Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3201 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3201 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 107, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 478, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 354, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 210, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Clinical Radiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Cosmetic Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Family Practice Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Ophthalmology and Optometry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 74)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 451, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 418, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 493, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 289, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 72, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.524
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1064-7481 - ISSN (Online) 1545-7214
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3201 journals]
  • In This Issue
    • Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-10
      DOI: 10.1016/S1064-7481(20)30454-1
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Information for Subscribers
    • Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-10
      DOI: 10.1016/S1064-7481(20)30452-8
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Facing the Change Together: Reflections of Coping and Resilience From
           American Geriatric Psychiatrists During COVID-19
    • Authors: Carmen Black Parker; Malcolm P Forbes, Ipsit V Vahia, Brent P Forester, Dilip V Jeste, Charles F Reynolds
      Pages: 1015 - 1019
      Abstract: “Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end.But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.”Winston Churchill1
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-23
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.04.011
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Changes in Internet Use When Coping With Stress: Older Adults During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Authors: Galit Nimrod
      Pages: 1020 - 1024
      Abstract: The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has placed humanity in an unprecedented situation, wherein billions of people throughout the world found themselves confined to their homes due to stay-at-home orders and/or self-sequestering. Most everyday activities were restrained and online activity became the new reality. As the pandemic posed a particular threat to older adults,1 much public debate concentrated on means that may support their physical and mental health during long periods of isolation. This discourse brought the topic of older adults’ use of the Internet to the center stage.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-20
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.010
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Accelerated Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Late-Life Depression:
           A Possible Option for Older Depressed Adults in Need of ECT During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Authors: Gerasimos N. Konstantinou; Jonathan Downar, Zafiris J. Daskalakis, Daniel M. Blumberger
      Pages: 1025 - 1029
      Abstract: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an essential psychiatric service that continues to be a lifesaving treatment for severe major depressive disorder (MDD) and has an important role in treating older adult patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD).1 The COVID-19 pandemic has caused massive shifts in healthcare delivery for patients with depression with a rapid shift to telemedicine. In-person care has been restricted to urgent cases, and though ECT is not an elective procedure in the majority of patients, many centers have had to reduce capacity due to enhanced infection control measures.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-15
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.007
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Psychological Distress and Its Correlates Among COVID-19 Survivors During
           Early Convalescence Across Age Groups
    • Authors: Xin Cai; Xiaopeng Hu, Ivo Otte Ekumi, Jianchun Wang, Yawen An, Zhiwen Li, Bo Yuan
      Pages: 1030 - 1039
      Abstract: 2019 corona-virus disease (COVID-19) is highly contagious.1 Since the first case reported in early December 2019, the epidemic has transmitted throughout China and many other countries and was declared as a “public emergency of international concern” by the World Health Organization (WHO) emergency committee.1 In order to prevent the spread of the epidemic, the Chinese government has been implementing strict self- and forced-quarantine measure across the country. Widespread unbearable psychological pressure and distress were reported.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-09
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.003
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Mental Health in Elderly Spanish People in Times of COVID-19 Outbreak
    • Authors: Lorena García-Fernández; Verónica Romero-Ferreiro, Pedro David López-Roldán, Sergio Padilla, Roberto Rodriguez-Jimenez
      Pages: 1040 - 1045
      Abstract: Several months have passed since the first cases of pneumonia caused by a new viral agent called severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) were reported in the Chinese city of Wuhan.1,2 The rapid increase in the number of contagions3 and the relentless international spread of the virus has led the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the so-called 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) a global pandemic on March 2020.4 As a result, government entities in different countries adopted abrupt and drastic population isolation measures in order to prevent the increase in the number of contagions.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.027
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • The Mental Health Benefits of Physical Activity in Older Adults Survive
           the COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Authors: Daniel D. Callow; Naomi A. Arnold-Nedimala, Leslie S. Jordan, Gabriel S. Pena, Junyeon Won, John L. Woodard, J. Carson Smith
      Pages: 1046 - 1057
      Abstract: The recent worldwide outbreak of a new type of coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has reached over 140 countries and has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization.1 The most common clinical manifestation of SARS-CoV-2 includes severe life-threatening respiratory tract infections (COVID-19) to which older adults and those with comorbidities (e.g., hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory diseases, and chronic kidney disease) are most susceptible.2–4 As a result, the United States and Canada have issued social distancing guidelines (SDG), and in certain parts of each country, stay-at-home orders intended to combat the spread of the disease and protect fragile healthcare systems.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-30
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.024
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Geriatric Mental Health and COVID-19: An Eye-Opener to the Situation of
           the Arab Countries in the Middle East and North Africa Region
    • Authors: Samer El Hayek; Mohamad Ali Cheaito, Marwa Nofal, Doaa Abdelrahman, Ali Adra, Siham Al Shamli, Mansour AlHarthi, Nawaf AlNuaimi, Chaimaa Aroui, Lynda Bensid, Alkhansa Mahdi Emberish, Amine Larnaout, Ahmed Radwan, Mohammad Slaih, Hamed Al Sinawi
      Pages: 1058 - 1069
      Abstract: COVID-19 constitutes a new major global health challenge. The socioeconomic and health care impacts of this pandemic are unprecedented, with worldwide economic loss, travel restrictions, closure of business activities, social distancing, isolation and quarantine, fear of shortage of basic needs, and rapid spread of mental health problems.1–3 The unpredictable nature of COVID-19 and its associated individual, societal, and global repercussions not only threaten one's physical health but also affects their mental health.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-05-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.009
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Differences in Assessment of Everyday Preferences Between People With
           Cognitive Impairment and Their Care Partners: The Role of Neuropsychiatric
           Symptoms
    • Authors: James M. Wilkins; Joseph J. Locascio, Jeanette M. Gunther, Liang Yap, Bradley T. Hyman, Deborah Blacker, Brent P. Forester, Olivia I. Okereke
      Pages: 1070 - 1078
      Abstract: As cognitive impairment progresses, people with cognitive impairment and dementia increasingly rely on surrogate decision-makers in all aspects of life, both through formal adjudication as well as more informal day-to-day decision-making.1 Because the median survival after a diagnosis of dementia has been found to be as high as twelve years, there is a lengthy period during which the quality of life for a person with dementia may be directly impacted by the decisions made by a surrogate, depending on what extent the surrogate is involved in decision-making.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-02-06
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.01.189
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Risk of Mortality Associated With Atypical Antipsychotic use: A National
           Cohort Study of Older Adults With Depression and Parkinson's Disease
    • Authors: Farid Chekani; Holly M. Holmes, Michael L. Johnson, Hua Chen, Jeffrey T. Sherer, Rajender R. Aparasu
      Pages: 1079 - 1088
      Abstract: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, associated with significant disability and mortality.1 The prevalence of Parkinson's disease has been estimated to be 0.3% in general population, 1%–5% in the elderly and 5%–10% in nursing home residents.2,3 Both motor and nonmotor symptoms contribute to disability and impaired quality of life of patients with PD. Parkinson's psychosis is a disabling nonmotor symptom with an occurrence rate of 25%–60% in lifetime course of PD, depending on the diagnostic criteria used.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-02-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.01.193
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Amygdala Functional Connectivity Features in Grief: A Pilot Longitudinal
           Study
    • Authors: Gang Chen; B. Douglas Ward, Stacy A. Claesges, Shi-Jiang Li, Joseph S. Goveas
      Pages: 1089 - 1101
      Abstract: Older adults inevitably lose loved ones, although their responses to bereavement vary. Grief is usually transient, with most grievers adapting to attachment loss within 12 months and returning to normal functioning without clinical intervention. However, in an important minority, estimated at about 7%–10%, complicated grief (CG) ensues. CG is a unique and recognizable mental health condition characterized by protracted, intense, and debilitating symptoms.1,2 CG can be clearly distinguished from bereavement-related major depression (MDD) in its clinical features3,4and treatment response,5,6 though these conditions often co-occur in the elderly following bereavement.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-03-09
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.02.014
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Digital Monitoring of Sleep, Meals, and Physical Activity for Reducing
           Depression in Older Spousally-Bereaved Adults: A Pilot Randomized
           Controlled Trial
    • Authors: Sarah T. Stahl; Stephen F. Smagula, Mary Amanda Dew, Richard Schulz, Steven M. Albert, Charles F Reynolds
      Pages: 1102 - 1106
      Abstract: The death of a spouse is a life-altering event that is associated with disruption in routine daily activities. Many older adults feel no reason to wake up, eat meals, or go to bed on a regular schedule. Disruptions of these key social timekeepers (or zeitgebers) decrease the stability of circadian rhythms, placing these individuals at high risk for mood disorders like major depressive disorder (MDD).1 Approximately 20%–30% of older adults meet criteria for MDD in the first year after spousal death.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-03-08
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.02.013
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • A Qualitative Study of Perioperative Depression and Anxiety in Older
           Adults
    • Authors: Joanna Abraham; Alicia Meng, Susan Siraco, Thomas Kannampallil, Mary C. Politi, Ana A. Baumann, Eric J. Lenze, Michael S. Avidan
      Pages: 1107 - 1118
      Abstract: An average person undergoes nine surgeries in their lifetime1 and adults over age 65 account for approximately half of the patients undergoing surgery.2 Psychological factors affect the overall surgical recovery of older patients.3–5 Although older adults tend to underreport their psychological concerns and symptoms,6,7 anxiety and depression are prevalent.8,9 These symptoms, before, during and after surgery (i.e., along the perioperative care continuum), increase the risk of postoperative complications, disability, short-term functional dependence and falls,10 postoperative delirium,11 lower tolerance to pain,12 opioid misuse,13,14 lower health-related quality of life,15 increased hospital stays,16 readmission, and mortality.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-03-02
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.02.010
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Grief and the COVID-19 Pandemic in Older Adults
    • Authors: Joseph S. Goveas; M. Katherine Shear
      Pages: 1119 - 1125
      Abstract: Seventy-eight-year-old Alice lost her only sibling, Charles, age 69, to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Alice and Charles lived in different towns but were very close, speaking daily on the phone for hours. They were practicing Christians and had similar interests. He often drove to visit her. They enjoyed spending time with each other and doing things together. Despite having coronary artery disease and hypertension, Charles was independent and happy. Alice was shocked to learn he had been hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia and that he was intubated and on a ventilator.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-27
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.021
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Hands On
    • Authors: Dan G. Blazer
      Pages: 1126 - 1127
      Abstract: Mary Skow, an artist and art instructor in College Station, TX and Dan Blazer, an Associate Editor for the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, have been friends for over 35 years. Dan has been inspired by Mary's paintings and Mary encouraged Dan to pursue the writing of verse for many of her paintings. They began a collaboration in which Dan puts into verse what Mary's paintings stimulate him to write. Mary provides Dan with feedback and encouragement (Fig. 1).
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-12
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.001
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Relapse
    • Authors: David L. Coulter
      First page: 1128
      Abstract: The trail winds unpredictablyThrough gentle woods, past rocks and stones,Along two logs above the wild streamUntil it ends abruptly without warningAt a sheer granite cliff, revealing the viewOf a verdant valley one thousand feet below.How daunting it is to stand at the precipiceAnd consider whatever the future might bring—A sudden and final fall through the airOr a welcomed and life-saving careful retreatBack to the trail, asking fate to still waitFor yet one more chance to defy the last leap.How many times can you see the green valleyAnd warily stand upon the great cliffBefore the ground falls away underneath you'
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28, 10 (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-01-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.01.006
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 10 (2020)
       
  • Ethical issues in the management of patients with behavioral and
           psychological symptoms of dementia during COVID-19 containment: examples
           from institutions in France
    • Authors: Jacques-Alexis Nkodo; Vincent Camus, Bertrand Fougère
      Abstract: The global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has prompted many countries to initiate containment measures intended to stem viral transmission. Although these measures are clearly legitimate from an epidemiological point of view, their application leads to significant organizational challenges for institutions caring for the most vulnerable people1, such as those with disruptive behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD).
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-10-06
       
  • INCREASE IN NUMBER OF DEPRESSION SYMPTOMS OVER TIME IS RELATED TO WORSE
           COGNITIVE OUTCOMES IN OLDER ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES
    • Authors: Ramit Ravona-Springer; Anthony Heymann, Hung-Mo Lin, Xiaoyu Liu, Yuval Berman, Jonathan Schwartz, Laili Soleimani, Mary Sano, Michal Schnaider Beeri
      Abstract: Depression, especially in old age, has been consistently associated with increased dementia incidence1,2, though it is still unclear whether depression is a risk or causal factor for dementia or merely a presenting symptom3. The evidence on the relationship of depression, and specifically its subtle presentations, with clinical entities that precede dementia, namely cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), is less consistent, with the majority of evidence indicating that depression and depression symptoms predict incident MCI4,5 and faster cognitive decline6.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-10-06
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.022
       
  • Improvements in functional disability after psychotherapy for depression
           are associated with reduced suicide ideation among older adults
    • Authors: Julie Lutz; R. Scott Mackin, Marcela C. Otero, Ruth Morin, David Bickford, Duygu Tosun, Derek D. Satre, Christine E. Gould, J. Craig Nelson, Sherry A. Beaudreau
      Abstract: Suicide is a significant public health priority for older adults, who exhibit the highest suicide rates around the world.1 In this population, functional disability has been identified as a significant factor associated with greater risk and severity of suicide ideation.2 Older adults are most likely to experience functional disability (difficulties carrying out life activities), with about one-third of those age 65 and older, and more than two-thirds of those age 85 and older, experiencing disability.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-10-06
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.021
       
  • Incremental Health Care Expenditures of the Spouses of Older Adults with
           Alzheimer's Diseases and Related Dementias (ADRD)
    • Authors: Jun Chu; Ivy Benjenk, Jie Chen
      Abstract: Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) affect over 5 million adults in the US.1 The majority of individuals with ADRD live at home with spouses and their spouses often live in a state of chronic stress.2 Spouses of community-dwelling persons with ADRD often act as primary caregivers, providing a range of supports from medication administration to assisting with activities of daily living.1,3 They are also challenged by changes in the quality of the relationship with their partner and often changes in their own self-identity.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-29
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.020
       
  • Preliminary Evidence That Cortical Amyloid Burden Predicts Poor Response
           to Antidepressant Medication Treatment in Cognitively Intact Individuals
           With Late-Life Depression
    • Authors: Warren D Taylor; Brian D Boyd, Damian Elson, Patricia Andrews, Kimberly Albert, Jennifer Vega, Paul A Newhouse, Neil D. Woodward, Hakmook Kang, Sepideh Shokouhi
      Abstract: Amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation may predispose some older adults to develop depressive episodes.1 In cognitively intact older adults, greater Aβ burden is cross-sectionally and longitudinally associated with greater depressive symptoms.2,3 In turn, cortical amyloid and depressive symptoms may interact to influence cognitive decline.4,5 Late-life depression (LLD) in the absence of dementia is associated with a higher plasma Aβ40:Aβ42 ratio,6 similar to what is seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and also an increased risk for cognitive decline and developing AD.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-26
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.019
       
  • Important Correlates of Purpose in Life Identified Through a Machine
           Learning Approach
    • Authors: Zhen Mei; Adriana Lori, Selina M. Vattathil, Patricia A. Boyle, Bekh Bradley, Peng Jin, David A. Bennett, Thomas S. Wingo, Aliza P. Wingo
      Abstract: Purpose in life (PiL) is a trait-like tendency to derive meaning from life experiences and to possess a sense of direction and intentionality in life.1 PiL has been shown to be an important building block for psychological resilience and eudaimonic well-being,2,3 as well as a protective factor for mental and physical health and for healthy aging. For instance, greater PiL predicts lower incidence of sleep disturbances,4 better physical functioning,5 lower risk for depression,6 lower incidence for stroke,7 lower risk for cardiovascular disease,8 and greater longevity.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-26
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.018
       
  • Stroke Risk among Elderly Users of Haloperidol and Typical Antipsychotics
           vs. Atypical Antipsychotics: A Real-World Study from a US Health Insurance
           Claims Database
    • Authors: Daniel Fife; Clair Blacketer, R. Karl Knight, James Weaver
      Abstract: Antipsychotics are approved and prescribed to treat various conditions such as schizophrenia, mania, major depressive disorder, agitation, delusional disorder, psychosis, and Tourette's syndrome1. The haloperidol prescribing information2 in the United States (US) does not warn about the risk of stroke but has a black box warning for an increased risk of death among elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs. Nonetheless, antipsychotics are used for indications such as neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia, in the presence or absence of psychosis; such use is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and this off-label use has increased over the past few years3.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-26
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.017
       
  • Risk of Mortality in Elderly Coronavirus Disease 2019 Patients With Mental
           Health Disorders: A Nationwide Retrospective Study in South Korea
    • Authors: Dong Yun Lee; Jaehyeong Cho, Seng Chan You, Rae Woong Park, Chung Soo Kim, Eun Young Lee, Howard Aizenstein, Carmen Andreescu, Helmet Karim, Chang Hyung Hong, Hyun Woong Rho, Bumhee Park, Sang Joon Son
      Abstract: The recent outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization.1 As of September 13, 2020, a total of 28,637,952 cases of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 have been reported worldwide, of which 917,417 patients have died.2 According to emerging data, COVID-19 is particularly dangerous for elderly individuals,3 who account for the majority of deaths.4 Mental health disorders could potentially worsen the outcomes. Although there is a significant prevalence of mental health disorders in elderly individuals, especially dementia, no studies have investigated the association between mental health disorders and COVID-19 in this patient population.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-26
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.016
       
  • Treatment of Traumatic Stress in Older Adults: Advances to Celebrate and a
           Request for More and Better
    • Authors: Joan M. Cook
      Abstract: While the majority of older adult trauma survivors do not develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a significant minority do, and some may have subthreshold PTSD1 or other trauma-related disorders, including depression and anxiety.2 Unless treated, older trauma survivors seem to experience a relatively stable course of PTSD across the lifespan, with some waxing and waning of symptoms. Older adults with PTSD are at risk of not receiving timely and appropriate mental health treatment, indicating targeted outreach could be helpful in increasing service use and improving care.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-25
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.015
       
  • Commentary: “Trends in Serious Mental Illness in US Assisted Living
           Compared to Nursing Homes and the Community: 2007–2017”
    • Authors: Victor Molinari
      Abstract: Serious Mental Illness (SMI) among older adults, especially those living in long term care (LTC) settings is a topic that has not received sustained attention in the research literature. I commend authors Hua et al. for their study “Trends in Serious Mental Illness in US Assisted Living Compared to Nursing Homes and the Community: 2007–2017.” This work, a detailed examination of the prevalence rates of those with SMI, has yielded estimations of over 10% prevalence in Assisted Living (ALs) and close to 20% in nursing homes (NHs).
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-23
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.014
       
  • Association of Subjective Cognitive Decline With Postoperative
           Complications Could Herald Dementia Risk
    • Authors: Paul B. Rosenberg; Esther S. Oh
      Abstract: There is an ongoing debate about whether cognitive and functional decline in older persons is accelerated after surgery, whether this increases risk of incident dementia, and whether specific aspects of the surgical experience (i.e., surgery, anesthesia, medication, and complications) are associated with these risks. Better understanding of these associations might lead to interventions to prevent such decline.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.013
       
  • Virtual Intergenerational Therapy: New Platforms for Engagement of Older
           Adults During the COVID-19 Crisis
    • Authors: Li Feng Tan; Louis Yun Shou Tee, Santhosh Kumar Seetharaman
      Abstract: Intergenerational programs have been shown to bring benefits to all groups involved and have been implemented internationally.1 Activities implemented during intergenerational sessions are highly varied and involve diverse groups from children,2 volunteers3 to college students. Kindergartens and child care centers have been co-located4 in the same building to facilitate intergenerational interactions and activities.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.012
       
  • Trends in Serious Mental Illness in US Assisted Living Compared to Nursing
           Homes and the Community: 2007-2017
    • Authors: Cassandra L. Hua; Portia Y. Cornell, Sheryl Zimmerman, Jaclyn Winfree, Kali S. Thomas
      Abstract: Over 800,000 residents live in assisted living (AL) communities in the United States.1 AL communities provide housing, personal care, at least two meals a day, and oversight 24 hours a day, but are not required to provide nursing services. AL settings were historically referred to as “facilities,” but that term has fallen out of favor due to the institutional connotation of that term. The preferred term is now “communities.” Although AL communities are intended to be more “home-like” than nursing homes (NHs)2 they are home to residents with neuropsychiatric care needs.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.011
       
  • Older Physicians’ Reporting of Psychological Distress, Alcohol Use,
           Burnout and Workplace Stressors
    • Authors: Chanaka Wijeratne; Carly Johnco, Brian Draper, Joanne K. Earl
      Abstract: There is an increasing concern about the mental health of physicians given the evidence that physicians experience significant rates of burnout and depression,1 while female physicians are more likely to die by suicide compared to women in other professions.2 Most of this attention, however, has been limited to younger physicians, in particular trainees.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-12
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.010
       
  • Family Communication in Long-Term Care During a Pandemic: Lessons for
           Enhancing Emotional Experiences
    • Authors: Joan K. Monin; Talha Ali, Sumaiyah Syed, Amanda Piechota, Michael Lepore, Catalina Mourgues, Joseph E. Gaugler, Richard Marottoli, Daniel David
      Abstract: Family visits with long-term care (LTC) residents have been restricted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although this has been essential in reducing the transmission risk, it has been of great concern to families and friends that their regular communication with residents is limited. Residents rely on face-to-face communication with their family members to feel socially connected and less lonely.1 Residents with dementia, in particular, rely on contact with their family and friends to make sense of the world,2 and residents tend to receive better care in LTC when they have a family advocate who is involved with daily activities and interacts with LTC staff.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-12
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.008
       
  • Prediction of Loneliness in Older Adults Using Natural Language
           Processing: Exploring Sex Differences in Speech
    • Authors: Varsha D. Badal; Sarah A. Graham, Colin A. Depp, Kaoru Shinkawa, Yasunori Yamada, Lawrence A. Palinkas, Ho-Cheol Kim, Dilip V. Jeste, Ellen E. Lee
      Abstract: The loneliness pandemic has been associated with serious physical and mental health consequences, rivaling smoking and obesity.1–5 Loneliness also has economic consequences like lost productivity, greater healthcare utilization, and indirect costs (estimated to be over $3 billion annually). These cost estimates included the increased risk of cognitive decline and development of dementia among lonely individuals, while controlling for demographic factors, social isolation, and mood symptoms.6–9 Older individuals are at particularly high risk for loneliness due to loss of partners and friends, as well as declining physical health and mobility.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-11
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.009
       
  • Surgical Complications in Older Adults Predict Decline in Self-Perceived
           Cognitive Function in the Ensuing Year: A Cohort Study
    • Authors: Thomas Kannampallil; Katherine J. Holzer, Joanna Abraham, Uzma Naim, Eric J. Lenze, Simon Haroutounian, Michael S. Avidan
      Abstract: Over 300 million surgeries are performed worldwide every year.1,2 In the US, more than 50% of surgical procedures involve older adults.3 Older adults undergoing surgeries are often at risk for poor postoperative clinical, physical, and cognitive outcomes.4-6 Among older adults, surgery or anesthesia has been associated with postoperative cognitive impairment and has been studied under the general umbrella of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD).7,8 Reported risk factors for POCD include poor prior cognitive status, lengthy surgeries, pre-existing cerebral, vascular or cardiac disease, and lower educational levels.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.007
       
  • Assessing Preventative Effect of Ramelteon on Postoperative Delirium in
           Older Patients: Methodology Is Important
    • Authors: Zhao-Jing Xue; Yi Cheng, Fu-Shan Xue, Hai-Jun Hou
      Abstract: With a great interest, we read the recent article by Oh et al.1 assessing the preventative effect of ramelteon on postoperative delirium (POD) in older patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. They showed that ramelteon was not efficacious for prevention of POD. The authors used a quadruple-masked randomized controlled design including a consistent surgical operation (knee and hip surgery), and had attempted to control most factors affecting the occurrence of POD, such as age, preoperative physical self-maintenance scale, cognitive and sleep status, drug use, comorbidities, durations of surgery and anesthesia, and others.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.006
       
  • Early Psychological Correlates Associated With COVID-19 in A Spanish Older
           Adult Sample
    • Authors: Teresa Bobes-Bascarán; Pilar A Sáiz, Angela Velasco, Clara Martínez-Cao, Cristina Pedrosa, Almudena Portilla, Lorena de la Fuente-Tomas, Leticia García-Alvarez, María P García-Portilla, Julio Bobes
      Abstract: Since the declaration of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and lockdown, the older adult Spanish population has been isolated with the aim of shielding this vulnerable and multimorbid group and preventing overburdened health systems from collapsing, as large scale studies confirm that illness severity and mortality rates are significantly higher in patients over 60 years of age.1 Indeed, deaths in that age group account for 81% of total COVID-19 deaths.2–4
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.005
       
  • The Computerized Functional Skills Assessment and Training Program:
           Sensitivity to Global Cognitive Impairment, Correlations With Cognitive
           Abilities, and Factor Structure
    • Authors: Philip D. Harvey; Daniela Bolivar Forero, Lauren B. Ahern, Lize Tibiriçá, Peter Kallestrup, Sara J. Czaja
      Abstract: Functional capacity measures are preferable to other strategies to assess abilities that underlie everyday functioning. Advantages of these measures include greater ecological validity than traditional neuropsychological tests, no reliance on self-report, and no requirement for informants.1 Many previous functional capacity measures, such as the Everyday Problems Test2 or the UCSD Performance-Based Skills Assessment3 were paper and pencil simulations (e.g., maintaining a checkbook). However, as more everyday tasks are performed with technology (e.g., online banking and shopping), the ability to use technology for everyday tasks is increasingly important.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-06
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.019
       
  • Response to Comment: “Assessing Preventative Effect of Ramelteon on
           Postoperative Delirium in Older Patients: Methodology is Important”
    • Authors: Esther S. Oh; Jeannie-Marie Leoutsakos, Karin J. Neufeld
      Abstract: We read the comment by Dr. Xue et al. regarding our study “Effects of Ramelteon on the Prevention of Postoperative Delirium in Older Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery: The RECOVER Randomized Controlled Trial.” We agree that previous studies have shown association of preoperative laboratory factors including hemoglobin and albumin. We also appreciate the authors highlighting the importance of intraoperative factors including the effect of anesthesia. Our study was a rigorously conducted, quadruple-masked randomized control trial assessing the effect of ramelteon on the outcome of postoperative delirium.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-04
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.003
       
  • Criteria for Psychosis in Major and Mild Neurocognitive Disorders:
           International Psychogeriatric Association (IPA) Consensus Clinical and
           Research Definition
    • Authors: Jeffrey Cummings; Luiz Cortez Pinto, Manuel Cruz, Corinne E. Fischer, Debby L. Gerritsen, George T. Grossberg, Tzung-Jeng Hwang, Zahinoor Ismail, Dilip V. Jeste, Raymond Koopmans, Krista L. Lanctot, Raimundo Mateos, Susan Peschin, Cristina Sampaio, Debby Tsuang, Huali Wang, Kate Zhong, Lisa J. Bain, Mary Sano
      Abstract: Psychosis and other psychiatric and behavioral syndromes are common in neurocognitive disorders (NCD) and are difficult to treat and manage, compromising patient quality of life and causing caregiver stress and frustration. In addition to the behavioral disturbances themselves, neuropsychiatric symptoms are associated with increased healthcare utilization, institutionalization, and mortality.1 The prevalence of psychosis in NCD varies depending on the underlying disease, with an overall prevalence of approximately 30% in Alzheimer's disease (AD), 75% in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 50% in Parkinson's disease (PD), 15% in vascular dementia (VaD), and 10% in frontotemporal dementia (FTD).
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-04
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.002
       
  • Advancing the Science of Person-Centered Care: Commentary on Kales et al
           Paper
    • Authors: Ann Kolanowski
      Abstract: The National Alzheimer's Project Act is a major piece of legislation that is dramatically increasing research activity on the causes, treatment and prevention of neurodegenerative diseases, and the care, services and supports that people with dementia and their caregivers need to live well. To date, two National Research Summits devoted to the later issues have been convened and made recommendations that inform the scientific agenda for generating evidence in areas of practice where knowledge is lacking.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-04
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.001
       
  • Modifying Behavioral Activation to Reduce Social Isolation and Loneliness
           Among Older Adults
    • Authors: Renee Pepin; Courtney J. Stevens, Namkee G. Choi, Sharon M. Feeney, Martha L. Bruce
      Abstract: Social isolation and loneliness, objective and subjective indicators of lack of social support and interaction, are pervasive among US older adults1,2 and their detrimental health effects have been well documented.3–9 Social distancing requirements of the COVID-19 pandemic have exacerbated these problems. The prevalence and deleterious health effects of social isolation and loneliness are especially notable among homebound older adults given their limited social engagement and activities due to their health conditions and mobility impairment.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-03
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.09.004
       
  • Health, Resilience, and Successful Aging in the Older US Veterans
    • Authors: Helen Lavretsky
      Abstract: Over 30 years ago, the MacArthur model of successful aging, described by John Rowe and Robert Kahn1–3 transformed the study of aging from a discipline focused on disease and decline to one emphasizing health and growth.4 However, the Rowe and Kahn definition of successful aging required better than average aging as a combination of three components: avoiding disease and disability, high cognitive and physical function, and engagement with life. Although we might be able to learn about successful aging by studying those 5% of older adults who are able to live up to this high standard, it is unlikely to inform the solutions for the problem of global aging and associated cognitive and functional decline.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-02
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.018
       
  • Loneliness Versus Wisdom Amid Two Concurrent Pandemics of Loneliness
    • Authors: Dilip V. Jeste; Ellen E. Lee
      Abstract: Today we are living in the midst of two ongoing pandemics. One of them began a couple of decades ago, with increasing social isolation and loneliness (SI/L) associated with growing social anomie resulting from progressive globalization and impossibly rapid changes in technology. This has led to a 33% increase in suicides and a 6-fold increase in the number of opioid-related deaths in the US since the late 1990s. SI/L is a major factor underlying this pandemic of deaths of despair.1 In the UK, a new Minister of Loneliness was appointed in 2018 out of concerns about lost productivity caused by loneliness among workers.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-09-02
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.017
       
  • Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation Using the H1-Coil for Treatment of
           Late-Life Depression With Comorbid Mild Cognitive Impairment
    • Authors: Benazir H. Hodzic-Santor; Jed A. Meltzer, Nicolaas Paul L.G. Verhoeff, Daniel M. Blumberger, Linda Mah
      Abstract: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD). Its main potential adverse effect is risk of seizures. Deep TMS (dTMS) uses an H1-coil to direct magnetic fields to a greater depth than conventional TMS, and is effective for MDD in the presence of age-related cortical atrophy.1,2
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-27
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.016
       
  • Insight into Potential Mechanisms Linking Loneliness and Cognitive
           Decline: Commentary on “Health Factors as Potential Mediator the
           Longitudinal Effect of Loneliness on General Cognitive Ability”
    • Authors: Neha Kidambi; Ellen E. Lee
      Abstract: Loneliness impacts mental and physical health in older adults, with health effects exceeding that of smoking 15 cigarettes per day or obesity.1 Older adults are at particularly high risk for loneliness due to living alone, physical decline, and shrinking social networks.2,3 Furthermore, the Covid-19 pandemic and physical distancing guidelines have increased social isolation and loneliness among older adults worldwide. Loneliness has also been linked to cognitive decline. Large-scale longitudinal studies have reported that lonely individuals are at increased risk of developing dementia at 3–4 years of follow-up.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-27
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.015
       
  • Response to Van Orden's Commentary on "COVID-19 Related Loneliness and
           Psychiatric Symptoms Among Older Adults: The Buffering Role of Subjective
           Age"
    • Authors: Yaakov; S.G. Hoffman, Amit Shrira, Ehud Bodner, Yuval Palgi
      Abstract: In a recent commentary1 on our article2 addressing the association between COVID-19 related loneliness and psychiatric symptoms in older adults and the moderating role of subjective age, concerns were raised both vis-à-vis the loneliness measure and possible negative effects of assessing subjective age.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-25
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.014
       
  • Social Disconnection in Late Life Mental Illness – Commentary From the
           National Institute of Mental Health
    • Authors: Elizabeth A. Necka; Laura M Rowland, Jovier D. Evans
      Abstract: Social disconnection – a term which refers to either objective social isolation, perceived social isolation (otherwise known as loneliness), or the co-presence of both – is a prevalent affliction among older adults. Nearly a quarter of older Americans live alone,1,2 and surveys suggest that over one third of Americans over the age of 45 are lonely at least some of the time,3 with levels of loneliness increasing rapidly among those over the age of 70,4 the same age when objective social isolation is highest.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-25
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.013
       
  • Late-Life Cognitive Activity: Implications for Healthcare and Financial
           Decision-Making
    • Authors: Malcolm Forbes
      Abstract: “Human beings, viewed as behaving systems, are quite simple. The apparent complexity of our behavior over time is largely a reflection of the complexity of the environment in which we find ourselves.” – Herbert Simon, 1969
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.012
       
  • Getting by With a Little Help From Our Peers
    • Authors: Jo Anne Sirey; Elissa Kozlov
      Abstract: We have been witnessing the tragic costs of COVID-19 on health and well-being, and an increased awareness of the racism that permeates much of our society. Urban residents and communities of color, particularly Black communities, have long faced health disparities leading to unequal access to care, differential treatment within the medical system, and poorer mental and physical health outcomes. As we have taken steps to protect ourselves against the virus, we have had to reduce social interactions with our families, friends, faith-based communities, neighborhoods, and other community supports.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.011
       
  • Commentary on “At Swami's Rock”
    • Authors: David L. Coulter
      Abstract: Swami Vivekananda (1863–1902) was a Hindu monk and teacher who came to the United States to speak at the Parliament of the World's Religions in Chicago in 1893. His opening speech established the theme of the unity of all the world's religions. After a speaking tour of the United States, in 1895, the Swami visited friends at Thousand Island Park on Wellesley Island in the Saint Lawrence River. He spent 7 weeks there resting, teaching, and writing. On the day he left, he and his associates walked a mile through the woods on the rock ridge above the Park until the Swami found a special place and said, “Here we shall meditate.” He sat there unmoving for hours even through a rainstorm.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.010
       
  • Culturally Consonant Interventions for Mental and Physical Health
    • Authors: Steven M. Albert
      Abstract: Positive Minds-Strong Bodies (PMSB) is an intervention designed to promote mental health and reduce physical disability among older adults. As described by Falgas-Bague et al., it combines 10 1-hour individual sessions involving cognitive therapy and behavioral activation (Positive Minds, PM) and a 3-times per week exercise training program (Strong Bodies, SB).1 The 12- to 14-week program “seeks to enhance participant ability to cope with stressors linked to poor mood and improve functional restoration by increasing mobility.” In a randomized controlled trial, the authors have shown acceptability (77.6% attended over half of PM Sessions, 53.4% over half of SB sessions) and efficacy in both physical function (lower extremity performance) and mental health (reduction in mood symptoms).
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-22
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.009
       
  • Moving Evidence-Informed Assessment and Management of Behavioral and
           Psychological Symptoms of Dementia into the Real World: Training Family
           and Staff Caregivers in the DICE Approach
    • Authors: Helen C. Kales; Vincent Kern, H. Myra Kim, Mary C. Blazek
      Abstract: Dementia affects more than 5 million US residents with over 15 million family caregivers providing unpaid care.1 In Michigan, these numbers are 200,000 and 500,000, respectively.2 Additionally, tens of thousands of professional caregivers (including nurse, home health, personal and home care aides) care for people with dementia in community and long-term care facilities. Often most troubling to caregivers are noncognitive behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) accompanying memory loss.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-21
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.008
       
  • COVID-19, Psychological Well-being and Physical Activity Levels in Older
           Adults During the Nationwide Lockdown in Spain
    • Authors: Alejandro Carriedo; José A. Cecchini, Javier Fernandez-Rio, Antonio Méndez-Giménez
      Abstract: The first case of coronavirus (COVID-19) was reported in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and the new disease began to sharply increase in Asia and Europe. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak of a pandemic. Since the first confirmed case, the world has seen more than 20.3 million COVID-19 infections, and more than 741.723 people have died (as of August 12, 2020).1 The risk of severe disease following infection from this virus is particularly worrisome for people older than 60 years, who represent more than 95% of deaths in the European Region.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-21
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.007
       
  • Successful Aging in Older US Veterans: Results From the 2019–2020
           National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study
    • Authors: Robert H. Pietrzak; Becca R. Levy, Jack Tsai, Steven M. Southwick
      Abstract: On average, US military veterans are 20 years older than US nonveterans, with a median age of 64 versus 44.1 Currently, approximately 46% of US veterans are aged 65 and older, which is expected to increase to nearly 60% over the next 5 years.2 This aging of the veteran population underscores the importance of identifying factors associated with successful adaptation to age-related morbidities, given the elevated prevalence and incidence of conditions such as heart disease and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans relative to nonveterans,3,4 as well as disproportionate use of VA healthcare services and resources of older versus younger veterans.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-19
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.006
       
  • Social Isolation and Loneliness in Older Adults: Review and Commentary of
           a National Academies Report
    • Authors: Nancy J. Donovan; Dan Blazer
      Abstract: Biomedical models of human health and disease have been enhanced by decades of sustained research into the social determinants of physical and mental health, though social influences on health and disease often receive less attention in healthcare practices. Over the 20th century, factors such as socio-economic position, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and others have populated the literature with every increasing evidences of their importance on health.1 Significant disparities in mortality were found for different occupations, as well as for different education and income strata.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-19
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.005
       
  • A Substance Misuse Intervention Program in Postacute Care: Who Declines
           Participation'
    • Authors: Verena R. Cimarolli; Orah Burack, Jillian M. Minahan, Francesca Falzarano, Joann P. Reinhardt, Xiaomei Shi
      Abstract: At-risk alcohol or other substance use of older adults over the age of 50 is a growing public health issue. Alcohol misuse, such as binge drinking, is estimated to be as high as 10% among older Americans.1 Furthermore, as chronic health conditions increase with age, older adults are prescribed and consume prescription drugs—sedatives and opioids in particular—leading to prescription drug misuse. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 3% of individuals aged 50–64 and 1.5% of individuals older than 65 report yearly opioid medications misuse.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.004
       
  • Health Factors as Potential Mediators of the Longitudinal Effect of
           Loneliness on General Cognitive Ability
    • Authors: Alice J. Kim; Christopher R. Beam, Nicole E. Greenberg, Shanna L. Burke
      Abstract: Significant effects of loneliness, conceptualized as perceived social isolation, on general cognitive ability (hereafter, cognition) are sometimes observed1,2 but not always.3–6 Further, reported associations are largely descriptive, as studies rarely examine the physiological, psychological, or social pathways that might mediate longitudinal effects of loneliness on cognition.7 The inclusion of health mediators may clarify null findings; effect sizes between processes that are more causally distal tend to be small or nonsignificant because effects are transmitted through intermediary links in the causal chain.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-11
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.017
       
  • Considering the Impact of Research Assessments: A Commentary on
           “COVID-19 Related Loneliness and Psychiatric Symptoms Among Older
           Adults: The Buffering Role of Subjective Age”
    • Authors: Kimberly A. Van Orden
      Abstract: Social connections are essential for health and well-being. Social isolation and loneliness are potent predictors of well-being, health, functioning, and longevity.1 Despite the public health significance of social isolation and loneliness, there are few evidence-based strategies to improve social connections.1 The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the urgency for identifying evidence-based strategies for improving social connections, including compensating for barriers to connectedness such as physical distancing.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-10
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.003
       
  • Scientific Autobiography of a Spiritual Seeker in the Year of Hindsight's
           20/20
    • Authors: Helen Lavretsky
      Abstract: I am honored to follow in the Journal's wisdom tradition and share my scientific autobiography, ironically, written in the year of hindsight's 20/20, when my research activities are suspended indefinitely, and I have plenty of time to reflect upon the meaning of life. We are living during unprecedented and difficult times when the entire world is asked to find its spiritual center and resilience in order to find collective solutions to its many problems. The surreal nature of the COVID-19 pandemic and the global lockdown makes each of us look back and ask “how did I get here'” followed by “and how do I move forward'” Reflections upon our life choices that resulted in the situation at hand can be very revealing and can help define our next chapter.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-10
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.002
       
  • The Protective Impact of Telemedicine on Persons With Dementia and Their
           Caregivers During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Authors: Frank Ho-yin Lai; Elaine Wai-hung Yan, Kathy Ka-ying Yu, Wing-Sze Tsui, Daniel Ting-hoi Chan, Benjamin K. Yee
      Abstract: Social distancing measures have been adopted worldwide to contain the spread of transmission of the COVID-19. Regardless of the success of such measures, social distancing invariably imposes limitations and constrains on diverse daily living activities.1 The older adults, and especially those with cognitive impairments under home care, are particularly vulnerable to the disruption caused by social distancing. Besides their known sensitivity to loneliness,2 severe disruptions of the normal routine,3 including access to social supports at the community level are expected.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.019
       
  • Cognitive Decline in Mild Cognitive Impairment With Lewy Bodies or
           Alzheimer Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study
    • Authors: Calum A. Hamilton; Fiona E. Matthews, Paul C. Donaghy, John-Paul Taylor, John T. O'Brien, Nicola Barnett, Kirsty Olsen, Jim Lloyd, George Petrides, Ian G. McKeith, Alan J. Thomas
      Abstract: Lewy body (LB) and Alzheimer (AD) diseases are the two commonest causes of degenerative dementia;1 the syndromes of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) or AD dementia may be distinguished by physical and psychiatric symptoms.2 They also present with different patterns of impairments in particular cognitive domains,3 and have been observed to decline at different rates; various studies report a more aggressive course in DLB than AD in rate of cognitive decline,4 mortality,5 and hospitalization.6 Consequently people with DLB have poorer quality of life7 and require more health and care resources.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.018
       
  • Electroconvulsive Therapy Practice Changes in Older Individuals Due to
           COVID-19: Expert Consensus Statement
    • Authors: Maria I. Lapid; Stephen Seiner, Hannah Heintz, Adriana P. Hermida, Louis Nykamp, Sohag N. Sanghani, Martina Mueller, Georgios Petrides, Brent P. Forester
      Abstract: With over 3.8 million cases in the United States alone,1 the coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19) caused by the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has had a profound impact on health care systems. Because COVID-19 primarily presents as a respiratory illness and is transmitted through respiratory droplets, great care must be taken to reduce the risk of transmission during as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), which involves an aerosol-generating procedure from manual ventilation with a bag mask valve while under anesthesia.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.08.001
       
  • Is There a Dose-Response Relationship Between Exercise and Cognitive
           Function in Older Adults'
    • Authors: Swathi Gujral; Lauren Oberlin
      Abstract: Frost et al.1 conducted a modest-sized randomized controlled trial (n = 99) examining the effects of 6-months of high-intensity versus moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (AE) training versus an inactive control condition on several subdomains of executive function (EF; set-shifting, working memory, inhibition, verbal generativity, and visual reasoning) in cognitively unimpaired older adults. The study also examined the long-term effects of AE training on EF 12-months after completion of the intervention.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.016
       
  • Subjective Cognitive Complaints in Aging: A Commentary on Topiwala et al.
           2020
    • Authors: Julie A. Dumas
      Abstract: In the process of aging, older adults may report that they notice changes in their cognitive functioning. These cognitive changes can be distressing to the individual and some studies have shown subjective cognitive changes may be predictive of later objective cognitive decline. Thus, understanding the implications of experiencing subjective cognitive changes is important to the patient and the community of physicians, researchers, and caregivers in the lives of older adults. Early studies of subjective cognitive decline (SCD) noted relationships between cognitive complaints and hippocampal volumes showing that those with SCD had hippocampal volumes that were similar in size to patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-08-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.015
       
  • Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Intervention for Disability Prevention,
           Implemented by Community Health Workers Serving Ethnic Minority Elders
    • Authors: Irene Falgas-Bague; Zorangeli Ramos, Paola del Cueto, Emily Kim, Jenny Zhen-Duan, Yankau Josephine Wong, Ching-King Chieng, Walter Frontera, Margarita Alegría
      Abstract: A recent Institute of Medicine Report1 highlighted that U.S. elders, particularly racial/ethnic minorities, face tremendous challenges in receiving care for mental illness and disability prevention. Cultural adaptations of evidence-based interventions are necessary to appropriately respond to the unique needs of a growing racial/ethnic minority elder population.2 Cultural adaptation is defined as the process of systematically modifying an evidence-based intervention to be congruent with the language, values, beliefs, and context corresponding to clients’ cultural background.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-29
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.014
       
  • Assessing Public's Attitudes Towards Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide of
           Persons With Dementia Based on Their Advance Request: An Experimental
           Survey of US Public
    • Authors: Dominic R Mangino; Talia Bernhard, Paul Wakim, Scott YH Kim
      Abstract: Euthanasia and/or assisted suicide (EAS) is currently permitted in a small number of jurisdictions, with some allowing EAS in non-terminally ill patients such as persons with dementia.1 Although U.S. jurisdictions that allow EAS currently require patients to be terminally ill, expanding the practice to include patients with dementia is increasingly discussed in news articles,2–4 medical journals,5 and state legislatures.6 Expanding the practice to persons with dementia compounds the controversy over EAS because progressive cognitive decline and the inevitable loss of decision-making capacity inescapably lead to debates about using advance euthanasia directives (AEDs) that specify future circumstances in which patients would receive EAS when they are no longer competent.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-29
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.013
       
  • The AAGP Scholars Program: Predictors of Pursuing Geriatric Psychiatry
           Fellowship Training
    • Authors: Michelle L. Conroy; Brandon C. Yarns, Kirsten M. Wilkins, Chadrick E. Lane, Kristina F. Zdanys, Robert H. Pietrzak, Brent P. Forester, Paul D. Kirwin
      Abstract: Demand for geriatric psychiatrists is indisputable, with the number of persons age 65 years and older in the United States projected to increase from 41.3 million in 2012 to 83.7 million in 2050.1 A 2012 Institute of Medicine report estimated that 14%–20% of older individuals suffer from mental health and/or substance use disorders2. Primary care physicians, general psychiatrists, and other clinicians without subspecialization provide the majority of older age mental health care.3,4 Clinicians with fellowship training in geropsychiatry and geriatric medicine provide much-needed expertise on complex issues relevant to this population, such as multimorbidity due to co-occurring psychiatric and medical disorders, behavioral symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders, and unique phase-of-life issues, such as retirement, leading to psychosocial stress.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-29
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.012
       
  • The Role of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Research Diagnostic Criteria for
           Neurodegenerative Diseases
    • Authors: Jeffrey Cummings
      Abstract: Research diagnostic criteria for neurodegenerative disorders (NDD) allow more precise patient diagnosis and management and facilitate research. Research diagnostic criteria lead to the identification of relatively homogenous patient populations that can be enrolled in pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventional research as well as in natural history studies. Research diagnostic criteria rapidly transcend research applications and are incorporated into clinical practice. They are periodically updated to reflect advances in scientific understanding of the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, management, and underlying biology of NDD.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-27
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.011
       
  • Older Sex Offenders: Expanding the Interface Between Geriatric and
           Forensic Psychiatry
    • Authors: William J. Newman; Amanie Salem
      Abstract: Every day, hundreds of Americans are affected by sexual violence. The general public's growing awareness about sexual misconduct has piqued public interest. Thus, mass movements such as #TimesUp and #MeToo have gained traction over recent years. However, our understanding of sexual offending in the scientific literature has continued room to develop. One challenge has been variations in terminology, as well as inconsistency regarding how data are gathered and analyzed.1 For these reasons and others, novel perspectives on sexual offending, such as those provided by Ghossoub and Khoury, loom important.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.009
       
  • Treating Apathy in Late-Life Depression
    • Authors: Sara L. Weisenbach
      Abstract: Apathy, defined as a lack of goal-directed behavior, is a common feature of late-life depression1 and has been associated with incident dementia.2 Apathy is difficult to effectively treat, even when depression reaches remission.3 Moreover, it has been associated with problems in managing daily activities independently and in reduced quality of life.4
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-16
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.008
       
  • Commentary Letter to the Editor on the Study of Mangino et al.: Euthanasia
           and Assisted Suicide of Persons with Dementia
    • Authors: Radboud Marijnissen; Robert Schoevers, Richard Oude Voshaar
      Abstract: With interest, we read the study of Mangino et al. (Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 28:4 [2020] 466–477) in which they reviewed 75 cases of euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) in persons with dementia in the Netherlands published by the Dutch regional euthanasia review committees (RTE) (2011–2018). This overview indeed offers an unique insight into aspects of current practice, on an individual patient level. However, a number of issues need to be taken into account more explicitly when interpreting this report.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-11
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.006
       
  • What We Can Learn From Published Reports of Euthanasia in Persons With
           Dementia: A Reply to Marijnissen et al.
    • Authors: Scott Y H Kim; Marie E Nicolini, Dominic R Mangino, Raymond G De Vries
      Abstract: We thank Marijnissen et al.1 for their thoughtful comments and an opportunity to provide additional context to our paper.2
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-11
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.005
       
  • Less Is More: The Impact of Deprescribing Psychotropic Drugs on Behavioral
           and Psychological Symptoms and Daily Functioning in Nursing Home Patients.
           Results From the Cluster-Randomized Controlled COSMOS Trial
    • Authors: Marie H. Gedde; Bettina S. Husebo, Janne Mannseth, Reidun L.S. Kjome, Mala Naik, Line I. Berge
      Abstract: The introduction of psychotropic drugs in the 1950s revolutionized the understanding and treatment of severe psychiatric disorders, undoubtedly alleviating the symptom burden and improving daily functioning for persons with severe affective and psychotic disorders.1 Today, these drugs are often used off-label, thus the use of psychotropic drugs for managing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) warrants special attention.2–5 BPSD such as delusions, hallucinations, agitation, anxiety, and aberrant motor behavior are associated with poorer physical and cognitive functioning as symptoms persist and reoccur in the course of dementia.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-11
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.004
       
  • Subjective Cognitive Complaints Given in Questionnaire: Relationship With
           Brain Structure, Cognitive Performance and Self-Reported Depressive
           Symptoms in a 25-Year Retrospective Cohort Study
    • Authors: Anya Topiwala; Sana Suri, Charlotte Allan, Enikő Zsoldos, Nicola Filippini, Claire E. Sexton, Abda Mahmood, Archana Singh-Manoux, Clare E. Mackay, Mika Kivimäki, Klaus P. Ebmeier
      Abstract: Subjective cognitive complaints are common, particularly in older adults.1 Some studies have found these complaints to be associated with later cognitive impairment and dementia,2,3 but such complaints are also associated with depressive symptoms.4 Thus, it remains unclear whether subjective memory problems reflect affective symptoms or further indicate an underlying pathological process. Examination of associations between subjective complaints and brain structure may represent a novel approach to clarify this.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.002
       
  • Attitudes Toward Computers Moderate the Effect of Computerized Cognitive
           Trainings in Oldest-Old Senior Living Center Residents
    • Authors: Feng Vankee Lin; Kaylin Cottone, Kelsey Mcdermott, Alanna Jacobs, Dallas Nelson, Anton Porsteinsson, Benjamin P. Chapman
      Abstract: Computerized cognitive interventions (CCIs) have been increasingly widely implemented among older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).1 Compared to traditional cognitive interventions, CCIs offer additional benefits including matching training content and difficulty with individual performance, visual appeal and variety, transportability, and scalability.1 Yet the efficacy of CCIs in maintaining or improving older adults’ cognitive and functional health has been modest in an overall sense, and highly variable across individuals and studies.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-06
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.07.001
       
  • Experiences and Needs of Caregivers of Persons With Dementia in India
           During the COVID-19 Pandemic—A Qualitative Study
    • Authors: Sridhar Vaitheswaran; Monisha Lakshminarayanan, Vaishnavi Ramanujam, Subashini Sargunan, Shreenila Venkatesan
      Abstract: The current pandemic caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak has forced several countries to go under a lockdown.1 The first case of corona virus disease (COVID-19) was identified in India on 30th January 2020 and the country has been under lockdown since 24th March 2020.2
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-06
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.026
       
  • Caregiving Factors as Predictors of Care Recipient Mortality
    • Authors: Richard Schulz; Scott R. Beach, Esther M. Friedman
      Abstract: Much of the family caregiving literature focuses on the impact of caregiving on the care provider, including effects on psychological and physical health, social relationships, and economic well-being.1 This literature in turn has generated wide-ranging research programs to identify risk factors for adverse caregiver (CG) outcomes as well as intervention strategies to mitigate the negative effects of caregiving.2 To a lesser extent, researchers have documented the impact of caregiving on care recipient (CR) outcomes, including care recipient behavior,3 psychological symptoms such as depression,4 time to nursing home admission.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-07-05
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.025
       
  • Neurobiological Targets of Apathy Can Guide Treatment Development
    • Authors: George S. Alexopoulos
      Abstract: Apathy is a motivational disturbance leading to reduced goal-oriented behavior. It afflicts a large percentage of patients suffering for Alzheimer disease but it is also common in many neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson disease, frontotemporal dementia, stroke, and idiopathic depression. Apathy is disabling and adds to caregiver burden and distress. In an authoritative review, van Dyke et al.1 summarize evidence indicating that compromise of the prefrontal cortex by the neuropathological changes of Alzheimer disease lead to the lack of motivation characterizing apathy.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-29
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.023
       
  • A Review of PTSD Augmentation Strategies for Older Adults and Case of
           rTMS-Augmented Prolonged Exposure
    • Authors: Carly Yasinski; Jessica Maples-Keller, Hannah Trautner, Gregory Job, Sheila A.M. Rauch, William M. McDonald, Barbara O. Rothbaum
      Abstract: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves a combination of symptoms, including re-experiencing, avoidance, negative alterations in cognition and mood, and alterations in arousal, following exposure to a traumatic event.1 Lifetime rates of PTSD are lower in older adults than in younger adults, yet PTSD in older patients is more likely to show a chronic course and is associated with increased psychiatric and physical comorbidity and poorer overall psychosocial and physical functioning.2,3 PTSD in older adults is often underrecognized and undertreated.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-26
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.022
       
  • Characteristics of Older Adult First-Time Sex Offenders: Insights From the
           Missouri Registry
    • Authors: Elias Ghossoub; Rita Khoury
      Abstract: Sexual violence is defined as “any sexual act, attempt to obtain a sexual act, unwanted sexual comments or advances, or acts to traffic, or otherwise directed, against a person's sexuality using coercion, by any person regardless of their relationship to the victim, in any setting, including but not limited to home and work.”1 Data regarding sexual violence typically come from police records, clinical settings, and community surveys but it is widely believed to be an underestimation of the magnitude of the problem.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.020
       
  • Subjective Sleep Quality and Trajectories of Interleukin-6 in Older Adults
    • Authors: Sarah T. Stahl; Stephen F. Smagula, Juleen Rodakowski, Mary Amanda Dew, Jordan F. Karp, Steven M. Albert, Meryl Butters, Ariel Gildengers, Charles F. Reynolds
      Abstract: Chronic low-grade inflammation increases risk for many age-related diseases including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, and cancer.1 It predicts both frailty and mortality in older adults, even in the absence of clinical disease.2 Compared with younger and middle-aged adults, older adults have higher concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, especially interleukin-6 (IL-6). These observations suggest inflammation may be a therapeutic target to minimize age-related disease and frailty.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.019
       
  • Response to Letter to the Editor
    • Authors: Gretchen A. Brenes; Stephanie Sohl, Rebecca E. Wells, Deanna Befus, Claudia L. Campos, Suzanne C. Danhauer
      Abstract: We agree with Dr. Bougea's comments on the limitations of the research on yoga and dementia and further suggestions for strengthening the next stages of research. In summary, we agree that screening measures should not serve as diagnostic measures for dementia diagnoses or type of dementia, and the research on yoga and dementia would be improved by the use of validated clinical diagnostic tests. It is important to note, however, that standard clinical practice for a typical dementia diagnosis does not include genetic or blood/CSF biomarker evaluation.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.018
       
  • A Critical Evaluation of the Studies Included in Brenes et al. 2019 on the
           Therapeutic Effects of Yoga in People With Dementia
    • Authors: Anastasia Bougea
      Abstract: Although yoga has been used as a complementary health approach for enhancing physical health, little is known about the impact of yoga in adults with dementia. I read with interest the review of Brenes et al. included only four studies of yoga intervention for demented subjects with beneficial effects on cognitive domains particularly on attention and verbal memory.1 However, these conclusions should be considered with caution.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.017
       
  • A Randomized Controlled Trial of High-Intensity Exercise and Executive
           Functioning in Cognitively Normal Older Adults
    • Authors: Natalie J. Frost; Michael Weinborn, Gilles E. Gignac, Stephanie R. Rainey-Smith, Shaun Markovic, Nicole Gordon, Hamid R. Sohrabi, Simon M. Laws, Ralph N. Martins, Jeremiah J. Peiffer, Belinda M. Brown
      Abstract: It has been hypothesized that age-related cognitive decline is associated with reduced structural integrity and decreased functional connectivity in the frontal lobes of the brain.1 As executive functions (EF) are predominantly frontal lobe processes, they are particularly vulnerable to age-related decline, with cognitive deficits in this domain recognized as one of the first markers of cognitive aging.2 There have been numerous efforts to outline a comprehensive theoretically-driven model of EF,3–5 with a general assertion that EF can be seen as both a broad, unitary cognitive domain, as well as separable, but related, subdomains.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-20
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.015
       
  • Relationships Among History of Psychosis, Cognition and Functioning in
           Later-Life Remitted Major Depression
    • Authors: Kathleen S. Bingham; Deirdre R. Dawson, Benoit H. Mulsant, Samprit Banerjee, Alastair J. Flint
      Abstract: Major depressive disorder (MDD) with psychotic features (“psychotic depression”) is associated with severe morbidity and disability during acute episodes of illness.1 Some, but not all, observational studies have found that psychotic depression has worse everyday functional outcome in the longer-term compared with nonpsychotic MDD (“nonpsychotic depression”).2–5 However, these findings are difficult to interpret because of the lack of control for residual symptoms, as well as for the effects of differing modalities of treatment in each condition.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-19
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.014
       
  • The Association of Late Life Cognitive Activity with Healthcare and
           
    • Authors: Crystal M. Glover; Lei Yu, Christopher C. Stewart, Robert S. Wilson, David A. Bennett, Patricia A. Boyle
      Abstract: Healthcare and financial decision-making represents a key determinant of health and well-being for older adults in the United States.1–3 However, many older adults are vulnerable to suboptimal decision-making in these domains.4–7 For instance, older adults have difficulties with Medicare Part D, particularly in understanding eligibility criteria, taking part in enrollment processes, and obtaining cost-effective prescription drug coverage.8,9 Financial decision-making also presents challenges for older adults, resulting in fees for late credit card payments, subprime home equity loans and lines of credit, and mismanagement of retirement funds.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-16
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.010
       
  • The Impact of Strategic White Matter Hyperintensity Lesion Location on
           Language
    • Authors: Saima Hilal; J. Matthijs Biesbroek, Henri Vrooman, Eddie Chong, Hugo J. Kuijf, Narayanaswamy Venketasubramanian, Ching-Yu Cheng, Tien Yin Wong, Geert Jan Biessels, Christopher Chen
      Abstract: Neuropsychological assessment plays a crucial role in detecting loss of cognitive functions and change in behavioral and functional state due to disruption in different neural networks and subnetworks caused by vascular damage.1 Neuropsychological tests include tasks assessing domains considered to reflect “cortical function” for example, language and visuoconstruction and tasks that tap into domains that are especially sensitive to vascular damage in subcortical regions such as attention and visuomotor speed.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-16
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.009
       
  • Electroconvulsive Therapy Pulse Amplitude and Clinical Outcomes
    • Authors: Christopher C. Abbott; Davin Quinn, Jeremy Miller, Enstin Ye, Sulaiman Iqbal, Megan Lloyd, Thomas R. Jones, Joel Upston, Zhi De Deng, Erik Erhardt, Shawn M. McClintock
      Abstract: Despite the proven antidepressant efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depressive episodes,1 neurocognitive impairment remains a major concern of treatment, especially in areas of episodic memory and executive function.2 Demographic (age, premorbid intelligence, and years of education), depression severity, and ECT treatment parameters (pulse-width, dose-titration, amplitude, and electrode placement) influence ECT-mediated neurocognitive outcomes.3 The impact of variable pulse amplitudes on clinical and cognitive outcomes has yet to be investigated.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-16
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.008
       
  • Brain Regional Glucose Metabolism, Neuropsychiatric Symptoms, and the Risk
           of Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment: The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging
    • Authors: Janina Krell-Roesch; Jeremy A. Syrjanen, Maria Vassilaki, Val J. Lowe, Prashanthi Vemuri, Michelle M. Mielke, Mary M. Machulda, Gorazd B. Stokin, Teresa J. Christianson, Walter K. Kremers, Clifford R. Jack, David S. Knopman, Ronald C. Petersen, Yonas E. Geda
      Abstract: Presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) and abnormalities in brain regional glucose metabolism as measured by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are independent risk factors for cognitive impairment. Research has shown that brain glucose metabolism declines with increasing age,1 that individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia due to Alzheimer disease (AD) have reduced FDG uptake,2–4 and that FDG-PET abnormalities are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-16
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.006
       
  • Cortical Thickness of the Salience Network and Change in Apathy Following
           Antidepressant Treatment for Late-Life Depression
    • Authors: Monique A. Pimontel; Nili Solomonov, Lauren Oberlin, Theodora Kanellopoulos, Jennifer N. Bress, Matthew J. Hoptman, George S. Alexopoulos, Faith M. Gunning
      Abstract: Apathy, defined as a decrease in self-motivated, goal-directed activity,1,2 is a common phenomenon in late-life depression.3–7 An estimated 75% of older, community-dwelling adults with depression suffer from comorbid apathy, compared to 25% of their nondepressed counterparts.6 Apathy is associated with decreased quality of life,8,9 greater functional and cognitive impairment, and elevated risk of poor clinical outcomes in depression treatments.10,11 Despite the prevalence and clinical implications of apathy in late-life depression, data regarding underlying neural circuitry abnormalities and effective interventions targeting apathy are sparse.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-15
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.06.007
       
  • Invited Perspective on the “Annual Prevalence of Use of Potentially
           Inappropriate Medications for Treatment of Affective Disorders in
           Parkinson's Disease”
    • Authors: Gregory M. Pontone
      Abstract: Affective disorders, anxiety, and depression, are the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD) and have a negative impact on quality of life and daily functioning beyond that caused by the movement symptoms.1,2 Despite the burden caused by affective disorders in PD, only a few medications have evidence of efficacy for treating depression and there are currently no evidence-based medications for anxiety in this population.3 Further, there is no evidence-based algorithmic approach for treating affective disorders that fail the first intervention.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-11
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.030
       
  • Adapting and Optimizing Problem Adaptation Therapy (PATH) for People With
           Mild-Moderate Dementia and Depression
    • Authors: Catherine McCombie; Elizabeth Cort, Rebecca L. Gould, Dimitris N. Kiosses, George S. Alexopoulos, Robert Howard, Vanessa C. Lawrence
      Abstract: Depression in dementia is common, with around half of people with Alzheimer's disease experiencing depression,1,2 compared to prevalence rates of around a third in older adults without dementia.3 The combined effect of depression with a disabling condition is profound, leading to reduced quality of life for people with dementia and their caregivers,1 exacerbating cognitive and functional impairments,4 increasing mortality,5 and worsening care outcomes by increasing caregiver burden and risk of transition to residential care.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-04
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.025
       
  • Peer Companionship for Mental Health of Older Adults in Primary Care: A
           Pragmatic, Nonblinded, Parallel-Group, Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Authors: Yeates Conwell; Kimberly A, Van Orden, Deborah M. Stone, Wendy LiKamWa McIntosh, Susan Messing, Jody Rowe, Carol Podgorski, Kimberly A. Kaukeinen, Xin Tu
      Abstract: Social connectedness refers to structural, functional, and qualitative aspects of relationships that social scientists regard as essential to a healthy life.1 Structural connectedness includes characteristics of social ties and networks that when insufficient may cause social isolation. Functional connectedness includes aspects of relationships that provide support, such as emotional or instrumental support, as well as subjective feelings of loneliness or that one does not belong. Qualitative aspects of connectedness include relationship quality or marital discord.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-06-02
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.021
       
  • Measuring Apathy in Alzheimer's Disease in the Apathy in Dementia
           Methylphenidate Trial 2 (ADMET 2): A Comparison of Instruments
    • Authors: Krista L. Lanctôt; Roberta W. Scherer, Abby Li, Danielle Vieira, Hamadou Coulibaly, Paul B. Rosenberg, Nathan Herrmann, Alan J. Lerner, Prasad R. Padala, Olga Brawman-Mintzer, Chris H. van Dyck, Anton P. Porsteinsson, Suzanne Craft, Allan Levey, William J. Burke, Jacobo E. Mintzer
      Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) has an estimated prevalence of 50 million persons worldwide1 and an incidence of 10 million cases per year,1–3 making it the most common form of dementia. While neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are common in AD, apathy is particularly frequent, affecting up to 70% of patients.4 Apathy has been broadly defined as a loss of interest in daily activities and diminished goal-directed behavior in the absence of depression and other mood changes.5–7 This NPS is associated with greater functional impairment, greater caregiver burden, increased risk of institutionalization, poorer quality of life, and higher costs of care.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-05-27
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.020
       
  • COVID-19-Related Loneliness and Psychiatric Symptoms Among Older Adults:
           The Buffering Role of Subjective Age
    • Authors: Amit Shrira; Yaakov Hoffman, Ehud Bodner, Yuval Palgi
      Abstract: In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a global policy of social distancing was initiated. Although circumstances necessitate such extreme measures, this social isolation places individuals at risk for adverse health effects.1 Older adults at greater risk for COVID-19 health complications will likely remain in strict self-isolation longer than other age groups; therefore, the effects of isolation and ensuing loneliness may be especially severe for them.2
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-05-27
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.018
       
  • Commentary on Treatment Adequacy and Adherence as Predictors of Depression
           Response in Primary Care
    • Authors: J. Craig Nelson
      Abstract: In this issue, Sirey et al. report a study examining the effects of adherence and dosing on response during antidepressant treatment of depressed older adults (age ≥ 55 years) in primary care. They found patients in the study with good adherence were more likely to respond, but that adequacy of dosage was not related to response. This study was a secondary analysis of a study previously published.1 The original study was a randomized trial in which depressed older adults received either usual care from a primary care physician (N = 116) or usual care plus the Treatment Initiation and Participation Program (TIP) intervention (N = 115).
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-05-19
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.015
       
  • Annual Prevalence of Use of Potentially Inappropriate Medications for
           Treatment of Affective Disorders in Parkinson's Disease
    • Authors: Danielle S. Abraham; Thanh Phuong Pham Nguyen, Sean Hennessy, Shelly L. Gray, Dawei Xie, Daniel Weintraub, Allison W. Willis
      Abstract: Affective disorders, in particular depression and anxiety, are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). The burden of depression and anxiety has been studied in several clinical and research setting studies, and the reported prevalence ranges from 3% to 89% for depression1 and 7% to 55% for anxiety.2 Additionally, patients commonly present with both disorders.3 These disorders have negative impacts on disease outcomes; for example, depression in PD is associated with worse disability and health-related quality of life.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-05-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.014
       
  • Strategies to Promote Social Connections Among Older Adults During
           “Social Distancing” Restrictions
    • Authors: Kimberly A. Van Orden; Emily Bower, Julie Lutz, Caroline Silva, Autumn M. Gallegos, Carol A. Podgorski, Elizabeth J. Santos, Yeates Conwell
      Abstract: Social connections are essential for health and well-being at all ages and may be especially important for promoting health in later life. Whereas declines in physical, sensory, and cognitive function are common with advancing age, social functioning remains malleable and responsive to intervention throughout life. Lifespan developmental theories of socioemotional development suggest that relationship satisfaction and social well-being increase in later life1 and are strengths that can be capitalized upon to promote mental health and well-being.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-05-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.004
       
  • Late-Life Brain Health Architecture: Leveraging Convergence Science
           Principles
    • Authors: Fiona E. Walsh; Greg S. Walsh, Harris A. Eyre, Walter D. Dawson
      Abstract: Your journal's recent publication purposed that “a convergence science (aka transdisciplinary science) approach is needed to develop novel clinical solutions in late-life brain health.”1 We agree and wish to highlight the role of architecture.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-05-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.003
       
  • Effects of Ramelteon on the Prevention of Postoperative Delirium in Older
           Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery: The RECOVER Randomized Controlled
           Trial
    • Authors: Esther S. Oh; Jeannie-Marie Leoutsakos, Paul B. Rosenberg, Alexandra M. Pletnikova, Harpal S. Khanuja, Robert S. Sterling, Julius K. Oni, Frederick E. Sieber, Neal S. Fedarko, Narjes Akhlaghi, Karin J. Neufeld
      Abstract: Postoperative delirium, an acute confusional state arising after surgery, is caused by an underlying physiological disturbance and characterized by sleep/wake cycle disturbances.1 It is a serious public health problem that disproportionately affects older people.2 Delirium is associated with many negative outcomes including increased mortality, longer hospital stays, increased institutionalization after acute care hospitalization, worse cognitive and physical outcomes (both short- and long-term), and significant distress for patients and their families.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-05-16
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.05.006
       
  • Neurobiologic Rationale for Treatment of Apathy in Alzheimer's Disease
           With Methylphenidate
    • Authors: Christopher H. van Dyck; Amy F.T. Arnsten, Prasad R. Padala, Olga Brawman-Mintzer, Alan J. Lerner, Anton P. Porsteinsson, Roberta W. Scherer, Allan I. Levey, Nathan Herrmann, Nimra Jamil, Jacobo E. Mintzer, Krista L. Lanctôt, Paul B. Rosenberg
      Abstract: The public health burden of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is related not only to cognitive symptoms, but also to neuropsychiatric symptoms. Most patients with AD will develop at least one such symptom over the course of the disease.1 Common neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD include agitation, depression, and apathy.2 Apathy is defined as a quantitative reduction of goal-directed activity in comparison to a previous level of functioning3 and affects 30%–70% of persons with AD.2,4 Even in the prodromal condition of mild cognitive impairment, apathy has an estimated prevalence of 15%–18%4,5 and is associated with a significantly increased risk of incident dementia.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-05-05
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.04.026
       
  • Understanding Personality's Role in Late-Life Suicide Research: A
           Multifaceted Challenge
    • Authors: Anna Szücs
      Abstract: When asked to picture a young adult who would likely die by suicide, we as mental health professionals usually visualize a person with pronounced Cluster B traits, high levels of impulsivity, severe depression, a marginalized lifestyle and a positive history of suicidal ideation, suicide attempts or self-harm. However, the clinical picture of the typical at-risk older adult is far less characterized; a serious problem given the alarming suicide rates in this age group.1 There does not seem to be one prominent pathway leading to late-life suicide, but multiple ones, creating a heterogeneity difficult to capture in quantitative studies.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-04-25
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.04.022
       
  • Treatment Adequacy and Adherence as Predictors of Depression Response in
           Primary Care
    • Authors: Jo Anne Sirey; Alexandra Woods, Nili Solomonov, Lauren Evans, Samprit Banerjee, Paula Zanotti, George Alexopoulos, Helen C. Kales
      Abstract: Depression among older adults is associated with suicide,1 nonsuicide mortality,2 higher rates of falls,3 and greater rates of health service utilization.4 The majority of depression care for adults of all ages is delivered in primary care, with a notable increase in primary care visits among the young old (65–74) and the oldest old (≥85).5 In primary care, 8.1% of older adults screen positive for depression.6 Their depressive syndromes have heterogeneous clinical presentation7 and the rates of treatment vary in older primary care patients.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-04-23
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.04.014
       
  • The Interaction of Personality and Social Support on Prospective Suicidal
           Ideation in Men and Women With Late-Life Depression
    • Authors: Kevin J. Manning; Grace Chan, David C. Steffens, Cortnee W. Pierce, Guy G. Potter
      Abstract: Suicidal ideation increases the risk of suicide attempt in some older adults. One study found that 53% of older adults who died by suicide had reported either passive (e.g., life-weariness or death ideation) or more active (e.g., thoughts of taking one's own life) suicidal ideation in the year before death.1 It is troubling to further consider that passive ideation—potentially ubiquitous among older adults with major depression or late-life depression (LLD)2—may convey an increased likelihood of future suicide in the absence of more active suicidal ideation.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-04-13
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.03.018
       
  • Achieving Equity in Informed Consent: A Culturally-Informed Perspective
           for the Consideration and Consent of Minority Patients for
           Electroconvulsive Therapy
    • Authors: Carmen Black Parker; William V. McCall, Peter Rosenquist, Niayesh Cortese, E.Vanessa Spearman-McCarthy
      Abstract: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is possibly the most stigmatized medical procedure in American popular culture. This negative reputation was born during the 1930s–1950s because prototypal treatment parameters using bilateral sinusoidal waveforms without anesthesia risked significant cognitive and physical harm. Clinicians also faced difficult ethical considerations treating a population that often lacked decision-making capacity due to severe mental illness. The advent of less invasive psychotropic medications in the 1960s further precipitated a social, political, and legal push against ECT.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-04-02
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.03.009
       
  • Poststroke Depression and Apathy: Why Should We Care'
    • Authors: Kevin J. Manning; Warren D. Taylor
      Abstract: Depression occurs in about 25% of stroke survivors and contributes to persistent disability and increased mortality.1 Poststroke depression is a heterogeneous syndrome; mood symptoms span the range of minor to major depression, and patients may also experience emotionally liability or blunting, restlessness, decreased insight, and cognitive impairment. These symptoms may in turn impair recovery and contribute to greater subsequent disability. In this issue of the Journal, Kanellopoulos et al. characterize dimensions of poststroke depression in 135 older adults with comorbid major depression by conducting a factor analysis of the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS).
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-03-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.03.005
       
  • Corrigendum to ‘Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Alzheimer Disease
           Mortality in Taiwan’ [The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 28
           (2020) 205–216]
    • Authors: Chien-Liang Chen; Chih-Kuang Liang, Chun-Hao Yin, Yu-Te Lin, Ching-Chih Lee, Nai-Ching Chen
      Abstract: From the Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Department of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Medical Education and Research, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan; Division of Otolaryngology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan; and the Division of Nephrology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-03-17
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.03.004
       
  • The American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry's Trainee Programs:
           Participant Characteristics and Perceived Benefits
    • Authors: Kirsten M. Wilkins; Michelle L. Conroy, Brandon C. Yarns, Robert H. Pietrzak, Brent P. Forester, Paul D. Kirwin
      Abstract: The number of adults age 65 years and older in the United States (US) is projected to grow to more than 83.7 million in 2050, almost doubling the 2012 estimate of 43.1 million older adults, nearly 21% of the U.S. population.1 The 2012 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report estimates that 14%–20% of the elder population are afflicted with mental health or substance use conditions, including dementia-related behavioral and psychiatric symptoms.2 Despite this demographic imperative, the number of physicians trained in geriatric psychiatry is dwindling, with only 52 physicians completing fellowship training in the U.S.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-03-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.03.002
       
  • iTBS to Relieve Depression and Executive Dysfunction in Older Adults: An
           Open Label Study
    • Authors: Pilar Cristancho; Lojine Kamel, Manuela Araque, Jacinda Berger, Daniel M. Blumberger, J. Philip Miller, Deanna M. Barch, Eric J Lenze
      Abstract: Late Life Depression (LLD) is characterized by deficits in several cognitive domains, particularly Executive Function Deficits (EFD). Affected executive domains include impulse inhibition, cognitive flexibility, planning and organization, semantic fluency and selective attention.1 EFD predicts antidepressant treatment resistance, increased disability,2 poor quality of life and an increased risk for suicide.3 Treatment options for LLD with EFD remain limited, because of poor response to antidepressants, and psychotherapy interventions targeting this problem are not widely available.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-03-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.03.001
       
  • WITHDRAWN: Good-Bye, and Keep Cold
    • Abstract: Available online Date
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-02-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.02.002
       
  • Summer
    • Authors: Nancy R. Davison
      Abstract: She sits in a pattern of sun and shadowOn the porch of a rented beach houseSummer dress, high heels,Sweater against an indoor chillShe will buy dinner, as grandmas doHappy in the chatter and buzz ofHer children, their childrenAt a nice restaurantShe hears themSquabbling through showersFinding clean shorts, shirts with collarsSluicing away the sand of an ordinary beach dayBraving tiny waves with DaddySandwichesSun tan lotionFrom MommyBuilding sand castlesDigging moats around themLaying on belliesA shimmer of waterKicking, splashing, yelling‘Look at me, Grandma.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-02-03
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.01.192
       
  • Tempus Fugit
    • Authors: Reverend J. Barrie Shepherd
      Abstract: I wish them past, add up the wintered daysalready gone, long weeks and months to comeand seek to brush them by, to hurry them aside,in my weary longing for the warm, the green,the blessed bursting forth of birdsong.“Time flies” they say, but these few February days(our shortest month) creep past as if they weresome kind of house arrest, a frigid, harsh detentionto be endured for fifty–sixty days and more,until the golden key is turned, the iron gatesspring free again, and blossom time returns.“Time flies,” they say, and so I wish awaya portion of my brief allotted span, a hoardof moments and experience that can never berepeated or retrieved from that immense repositorywhere the mists of time erase and nullify.
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-02-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.01.187
       
  • Over the Limit (For a New Nonagenarian)
    • Authors: J. Barrie Shepherd
      Abstract: The Good Book sets it downas just three score years and ten,with a fudge factor that took us up to eighty.Four score plus ten used to be pushing things,might even be called flagrant flouting of the law.But these rebellious old folks nowadayspay no heed to any of this.They no longer seem to get so old so fast.It's as if their warranties have been extended.Who knows' Maybe – if those creeks don't rise –all limits can be wiped away, eliminatedonce for all, and the word will be,“Methuselah move over!”
      Citation: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2020)
      PubDate: 2020-01-25
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2020.01.010
       
 
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