information for Subscribers
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
       
  • In This Issue
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
       
  • Promoting Wellness in Older Adults with Mental Illnesses and Substance Use
           Disorders: Call to Action to All Stakeholders
    • Authors: Dilip V. Jeste; Susan Peschin; Kathleen Buckwalter; Dan G. Blazer; Marsden H. McGuire; Joel Miller; Christine Moutier; Allen Doederlein; George Niederehe; Brian Altman; Jeffrey Borenstein; Elyn Saks; Grayson Norquist; George F. Koob; Wilson M. Compton; Andrew Sperling; Lisa Bain; Danielle Glorioso; Ilisa Halpern Paul; Charles F. Reynolds
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Dilip V. Jeste, Susan Peschin, Kathleen Buckwalter, Dan G. Blazer, Marsden H. McGuire, Joel Miller, Christine Moutier, Allen Doederlein, George Niederehe, Brian Altman, Jeffrey Borenstein, Elyn Saks, Grayson Norquist, George F. Koob, Wilson M. Compton, Andrew Sperling, Lisa Bain, Danielle Glorioso, Ilisa Halpern Paul, Charles F. Reynolds


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.011
       
  • The Value of a Palliative Frame in Advanced Dementia
    • Authors: Andrea Iaboni; Karen Van Ooteghem; Alastair J. Flint; Ron Keren; Daphna Grossman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Andrea Iaboni, Karen Van Ooteghem, Alastair J. Flint, Ron Keren, Daphna Grossman


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.04.007
       
  • Sertraline for the Treatment of Depression in Vascular Cognitive
           Impairment
    • Authors: Gali H. Weissberger; Brandon C. Yarns; Stephen T. Chen; Theresa Narvaez; Natalya Bussel; David L. Sultzer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Gali H. Weissberger, Brandon C. Yarns, Stephen T. Chen, Theresa Narvaez, Natalya Bussel, David L. Sultzer


      PubDate: 2018-05-31T15:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.04.006
       
  • The Promise and Challenges of Using Combined Moderator Methods to
           Personalize Mental Health Treatment
    • Authors: Meredith L. Wallace; Stephen H. Smagula
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Meredith L. Wallace, Stephen H. Smagula


      PubDate: 2018-04-25T13:36:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.02.001
       
  • Commentary: Symptomatic and Functional Recovery From Major Depressive
           Disorder in the Ibadan Study of Ageing
    • Authors: Alex Cohen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Alex Cohen


      PubDate: 2018-04-25T13:36:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.02.003
       
  • Resilience and White Matter Integrity in Geriatric Depression
    • Authors: Roza M. Vlasova; Prabha Siddarth; Beatrix Krause; Amber M. Leaver; Kelsey T. Laird; Natalie St. Cyr; Katherine L. Narr; Helen Lavretsky
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Roza M. Vlasova, Prabha Siddarth, Beatrix Krause, Amber M. Leaver, Kelsey T. Laird, Natalie St. Cyr, Katherine L. Narr, Helen Lavretsky
      Background Greater psychological resilience may protect against developing depression in a growing geriatric population. Identifying the neural correlates of resilience in geriatric depression could provide neurobiological targets to inform clinical interventions. However, most prior neuroimaging studies have only considered the presence or absence of resilience and have not addressed the multifactorial nature of resilience. The current study aimed to establish the neural correlates of four factors of resilience in the depressed elderly. Methods White matter integrity was assessed using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) data collected from 70 older adults with major depressive disorder. We used four resilience factors previously derived in an exploratory factor analysis of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale in a large sample of depressed older adults: 1, grit; 2, active coping self-efficacy; 3, accommodative coping self-efficacy, and 4, spirituality. Results The Resilience factor “grit” was positively associated with fractional anisotropy in the callosal region connecting prefrontal cortex and fractional anisotropy in cingulum fibers, however, the latter did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Structural integrity of major white matter pathways implicated in cognitive control and emotion regulation (i.e., connecting prefrontal cortex) was positively associated with the resilience factor “grit” in our sample of older adults with depression. Prospective studies are needed to determine the utility of the structural integrity of these pathways as a biomarker in predicting risk for depression and treatment response.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T13:36:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.04.004
       
  • Finding Disparities in the Stars: Using the Nursing Home Five-Star Quality
           Rating System to Identify Disparities in Nursing Home Quality for Older
           Adults with Severe Mental Illness
    • Authors: Ivy Benjenk; Jie Chen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Ivy Benjenk, Jie Chen


      PubDate: 2018-04-25T13:36:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.017
       
  • Odorant Item Specific Olfactory Identification Deficit May Differentiate
           Alzheimer's Disease From Aging
    • Authors: Matthew R. Woodward; Muhammad Ubaid Hafeez; Qianya Qi; Ahmed Riaz; Ralph H.B. Benedict; Li Yan; Kinga Szigeti
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Matthew R. Woodward, Muhammad Ubaid Hafeez, Qianya Qi, Ahmed Riaz, Ralph H.B. Benedict, Li Yan, Kinga Szigeti
      Objectives To explore whether the ability to recognize specific odorant items are differentially affected in aging versus Alzheimer's disease (AD); To refine olfactory identification deficit (OID) as a biomarker of prodromal and early AD. Design Prospective multicenter cross-sectional study with a longitudinal arm Setting Outpatient memory diagnostic clinics in New York and Texas Participants Adults aged 65 and older with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and AD and healthy aging (HA) subjects in the comparison group. Measurements Participants completed the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and neuropsychological testing. AD-associated odorants (AD-10) were selected based on a model of ordinal logistic regression. Age-associated odorants (Age-10) were identified using a linear model. Results For the 841 participants (234 HA, 192 aMCI, 415 AD), AD-10 was superior to Age-10 in separating HA and AD. AD-10 was associated with a more widespread cognitive deficit across multiple domains, in contrast to Age-10. The disease- and age-associated odorants clustered separately in age and AD. AD-10 predicted conversion from aMCI to AD. Conclusions Non-overlapping UPSIT items were identified that were individually associated with age and disease. Despite a modest predictive value of the AD-specific items for conversion to AD, the AD-specific items may be useful in enriching samples to better identify those at risk for AD. Further studies are needed with monomolecular and unilateral stimulation and orthogonal biomarker validation to further refine disease- and age-associated signals.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25T13:36:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.02.008
       
  • Age-Related Hearing Loss and Its Association with Depression in Later Life
    • Authors: Katharine K. Brewster; Adam Ciarleglio; Patrick J. Brown; Chen Chen; Hae-Ok Kim; Steven P. Roose; Justin S. Golub; Bret R. Rutherford
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Katharine K. Brewster, Adam Ciarleglio, Patrick J. Brown, Chen Chen, Hae-Ok Kim, Steven P. Roose, Justin S. Golub, Bret R. Rutherford
      Objectives To evaluate the association between age-related hearing loss (ARHL) and depressive symptoms in older adults over time. Methods Data from the Health Aging and Body Composition study (N=3075, aged 70–79 at baseline) were used previously to conduct a longitudinal latent class analysis to evaluate depression trajectories (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression [CES-D] Scale) over 10 years. Restricting to the subset of subjects who had hearing information available (N=1204), self-reported hearing categories were evaluated over the same period. Association between depression classes and hearing categories were assessed via multinomial logistic regression analyses. Correlation analyses and two-sample t-tests were used to assess cross-sectional associations between depression status and audiometric hearing measures. Results Low-probability (N=644), increasing-probability (N=385), and high-probability (N=175) trajectories of depressive symptoms were identified for the 10-year period. Impaired/Worsening (N=182) and Healthy/Improving (N=1,022) hearing categories were defined using self-reports. With the low-probability depression trajectory as the reference group, subjects reporting Impaired/Worsening hearing had 1.63 times increased odds of having an increasing- (p=0.0088, 95% CI [1.13, 2.34]) and 1.85 times increased odds of having a high-probability depression trajectory (p=0.0102, 95% CI [1.16, 2.96]). At Year 5, individuals with depressive symptoms (10CES-D≥10) had impaired hearing ability measured by audiometric threshold for low-frequency (Adjusted mean difference=2.29 dBHL, p=0.0005) and mid-frequency sounds (Adjusted mean difference=2.28 dBHL,p=0.0049) compared to those with 10CES-D < 10. Conclusions ARHL was associated with increased depressive symptoms in older adults. Future studies should investigate whether treatment of ARHL may be an effective prevention and/or therapeutic strategy for depressive symptoms.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T18:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.04.003
       
  • Integrated Exposure Therapy and Exercise Reduces Fear of Falling and
           Avoidance in Older Adults: a Randomized Pilot Study
    • Authors: Julie Loebach Wetherell; Emily S. Bower; Kristen Johnson; Douglas G. Chang; Samuel R. Ward; Andrew J. Petkus
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Julie Loebach Wetherell, Emily S. Bower, Kristen Johnson, Douglas G. Chang, Samuel R. Ward, Andrew J. Petkus
      Objective: To evaluate the safety and acceptability of a novel 8-week intervention integrating exercise, exposure therapy, cognitive restructuring, and a home safety evaluation, conducted by a physical therapist, in reducing fear of falling and activity avoidance. To collect preliminary evidence of efficacy. Design: Randomized pilot study comparing the intervention to time- and attention-equivalent fall prevention education. Setting: Participants' homes. Participants: 42 older adults with disproportionate fear of falling (high fear, low to moderate objective fall risk). Measurements: Falls Efficacy Scale-International, modified Activity Card Sort, satisfaction, falls. Results: Relative to education, the intervention reduced fear of falling (d = 1.23) and activity avoidance (d = 1.02) at 8 weeks, but effects eroded over a six-month follow-up period. The intervention did not increase falls, and participants rated the exercise, exposure therapy, and non-specific elements as most helpful. Conclusion: An integration of exercise and exposure therapy may help older adults with disproportionate fear of falling, but modifications to the intervention or its duration may be needed to maintain participants' gains.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T18:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.04.001
       
  • People's Beliefs and Expectations About How Cognitive Skills Change with
           Age: Evidence From a UK-Wide Aging Survey
    • Authors: Eleftheria Vaportzis; Alan J. Gow
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Eleftheria Vaportzis, Alan J. Gow
      Objective We conducted a UK-wide survey to collect information on people's beliefs, fears, perceptions and attitudes to cognitive aging. Setting Community-based aging survey. Participants Respondents were 3,146 adults over 40 years. Results Respondents thought memory might be the earliest cognitive skill to decline (M = 59.4 years), followed by speed of thinking (M = 64.9). Those in their 40s were more pessimistic, as they estimated cognitive changes would start up to 15 years earlier than respondents over 70 years. Having a purpose in life, healthy eating, challenging the mind, sleep, and physical activity ranked higher in terms of perceived importance for maintaining or improving cognitive skills. Yet less than 50% engaged in any of these activities. Although 91% thought there are things people can do to maintain or improve their cognitive skills, more than 40% were unsure or did not know how to do so. Respondents who strongly agreed that changes in cognitive skills might be a sign of something more serious were significantly more likely to do various activities to benefit their cognitive skills. Conclusions Results suggest that people are less aware of the potential cognitive benefits of certain activities, such as exercise and diet. It is important to build awareness about the benefits of certain activities for cognitive health.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T18:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.016
       
  • Information for Subscribers
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T18:52:06Z
       
  • In This Issue
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T18:52:06Z
       
  • Making Sense of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia
    • Authors: Ladson Hinton
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Ladson Hinton


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T18:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.001
       
  • Palliating Severe Refractory Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Dementia: Is
           There a Role for Electroconvulsive Therapy'
    • Authors: Tyler S. Kaster; Daniel M. Blumberger
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Tyler S. Kaster, Daniel M. Blumberger


      PubDate: 2018-02-17T15:47:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2018.01.002
       
 
 
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