for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3031 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3031 Journals sorted alphabetically
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 79, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 302, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 195, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 119, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 332, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 303, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 389, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access  
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 152, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription  
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 141, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.711, h-index: 78)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.394, h-index: 30)
Annales d'Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.177, h-index: 13)
Annales de Chirurgie de la Main et du Membre Supérieur     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Chirurgie Plastique Esthétique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 22)
Annales de Chirurgie Vasculaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
  [SJR: 1.653]   [H-I: 93]   [14 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1064-7481 - ISSN (Online) 1545-7214
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3031 journals]
  • Subspecialty Training and Certification in Geriatric Psychiatry: A 25-Year
           Overview
    • Authors: Dorthea Juul; Christopher C. Colenda; Jeffrey M. Lyness; Laura B. Dunn; Rita Hargrave; Larry R. Faulkner
      Pages: 445 - 453
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Dorthea Juul, Christopher C. Colenda, Jeffrey M. Lyness, Laura B. Dunn, Rita Hargrave, Larry R. Faulkner
      The Institute of Medicine estimated that by 2030, from 10.1 to 14.4 million Americans aged 65 years or older will have mental health or substance use disorders. This article reviews the history and current status of training, certification, and practice in geriatric psychiatry against the backdrop of this “silver tsunami.” The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) administered the first subspecialty examination in geriatric psychiatry in 1991, and through 2015 3,329 certificates were awarded. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education approved the training requirements in 1993. After a surge in programs and fellows, the numbers appear to have stabilized at about 57 programs and 60–65 trainees per year with fewer than half of the positions filled each year. The majority of graduates seeks and obtains ABPN certification, and the majority of those who were fellowship trained have maintained certification. Despite the unprecedented demand for mental health services for older adults, it must be acknowledged that not enough geriatric psychiatrists can be prepared to meet the needs of an aging U.S. population. Strategies for addressing the shortage are discussed, including undertaking subspecialty training in the fourth year of psychiatry training, increasing the time devoted to the care of older adults in undergraduate and graduate medical education, and developing alternative training pathways such as mini-fellowships. It is not clear whether more favorable Medicare reimbursement rates for those certified in geriatric psychiatry would increase the numbers seeking fellowship training.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.12.018
       
  • Tipping Point
    • Authors: Paul Kirwin
      Pages: 454 - 455
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Paul Kirwin


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.06.004
       
  • Co-Occurrence and Predictors of Three Commonly Occurring Behavioral
           Symptoms in Dementia: Agitation, Aggression, and Rejection of Care
    • Authors: Scott Seung W. Choi; Chakra Budhathoki; Laura N. Gitlin
      Pages: 459 - 468
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Scott Seung W. Choi, Chakra Budhathoki, Laura N. Gitlin
      Objective To investigate co-occurrences of agitation, aggression, and rejection of care in community-dwelling families living with dementia. Methods Cross-sectional, secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial testing a nonpharmacological intervention to reduce behavioral symptoms. We examined frequency of occurrence of presenting behaviors at baseline and their combination. Omnibus tests compared those exhibiting combinations of behaviors on contributory factors. Multinomial logistic regression analyses examined relationships of contributory factors to combinations of behaviors. Results Of 272 persons with dementia (PwDs), 41 (15%) had agitation alone (Agi), 3 (1%) had aggression alone, 5 (2%) had rejection of care alone. For behavioral combinations, 65 (24%) had agitation and aggression (Agi+Aggr), 35 (13%) had agitation and rejection (Agi+Rej), 1 (0%) had aggression and rejection, and 106 (39%) had all three behaviors (All). Four behavioral subgroups (Agi, Agi+Aggr, Agi+Rej, and All) were examined. Kruskal-Wallis tests showed that there were significant group differences in PwD cognition, functional dependence, and caregiver frustration. PwDs in Agi+Rej and All were more cognitively impaired than those in Agi and Agi+Aggr. Also, caregivers in All were more frustrated than those in Agi. In logistic regression analyses, compared with Agi, greater cognitive impairment was a significant predictor of Agi+Rej and All, but not Agi+Aggr. In contrast, greater caregiver frustration was a significant predictor of Agi+Aggr and All, but not Agi+Rej. Conclusions We found that agitation, aggression, and rejection are common but distinct behaviors. Combinations of these behaviors have different relationships with contributory factors, suggesting the need for targeting treatment approaches to clusters.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.10.013
       
  • Bringing Precision Medicine to the Management of BPSD
    • Authors: Donovan T. Maust; Helen C. Kales
      Pages: 469 - 470
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Donovan T. Maust, Helen C. Kales


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.02.010
       
  • Measurement of Functional Cognition and Complex Everyday Activities in
           Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Mild Dementia: Validity of
           the Large Allen's Cognitive Level Screen
    • Authors: Jacqueline Wesson; Lindy Clemson; John D. Crawford; Nicole A. Kochan; Henry Brodaty; Simone Reppermund
      Pages: 471 - 482
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Jacqueline Wesson, Lindy Clemson, John D. Crawford, Nicole A. Kochan, Henry Brodaty, Simone Reppermund
      Objective To explore the validity of the Large Allen's Cognitive Level Screen-5 (LACLS-5) as a performance-based measure of functional cognition, representing an ability to perform complex everyday activities in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mild dementia living in the community. Methods Using cross-sectional data from the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study, 160 community-dwelling older adults with normal cognition (CN; N = 87), MCI (N = 43), or dementia (N = 30) were studied. Functional cognition (LACLS-5), complex everyday activities (Disability Assessment for Dementia [DAD]), Assessment of Motor and Process Skills [AMPS]), and neuropsychological measures were used. Results Participants with dementia performed worse than CN on all clinical measures, and MCI participants were intermediate. Correlational analyses showed that LACLS-5 was most strongly related to AMPS Process scores, DAD instrumental activities of daily living subscale, Mini-Mental State Exam, Block Design, Logical Memory, and Trail Making Test B. Multiple regression analysis indicated that both cognitive (Block Design) and functional measures (AMPS Process score) and sex predicted LACLS-5 performance. Finally, LACLS-5 was able to adequately discriminate between CN and dementia and between MCI and dementia but was unable to reliably distinguish between CN and MCI. Conclusion Construct validity, including convergent and discriminative validity, was supported. LACLS-5 is a valid performance-based measure for evaluating functional cognition. Discriminativevalidity is acceptable for identifying mild dementia but requires further refinement for detecting MCI.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.11.021
       
  • Functional Cognition: Implications for Practice, Policy, and Research
    • Authors: Elizabeth R. Skidmore
      Pages: 483 - 484
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Elizabeth R. Skidmore


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.12.020
       
  • Operationalizing the Diagnostic Criteria for Mild Cognitive Impairment:
           The Salience of Objective Measures in Predicting Incident Dementia
    • Authors: Henry Brodaty; Liesbeth Aerts; John D. Crawford; Megan Heffernan; Nicole A. Kochan; Simone Reppermund; Kristan Kang; Kate Maston; Brian Draper; Julian N. Trollor; Perminder S. Sachdev
      Pages: 485 - 497
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Henry Brodaty, Liesbeth Aerts, John D. Crawford, Megan Heffernan, Nicole A. Kochan, Simone Reppermund, Kristan Kang, Kate Maston, Brian Draper, Julian N. Trollor, Perminder S. Sachdev
      Objective Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered an intermediate stage between normal aging and dementia. It is diagnosed in the presence of subjective cognitive decline and objective cognitive impairment without significant functional impairment, although there are no standard operationalizations for each of these criteria. The objective of this study is to determine which operationalization of the MCI criteria is most accurate at predicting dementia. Design Six-year longitudinal study, part of the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. Setting Community-based. Participants 873 community-dwelling dementia-free adults between 70 and 90 years of age. Persons from a non-English speaking background were excluded. Measurements Seven different operationalizations for subjective cognitive decline and eight measures of objective cognitive impairment (resulting in 56 different MCI operational algorithms) were applied. The accuracy of each algorithm to predict progression to dementia over 6 years was examined for 618 individuals. Results Baseline MCI prevalence varied between 0.4% and 30.2% and dementia conversion between 15.9% and 61.9% across different algorithms. The predictive accuracy for progression to dementia was poor. The highest accuracy was achieved based on objective cognitive impairment alone. Inclusion of subjective cognitive decline or mild functional impairment did not improve dementia prediction accuracy. Conclusions Not MCI, but objective cognitive impairment alone, is the best predictor for progression to dementia in a community sample. Nevertheless, clinical assessment procedures need to be refined to improve the identification of pre-dementia individuals.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.12.012
       
  • Who Are the Seniors with Subjective but Not Objective Cognitive
           Impairment?
    • Authors: Dilip V. Jeste; Graham M.L. Eglit
      Pages: 498 - 499
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Dilip V. Jeste, Graham M.L. Eglit


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.02.005
       
  • Physical Health, Medication, and Healthcare Utilization among 70-Year-Old
           People with Schizophrenia: A Nationwide Danish Register Study
    • Authors: Maria Brink; Anders Green; Anders Bo Bojesen; J. Steven Lamberti; Yeates Conwell; Kjeld Andersen
      Pages: 500 - 509
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Maria Brink, Anders Green, Anders Bo Bojesen, J. Steven Lamberti, Yeates Conwell, Kjeld Andersen
      Objectives In light of the excess early mortality in schizophrenia, mainly due to physical illnesses, we investigated medical comorbidity, use of medication, and healthcare utilization among individuals with schizophrenia who survived into older ages to uncover potential factors contributing to their longevity. Design A nationwide register-based case-control study comparing 70-year-olds with and without schizophrenia. Setting Cases were drawn from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. Age- and sex-matched controls were drawn from the general population via the Civil Registration System. Participants All Danish inhabitants who were diagnosed and registered with early onset schizophrenia in 1970–1979 and still alive at age 70 years. Controls alive at age 70 years. Measurements Chronic medical comorbidity, medications, and inpatient and outpatient healthcare utilization extracted from Danish healthcare registers. Results Older adults with schizophrenia did not differ from controls with regard to registered chronic medical illnesses, but were significantly less likely to receive medication for cardiovascular diseases (OR: 0.65; 99.29% CI: 0.50, 0.83) and more likely to be treated with analgesics (OR: 1.46; 99.29% CI: 1.04, 2.05). Overall, hospital admissions and number of days hospitalized were equal to controls, but with significantly fewer general medical outpatient contacts (RR: 0.37; 98.75% CI: 0.24, 0.55). Conclusions Because the literature suggests that excess mortality continues into old age, it is possible that medical diseases were under-registered and/or under-treated. Focus on adequate medical treatment, in particular for cardiovascular disease, is needed. Future integration of psychiatric and general medical healthcare, especially outpatient care, might further optimize health outcomes for older adults with schizophrenia.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.12.015
       
  • Healthy Older Schizophrenia Patients: Exceptions to the Rule?
    • Authors: Paul D. Meesters
      Pages: 510 - 511
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Paul D. Meesters


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.01.015
       
  • Prevention of Poststroke Mortality Using Problem-Solving Therapy or
           Escitalopram
    • Authors: Robert G. Robinson; Ricardo E. Jorge; Jeffrey Long
      Pages: 512 - 519
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Robert G. Robinson, Ricardo E. Jorge, Jeffrey Long
      Objective This study re-examined patients from a 1-year randomized controlled double-blind trial of escitalopram, problem-solving therapy (PST), or placebo to prevent depression among patients less than 3 months after a stroke. The objective of the current study was to determine if preventive treatment would predict time to death over 8–10 years of follow-up. Based on the importance of depression in poststoke mortality and a previous study of this population at 18 months' follow-up showing that stopping escitalopram but not PST led to a significant increase in depression, the authors hypothesized that PST would be associated with the longest time to death. Methods Of 129 eligible patients, 122 were contacted and 7 were lost to follow-up. Families and surviving patients were interviewed to determine current health status or the date and cause of death. Results Using the Weibull model of log time (years) to death, controlled for age, severity of physical illness, gender, severity of stroke, and history of depression after study entry, there was a significant independent effect of treatment. PST significantly and independently increased the time to mortality, whereas older age and major depression significantly and independently decreased the time to death. Conclusion To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a psychological antidepressant treatment administered for 1 year has been associated with increased survival among patients who have suffered a stroke.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.10.001
       
  • Multimorbidity and Mental Health
    • Authors: Joseph J. Gallo
      Pages: 520 - 521
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Joseph J. Gallo


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.02.007
       
  • Older Adults with PTSD: Brief State of Research and Evidence-Based
           Psychotherapy Case Illustration
    • Authors: Joan M. Cook; Elissa McCarthy; Steven R. Thorp
      Pages: 522 - 530
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Joan M. Cook, Elissa McCarthy, Steven R. Thorp
      Although lifetime exposure to potentially traumatic events among older adults is fairly high, rates of full-blown post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are estimated at about 4.5%, a rate lower than that for middle-aged and young adults. Nevertheless, PTSD seems to be an under-recognized and under-treated condition in older adults. Assessment and treatment can be challenging in this population for various reasons, including potential cognitive or sensory decline and comorbid mental and physical disorders. This article provides highlights of the empirical research on PTSD in late life, including information on its effects on cognition and physical health. The bulk of this piece is spent on reviewing the theory, description of, and efficacy for an evidence-based psychotherapy, Prolonged Exposure (PE), for PTSD. A detailed successful application of PE with an older veteran with severe, chronic PTSD in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System is presented. Evidence-based psychotherapy for PTSD can be safely and effectively used with older individuals.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.12.016
       
  • Comparison of Nine Instruments to Calculate Anticholinergic Load in a
           Large Cohort of Older Outpatients: Association with Cognitive and
           Functional Decline, Falls, and Use of Laxatives
    • Authors: Tanja Mayer; Andreas Daniel Meid; Kai-Uwe Saum; Hermann Brenner; Ben Schöttker; Hanna Marita Seidling; Walter Emil Haefeli
      Pages: 531 - 540
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Tanja Mayer, Andreas Daniel Meid, Kai-Uwe Saum, Hermann Brenner, Ben Schöttker, Hanna Marita Seidling, Walter Emil Haefeli
      Objective A patient's risk for anticholinergic adverse effects is frequently estimated by instruments evaluating the drugs included in his medication profile. It remains unknown, however, which characteristics should be included in such an assessment instrument aiming to reliably predict adverse anticholinergic outcomes. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting ESTHER cohort (Germany). Participants Home-dwelling participants (N = 2,761) aged between 60 and 87 years. Measurements The association between anticholinergic load calculated with nine different instruments and four anticholinergic adverse outcomes was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. Therefore, linear models complemented with Kendall's tau rank correlation coefficients (ԏ) were applied for continuous outcomes and generalized linear models were used to derive odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for binary endpoints. Results Based on the respective identification criteria for anticholinergic drugs, the nine instruments identified between 245 (9%) and 866 (31%) anticholinergic drug users (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 6 years; Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score: 28.3 ± 2.07; Barthel Index: 97.1 ± 7.5; 291 reporting falls; 29 taking laxatives [surrogate for constipation]). In the multivariate analysis, only two instruments indicated a significant association between anticholinergic load and all four outcomes. The instrument considering the prescribed dose showed the strongest association with MMSE scores (ԏ = −0.10), falls (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.50–3.52), and the use of laxatives (OR: 3.11; 95% CI: 1.04–9.36). Conclusions Instruments most reliably predicted anticholinergicadverse events if they were either based on the drugs' serum anticholinergic activity and the suggestions of clinician experts or considered the actual prescribed dose.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.01.009
       
  • Measuring Maladaptive Cognitions in Complicated Grief: Introducing the
           Typical Beliefs Questionnaire
    • Authors: Natalia A. Skritskaya; Christine Mauro; Matthew Olonoff; Xin Qiu; Sarah Duncan; Yuanjia Wang; Naihua Duan; Barry Lebowitz; Charles F. Reynolds; Naomi M. Simon; Sidney Zisook; M. Katherine Shear
      Pages: 541 - 550
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Natalia A. Skritskaya, Christine Mauro, Matthew Olonoff, Xin Qiu, Sarah Duncan, Yuanjia Wang, Naihua Duan, Barry Lebowitz, Charles F. Reynolds, Naomi M. Simon, Sidney Zisook, M. Katherine Shear
      Objectives Maladaptive cognitions related to loss are thought to contribute to development of complicated grief and are crucial to address in treatment, but tools available to assess them are limited. This paper introduces the Typical Beliefs Questionnaire (TBQ), a 25-item self-report instrument to assess cognitions that interfere with adaptation to loss. Design Study participants completed an assessment battery during their initial evaluation and again after completing treatment at 20 weeks. Test–retest reliability was assessed on a subsample of the participants who did not show change in complicated grief severity after the first 4 weeks of treatment. To examine latent structure of the TBQ, an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed. Setting Academic medical centers in Boston, New York, Pittsburgh, and San Diego from 2010–2014. Participants 394 bereaved adults who met criteria for complicated grief. Measurements The TBQ along with assessments of complicated grief symptoms and related avoidance, depression symptoms, functional impairment, and perceived social support. Results The TBQ exhibited good internal consistency (α = 0.82) and test–retest reliability (N = 105; intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.74). EFA indicated a five-factor structure: “Protesting the Death,” “Negative Thoughts About the World,” “Needing the Person,” “Less Grief is Wrong” and “Grieving Too Much.” The total score and all factors showed sensitivity to change with treatment. Conclusions This new tool allows a clinician to quickly and reliably ascertain presence of specific maladaptive cognitions related to complicated grief, and subsequently, to use the information to aid a diagnostic assessment, to structure the treatment, and to measure treatment outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.09.003
       
  • Amyloid-Beta Deposition is Associated with Increased Medial Temporal Lobe
           Activation during Memory Encoding in the Cognitively Normal Elderly
    • Authors: Kathryn Edelman; Dana Tudorascu; Christian Agudelo; Beth Snitz; Helmet Karim; Ann Cohen; Chester Mathis; Julie Price; Lisa Weissfeld; William Klunk; Howard Aizenstein
      Pages: 551 - 560
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): Kathryn Edelman, Dana Tudorascu, Christian Agudelo, Beth Snitz, Helmet Karim, Ann Cohen, Chester Mathis, Julie Price, Lisa Weissfeld, William Klunk, Howard Aizenstein
      Background Much is unknown about changes that occur in the brain in the years preceding the cognitive and functional impairment associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). This period before mild cognitive impairment is present has been referred to as preclinical AD, and is thought to begin with amyloid-beta deposition and then progress to neurodegeneration and functional brain circuit alterations. Prior studies have shown that there is increased medial temporal lobe activation on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) early in the course of mild cognitive impairment. It is unknown, however, whether this altered fMRI activity precedes cognitive impairment. The purpose of this study is to address this question using Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) imaging and fMRI in a sample of cognitively normal older adults. Methods Forty-four cognitively normal older adults underwent both PiB imaging and fMRI with a face-name memory task: 21 were classified as PiB(+) and 23 were PiB(−). Additionally, thorough cognitive and neuropsychological test batteries were administered outside the scanner. The main outcome measure in this study is fMRI activation in the medial temporal lobe during a face-name memory-encoding task. Results PiB(+) subjects showed higher fMRI activation during the memory task in the hippocampus relative to PiB(−) participants. Conclusions The increased medial temporal lobe activation in preclinical AD, observed in this study, may serve as an early biomarker of neurodegeneration. Future studies are needed to clarify whether this functional biomarker can stratify AD risk among PiB(+) older adults.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.12.021
       
  • Reconciling the Many Evolving Perspectives of Psychopathology
    • Authors: George S. Alexopoulos
      Pages: 561 - 566
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): George S. Alexopoulos


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.01.002
       
  • Approaching 81
    • Authors: J. Barrie Shepherd
      First page: 567
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5
      Author(s): J. Barrie Shepherd


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.01.006
       
  • Prevalence of DSM-5 Mild Neurocognitive Disorder in Dementia-Free Older
           Adults: Results of the Population-Based LIFE-Adult-Study
    • Authors: Tobias Luck; Francisca S. Then; Matthias L. Schroeter; Veronica Witte; Christoph Engel; Markus Loeffler; Joachim Thiery; Arno Villringer; Steffi G. Riedel-Heller
      Pages: 328 - 339
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4
      Author(s): Tobias Luck, Francisca S. Then, Matthias L. Schroeter, Veronica Witte, Christoph Engel, Markus Loeffler, Joachim Thiery, Arno Villringer, Steffi G. Riedel-Heller
      Objective The DSM-5 introduces mild neurocognitive disorder (miNCD) as a syndrome that recognizes the potential clinical importance of acquired cognitive deficits being too mild to qualify for diagnosis of dementia. We provide new empirical data on miNCD including total, age-, and sex-specific prevalence rates; number and types of neurocognitive domains being impaired; and diagnostic overlap with the well-established mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concept. Design Cross-sectional results of an observational cohort study (LIFE-Adult-Study). Setting General population. Participants A total of 1,080 dementia-free individuals, aged 60–79 years. Measurements We calculated weighted point prevalence rates with confidence intervals (95% CI) for miNCD and analyzed diagnostic overlap between miNCD and MCI by calculating overall percentage agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficient. Results Weighted total prevalence of miNCD was 20.3% (95% CI: 17.8–23.0). Prevalence was similar in both sexes, but significantly higher in older age. Two-thirds (66.2%) of the individuals with miNCD showed impairment restricted to only one out of six possible neurocognitive domains. Learning and memory was the most frequently (38.3%) impaired domain in all miNCD-cases, followed by social cognition (26.1%). Analysis of diagnostic overlap with MCI yielded an overall agreement of 98.6% and a kappa of 0.959. Conclusions By considering all six predefined neurocognitive domains, our study observed a substantial proportion of dementia-free older adults having miNCD. Provision of information on the underlying etiology/ies may be of prime importance in future studies aiming at evaluating the clinical relevance of the miNCD syndrome.

      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.07.001
       
  • Bridge Over Troubled Water
    • Authors: Ingmar Skoog
      Pages: 340 - 341
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4
      Author(s): Ingmar Skoog


      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.01.008
       
  • Cholinergic Receptor Binding in Alzheimer Disease and Healthy Aging:
           Assessment In Vivo with Positron Emission Tomography Imaging
    • Authors: David L. Sultzer; Rebecca J. Melrose; Hannah Riskin-Jones; Theresa A. Narvaez; Joseph Veliz; Timothy K. Ando; Kevin O. Juarez; Dylan G. Harwood; Arthur L. Brody; Mark A. Mandelkern
      Pages: 342 - 353
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4
      Author(s): David L. Sultzer, Rebecca J. Melrose, Hannah Riskin-Jones, Theresa A. Narvaez, Joseph Veliz, Timothy K. Ando, Kevin O. Juarez, Dylan G. Harwood, Arthur L. Brody, Mark A. Mandelkern
      Objective To compare regional nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding in older adults with Alzheimer disease (AD) and healthy older adults in vivo and to assess relationships between receptor binding and clinical symptoms. Methods Using cross-sectional positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging and structured clinical assessment, outpatients with mild to moderate AD (N = 24) and healthy older adults without cognitive complaints (C group; N = 22) were studied. PET imaging of α4β2* nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding using 2-[18F]fluoro-3-(2(S)azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2FA) and clinical measures of global cognition, attention/processing speed, verbal memory, visuospatial memory, and neuropsychiatric symptoms were used. Results 2FA binding was lower in the AD group compared with the C group in the medial thalamus, medial temporal cortex, anterior cingulate, insula/opercula, inferior caudate, and brainstem (p < 0.05, corrected cluster), but binding was not associated with cognition. The C group had significant inverse correlations between 2FA binding in the thalamus (left: rs = −0.55, p = 0.008; right: rs = −0.50, p = 0.02; N = 22) and hippocampus (left: rs = −0.65, p = 0.001; right: rs = −0.55, p = 0.009; N = 22) and the Trails A score. The AD group had inverse correlation between 2FA binding in anterior cingulate (left: rs = −0.50, p = 0.01; right: rs = −0.50, p = 0.01; N = 24) and Neurobehavioral Rating Scale agitation/disinhibition factor score. Conclusion Cholinergic receptor binding is reduced in specific brain regions in mild to moderate AD and is related to neuropsychiatric symptoms. Among healthy older adults, lower receptor binding may be associated with slower processing speed. Cholinergic receptor binding in vivo may reveal links to other key brain changes associated with aging and AD and may provide a potential molecular treatment target.

      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.11.011
       
  • Molecular Imaging of the Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor in Alzheimer
           Disease
    • Authors: Gwenn S. Smith
      Pages: 354 - 356
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4
      Author(s): Gwenn S. Smith


      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.01.001
       
  • History of Bipolar Disorder and the Risk of Dementia: A Systematic Review
           and Meta-Analysis
    • Authors: Breno S. Diniz; Antonio L. Teixeira; Fei Cao; Ariel Gildengers; Jair C. Soares; Meryl A. Butters; Charles F. Reynolds
      Pages: 357 - 362
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4
      Author(s): Breno S. Diniz, Antonio L. Teixeira, Fei Cao, Ariel Gildengers, Jair C. Soares, Meryl A. Butters, Charles F. Reynolds
      Objective We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate whether history of bipolar disorder (BD) increases the risk of dementia. Methods We searched PubMed and Scopus to identify studies that evaluated the risk of dementia in individuals with a history of BD. A total of 6 studies including 3,026 individuals with history of BD and 191,029 non-BD individuals were included in the meta-analysis. Results History of BD significantly increased the risk of diagnosis of dementia (pooled odds ratio: 2.36; 95% confidence interval: 1.36–4.09; z = 3.07, p < 0.001). Evidence of heterogeneity and of publication bias in the analysis was found. Conclusion History of BD is associated with significantly higher risk of dementia in older adults. Future studies are necessary to evaluate the potential mediators of this association and to evaluate interventions that may reduce the risk of dementia in this population.

      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.11.014
       
  • Bipolar Disorder and Dementia: Weighing the Evidence
    • Authors: Dan Blazer
      Pages: 363 - 364
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4
      Author(s): Dan Blazer


      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.12.009
       
  • Inappropriate Sexual Behaviors Among Community-Dwelling Patients with
           Dementia
    • Authors: Marco Canevelli; Flaminia Lucchini; Carlo Garofalo; Giuseppina Talarico; Alessandro Trebbastoni; Fabrizia D'Antonio; Letizia Imbriano; Patrizia Velotti; Carlo de Lena; Marina Gasparini; Giuseppe Bruno
      Pages: 365 - 371
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4
      Author(s): Marco Canevelli, Flaminia Lucchini, Carlo Garofalo, Giuseppina Talarico, Alessandro Trebbastoni, Fabrizia D'Antonio, Letizia Imbriano, Patrizia Velotti, Carlo de Lena, Marina Gasparini, Giuseppe Bruno
      Objective Inappropriate sexual behaviors (ISBs) represent challenging and stressful manifestations of dementia and are highly burdening for patients, families, and healthcare providers. Nevertheless, ISBs have so far attracted limited clinical and scientific interest compared with other neuropsychiatric symptoms occurring in dementing illnesses. The authors aimed to systematically investigate the prevalence and characteristics of ISBs in a population of patients with dementia attending a memory clinic. Methods In this cross-sectional study, individuals with dementia attending our memory clinic were consecutively enrolled between January 2015 and February 2016. Participating subjects underwent a detailed medical history collection and a comprehensive cognitive, functional, and neuropsychiatric assessment. The presence of ISBs (in the previous 30 days) was investigated by the adoption of an ad hoc questionnaire, administered to informants. A logistic regression model was carried out to identify sociodemographic and clinical variables associated with ISBs. Results In the 195 patients (48.7% women) with dementia recruited for the study, ISBs were detected in 35 patients (17.9% of the total sample). The logistic regression model showed that male sex (OR: 5.14; 95% CI: 1.44–18.41) and anxiety (OR: 4.92; 95% CI: 1.44–16.84) were statistically significantly associated with the presence of ISBs. Conclusion ISBs represent common manifestations of dementing illnesses. Given the significant burden of ISBs on patients and families and the impact on care management, their occurrence should always be investigated in the clinical care of individuals with dementia. For this purpose, specific screening/assessment tools should be properly designed and validated.

      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.11.020
       
  • Inappropriate Sexual Behaviors in Dementia
    • Authors: Perminder S. Sachdev
      Pages: 372 - 373
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4
      Author(s): Perminder S. Sachdev


      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.01.012
       
  • Information for Subscribers
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
       
  • In This Issue
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
       
  • Individualized Music Program is Associated with Improved Outcomes for U.S.
           Nursing Home Residents with Dementia
    • Authors: Kali Thomas; Rosa Baier; Cyrus Kosar; Jessica Ogarek; Alissa Trepman; Vincent Mor
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Kali Thomas, Rosa Baier, Cyrus Kosar, Jessica Ogarek, Alissa Trepman, Vincent Mor
      Objectives The objective of this study was to compare resident outcomes before and after implementation of an individualized music program, MUSIC & MEMORYSM (M&M), designed to address the behavioral and psychological symptoms associated with dementia (BPSD). Design Setting: 98 nursing homes (NHs) trained in the M&M program during 2013 and 98 matched-pair comparisons. Participants Long-stay residents with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) residing in M&M participating facilities (n=12,905) and comparison facilities (n=12,811) during 2012-2013. Intervention: M&M is a facility-level quality improvement program that provides residents with music specific to their personal histories and preferences. Measurements Discontinuation of anxiolytic and antipsychotic medications, and reductions in behavioral problems and depressed mood in 2012 (pre-intervention) and 2013 (intervention), calculated using Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments. Results The proportion of residents who discontinued antipsychotic medication use over a six-month period increased from 17.6% to 20.1% among M&M facilities, while remaining stable among comparison facilities (15.9% to 15.2%). The same trend was observed for anxiolytic medications: discontinuation of anxiolytics increased in M&M facilities (23.5% to 24.4%), while decreased among comparison facilities (24.8% to 20.0%). M&M facilities also demonstrated increased rates of reduction in behavioral problems (50.9% to 56.5%) vs. comparison facilities (55.8% to 55.9%). No differences were observed for depressed mood. Conclusions These results offer the first evidence that the M&M individualized music program is associated with reductions in antipsychotic medication use, anxiolytic medication use, and BPSD symptoms among long-stay NH residents with ADRD.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T18:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.04.008
       
  • Prediction of Response to Antipsychotics in Patients with Dementia Remains
           a Conundrum
    • Authors: D.P. Devanand
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): D.P. Devanand


      PubDate: 2017-04-11T23:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.04.005
       
  • Unraveling the Biological Basis for Domain-Specific Cognitive Decline: a
           Commentary on “Neural Basis of Cognitive Assessment in Alzheimer's
           Disease, Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Subjective Memory
           Complaints”
    • Authors: Shannon L. Risacher
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Shannon L. Risacher


      PubDate: 2017-04-11T23:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.04.007
       
  • Does Music Have Charms to Soothe Dementia?
    • Authors: Jeffrey M. Lyness
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Jeffrey M. Lyness


      PubDate: 2017-04-11T23:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.04.006
       
  • Risk Factors for Depression: Differential Across Age?
    • Authors: Roxanne Schaakxs; Hannie C. Comijs; Roos C. Van der Mast; Robert A. Schoevers; Aartjan T.F. Beekman; Brenda W.J.H. Penninx
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Roxanne Schaakxs, Hannie C. Comijs, Roos C. Van der Mast, Robert A. Schoevers, Aartjan T.F. Beekman, Brenda W.J.H. Penninx
      Introduction The occurrence of well-established risk factors for depression differs across the lifespan. Risk factors may be more strongly associated with depression at ages when occurrence, and therefore expectance, is relatively low (‘on-time off-time’ hypothesis). This large-scale study examined absolute and relative risks of established risk factors for depression across the lifespan. Methods Participants were 2,215 currently or never depressed adults aged 18-93 years from two cohort studies: NESDA and NESDO. The occurrence of nineteen established risk factors (absolute risk) was examined in different age groups. In addition, the relative risk of these risk factors for depression was compared across age groups by examining risk factor*age interaction. Results The occurrence of all risk factors differed significantly across age groups. Although most risk factors had significant associations with depression across the lifespan, for five risk factors the strength of the association was age-dependent. Stronger associations with depression in younger age were found for childhood abuse, pain, higher body mass index (BMI) and number of chronic diseases, whereas low income imposed a stronger risk in older age. Associations with depression were strongest in age groups where occurrence was lowest. Conclusions Although the exposure to risk factors changes across the lifespan, the relative risk associating them to depression remains similar for most risk factors. However, some specific risk factors (low income, and health factors pain, BMI, and number of chronic diseases) seem more strongly associated with depression in ages in which occurrence is lowest and least expected.

      PubDate: 2017-04-11T23:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.04.004
       
  • Clock Copying Predicts Mortality in Adult Protective Services Clients
    • Authors: Abigail E. Talley; Jason E. Schillerstrom; Donald R. Royall
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Abigail E. Talley, Jason E. Schillerstrom, Donald R. Royall
      Objective : The objective of this study was to determine if a clock copying task predicts 18-month mortality in an Adult Protective Services (APS) sample referred for a decision making capacity assessment. Methods The authors performed a retrospective medical record review of clients (n=233) referred by APS for a decision making capacity assessment during a three year time period. Information extracted included demographic data and neuropsychological performance on a battery sensitive to executive function, visuospatial ability, depression, memory, and general cognition. A Cox proportional hazards models was constructed to determine the relationship between CLOX2 performance and survival. Results: Poor clock copying, as measured by the Executive Clock Drawing Task Part 2 (CLOX2), predicted 18-month mortality when covaried for age, education, sex, rural dwelling status, depression, and general cognition. Conclusions Clock copying is an easily administered visuospatial task that may inform survival in this vulnerable population.

      PubDate: 2017-04-11T23:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.02.020
       
  • Cognitive Effects of Chemotherapy and Cancer-Related Treatments in Older
           Adults
    • Authors: Jennifer N. Vega; Julie Dumas; Paul Newhouse
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Jennifer N. Vega, Julie Dumas, Paul Newhouse
      Advances in cancer treatment are producing a growing number of cancer survivors; therefore, issues surrounding quality of life during and following cancer treatment have become increasingly important. Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) is a problem that is commonly reported following the administration of chemotherapy treatment in patients with cancer. Research suggests that CRCI can persist for months to years after completing treatment, which has implications for the trajectory of normal and pathologic cognitive aging for the growing number of long-term cancer survivors. These problems are particularly relevant for older individuals given that cancer is largely a disease of older age, and the number of patients with cancer who are age 65 years or older will increase dramatically over the coming decades. This review will briefly summarize empirical findings related to CRCI, discuss CRCI in older patients with cancer, potential causative hypotheses, and provide a canonical patient case to illustrate how CRCI presents clinically. Finally, potential intervention strategies for CRCI will be highlighted and issues to consider when evaluating older patients with a history of cancer will be discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-04-11T23:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.04.001
       
  • Mobile Health Technology in Late-Life Mental Illness: a Focused Literature
           Review
    • Authors: Yara Moussa; Artin A. Mahdanian; Ching Yu; Marilyn Segal; Karl J. Looper; Ipsit V. Vahia; Soham Rej
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Yara Moussa, Artin A. Mahdanian, Ching Yu, Marilyn Segal, Karl J. Looper, Ipsit V. Vahia, Soham Rej
      In an era of rising geriatric mental health care needs worldwide, technological advances can help address care needs in a cost-effective fashion. Studies have been increasingly examining mobile health technologies, such as tablets and smartphones in late-life mental illness. We were primarily interested in whether mobile health technology was feasible to use in this population, as well as whether they were generally reliable modes of mental health/cognitive assessment. We performed a focused literature review of MEDLINE, PsychInfo, and Embase databases, including papers that specifically assessed the implementation of mobile health technologies: Electronic tablets (e.g. iPad), smartphones and other mobile computerized equipment in older adults (age≥65) diagnosed with or at risk of a mental and/or cognitive disorder. 2079 records were assessed, of which 7 papers were of direct relevance. Studies investigated a broad variety of mobile health technologies. Almost all examined samples with dementia/cognitive dysfunction or at risk for those disorders. All studies exclusively examined the use of mobile health technologies for the assessment of cognitive and or mental illness symptoms or disorders. None of the studies reported participants having any difficulties using the mobile health technology assessments and overall reliability was similar to paper-and-pencil modes of assessment. Overall, mobile health technologies were found to be feasible by patients and had promising reliability for the assessment of cognitive and mental illness domains in older adults. Studies to-date almost exclusively examined dementia or cognitive dysfunction. Future clinical trials will be necessary to assess whether interventions enabled by portable communication (e.g. symptom tracking) can be used to improve geriatric mental health outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-04-11T23:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.04.003
       
  • Commentary for “Steeper Slope of Age-Related Changes in White Matter
           Microstructure and Processing Speed in Bipolar Disorder”
    • Authors: Ariel Gildengers
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Ariel Gildengers


      PubDate: 2017-04-11T23:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.04.002
       
  • The Best Value in Dementia Care
    • Authors: Robert Roca
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Robert Roca


      PubDate: 2017-04-11T23:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.010
       
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Older Adults Experiencing Motor
           Vehicle Collision: a Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study
    • Authors: Timothy F. Platts-Mills; Bo C. Nebolisa; Sean A. Flannigan; Natalie L. Richmond; Robert M. Domeier; Robert A. Swor; Phyllis L. Hendry; David A. Peak; Niels K. Rathlev; Jeffrey S. Jones; David C. Lee; Christopher W. Jones; Samuel A. McLean
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Timothy F. Platts-Mills, Bo C. Nebolisa, Sean A. Flannigan, Natalie L. Richmond, Robert M. Domeier, Robert A. Swor, Phyllis L. Hendry, David A. Peak, Niels K. Rathlev, Jeffrey S. Jones, David C. Lee, Christopher W. Jones, Samuel A. McLean
      Objective To characterize risk factors for and consequences of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among older adults evaluated in the emergency department (ED) following motor vehicle collision (MVC). Design Prospective multicenter longitudinal study (2011-2015). Setting 9 EDs across the United States. Participants Adults aged 65 years and older who presented to an ED after MVC without severe injuries. Measurements PTSD symptoms were assessed 6 months after the ED visit using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Results Of 223 patients, clinically significant PTSD symptoms at 6 months were observed in 21% (95% CI 16%-26%). PTSD symptoms were more common in patients who did not have a college degree, had depressive symptoms prior to the MVC, perceived the MVC as life-threatening, had severe ED pain, and expected their physical or emotional recovery time to be greater than 30 days. Three factors (ED pain severity [0-10 scale], perceived life-threatening MVC [0-10 scale], and pre-MVC depressive symptoms [yes to either of two questions]), predicted 6 month PTSD symptoms with an area under the curve of 0.76. Compared to patients without PTSD symptoms, those with PTSD symptoms were at higher risk for persistent pain (72% vs. 30%), functional decline (67% vs. 42%), and new disability (49% vs. 18%). Conclusions Among older adults treated in the ED following MVC, clinically significant PTSD symptoms at 6 months were present in 21% of patients and were associated with adverse health outcomes. Increased risk for PTSD development can be identified with moderate accuracy using information readily available in the ED.

      PubDate: 2017-04-04T23:40:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.011
       
  • Negative Affectivity, Aging, and Depression: Results From the Neurobiology
           of Late-Life Depression (NBOLD) Study
    • Authors: David C. Steffens; Lihong Wang; Kevin J. Manning; Godfrey D. Pearlson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): David C. Steffens, Lihong Wang, Kevin J. Manning, Godfrey D. Pearlson
      Objectives Neuroticism is a common yet understudied condition in older adults. We hypothesized that presence of high Negativity Affectivity (NA), a key feature of neuroticism, would be associated with different prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity and connectivity patterns in depressed and never-depressed older adults. Design Baseline cross-sectional analysis of a cohort study Participants Fifty-two depressed and 36 never-depressed older adults. Measurements Assessments included Negative Affectivity scores from the Type D Scale-14 (DS-14) and Montgomery-Ǻsberg Depression Rating Scale scores. All subjects had a 3T brain functional magnetic resonance imaging resting scan, neuronal activity was determined by Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuations (ALFF) were obtained, and resting state functional connectivity (FC) analyses were performed. ANCOVA analyses were conducted on ALFF and FC to examine significant differences between groups. Results In the analyses on ALFF, there were clearly different patterns between depressed and comparison groups in the correlation of ALFF and NA. The correlation differences between the two groups were significant in the dorsomedial PFC, insula, amygdala and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). FC analyses revealed different between-group connectivity patterns. Significantly higher ventromedial PFC-amygdala FC with NA correlation was found in the depressed group than that in the never-depressed group. Conclusion This study confirms differential activity of the dorsal and ventral regions of the medial prefrontal cortex in individuals with high neuroticism. Our findings suggest increased rostral medial PFC activity may be a marker of resilience to depression in the elderly and decreased anterior ventromedial PFC/PCC/amygdala activity may be a result of successful emotion regulation in never-depressed higher NA individuals.

      PubDate: 2017-04-04T23:40:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.017
       
  • Characteristics and Service Use of Older Adults with Schizoaffective
           Disorder, as Compared to Older Adults with Schizophrenia and Bipolar
           Disorder
    • Authors: Stephanie A. Rolin; Kelly A. Aschbrenner; Karen L. Whiteman; Emily Scherer; Stephen J. Bartels
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Stephanie A. Rolin, Kelly A. Aschbrenner, Karen L. Whiteman, Emily Scherer, Stephen J. Bartels
      Objective The purpose of this study is to determine if schizoaffective disorder in older adults is differentiated from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with respect to community functioning, cognitive functioning, psychiatric symptoms, and service use. Design Secondary analysis of baseline data collected from the Helping Older People Experience Success (HOPES) psychosocial skills training and health management study. Setting Three community mental health centers in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Participants Adults over the age of 50 (n=139, mean age=59.7, SD= 7.4) with persistent functional impairment and a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder (n=52), schizophrenia (n=51), or bipolar disorder (n=36). Measurements Health status (SF-36), performance-based community living skills (UPSA), neuropsychological functioning (Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning subtests), psychiatric symptoms (BPRS, CESD, SANS), medical severity (Charlson index), and acute service use. Results Older adults with schizoaffective disorder had depressive symptoms of similar severity to bipolar disorder, and thought disorder symptoms of similar severity to schizophrenia. Schizoaffective disorder compared to schizophrenia was associated with better community functioning, but poorer subjective physical and mental health functioning as measured by the SF-36. Older adults with schizoaffective disorder had greater acute hospitalization compared to adults with schizophrenia, though their use of acute care services was comparable to individuals with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest that schizoaffective disorder in older adults occupies a distinct profile from either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder with respect to community functional status, symptom profile, and acute services utilization.

      PubDate: 2017-04-04T23:40:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.014
       
  • Personality and Performance in Specific Neurocognitive Domains among Older
           Persons
    • Authors: Benjamin P. Chapman; Ralph H. Benedict; Feng Lin; Shumita Roy; Howard J. Federoff; Mark Mapstone
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Benjamin P. Chapman, Ralph H. Benedict, Feng Lin, Shumita Roy, Howard J. Federoff, Mark Mapstone
      Objective Certain Big 5 personality dimensions have been repeatedly linked to global measures of cognitive function and outcome categories. We examined whether the Big 5 or their specific components showed differential evidence of associations with specific neurocognitive domains. Design Cross-sectional. Participants. 179 older adults (70+) participating in a broader study on cognitive aging. Measurements The NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) and a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. Results. Adjusted for age, gender, and years of education, p-values, Bayes Factors, and measures effect size from linear models suggested strong evidence for associations between better delayed recall memory and higher Conscientiousness (principally the facets of Goal-Striving and Dependability) and Openness (specifically the Intellectual Interest component). Better executive function and attention showed moderate to strong evidence of associations with lower Neuroticism (especially the Self-conscious Vulnerability facet), and higher Conscientiousness (mostly the Dependability facet). Better language functioning was linked to higher Openness (specifically, the Intellectual Interests facet). Worse visual-spatial function was strongly associated with higher Neuroticism. Conclusions Different tests of neurocognitive functioning show varying degrees of evidence for associations with different personality traits. Better understanding of the patterning of neurocognitive-personality linkages may facilitate grasp of underlying mechanisms, and/or refine understanding of co-occurring clinical presentation of personality traits and specific cognitive deficits.

      PubDate: 2017-04-04T23:40:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.006
       
  • Information for Subscribers
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
       
  • In This Issue
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Volume 25, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:53:10Z
       
  • Geriatric Psychiatry: is There a Future?
    • Authors: Jimmy N. Avari; Barnett S. Meyers
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Jimmy N. Avari, Barnett S. Meyers


      PubDate: 2017-03-09T12:49:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.03.002
       
  • AAGP Statement on Immigration Executive Order February 7, 2017
    • Authors: Daniel Sewell; Kirsten Wilkins
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2017
      Source:The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
      Author(s): Daniel Sewell, Kirsten Wilkins


      PubDate: 2017-03-03T12:31:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.02.008
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.166.186.79
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016