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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3159 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3159 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 408, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 246, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 396, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 336, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 445, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 202, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)

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Journal Cover
Academic Pediatrics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.655
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 32  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1876-2859
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3159 journals]
  • Evaluation of the Implementation of a Multi-Component Intervention to
           Improve Healthcare Provider Communication about HPV Vaccination
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Jenna E. Reno, Sean T. O'Leary, Jennifer Pyrzanowski, Steven Lockhart, Jacob Thomas, Amanda F. Dempsey ObjectiveTo evaluate the relative use, usefulness, and facilitators and barriers to use, as perceived by providers, of five different components in an HPV vaccine communication intervention—which was found to be effective at improving HPV vaccination rates.MethodsFour serial surveys of 108 providers (MD, NP, or PA) from intervention clinics involved in the study assessed use and usefulness of the 5 communication intervention components over a 12-month period.ResultsResponse rates were 79%-86%. The fact sheet (64%-77%) and motivational interviewing techniques (MI; 86%) were the most used components—use was sustained over the 12-month period. These components were also perceived as somewhat or very useful by most providers, and this perceived usefulness increased over time (very or somewhat useful at end of study, 97% fact sheet, 98% MI, respectively). Although fewer providers reported using the website (15%-42%), or disease images (6%-17%%), when these were used, most providers (67%-87%) felt they were somewhat or very useful. The decision aid was not used frequently (17%-41% of providers) and 43% of providers felt it was not very or not at all useful. Facilitators and barriers were identified for each component. The fact sheet and MI were perceived as the easiest to integrate into the clinic workflow.Conclusion(s)the fact sheet and MI were the most used and most useful intervention components, both were easy to integrate into clinic workflow, and their use was sustained over time. Dissemination of similar interventions in the future should focus on these two specific components.
       
  • The Sounds of Grief
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Selin Tuysuzoglu Sagalowsky
       
  • Neonatal Intubation Competency Assessment Tool: Development and Validation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Lindsay Johnston, Taylor Sawyer, Akira Nishisaki, Travis Whtifill, Anne Ades, Heather French, Kristen Glass, Rita Dadiz, Christie Bruno, Orly Levit, Sandeep Gangadharan, Daniel Scherzer, Ahmed Moussa, Marc Auerbach, INSPIRE Research NetworkABSTRACTBackground: Neonatal tracheal intubation (NTI) is an important clinical skill. Suboptimal performance is associated with patient harm. Simulation training can improve NTI performance. Improving performance requires an objective assessment of competency. Competency assessment tools need strong evidence of validity. We hypothesized that a NTI competency assessment tool with multi-source validity evidence could be developed, and could be used for formative and summative assessment during simulation-based training.Methods: A NTI assessment tool was developed based on a literature review. The tool was refined through two rounds of a modified Delphi process involving 12 subject matter experts. The final tool had a 22 item checklist, a global skills assessment (GSA), and an entrustable professional activity (EPA) level. The validity of the checklist was assessed by having four blinded reviewers score 23 videos of healthcare providers intubating a neonatal simulator.Results: The checklist items had good internal consistency (overall α 0.79). Checklist scores were higher for providers at higher training levels and more NTI experience. Checklist scores correlated with GSA (ρ=0.85; P < 0.05), EPA levels (ρ=0.87; P < 0.05), percent glottic exposure (r=0.59; P < 0.05), and Cormack-Lehane scores (ρ=0.95; P < 0.05). Checklist scores reliably predicted EPA levels.Conclusion: We developed a NTI competency assessment tool with multi-source validity evidence. The tool was able to discriminate NTI performance based on experience. The tool can be used during simulation-based NTI training to provide formative and summative assessment and can aid with entrustment decisions.
       
  • Sleep, Physical Activity, and General Health Status: US Pediatricians and
           the General US Adult Population
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Elizabeth A. Gottschlich, Kandyce Larson, BlakeSisk, Mary Pat Frintner ObjectiveTo examine US pediatricians and US adults on three self-reported health measures (sleep, physical activity, and general health status), and to assess factors related to these measures for each group.MethodsPediatrician data were collected through a 2012 AAP Periodic Survey (response rate=64.0%). US population data originated from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (response rate=61.2%). Analytic samples included those currently working and ≥30 years old; restricted to post-trainees (pediatricians; n=854) and those with at least a Bachelor's degree (US population; n=5,447). Accounting for sample demographic differences, predicted probabilities compared the proportions reporting ≥7 hours of sleep, meeting physical activity recommendations, and reporting very good/excellent health. Multivariable logistic regression examined characteristics associated with health measures for pediatricians and US adults separately.ResultsWhen the US population demographic profile was adjusted to resemble the pediatrician sample, 7 in 10 pediatricians (71.2%, CI=68.0%-74.5%) and US adults (69.9%, CI=67.8%-72.0%) reported ≥7 hours of sleep. Pediatricians were more likely than US adults to meet physical activity recommendations (71.4%, CI=68.0%-74.8% vs. 62.9%, CI=60.6%-65.2%), and less likely to report very good/excellent health (74.3%, CI=71.2%-77.3% vs. 80.2%, CI=78.3%-82.1%). In pediatrician and US population multivariable models, self-identified Asians and those working ≥50 hours were less likely to get ≥7 hours of sleep (p
       
  • Trends in prevalence and management of childhood anxiety by Australian
           pediatricians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Margie Danchin, Alisha Gulenc, Daryl Efron, Emma Sciberras, Christos Symeonides, Harriet HiscockABSTRACTObjective:Rising anxiety rates and equity of care are ongoing concerns. Through two pediatric practice audits conducted five years apart, we aimed to determine the change in (1) anxiety diagnoses; (2) associated comorbid diagnoses; (3) variance in management by location and (4) child, family and pediatrician predictors of management.Methods:Members of the Australian Paediatric Research Network (APRN) were invited to participate in patient-level prospective national pediatric practice audits in 2008 and 2013. Pediatricians were asked to complete standardized forms for 100 consecutive patients or all patients seen over two weeks, whichever was completed first. Demographic data, diagnoses, medications and referrals were collected. Logistic regressions were conducted, clustered at the pediatrician level.Results:Of eligible APRN pediatricians in 2013 and 2008, 48% and 66% participated and contributed 7102 and 8345 consultations, respectively. Anxiety diagnoses increased over the five-year period (4.4% to 7.6%; p
       
  • Development and Assessment of an Online Training for the Medical Response
           to Sex Trafficking of Minors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Sydney Hansen, Marlene Melzer-Lange, Melodee Nugent, Ke Yan, Angela Rabbitt
       
  • Using Mobile Health to Promote Early Language Development: A Narrative
           Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Catherine McClure, Maureen Cunningham, Sheana Bull, Stephen Berman, Mandy A. Allison : In this narrative review, we will present a brief overview of known disparities in children's language development based on socioeconomic status (SES) and efforts in the primary care setting to promote children's language development. Next, we will define mobile-health (m-health) and review the limited, published literature regarding the effectiveness of m-health interventions in promoting children's health, in general, and language development, in particular. Finally, we will discuss the potential role of smart phone applications to increase parental behaviors that promote their children's language development as well as challenges that should be addressed as the field of m-health continues to grow.
       
  • Best Practices for Labeling and Dosing Liquid MedicationsIdentifying and
           Advancing Best Practices for the Labeling and Dosing of Pediatric Liquid
           Medications: Progress and Challenges
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): H. Shonna Yin, Carrie Vuong, Ruth M. Parker, Lee M. Sanders, Alan L. Mendelsohn, Benard P. Dreyer, Jessica J. Velazquez, Michael S. WolfWhat's NewThe NIH-funded SAFE Rx for Kids study has identified best practices for the labeling/dosing of pediatric liquid medications. Findings support use of pictographic instructions and optimized provision of dosing tools, along with careful selection of the unit of measurement used.
       
  • Utilizing Family-Centered Process and Outcome Measures to Assess
           Hospital-to-Home Transition Quality
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Arti D. Desai, Tamara D. Simon, JoAnna K. Leyenaar, Maria T. Britto, Rita Mangione-Smith
       
  • Implementing a standardized constipation management pathway to reduce
           resource utilization
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): David R. Sandweiss, Lauren Allen, Mark Deneau, Janet Harnsberger, Amy Pasmann, Randall Smout, Michael Mundorff, Nanette Dudley Background and ObjectiveConstipation is commonly diagnosed in our pediatric ED. Care has varied significantly, with a heavy reliance on abdominal radiography (AR) for diagnosis and inpatient management for bowel cleanout. We implemented a standardized approach to caring for patients presenting to a pediatric ED with symptoms consistent with constipation, emphasizing clinical history, physical exam, less reliance on AR, and standardized home management.MethodsUsing QI methodology, a multidisciplinary group developed an ED constipation management pathway, encouraging less reliance on AR for diagnosis and promoting home management over inpatient bowel cleanout. The pathway included a home management “gift-basket” containing over-the-counter medications and educational materials to promote successful bowel cleanout. Outcome measures included pathway utilization, AR rate, ED cost and LOS, and ED admission rate for constipation.ResultsWithin 3 months, over 90% of patients discharge home with an ED disposition diagnosis of constipation left with standardized educational materials and home medications. Staff education and feedback, pathway and “gift-basket” changes, and a higher threshold for inpatient management led to significant drops in AR rate (73.3% to 24.6%, p
       
  • Teaching Pediatric Otoscopy Skills to Pediatric and Emergency Medicine
           Residents: A Cross-Institutional Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Caroline R. Paul, Meg G. Keeley, Gregory S. Rebella, John G. Frohna ObjectiveTo evaluate a pediatric otoscopy curriculum with the use of outcome measures that included assessment of skills with real patients.MethodsThirty-three residents in an intervention group from 2 institutions received the curriculum. In the previous year, 21 residents in a nonintervention group did not receive the curriculum. Both groups were evaluated at the beginning and end of their internship years with the use of the same outcome assessments: 1) a written test, 2) an objective standardized clinical examination (OSCE), and 3) direct observation of skills in real patients with the use of a checklist with established validity.ResultsThe intervention group had a significant increase in percentage reaching minimum passing levels between the beginning and end of the internship year for the written test (12% vs 97%; P 
       
  • Early Childhood Stress and Child Age Predict Longitudinal Increases in
           Obesogenic Eating Among Low-Income Children
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Alison L. Miller, Ashley N. Gearhardt, Lauren Retzloff, Julie Sturza, Niko Kaciroti, Julie C. Lumeng ObjectiveTo identify whether psychosocial stress exposure during early childhood predicts subsequent increased eating in the absence of hunger (EAH), emotional overeating, food responsiveness, and enjoyment of food.MethodsThis was an observational longitudinal study. Among 207 low-income children (54.6% non-Hispanic white, 46.9% girls), early childhood stress exposure was measured by parent report and a stress exposure index calculated, with higher scores indicating more stress exposure. Eating behaviors were measured in early (mean, 4.3; standard deviation, 0.5 years) and middle (mean, 7.9; standard deviation, 0.7 years) childhood. Observed EAH was assessed by measuring kilocalories of palatable food the child consumed after a meal. Parents reported on child eating behaviors on the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Child weight and height were measured and body mass index z score (BMIz) calculated. Multivariable linear regression, adjusting for child sex, race/ethnicity, and BMIz, was used to examine the association of stress exposure with rate of change per year in each child eating behavior.ResultsEarly childhood stress exposure predicted yearly increases in EAH (β = 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.002, 0.27) and Emotional Overeating (β = 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.008, 0.27). Stress exposure was not associated with Food Responsiveness (trend for decreased Enjoyment of Food; β = −0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.002, −0.26). All child obesogenic eating behaviors increased with age (P 
       
  • Health Care Utilization in the First Month After Birth and Its
           Relationship to Newborn Weight Loss and Method of Feeding
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Valerie Flaherman, Eric W. Schaefer, Michael W. Kuzniewicz, Sherian X. Li, Eileen M. Walsh, Ian M. Paul ObjectiveGuidelines recommend closer outpatient follow-up for exclusively breastfed newborns, especially those with pronounced weight loss, because of increased risk of hyperbilirubinemia and dehydration that might require readmission. Our objective was to determine how feeding method and weight loss are associated with neonatal health care utilization.MethodsA retrospective cohort study conducted at Northern California Kaiser Permanente hospitals in 2009–2013 assessed 143,889 neonates to study the inpatient method of feeding as well as inpatient and outpatient weights. The main outcome measures were inpatient and outpatient health care utilization in the 30 days after birth.ResultsNewborn weight loss and feeding method were both associated with utilization. Exclusively breastfed newborns had higher readmission rates than those exclusively formula fed for both vaginal (4.3% compared to 2.1%) (P 
       
  • Quality of Care for Children With Medical Complexity: An Analysis of
           Continuity of Care as a Potential Quality Indicator
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Kimberly C. Arthur, Rita Mangione-Smith, Q Burkhart, Layla Parast, Hangsheng Liu, Marc N. Elliott, Elizabeth A. McGlynn, Eric C. Schneider ObjectiveTo examine the relationship between continuity of care for children with medical complexity (CMC) and emergency department (ED) utilization, care coordination quality, and family effects related to care coordination.MethodsWe measured ED utilization and primary care continuity with the Bice-Boxerman continuity of care index for 1477 CMC using administrative data from Minnesota and Washington state Medicaid agencies. For a subset of 186 of these CMC a caregiver survey was used to measure care coordination quality (using items adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System Adult Health Plan Survey) and family impact (using items adapted from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs). Multivariable regression was used to examine the relationship between continuity, entered as a continuous variable ranging from 0 to 1, and the outcomes.ResultsThe median continuity was 0.27 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.12–0.48) in the administrative data cohort and 0.27 (IQR, 0.14–0.43) in the survey cohort. Compared with children with a continuity score of 0, children with a score of 1 had lower odds of having ≥1 ED visit (odds ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46–0.93; P = .017) and their caregivers reported higher scores for the measure of receipt of care coordination (β = 35.2 on a 0–100 scale; 95% CI, 11.5–58.9; P = .004). There was no association between continuity and family impact.ConclusionsContinuity of care holds promise as a quality measure for CMC because of its association with lower ED utilization and more frequent receipt of care coordination.
       
  • Benefits of Medical Home Care Reaching Beyond Chronically Ill Teens:
           Exploring Parent Health-Related Quality of Life
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Laura J. Chavez, Connor Grannis, Millie Dolce, Deena J. Chisolm BackgroundCaring for teens with special health care needs places physical and mental health burdens on parents, which can be exacerbated by the stresses of transitions to independence. Medical homes can improve teen transitions to greater self-management and reduce health care–related time and financial burdens for families. We examined the association between parent-reported teen medical home status and caregiver health-related quality of life (HRQOL).MethodsThe study sample included parents or caregivers of teens with special health care needs aged 15 to 18 recruited from a pediatric Medicaid accountable care organization who participated in a survey (response rate, 40.5%). The primary outcome was parent HRQOL scores (0–100 points) measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Family Impact Module. Medical home status was based on parent report of teen's health care meeting medical home criteria. Linear regression models were used to estimate HRQOL scores, adjusted for demographic characteristics, health literacy, and teen functional limitation.ResultsAmong 488 parents, 27% reported their teen received care consistent with a medical home. Adjusted parent HRQOL scores were significantly higher among those whose teens had a medical home (74.40; 95% confidence interval, 71.31–77.48), relative to those whose teens did not (65.78; 95% confidence interval, 63.92–67.65). Medical home subscale analyses showed HRQOL scores had significant positive associations with family-centered care and coordinated care, but not other subscales.ConclusionsTeen medical home status was positively associated with caregiver HRQOL, suggesting that the medical home may benefit overall caregiver well-being. In particular, receiving care that was family centered and coordinated appeared to be the most beneficial.
       
  • Sleep Disturbances, Psychosocial Difficulties, and Health Risk Behavior in
           16,781 Dutch Adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Sanne Verkooijen, Nelleke de Vos, Betty J.W. Bakker-Camu, Susan J.T. Branje, René S. Kahn, Roel A. Ophoff, Carolien M. Plevier, Marco P.M. Boks ObjectiveTo investigate the prevalence of adolescent sleep disturbances and their relation to psychosocial difficulties and health risk behaviors with the use of data from a province-wide health survey (n = 16,781).MethodsPsychosocial difficulties were measured with the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. Additional assessments included self-reported sleep disturbances, suicidality, and health risk behaviors including current use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs, physical inactivity, and compulsive use of multimedia. We used multilevel analyses to investigate the relationhips, including differences, between boys and girls, as well as the mediating role of emotional problems.ResultsJust under 20% of adolescents reported sleep disturbances in the previous month. These sleep disturbances were associated with psychosocial problems (odds ratio [OR], 6.42; P 
       
  • Problem Behaviors and Psychological Distress Among Teens Seen in a
           National Sample of Emergency Departments
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Megan L. Ranney, Julie Bromberg, Alyssa Hozey, T. Charles Casper, Michael J. Mello, Anthony Spirito, Thomas H. Chun, James G. Linakis, Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network BackgroundProblem behaviors, such as substance use and peer aggression, frequently coexist and are common among youth seen in emergency departments (EDs). EDs are increasingly urged to screen for both psychological distress and problem behaviors.ObjectiveTo inform screening and intervention efforts, we aimed to identify classes of problematic substance use and peer aggression in a sample of adolescents from 16 pediatric EDs, and to examine the relative prevalence of psychological distress in identified classes.MethodsWe completed a cross-sectional survey of youth (n = 5001) presenting for any reason to 16 pediatric EDs across the United States, with the use of validated measures of demographics, alcohol and substance use, and peer aggression. We used standard latent class analysis techniques to create behavioral risk classes of adolescents based on violence and substance use variables; then we conducted logistic regression to examine the relationship between psychological distress and the latent classes.ResultsThree classes of problem behaviors were identified: low-risk (few problem behaviors, 91.2% of sample), medium risk (high cigarette smoking; moderate violence, alcohol/substance use; 5.2%), and high risk (high levels of all problem behaviors, 3.5%). A significant directional association (P 
       
  • Feasibility and Acceptability in a Community-Partnered Implementation of
           CenteringParenting for Group Well-Child Care
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Kai A. Jones, Stephanie Do, Lorena Porras-Javier, Sandra Contreras, Paul J. Chung, Tumaini R. Coker BackgroundIn a community-academic partnership, we implemented a group-based model for well-child care (WCC) (CenteringParenting) and conducted a pilot test for feasibility and acceptability among families at a federally qualified health center (FQHC).MethodsThe FQHC implemented CenteringParenting for all WCC visits in the first year of life, starting at the 2-week visit. Over a 14-month time period, parents from each new CenteringParenting group were enrolled into the study. Baseline data were collected at enrollment (infant age < 31 days) and again at a 6-month follow-up survey. Main outcomes were feasibility and acceptability of CenteringParenting; we also collected exploratory measures (parent experiences of care, utilization, self-efficacy, and social support).ResultsOf the 40 parent-infant dyads enrolled in the pilot, 28 CenteringParenting participants completed the 6-month follow-up assessment. The majority of infants were Latino, black, or “other” race/ethnicity; over 90% were Medicaid insured. Of the 28 CenteringParenting participants who completed the 6-month follow-up, 25 completed all visits between ages 2 weeks and 6 months in the CenteringParenting group. Of the CenteringParenting participants, 97% to 100% reported having adequate time with their provider and sufficient patient education and having their needs met at visits; most reported feeling comfortable at the group visit, and all reported wanting to continue CenteringParenting for their WCC. CenteringParenting participants’ mean scores on exploratory measures demonstrated positive experiences of care, overall satisfaction of care, confidence in parenting, and parental social support.ConclusionsA community-academic partnership implemented CenteringParenting; the intervention was acceptable and feasible for a minority, low-income population. We highlight key challenges of implementation.
       
  • Educational Text Messages Decreased Emergency Department Utilization Among
           Infant Caregivers: A Randomized Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Amy Ladley, Amanda Waltos Hieger, Joshua Arthur, Matthew Broom ObjectiveTo determine the feasibility and effectiveness of text messages as an educational tool to reduce the prevalence of nonurgent emergency department (ED) visits among a population with high levels of low health literacy.MethodsThis prospective, randomized experiment conducted in a large, urban, academic pediatric primary care practice enrolled 231 caregivers of infants into 2 groups: enhanced standard of care materials at well-child visits through 6 months (n = 99 completing), and enhanced standard of care and 4 text messages a week through 6 months (n = 108 completing). Use of the ED and visit urgency were compared between groups via chart review at 1 year of age.ResultsOf the 230 included in the analysis, 84.2% (n = 194 of 230) were racial or ethnic minorities, 69.7% (n = 142 of 204) reported yearly incomes of less than $20,000 per year, and 70.4% (n = 142 of 204) were identified as having likely or probable limited health literacy. Participants who received text messages had fewer visits to the ED in their first year (2.14 visits in the control group to 1.47 visits in the intervention group who received text messages; P 
       
  • Chinese, Vietnamese, and Asian Indian Parents' Perspectives About
           Well-Child Visits: A Qualitative Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Maya I. Ragavan, Wendy Li, A. Rani Elwy, John D. Cowden, Megan Bair-Merritt ObjectivesWell-child visits are a critical component of pediatric health care; however, disparities in attendance and quality of care exist for Asian children. Limited research has explored Asian immigrant parents' perspectives about their well-child visit experience.MethodsQualitative interviews were conducted with Chinese, Vietnamese, and Asian Indian immigrant parents. Participants were recruited from community-based organizations in the Boston area. Interviews focused on parents' perceptions about well-child visits, including individual attitudes, social and cultural factors affecting their opinions, perceived behavioral control, and improving visits for Asian immigrant families. Data were coded and analyzed using thematic analysis.ResultsFifty-one parents participated. Although participants reported attending well-child visits, they thought language barriers and unfamiliarity with US preventive health care may limit attendance for other Asian immigrant families. Some reported high-quality visits, while others described them as “too simple,” recollecting health care experiences from their countries of origin where more tests were completed. Participants described seeking advice about their children's preventive care from elder family members. Many expressed the importance of culturally concordant health care providers and culturally sensitive care, while others thought that culture was less relevant. Differences emerged among the 3 subgroups around culturally concordant care and traditional medicine.ConclusionsQuerying parents about their past health care experiences and providing information about well-child visits may be useful when caring for immigrant families. Social influences on children's health outside of the parent–provider–child triad may also be important. Further work should explore how to deliver culturally sensitive care that considers not only a family's language preferences but also their unique cultural identity.
       
  • Family Functioning and Childhood Obesity Treatment: A Family Systems
           Theory-Informed Approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Keeley J. Pratt, Joseph A. Skelton Childhood obesity recommendations advise providers to use family-based care for the treatment of youth and adolescent obesity. Family-based care, defined as the inclusion of a caregiver and a youth, is commonly conducted through behavioral interventions that target the dietary and physical activity behaviors of the attending parent-youth dyads. However, focusing on behaviors isolated to the parent and youth neglects the rest of the family members, and the larger rules, routines, communication, and dynamics in the family. Family-based interventions grounded in family systems theory (FST) target family dynamics to influence weight-related behaviors through higher-level changes in the family. The utility of using FST in childhood obesity treatment has not been extensively conceptualized or applied. Few outcome studies have reported on variables representative of FST, and even fewer FST interventions have been conducted. Because of the lack of detail on the application of FST to childhood obesity treatment, providers are left with little clarity on how to use FST in clinical encounters. We provide the background and evidence for use of FST, detail how families organize around weight-related behaviors that contribute to obesity, and on the basis of their organization, what type of treatment might be beneficial, FST-informed or family-based behavioral interventions. Finally, a suggested family-based clinical algorithm is provided detailing the use of FST through assessment, intervention, and follow-up that can be refined over time by providers and researchers committed to viewing obesity in the context of the family and family dynamics.
       
  • Six Questions for Well-Child Care Redesign
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Brandi K. Freeman, Tumaini R. CokerAbstractIn the United States, well-child care has the goal of providing comprehensive care to children by addressing developmental, behavioral, psychosocial, and health issues through visits at recommended intervals. The preventive care needs of families can outpace the capacity of clinics and practices to provide it, necessitating a redesign of our well-child care system that aligns the structure of preventive care delivery with the needs of families. Here we focus on 6 questions (the what, when, who, why, how, and where) for well-child care redesign for infants and young children. By addressing these key questions and providing recommendations for advancing well-child care redesign in the clinical and research arenas, we hope to accelerate the process of well-child care redesign. In the current political and socioeconomic environment, continuing with well-child care “as usual” will mean that many families will find that their well-child care visits do not fully address the most pressing needs impacting children's health and well-being. It is time to implement and sustain real change in our system for preventive care.
       
  • Prenatal Material Hardship and the Internal Locus of Control Over the
           Prevention of Child Obesity: Progress Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Rachel S. Gross, Alan L. Mendelsohn, Mary Jo Messito
       
  • Relative Comfort
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): John W. Stelzer
       
  • Learning in a Web-Based World: An Innovative Approach to Teach Physical
           Examination Skills in Patients with Neurodisability
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Jennifer Benjamin, Judith Groner, Jennifer Walton, Garey Noritz, Gregg M. Gascon, John D. MahanWhat's NewDespite increasing numbers of patients with neurodisability, residents lack training to develop physical examination skills. Following a blended educational intervention combining online and bedside teaching, residents demonstrated desired patient-care behaviors on standardized clinical exam assessment.
       
  • Using a Community Bus Tour for Pediatric Residents to Increase Their
           Knowledge of Health Disparities
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Cara Lichtenstein, Desiree de la Torre, Olanrewaju Falusi, Alexandra Sims, Yael Smiley, Melissa BaiyewuWhat's NewA community bus tour with a focus on social determinants of health created through a partnership between the pediatric residency program and the hospital's Child Health Advocacy Institute was shown to increase knowledge of health disparities among pediatric interns.
       
  • Modernizing Training on Social Determinants of Health: A Virtual
           Neighborhood Tour is Noninferior to an in-Person Experience
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Margot A. Lazow, Francis J. Real, Nicholas J. Ollberding, David Davis, Bradley Cruse, Melissa D. KleinWhat's New'Using innovative technology to teach about social determinants of health might address current training barriers related to standardization, sustainability, and scalability. A virtual tour of an impoverished neighborhood that used 360° videos was noninferior to the previous in-person experience.
       
  • Landscape Analysis of Global Health Tracks in United States Pediatric
           Residencies: Moving Toward Standards
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Jennifer Watts, Christiana Russ, Nicole E. St Clair, Omolara Thomas Uwemedimo ObjectiveThe number of pediatric Global Health (GH) tracks has more than doubled in less than 10 years. The goal of this study was to describe the characteristics of the pediatric GH tracks to identify commonalities and differences in track structure, funding, and education. In addition, we also identified demographic, institutional, and residency-related factors that were significantly associated with educational offerings and logistical challenges.MethodsA cross-sectional survey was electronically administered to pediatric residency programs with GH tracks. Statistical analyses included frequencies to describe GH track characteristics. Fisher's exact tests were used to identify bivariate associations between track structure and funding with educational offerings and logistical challenges.ResultsLeaders of 32 pediatric GH tracks (67%) completed the survey. The majority of GH tracks were completed within the 3 years of residency (94%) and identified a GH track director (100%); however, tracks varied in size, enrollment methods, domestic and international partnerships, funding, and evaluations. Dedicated faculty time and GH track budget amounts were associated with more robust infrastructure pertaining to resident international electives, including funding and mentorship. Many tracks did not meet American Academy of Pediatrics recommended standards for clinical international rotations.ConclusionsDespite the presence of multiple similarities among pediatric GH tracks, there are large variations in track structure, education, and funding. The results from this study support the proposal of a formal definition and minimum standards for a GH track, which may provide a framework for quality, consistency, and comparison of GH tracks.
       
  • Improving Response Rates and Representation of Hard-to-Reach Groups in
           Family Experience Surveys
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Sara L. Toomey, Marc N. Elliott, Alan M. Zaslavsky, Jessica Quinn, David J. Klein, Stephanie Wagner, Cassandra Thomson, Melody Wu, Sarah Onorato, Mark A. SchusterABSTRACTBackgroundMost US hospitals conduct patient experience surveys by mail or telephone after discharge to assess patient/family-centeredness of care. Pediatric response rates are usually very low, especially for black, Latino, and low-income respondents. We investigated whether day of discharge surveying using tablets improves response rates and respondent representativeness.MethodsQuasi-experimental study of parents of patients discharged from four units of a children's hospital. Parents were assigned to receive Child HCAHPS via an audio-enabled tablet before discharge or via mail ∼1 week post-discharge. Intervention and control conditions alternated by week. We compared response rates, child/respondent characteristics, and mean top-box scores between Tablet and Mail Only arms.ResultsAdministering Child HCAHPS on a tablet was administratively feasible and did not interfere with the discharge process (median completion time 12.4 minutes). Tablet response rate was 71.1% (424/596), vs. 16.3% (96/588) for Mail Only. Although Tablet response rates were higher in every subgroup, Tablet respondents were more likely to be fathers (20.4% vs. 6.4%, p=.006) and have ≤high school education (17.5% vs. 8.4%, p=.002); patients were were less likely to be white (56.8% vs. 71.9%, p=.006) and more likely to be publicly-insured (31.4% vs. 19.8%, p=.02). Tablet scores were significantly higher than Mail Only scores for 3 of 17 measures.ConclusionsThe response rate for day-of-discharge tablet survey administration was>four times higher than with single-wave mail-only administration, with greater participation of hard-to-reach groups. These findings suggest tablet administration before discharge shows great promise for real-time feedback and QI and may transform the field of inpatient survey administration.
       
  • Performance of International Medical Graduates in Pediatric Residency: A
           Study of Peer and Faculty Perceptions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Andres Jimenez-Gomez, Michael R. FitzGerald, Carmen Leon-Astudillo, Javier Gonzalez-del-Rey, Charles J. Schubert PurposeInternational Medical Graduates (IMGs) constitute around 25% of the US pediatric workforce. Their recruitment into US residency training yields concerns regarding their competence, though this has not been formally studied. Cincinnati Children's Hospital has systematically recruited IMGs over 16 years. This study evaluates perceptions of IMG performance by faculty and US-graduate (USG) peers.Methods
      Authors surveyed IMG, USG and faculty groups including current and former trainees, assessing perceived IMG performance compared to USGs in clinical knowledge/skills, resource utilization, communication, public health knowledge and efficiency, and overall impact on the program.ResultsOverall perceived performance was within one standard deviation of expected USG performance. IMGs outperformed USGs in clinical knowledge/skills and resource utilization, underperforming in communication, public health knowledge and efficiency. Significant differences were noted in communication with patients and public health knowledge (IMGs ranked their performance significantly lower than USGs/Faculty ranked their performance). Overall impact was perceived positively, including an increased interest in global health in among USGs.ConclusionCarefully recruited IMGs are perceived to perform near equally to USG peers and their presence is perceived as positive to a major pediatric residency program. Specific domains for educational interventions are identified for programs wishing to expand IMG recruitment.
       
  • Identifying Associations among Co-occurring Medical Conditions in Children
           with Autism Spectrum Disorders
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 July 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Ann M Neumeyer, Julia Anixt, James Chan, James Perrin, Donna Murray, Daniel L Coury, Amanda Bennett, Justin Farmer, Robert A Parker BackgroundChildren with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have high prevalence of co-occurring medical conditions including speech, sleep, and gastrointestinal disorders (constipation and feeding difficulties), developmental delay, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, hypotonia, epilepsy, anxiety, disruptive behavior, pica, and eczema. Less is known about whether these commonly co-exist in the same children. We sought to determine clinically meaningful, statistically significant associations among co-occurring medical conditions in children with ASD that could lead to better identification, treatment or understanding of the disease process.MethodsWe studied 2114 children with ASD ages 17 months to 5 years and 1221 children 6-17 years at 15 Autism Speaks-Autism Treatment Network Registry sites. Clinician-reported diagnoses and problems were grouped into 12 core conditions. We determined observed prevalence (O) of co-occurring conditions and estimated expected prevalence (E) across the network, adjusting for site variability in the prevalence of individual conditions. P-values were calculated using a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test stratified by site. We identified pairs of conditions co-occurring more frequently than expected (O/E> 1) and less frequently than expected (O/E < 1) and highlighted statistically significant differences.ResultsAmong the 66 condition pairs for each age group, we confirmed previously identified associations such as sleep disorders and anxiety symptoms in older children. We found associations not previously described: feeding with sleep disorders (younger children only), constipation with sleep disorders, feeding with speech disorders, and constipation with speech disorders.ConclusionsWe identified new associations among co-occurring medical conditions in children with ASD, offering the potential to examine common pathways.
       
  • Professional Interpreter Use and Discharge Communication in the Pediatric
           Emergency Department
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 July 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Colleen K. Gutman, Liliana Cousins, Jesse Gritton, Eileen J. Klein, Julie C. Brown, Jack Scannell, K. Casey Lion ObjectiveFamilies with limited English proficiency (LEP) experience communication barriers and are at risk for adverse events after discharge from the pediatric emergency department (ED). We sought to describe the characteristics of ED discharge communication for LEP families and to assess whether professional interpreter use was associated with provider communication quality during ED discharge.MethodsTranscripts of video-recorded ED visits for Spanish-speaking LEP families were obtained from a larger study comparing professional interpretation modalities in a freestanding children's hospital. Caregiver-provider communication interactions that included discharge education were analyzed for content and for the techniques providers used to assess caregiver comprehension. Regression analysis was used to assess for an association between professional interpreter use and discharge education content or assessment of caregiver comprehension.ResultsWe analyzed 101 discharge communication interactions from 47 LEP patient visits; 31% of communications did not use professional interpretation. Although most patients (70%) received complete discharge education content, only 65% received instructions on medication dosing and only 55% were given return precautions. Thirteen percent of patient visits included an open-ended question to assess caregiver comprehension and none included teach-back. Professional interpreter use was associated with greater odds of complete discharge education content (OR 7.1, 95% CI 1.4-37.0) and high-quality provider assessment of caregiver comprehension (OR 6.1, 95% CI 2.3-15.9).ConclusionsProfessional interpreter use is associated with superior provider discharge communication behaviors. This study identifies clear areas for improving discharge communication, which may improve safety and outcomes for LEP children discharged from the ED.
       
  • Neighborhood Commute to Work Times and Self-Reported Caregiver Health
           Behaviors and Food Access
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 July 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Michelle J. White, H. Shonna Yin, Russell L. Rothman, Lee M. Sanders, Alan Delamater, Kori Flower, Eliana M. Perrin ObjectivesTime spent commuting is associated with obesity. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between neighborhood-level commute to work (CTW) times and self-reported health behaviors and food access.MethodsWe conducted a cross-sectional analysis of caregivers with infants as part of the Greenlight study, a multisite obesity trial in Chapel Hill, NC; New York, New York; Nashville, TN and Miami, FL. Zip-code based commute estimates were determined using the U.S. Census’ American Community Survey. Self-reported health behavior and food access data were collected via directed interview. Logistic and linear regression models determined associations between neighborhood CTW times and health behaviors and food access.ResultsThe average neighborhood CTW time for all zip codes was 29 mins (N=846). Caregivers in longer CTW time neighborhoods were more likely to endorse fewer food choices (AOR=1.39; 95% CI 1.15,1.69; p=0.001) and difficulty accessing markets with fresh produce (AOR=1.51; 95% CI 1.02, 2.25; p=0.04). Neighborhood CTW time>30 mins were associated with less caregiver physical activity (AOR=0.58; 95% CI 0.34, 0.98; p=0.044). Neighborhood CTW time was inversely related to infant television time (adjusted mean 399 min/day for ≤30min; 256min/day for>30 minutes; p=0.025). New York families in longer CTW neighborhoods were more likely to report difficulty accessing markets with fresh produce (AOR= 1.80, 95% CI 1.03, 3.14; p=0.039).ConclusionsNeighborhood CTW times are associated with several self-reported health behaviors and perceived food access among caregivers with children. Neighborhood CTW times may represent city-specific features including transportation infrastructure which may impact the health of families.
       
  • Dual Food and Energy Hardship and Associated Child Behavior Problems
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 July 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Cristina R. Fernández, Maiko Yomogida, Yumiko Aratani, Diana HernándezABSTRACTObjectiveTo examine dual food and energy hardship and internalizing and externalizing behavior problems in 9 year-old children.MethodsWe conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a prospective national urban birth cohort, when the children were 9 years-old. Maternal reported “food hardship” (ever hungry and/or ever received free food) and “energy hardship” (ever unable to pay utility bill and/or utility shut-off) within the past year, and child behavior using the Child Behavior Checklist/6-18 years were assessed. Multiple logistic regression analyses estimated associations between individual and dual food and energy hardship and child behavior problems, adjusting for a priori covariates (child sex, health insurance, maternal sociodemographic characteristics, poverty, reported health, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depressive symptoms, smoking, and substance and alcohol abuse).ResultsApproximately 10% of households reported dual food and energy hardship. Children experiencing dual food and energy hardship had 3 times greater odds of withdrawn/depressed behaviors (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.8, 95% CI:1.4-5.5), 3 times greater odds of somatic complaints (AOR=3.2, 95% CI:1.5-6.9), and 4 times greater odds of rule breaking behavior (AOR=3.7, 95% CI:1.5-9.2) in the borderline/clinical range compared to children with no hardship, and had 4 times greater odds of borderline/clinical range somatic complaints (AOR=4.2, 95% CI: 1.7-10.3) compared to children with only energy hardship.ConclusionsChildren experiencing dual food and energy hardship have greater odds of coexisting internalizing and externalizing behaviors after controlling for possible confounders. Providers can consider screening and resource referrals for these addressable hardships alongside behavior assessments in the clinical setting.
       
  • Opioids in Adolescents’ Homes: Prevalence, Caregiver Attitudes and Risk
           Reduction Opportunities
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 July 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Jane M. Garbutt, Katharine Kulka, Sherry Dodd, Randall Sterkel, Kathryn PlaxABSTRACTObjectiveThe most common source for misused opioids is pain relievers prescribed for family and friends. Our objective was to assess knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of adolescents’ caregivers regarding prescribed opioids in the home.MethodsThe self-administered survey was completed by caregivers in the waiting rooms of 12 pediatric practices in the mid-west. Eligibility required living in a home where youth ≥10 years old were frequently present. 700 of 793 (88.3%) eligible caregivers completed the survey, and 76.8% were the parent.ResultsOf 700 caregivers, 34.6% reported opioids in their home (13.6% active prescription, 12.7% leftover medications, 8.3% both). Of those with an active prescription, 66.0% intended to keep any leftover medications for future need (for the patient 60.1%, someone else 5.9 %). Of those with leftover medications, 60.5% retained them for the same reason (for the patient 51.0%, someone else, 9.5%). Others kept medications unintentionally: they never got around to disposing of them (30.6%), did not know how (15.7%), or it never occurred to them (7.5%). Many caregivers were unaware that adolescents commonly misuse opioids (30.0%), use them to attempt suicide (52.3%), and that opioid use can lead to heroin addiction (38.6%). 7.1% would give leftover opioid medications to an adolescent to manage pain and 5.9% may do so.ConclusionOpioids are prevalent in homes in our community and many parents are unaware of the risks they pose. Study findings can inform strategies to educate parents about opioid risk and encourage and facilitate timely, safe disposal of unused medications.
       
  • Provision of Parent Feedback via the Communication Assessment Tool: Does
           It Improve Resident Communication Skills'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 July 2018Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Dominick DeBlasio, Francis J. Real, Nicholas J. Ollberding, Melissa D. Klein ObjectiveTo determine the impact of a curriculum which included parent feedback on resident communication skills.MethodsIn a prospective, controlled study, categorical pediatric residents in continuity clinic were divided into control and intervention groups based on clinic day. Parent feedback was obtained for all residents at the beginning and end of the year using the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT), a validated survey to assess physician communication. Intervention residents participated in learning conferences which reviewed communication best practices and received parental feedback via individual and group CAT scores. Scores were dichotomized as 5 (excellent) versus 1-4 (less than excellent) and reported as percentage of items rated excellent. Curriculum impact was assessed by comparing score changes between groups. Residents’ scores in both arms were combined to assess changes from year beginning to end. Statistical testing was performed using generalized linear mixed effects models.ResultsAll residents (n=68) participated. Intervention (n=38) and control (n=30) residents received at least 10 CATs at the beginning and end of the year. The percentage of parents rating all items as excellent increased by similar percentages in intervention and control groups (60.9% to 73.8% vs. 61.1% to 69.8; p=0.38). When scores of residents in both arms were combined, improvement was found from the beginning to end of the year for all CAT items (p
       
  • 43 - Data-Driven Practice Habits for Pediatric Trainees: Getting a Return
           on Our Data Entry Investment
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Emily M. Powers, Nitu Kashyap, Pnina Weiss
       
  • 96 - Exploring Grit and Resilience in First Year Pediatric (P1) Residents
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Rebecca Wallihan, John Mahan, Suzanne Reed, Claire Stewart, Mary Kay Kuzma, Alex Rakowsky
       
  • 95 - The Benefits of a Consistent Approach among Program Directors in
           Addressing Resident Burnout
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Eva K. Schwartz, Ben Miller, Stephanie B. Dewar
       
  • 94 - Care Team Assistant Program: Promoting Resident WELLNESS and
           Efficiency
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Michelle-Marie Peña, Ryosuke Takei, Anna Sweeney, Zoey Atabek, George Dalembert, Nicole Washington, Jeanine Ronan
       
  • 93 - One Program's Journey Into the Wizarding World of Wellness
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Cameron D. Nereim, Rebecca M. Plant, Sharon Dabrow
       
  • 92 - Resident Use of the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) Outside of Work
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Lorraine E. Canham, Molly H. Silber, Leah S. Millstein, Jason W. Custer, Susan Feigelman, Ronald San Juan, Erin L. Giudice
       
  • 91 - Acceptance and Perceived Benefits of Conference-Based Storytelling
           Session on Pediatric Resident Wellness
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Daria Murosko, Zeena Audi, Yuan He, Jonathan Gall, Daniel Zheng, Tyler Rainer, Avital Ludomirsky, Sarah Wingerter
       
  • 90 - We Don't All Scream for Ice Cream: Creation of an Integrated
           Longitudinal Well-Being Curriculum
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Jessica L. Meikle, Weston Powell, Lauren Poull, Tiana Won, Heather A. McPhillips, Maneesh Batra
       
  • 89 - Resilience: Resident Led Initiative to Empower a Change in Culture
           and Promote Resilience in Accordance with the ACGME Learning Environment
           Guidelines
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Alexandra Kilinsky, Michael Dolinger, Anna Plichta
       
  • 88 - Persistent Burnout and Mindfulness in Pediatric Internship
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Colin M. Sox, Christine Cheston, Catherine Michelson, Yarden S. Fraiman
       
  • 87 - Effective Debriefing: Empowering Trainees to Process Distressing
           Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Morgen Govindan, Patricia Keefer, Julie Sturza, Nasuh Malas
       
  • 86 - Mindful Moments: Improving Resident Wellness Through a Text-Message
           Based Curriculum
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Anita Desai, Allison Rubin
       
  • 85 - The Pediatric Buddy Program: Cohort 3 Wellness Focus
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Beth Payne, Haneme Idrizi, Michelle Arandes
       
  • 84 - The Intimidation Factor: Workplace Intimidation and Its Effects on
           Wellness, Morale, and Patient Care
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Rebecca Hernandez, Karli McCoy, Amanda Chavez, Samantha Wertz, Elizabeth Payne
       
  • 83 - An Assessment of Burnout in Critical Care Fellows
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Markita L. Suttle, Margaret Chase, Melissa Moore-Clingenpeel, Tensing Maa, Donald Boyer, William Sasser, Jason Werner, Karen Marcdante, Meredith Bone, Katherine Mason, Megan McCabe, Felice Su, Richard Mink, David Turner
       
  • 82 - Pediatric Resident Burnout: Impact of Debriefing
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Tanya D. Murtha, Andrea Asnes
       
  • 81 - Developing Personal and Professional Resident Wellness Through
           Resident Led Activities and Discussions
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Shannon E. Barker, Chad Vercio
       
  • 80 - Implementation of A Pediatric Wellness Curriculum and Its Impact on
           Resident Burnout and Their Perception of Work-Life Balance
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Johanan Vargas, Jessica Berrios, Erika Regalado
       
  • 79 - Suicide Risk Assessment and Management Training Practices in
           Pediatric Residency Programs: A Nationwide Needs Assessment Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Lucy E. Schoen, Alyssa L. Bogetz, Rebecca A. Bernert
       
  • 78 - A Program's Experience with Healer's Art: Fostering Compassionate
           Healing and Human Connection
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Miri Lader, Ann E. Burke, Adrienne Stolfi, Evangeline Andarsio, Claire Hanson, Craig Boreman
       
  • 77 - Soothing the Burn: A Comprehensive Wellness Program for Pediatric
           Residents
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Anna Schmitz, Sonia Mehta, Catherine Ferguson, Kaitlin McKenna, Jessica DeValk, Michael Weisgerber
       
  • 76 - Impact of A Pediatric Value Curriculum on Resident Knowledge,
           Attitudes and Behavior
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Lisa E. Herrmann, Michael Tchou, Allison Parsons, Naveen Muthu, Rebecca Tenney-Sorreo, Evan Fieldston, Brad Lindell, Adam Dziorny, Maya Dewan
       
  • 75 - Longitudinal Community Assets Curriculum for Pediatric Residents
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Catherine Park, Joshua Bakke, Jason Yaun, Bindiya Bagga
       
  • 74 - Increasing Resident Engagement Through Interactive Learning at
           Morning Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Katherine A. Jordan, Laura Cannon, Mark W. Chandler, Kenya McNeal-Trice
       
  • 73 - Pediatric Residency Transgender Education Initiative
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Elizabeth S. Sandberg, Steven Weinberg, Zachary Smith, Emily Vander Schaaf, Sue Tolleson-Rinehart
       
  • 72 - New Parent Electives in U.S. Pediatric Residency Programs: A
           Qualitative Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Elena Griffin, Benjamin Hoffman
       
  • 71 - Improving the Resident Research Experience Through the Implementation
           of a Resident Scholarly Oversight Committee
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Jon F. McGreevy, Kiley Vander Wyst, Brigham C. Willis, Vasudha Bhavaraju
       
  • 70 - Resident Academic Half Day: Perspectives of Faculty Teachers
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Lauren K. Ritchie, L. Barry Seltz, Emma Kulig
       
  • 69 - Recognizing a Cycle of Dependence that Impedes Residents' Ability to
           Learn Neurology: A Qualitative Study Exploring Pediatric Residents
           Perspectives
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Thuy Nguyen, Sara Pavitt, Courtney Wusthoff, Caroline Rassbach
       
  • 68 - Needs Assessment and Early Experience with an Outpatient Complex Care
           Elective
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Karl Eckberg, Emily Borman-Shoap
       
  • 67 - Jackpot: Use of a Lottery Incentive System is Associated with
           Sustained Gains in Resident Academic Productivity
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Emily Borman-Shoap, Lei Zhang, Michael B. Pitt
       
  • 66 - Diagnostic Testing for (Non-)Dummies: Applying Adult Learning Theory
           to Teach Statistics-Based Interpretation of Clinical Test Results
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Adin Nelson
       
  • 65 - Implementation of a Novel Curriculum and Conceptual Framework for
           Pediatrician-Scientist Development
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Audrea M. Burns, Satid Thammasitboon, Teri L. Turner, Mark A. Ward, Jordan S. Orange
       
  • 64 - Effects of a Daily Interactive Quiz on Pediatric Resident Case
           Conference Content
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Michael B. Spewak, Carolynn L. Price, Laura K. Eder, Sharon M. Unti
       
  • 63 - Lone Ranger or Pit Crew' Evaluating the Impact of a Team-Based
           Care Curriculum for Pediatric Residents
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Dawn S. Tuell, Gayatri Jaishankar, Ivy Click, Beth Fox, Jodi Polaha
       
  • 62 - Evaluating Curricular Modules in the Care of Children with Medical
           Complexity: A Mixed-Methods Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Kathleen Huth, Tobey Audcent, Sara Long-Gagne, Anne Marie Sbrocchi, Natalie Weiser, Doug Miller, Danielle Arje, Nathalie Major, Kheirie Issa, Eyal Cohen, Julia Orkin
       
  • 61 - An Individualized Career Exploration Rotation: Can We Impact Career
           Decision Early in Training'
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Heather B. Howell, Francisco Hernandez, Hannah Famiglietti, Patricia Poitevien
       
  • 60 - A Humanities Curriculum in a Pediatric Training Program
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Susan Gottlieb, Leona Jaglom, Ilya Bialik, Steven Gelman, Yvonne Ferreira, Revathy Sundaram, Madhu Gudavalli, Ali Nadroo, Jolanta Kulpa, Pramod Narula
       
  • 59 - Creation, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Curriculum in Scholarly
           Development
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Ross E. Myers, Keith Ponitz, Meghan Treitz, Katherine Mason
       
  • 58 - Pediatric Pain Management: Tools for Resident Education
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Rebecca MacDonell-Yilmaz, Angela Anderson
       
  • 57 - Use of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Bioethics Curriculum
           in Pediatrics Residency Training: Results of a National Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Lauren E. Veit, Janice L. Liebhart, Jennifer C. Kesselheim
       
  • 56 - What Makes the Perfect Inpatient Consultation' A Qualitative
           Analysis of Resident and Fellow Perspectives
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Sara Pavitt, Alyssa Bogetz, Rebecca Blankenburg
       
  • 55 - Scholarly Activity Training during Residency: How Well Aligned are
           Program Directors and Residents'
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Erika L. Abramson, Michelle D. Stevenson, Monique Naifeh, Elizabeth Mauer, Linda Gerber, Su-Ting Li
       
  • 54 - Pediatric Resident Experiences at Morning Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Joshua T. Williams, Laura Zastoupil, Melisa Tanverdi, Leonard B. Seltz
       
  • 53 - Novel Mental Health Curriculum in a Pediatric Continuity Clinic
           Improves Mental Health Screening and Diagnosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Skyler McLaurin-Jiang, Laurie W. Albertini, Gail M. Cohen, Callie L. Brown, Palmer Edwards
       
  • 52 - How to Increase Resident Participation in Continuity Clinic Didactics
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Kristen E. Samaddar, Katy Mullens, Jennifer Farabaugh
       
  • 51 - Education Track: Beyond the Residents as Teachers Curriculum
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Eyal Ben-Isaac, Adriana Hernandez, Michelle Thompson
       
  • 50 - Pediatric Chief Resident Perspective on High Value Cost Conscious
           Care Training during Residency: A National Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Miriam Samstein, Yiyuan Wu, Linda M. Gerber, Erika Abramson
       
  • 49 - Discussing Death: A Curriculum to Empower Residents
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Katherine J. Schultz, Jessica Turnbull, Travis Crook, Rosemary Hunter
       
  • 48 - Evaluating Learner Preference of Schedule Type for Best Engagement of
           Pediatric Residents during Critical Care Rotation in a Small Residency
           Program: Results of a Mixed-Methods Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Jody N. Huber
       
  • 47 - What is the Individualized Curriculum'
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Kimberly A. Gifford, Daniel J. Schumacher, Suzanne Reed, Ann Burke, Laura Zastoupil, Lynn Thoreson, John Mahan, Tai Lockspeiser
       
  • 46 - Pediatrics in Press—A Resident Driven Innovative Model of
           Education
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Krishna Kishore Umapathi, Sruthi Menon, Kimberly Hung, Abdulla Ghori
       
  • 45 - Creation of a Cancer Survivorship Curriculum for Pediatric Resident
           Physicians
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Lindsay F. Schwartz, Clarence Braddock, Roy L. Kao, Myung-Shin Sim, Jacqueline N. Casillas
       
  • 44 - A Quality Improvement Project to Improve Timeliness of Submission of
           Fellow Evaluations by Neonatology Faculty
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Academic Pediatrics, Volume 18, Issue 5Author(s): Mackenzie S. Frost, Allie Austin, Andi Scarborough, Luc Brion
       
 
 
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