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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3049 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3080 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 86, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 363, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 229, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 132, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
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Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 360, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 331, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 417, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 198, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 172, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)

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Journal Cover Allergologia et Immunopathologia
  [SJR: 0.46]   [H-I: 29]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0301-0546
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3049 journals]
  • The influence of microorganisms in allergic diseases
    • Authors: M. Tortajada-Girbés; Javier Torres-Borrego
      Pages: 519 - 520
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): M. Tortajada-Girbés, Javier Torres-Borrego


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.10.001
       
  • The protective role of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein
           in childhood asthma
    • Authors: A. Karakullukcu; H.B. Tokman; S. Nepesov; M. Demirci; S. Saribas; S. Vehid; R. Caliskan; Z. Taner; H. Cokugras; T. Ziver; S. Demiryas; B. Kocazeybek
      Pages: 521 - 527
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): A. Karakullukcu, H.B. Tokman, S. Nepesov, M. Demirci, S. Saribas, S. Vehid, R. Caliskan, Z. Taner, H. Cokugras, T. Ziver, S. Demiryas, B. Kocazeybek
      Background Helicobacter pylori quantity and HP-NAP gene expression were evaluated in the faeces of healthy and asthmatic children. Methods H. pylori DNAs and RNAs were isolated from the stool samples of 92 asthmatic children (AC; 3–8 years) and 88 healthy controls (HC). Quantitative PCR was used to determine the quantity of H. pylori and HP-NAP expression relative to the 16S rRNA (reference gene). Gene expression was analysed using the delta delta-Ct method. Results H. pylori DNA was detected in the stool samples of 18 (20.4%) of the 88 HC (p <0.0001, OR=0.79) and none of AC. No meaningful statistical differences were found between individuals with positive and negative family histories for asthma in AC and HC (p >0.05). H. pylori quantity was higher in seven of 18 H. pylori-positive samples, but HP-NAP expression levels were low in four of these seven samples. Based on a multivariate logistic regression analysis of these three variables together, only males displayed a significant difference based on gender differences (p <0.02) and it was determined that, based on the OR value of 0.46 and the 95% CI range of 0.241–0.888, male gender was an independent protective factor in asthma. Conclusions HP-NAP levels vary to the relative concentrations of bacteria in the stationary or late logarithmic phases. Different napA expression levels may be caused by different endogenous napA gene expression or different environmental conditions.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.008
       
  • Prenatal paracetamol use and asthma in childhood: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis
    • Authors: G. Fan; B. Wang; C. Liu; D. Li
      Pages: 528 - 533
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): G. Fan, B. Wang, C. Liu, D. Li
      Objectives Some studies have suggested that prenatal paracetamol exposure might associate with the risk of child asthma. However, other studies have not confirmed this result. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate their relationship. Methods Two authors searched Pubmed and Embase databases up to June 2016. The strength of the association was calculated with the OR and respective 95% CIs. The random-effects model was chosen to calculate the pooled OR. Results A total of 13 articles of more than 1,043,109 individuals were included in the meta-analysis. A statistically significant association between prenatal paracetamol exposure and child asthma risk was found. The data showed that prenatal paracetamol exposure could increase the risk of child asthma (OR=1.19; 95% CI, 1.12–1.27; P <0.00001) in a random-effect model. Six studies reported paracetamol exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy. We found that paracetamol exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with increased risk of child asthma (OR=1.21; 95% CI, 1.14–1.28; P <0.00001). Furthermore, we observed that paracetamol exposure during the 2–3 trimesters of pregnancy was also associated with child asthma risk (OR=1.13; 95% CI, 1.04–1.23; P =0.005). Conclusions This study suggested that prenatal paracetamol exposure was significantly associated with the increased risk of child asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.10.014
       
  • Is there any difference regarding atopy between children with familial
           Mediterranean fever and healthy controls'
    • Authors: Ç. Aydoğmuş; N.A. Ayaz; M. Çakan; F. Çipe; N. Topal; Ö.B. Öner; G. Keskindemirci; A. Akçay
      Pages: 549 - 552
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): Ç. Aydoğmuş, N.A. Ayaz, M. Çakan, F. Çipe, N. Topal, Ö.B. Öner, G. Keskindemirci, A. Akçay
      Introduction There are only a few studies regarding the prevalence of atopy in Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients, and their results are conflicting. Methods In this study children with the diagnosis of FMF were evaluated for the presence of atopy by comparing with controls. One hundred and eighteen children diagnosed as FMF and 50 healthy age and sex matched controls were enrolled. They were evaluated for the presence of rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, urticaria and asthma. Laboratory assessment was done by measuring IgA, IgM, IgG, IgE levels, total eosinophil count and by performing skin prick test (SPT) panels for common allergens to children with FMF and healthy controls. Results One hundred and eighteen children (61girls and 57 boys) diagnosed as FMF with a median age of 120±47 months (range 36–204 months) were compared with 50 healthy controls (31 girls and 19 boys) having a median age of 126±37 (range 48–192 months). The mean percentage of total eosinophil count of patients was similar to that of the control group. The mean level of IgE was significantly higher in children with FMF than controls (136±268, 87±201, respectively; p values <0.05). The percentage of skin prick test positivity was similar for both patients and controls (13% and 8.2%, respectively; p >0.05). The prevalences of atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, and asthma in the patient group were 5.08%, 28.8%, and 15.25%, respectively, while the control group had the prevalences of 0%, 36%, and 14% respectively. Conclusion Children with FMF did not show an increase of atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and asthma with respect to controls.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.12.006
       
  • Allergy is associated with reduced risk of glioma: A meta-analysis
    • Authors: C. Zhang; Q.-X. Zhu
      Pages: 553 - 559
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): C. Zhang, Q.-X. Zhu
      Background Increasing evidences suggest that allergy may reduce the risk of glioma, so it is necessary to perform an up-to-data literature search and investigate this relationship by meta-analysis. Methods We identified the included studies by searching PubMed and Web of Science and excluding irrelevant or ineligible articles. Nineteen studies from 15 articles, including 8435 cases and 118,719 controls, were selected for data extraction and synthesis. Results Pooled outcomes showed that there was an inverse association between allergy and risk of glioma (OR=0.64, 95% CI=0.52–0.78, P <0.001). Meanwhile, asthma and eczema would reduce the risk of glioma by 33% and 23% (OR=0.67, 95% CI=0.59–0.75, P <0.001; OR=0.77, 95% CI=0.68–0.86, P <0.001), respectively. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the stability of these findings. Besides, no publication biases were detected regarding all the investigations. Conclusions Overall or specific allergy is protective against glioma. More prospective cohort studies or molecular laboratory experiments are warranted to elucidate the causation and key mechanism.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.12.005
       
  • Cofactors and comorbidities in patients with aspirin/NSAID
           hypersensitivity
    • Authors: M. Sánchez-Borges; F. Caballero-Fonseca; A. Capriles-Hulett
      Pages: 573 - 578
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): M. Sánchez-Borges, F. Caballero-Fonseca, A. Capriles-Hulett
      Hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin and other NSAIDs occur in individuals genetically predisposed and exhibit different clinical manifestations, especially respiratory, cutaneous, and generalised. Five different phenotypes define distinct clinical pictures: aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, aspirin/NSAID cutaneous disease, NSAID-induced urticaria, angio-oedema and anaphylaxis, single NSAID reactions, and delayed reactions. They are observed more frequently in middle-aged women, and in atopic individuals. While ASA/NSAID hypersensitivity shares comorbidities with asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, chronic urticaria and angio-oedema, ASA and other NSAIDs can also be cofactors for other clinically relevant conditions, especially food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, angio-oedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and oral mite anaphylaxis. Awareness on these relationships is required for the correct diagnosis, classification, and treatment of affected patients.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.08.010
       
  • Allergy genuflection' It's surmount with special focus on ear, nose
           and throat
    • Authors: D. Gupta; L. Deshmukh; R. Gupta; S.S. Sandhu
      Pages: 592 - 601
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): D. Gupta, L. Deshmukh, R. Gupta, S.S. Sandhu
      The system that protects body from infectious agents is immune system. On occasions, the system seldom reacts with some foreign particles and causes allergy. Allergies of the ear, nose and throat (ENT) often have serious consequences, including impairment and emotional strain that lowers the quality of life of patients. This is further responsible for the common cold, cough, tonsillitis, dermal infection, chest pain and asthma-like conditions which disturb one's day to day life. The present review enlightens some common ENT allergies which one can suffer more frequently in one's lifetime, and ignorance leads to making the condition chronic. Information regarding pathophysiology and the management of ENT allergy by this review could help clinicians and common people to better understand the circumstances and treatment of ENT allergy.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.10.010
       
  • Epidemiology and pathophysiology of malignancy in common variable
           immunodeficiency'
    • Authors: A. Tak Manesh; G. Azizi; A. Heydari; F. Kiaee; M. Shaghaghi; N. Hossein-Khannazer; R. Yazdani; H. Abolhassani; A. Aghamohammadi
      Pages: 602 - 615
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): A. Tak Manesh, G. Azizi, A. Heydari, F. Kiaee, M. Shaghaghi, N. Hossein-Khannazer, R. Yazdani, H. Abolhassani, A. Aghamohammadi
      Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a diagnostic category of primary immunodeficiency (PID) which may present with heterogeneous disorders including recurrent infections, autoimmunity, granulomatous diseases, lymphoid and other types of malignancies. Generally, the incidence of malignancy in CVID patients is around 1.5–20.7% and usually occurs during the 4th–6th decade of life. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the most frequent malignancy, followed by epithelial tumours of stomach, breast, bladder and cervix. The exact pathological mechanisms for cancer development in CVID are not fully determined; however, several mechanisms including impaired genetic stability, genetic predisposition, immune dysregulation, impaired clearance of oncogenic viruses and bacterial infections, and iatrogenic causes have been proposed to contribute to the high susceptibility of these patients to malignancies.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.006
       
  • Is the evidence of breast feeding protection against coeliac disease
           real'
    • Authors: A. Girbovan; G. Sur; G. Samasca; I. Lupan
      Pages: 616 - 618
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): A. Girbovan, G. Sur, G. Samasca, I. Lupan
      Many recent studies discredit breastfeeding protection against coeliac disease. We will try to answer the question: “Is the evidence of breast feeding protection against coeliac disease real'”

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.005
       
  • What are the real effects of the Mediterranean diet on recurrent colds and
           their complications'
    • Authors: J.A. Castro-Rodriguez
      Pages: 415 - 416
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): J.A. Castro-Rodriguez


      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.002
       
  • Effects of Mediterranean diet in patients with recurring colds and
           frequent complications
    • Authors: F.M. Calatayud; B. Calatayud; J.G. Gallego; C. González-Martín; L.F. Alguacil
      Pages: 417 - 424
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): F.M. Calatayud, B. Calatayud, J.G. Gallego, C. González-Martín, L.F. Alguacil
      Introduction In recent years, traditional diets enriched with fresh plant-based foods have been gradually abandoned, increasing the consumption of animal foods and highly processed food. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a nutritional intervention with a Traditional Mediterranean Diet in patients with recurring colds (RC) and frequent inflammatory complications (IC). Methods Prospective before-after comparison study of 63 girls and 65 boys aged 1–5 years were included over a year in the nutritional programme “Learning to eat from the Mediterranean”. We studied clinical and therapeutic variables and various anthropometric parameters. Results All the studied indicators (number of catarrhal episodes CB, degree of intensity, emergency and hospital admissions) showed a positive and statistically significant evolution, evidenced from the first weeks of starting treatment, until the end of the year, after which 53.9% of patients had no CB, 25% had only one, and 16.4% had two episodes, compared to the 4.64 episodes on average in the previous year. Antibiotic use decreased by 87.4%, from 3.85±1.27 times/patient/year to 0.49±0.79 (p <0.001). Symptomatic treatment decreased by 56.7%, from 7.03±2.76 to 3.05±1.69 (p <0.001). The satisfaction of the families was very high. The Kidmed index, which assesses the quality of the Mediterranean Diet, increased from 7.8 to 10.9 points. Conclusion The adoption of a Traditional Mediterranean Diet could be a major contribution to the improvement of patients with recurring colds and frequent inflammatory complications.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.08.006
       
  • Immune response of toddlers with history of prematurity
    • Authors: S.P. Muraro; P.M. Pitrez; A.P.D. de Souza; B.N. Porto; J.E. Vargas; I.P. Ewald; J.P. Heinzmann-Filho; G. dos Santos; T.S. Baptista; T.D. Gandolfi; F.D. Machado; M.H. Jones; C. Bonorino; R.T. Stein
      Pages: 425 - 431
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): S.P. Muraro, P.M. Pitrez, A.P.D. de Souza, B.N. Porto, J.E. Vargas, I.P. Ewald, J.P. Heinzmann-Filho, G. dos Santos, T.S. Baptista, T.D. Gandolfi, F.D. Machado, M.H. Jones, C. Bonorino, R.T. Stein
      Background It is not quite well established how immune responses differ in term and preterm infants beyond the first year of life. This study aimed to evaluate aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in a group of preterm infants in comparison with their term peers. Methods In this cross-sectional study peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from preterm and term children at age three years. Innate immune response was evaluated by the analysis of TLR receptors expression on CD11c+HLADRhigh cells and inflammatory cytokine production after PBMC stimulation with Toll like receptors (TLR) ligands. Adaptive immune response was evaluated by T cells’ phenotyping and function after stimulation with polyclonal conventional T cell stimulus. Conclusion We have found that the patterns of innate and adaptive immune responses at 3 years of age were not affected by the fact of the children having being born preterm or at term.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.10.020
       
  • Polymorphisms of TGFB1, TLE4 and MUC22 are associated with childhood
           asthma in Chinese population
    • Authors: J.B. Chen; J. Zhang; H.Z. Hu; M. Xue; Y.J. Jin
      Pages: 432 - 438
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): J.B. Chen, J. Zhang, H.Z. Hu, M. Xue, Y.J. Jin
      Objective To investigate whether the genetic variants of TGFB1, TLE4, MUC22 and IKZF3 are associated with the development of asthma in Chinese children. Methods 572 adolescent asthma patients and 590 age-matched healthy controls were included in this study. A total of four SNPs were genotyped, including rs2241715 of TGFB1, rs2378383 of TLE4, rs2523924 of MUC22, and rs907092 of IKZF3. Allele frequencies of the patients and the control group were compared by the Chi-square test. The Student t test was used to analyse the relationship between genotypes and clinical feature of the patients. Results Patients were found to have significantly different frequencies of allele A of rs2241715, allele G of rs2378383 and allele A of rs2523924 as compared with the controls (40.4% vs. 45.9%, p =0.01 for rs2241715; 17.2% vs. 13.4%, p =0.01 for rs2378383; 15.3% vs. 11.9%, p =0.02 for rs2523924). For patients with severe asthma, those with genotype AA/AG of rs2241715 had remarkably higher FEV1% as compared with those with genotype GG (59.1±4.3% vs. 55.4±3.7%, p <0.001). Moreover, those with genotype GG/GA of rs2378383 had remarkably lower FEV1% as compared with those with genotype AA (54.6±2.9% vs. 58.6±4.1%, p <0.001). Conclusions Genes TGFB1, TLE4 and MUC22 are associated with the risk of childhood asthma in Chinese population. Our results associating TGFB1 and TLE4 with clinical features of asthma suggest potential application of these parameters in the management of asthma children.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.10.021
       
  • The role of active B cells in allergen immunotherapy
    • Authors: M.H. Celiksoy; R. Sancak; A. Yildiran
      Pages: 439 - 444
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): M.H. Celiksoy, R. Sancak, A. Yildiran
      Background The purpose of this study is to examine the changes in B lymphocyte subsets in patients receiving allergen immunotherapy. Methods B lymphocyte subsets of patients before immunotherapy and one year after immunotherapy began were examined using the flow cytometric method. Age-matched healthy children served as the control group. Results Twenty-two patients with asthma and/or allergic rhinitis and 14 healthy, age-matched controls were included in the study. The median age of the patients was 13 years old (range: 6–20 years), and eleven (50.0%) were male. The median age of the healthy controls was also 13 years old (range: 7–17), and seven (50.0%) were male. In the age group from 11 to 15 years; the patients’ relative and absolute counts of active and mature sensitive B cells were higher than those of the healthy children (p =0.027–0.012 and p =0.032–0.010, respectively) before immunotherapy. The relative and absolute counts of active B cells before immunotherapy were also significantly higher than those of after immunotherapy (p =0.001–0.001, p =0.025–0.037, and p =0.029–0.035, respectively). Before immunotherapy, the relative and absolute counts of mature sensitive B cells were significantly higher than those obtained after immunotherapy (p =0.024–0.006) in the 11–15-year-old age group. Conclusions Allergen immunotherapy directly influences B cell differentiation and causes a decrease in the count of active B cells. This finding is relevant because the B cell count can be used as a guide in the assessment of an individual patient's treatment response and also when determining whether to continue the immunotherapy.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.10.017
       
  • Diagnostic values for egg white specific IgE levels with the skin prick
           test in Turkish children with egg white allergy
    • Authors: H.T. Nacaroglu; S.B. Erdem; S. Karaman; D. Dogan; C.S. U.Karkiner; E. T. Kanık; D. Can
      Pages: 445 - 451
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): H.T. Nacaroglu, S.B. Erdem, S. Karaman, D. Dogan, C.S. U.Karkiner, E. T. Kanık, D. Can
      Background The diagnostic values for the skin prick test (SPT) diameters and egg white-specific IgE (EW-sIgE) levels that will allow us to predict the result of the oral food challenge test (OFC) in the diagnosis of egg white allergy vary by the community where the study is carried out. Objective This study aimed to determine the diagnostic values of SPT and EW-sIgE levels in the diagnosis of egg white allergy. Methods 59 patients followed with the diagnosis of egg allergy September 2013 to September 2015 were included in our retrospective cross-sectional study. The patients were investigated in terms of egg and anaphylaxis history or the requirement of the OFC positivity. The demographic, clinical and laboratory findings of the cases were recorded, and they were compared with the patients with the suspected egg allergy but negative OFC (n =47). Results In the study, for all age groups, the value of 5mm in SPT was found to be significant at 96.4% positive predictive value (PPV) and 97.8% specificity and the value of 5.27kU/L for EW-sIgE was found to be significant at 76% PPV and 86.6% specificity for egg white. The diagnostic power of the SPT for egg white (AUC: 72.2%) was determined to be significantly higher compared to the diagnostic power of the EW-sIgE (AUC: 52.3%) (p <0.05). Conclusion Along with the determination of the diagnostic values of communities, the rapid and accurate diagnosis of the children with a food allergy will be ensured, and the patient follow-up will be made easier.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.10.018
       
  • Predictivity of clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) based
           on sensitisation pattern to molecular allergens in children with allergic
           rhinoconjunctivitis
    • Authors: A. di Coste; F. Occasi; G. De Castro; A.M. Zicari; R. Galandrini; A. Giuffrida; L. Indinnimeo; M. Duse
      Pages: 452 - 456
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): A. di Coste, F. Occasi, G. De Castro, A.M. Zicari, R. Galandrini, A. Giuffrida, L. Indinnimeo, M. Duse
      Background The diagnostic and therapeutic approach to grass pollen allergy is now possible by detecting specific IgE (sIgE) to its allergenic components. Aim To evaluate the correlation between the sensitisation to different molecular Phleum pratense (Phl p) allergens and clinical efficacy of SLIT. Methods The pilot study included 36 patients affected by allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, all treated with SLIT actively. We performed serum analysis of sIgE to Phl p 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11 and 12. The Average Rhinoconjunctivitis Total Symptom Score (ARTSS) and the Average Combined Score (ACS) were evaluated before and after one year of immunotherapy. Results Three different groups of sensitisation were defined based on the range of IgE reactivity to Phleum pratense allergens at baseline: group I (sIgE reactive to 1–3 allergens); group II (sIgE reactive to 4–5 allergens); and group III (sIgE reactive to 6–8 allergens). At T0 ACS was 1.79±0.18 in group I; 1.81±0.23 in group II; and 1.95±0.34 in group III. At T1 ACS was 0.85±0.55 in group I; 1.01±0.31 in group II; and 1.44±0.39 in group III. At T1 there was a significant improvement of ARTSS and ACS for group I (p =0.001). Conclusions Sublingual immunotherapy with a grass pollen is efficacious irrespective of the patients’ baseline sensitisation to either single or multiple grass pollen molecular allergens. We found that patients with few sensitisations have a greater improvement in combined symptom and medication score. SLIT improves the clinical course of allergic patients although new sensitisations may appear.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.001
       
  • The efficacy and safety of sublingual immunotherapy in children and adult
           patients with allergic rhinitis
    • Authors: X. Lin; H. Lin; X. Wei; Q. Huang
      Pages: 457 - 462
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): X. Lin, H. Lin, X. Wei, Q. Huang
      Background Clinical research has shown that sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is effective and safe in moderate-severe allergic rhinitis (AR) induced by house dust mite (HDM). However, the sample size in many studies is small. Meanwhile, the controversy on the efficacy and safety in the very young children younger than four years old still existed. Objective The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SLIT with Dermatophagoides farinae (Der.f) extracts in children and adult patients with allergic rhinitis, particularly in the very young children. Method A total of 573 subjects aged 3–69 with AR received a three-year course of sublingual immunotherapy with Der.f extracts along with pharmacotherapy. The total nasal symptoms score (TNSS), total medication score (TMS), visual analogue score (VAS) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated at each visit. Result TNSS, TMS, VAS were significantly improved during the three-year course of treatment in comparison to the baseline values (P <0.01). Besides, significant improvement in nasal symptoms and reduction of medication use were also observed in young children aged 3–6 years (P <0.01). No severe systemic adverse events (AEs) were reported. Conclusion SLIT with Der.f drops is clinically effective and safe in children and adult patients with HDM-induced AR, including the very young children less than four years old.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.10.016
       
  • Molecular diagnosis of allergy to Anisakis simplex and Gymnorhynchus gigas
           fish parasites
    • Authors: A. Armentia; J. Santos; Z. Serrano; B. Martín; S. Martín; J. Barrio; S. Fernández; M. González-Sagrado; F. Pineda; R. Palacios
      Pages: 463 - 472
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): A. Armentia, J. Santos, Z. Serrano, B. Martín, S. Martín, J. Barrio, S. Fernández, M. González-Sagrado, F. Pineda, R. Palacios
      Background There has been an increase in the prevalence of hypersensitivity to Anisakis simplex. There are fish parasites other than Anisakis simplex whose allergenicity has not yet been studied. Objective To assess IgE hypersensitivity caused by fish parasite allergens in patients with gastro-allergic symptoms after consumption of fish, shellfish or cephalopods, compared with healthy subjects, pollen allergic individuals and children with digestive symptoms after eating marine food. Methods We carried out in vivo tests (skin prick) and in vitro tests (specific IgE determination, Western blot) and component resolved diagnostics (CRD) using microarray analysis in all patients. Results CRD better detected sensitisation to allergens from marine parasites than skin prick tests and determination of specific IgE by CAP. Sensitisation to Gymnorhynchus gigas was detected in 26% of patients measured by skin prick tests and 36% measured by IgE. Conclusions The prevalence of hypersensitivity to marine parasite allergens other than Anisakis simplex should be studied, and the most appropriate technique for this is CRD.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.12.008
       
  • Comparison of inflammatory cytokine release from nasal epithelial cells of
           non-atopic non-rhinitic, allergic rhinitic and polyp subjects and effects
           of diesel exhaust particles in vitro
    • Authors: A.B. Ozturk; R. Bayraktar; B. Gogebakan; S. Mumbuc; H. Bayram
      Pages: 473 - 481
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): A.B. Ozturk, R. Bayraktar, B. Gogebakan, S. Mumbuc, H. Bayram
      Background Although studies have reported an association between air pollutants and increased allergic airway diseases, such as allergic rhinitis and nasal polyposis, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. A limited number of studies have suggested that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) play a role in atopy and the pathogenesis of allergic upper airway diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of DEP on inflammatory cytokine release, and mRNA expression of transcription factors such as JNK and NF-β in primary nasal epithelial cells (NECs), in vitro. Methods NECs from non-atopic, non-rhinitic subjects (controls) and patients with allergic rhinitis and nasal polyps were cultured and incubated with 0–100μg/ml DEP for 24h. ELISA and RT-PCR were used to assess the release of IL-8, GM-CSF, and RANTES, and mRNA expression for JNK and NF-κB, respectively. Results Compared to control cells, NECs from subjects with atopic polyps released significantly greater amounts of IL-8 (median=887 vs. 176.6pg/μg cellular protein; p <0.0001) and RANTES (median=0.191 vs. 0.02pg/μg cellular protein; p <0.001). While 50μg/ml DEP induced release of RANTES in NECs from patients with allergic rhinitis, 100μg/ml DEP decreased IL-8 levels in NECs from both control and allergic rhinitic subjects. DEP did not affect mRNA expression for JNK and NF-κB from NECs of subjects with polyps. Conclusions NECs from subjects with various pathologies may respond differently to DEP.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.10.015
       
  • Trends in prevalence and risk factors of allergic rhinitis symptoms in
           primary schoolchildren six years apart in Budapest
    • Authors: M. Sultész; I. Balogh; G. Katona; G. Mezei; A. Hirschberg; G. Gálffy
      Pages: 487 - 495
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): M. Sultész, I. Balogh, G. Katona, G. Mezei, A. Hirschberg, G. Gálffy
      Background Few data are available concerning the time trends and risk factors associated with allergic rhinitis (AR) in schoolchildren in Hungary. Methods At an interval of six years, parents of 6–12-year-old children completed identical ISAAC-based and additional questionnaires related to possible risk factors. Results Response rate was 62.8% with 6335 questionnaires distributed in 2007, and 52.9% with 6441 questionnaires in 2013. The prevalence of current AR symptoms (subjects presenting clinical symptoms of AR in the past 12 months, but had yet to be diagnosed by physician) increased significantly from 14.9% to 23.5% (p <0.001). There was no significant change in the prevalence of physician-diagnosed AR (11.6–11.2%). In multivariate analysis, gender (OR 0.733; CI 0.642–0.931), a family history of atopy (OR 2.017; CI 1.669–2.436), frequent upper respiratory tract infections (OR 2.033; CI 1.659–2.492), long-lasting disease before the appearance of the allergy (OR 2.119; CI 1.311–3.428), feather bedding (OR 0.773; CI 0.599–0.996) and living in a green area (OR 1.367; CI 1.133–1.650) were found to be significant risk factors of cumulative AR in 2013. In both of the groups with (p <0.000) or without (p <0.003) AR the families with a history of atopy used feather bedding less frequently than families without atopy. Conclusion Although the prevalence of physician-diagnosed AR has not shown significant changes during the studied interval, the significant increase of the current AR symptoms suggests growing prevalence of AR among children in Budapest. Our results revealed new aspects of bedding customs in atopic families.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.010
       
  • Oral immunotherapy for food allergy: A Spanish guideline. Egg and milk
           immunotherapy Spanish guide (ITEMS GUIDE). Part 2: Maintenance phase of
           cow milk (CM) and egg oral immunotherapy (OIT), special treatment dosing
           schedules. Models of dosing schedules of OIT with CM and EGG
    • Authors: A. Martorell; E. Alonso; L. Echeverría; C. Escudero; R. García-Rodríguez; C. Blasco; J. Bone; J. Borja-Segade; T. Bracamonte; A. Claver; J.L. Corzo; B. De la Hoz; R. Del Olmo; O. Dominguez; V. Fuentes-Aparicio; I. Guallar; H. Larramona; F. Martín-Muñoz; V. Matheu; A. Michavila; I. Ojeda; P. Ojeda; M. Piquer; P. Poza; M. Reche; P. Rodríguez del Río; M. Rodríguez; F. Ruano; S. Sánchez-García; S. Terrados; L. Valdesoiro; M. Vazquez-Ortiz
      Pages: 393 - 404
      Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): A. Martorell, E. Alonso, L. Echeverría, C. Escudero, R. García-Rodríguez, C. Blasco, J. Bone, J. Borja-Segade, T. Bracamonte, A. Claver, J.L. Corzo, B. De la Hoz, R. Del Olmo, O. Dominguez, V. Fuentes-Aparicio, I. Guallar, H. Larramona, F. Martín-Muñoz, V. Matheu, A. Michavila, I. Ojeda, P. Ojeda, M. Piquer, P. Poza, M. Reche, P. Rodríguez del Río, M. Rodríguez, F. Ruano, S. Sánchez-García, S. Terrados, L. Valdesoiro, M. Vazquez-Ortiz
      Introduction Cow's milk and egg are the most frequent causes of food allergy in the first years of life. Treatments such as oral immunotherapy (OIT) have been investigated as an alternative to avoidance diets. No clinical practice guides on the management of OIT with milk and egg are currently available. Objectives To develop a clinical guide on OIT based on the available scientific evidence and the opinions of experts. Methods A review was made of studies published in the period between 1984 and June 2016, Doctoral Theses published in Spain, and summaries of communications at congresses (SEAIC, SEICAP, EAACI, AAAAI), with evaluation of the opinion consensus established by a group of experts pertaining to the scientific societies SEICAP and SEAIC. Results Recommendations have been established regarding the indications, requirements and practical aspects of the different phases of OIT, as well as special protocols for patients at high risk of suffering adverse reactions. Conclusions A clinical practice guide is presented for the management of OIT with milk and egg, based on the opinion consensus of Spanish experts.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.001
       
  • Tablet-based sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy
    • Authors: Prieto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): L. Prieto
      Allergic respiratory disease represents a significant and expanding health problem worldwide. The gold standard of therapeutic intervention is still grucocorticosteroids, although they are not effective in all patients and may cause side effects. Allergen Immunotherapy has been administrated as subcutaneous injections for treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma and has been practiced for the past century. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablets are now available for grass- or ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis and will be available in Spain for house dust mite (HDM)-induced rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma in the next months. In this review, new developments in the field of tablet-based SLIT for respiratory allergy are summarized, with special emphasis on HDM-induced allergic rhinitis and asthma. SLIT tablets are the best-documented immunotherapy products on the market and represent a more patient-friendly concept because they can be self-administrated at home.

      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
       
  • Requirements of a new allergen regulation
    • Authors: Cristina Rivas-Juesas; Joan Tomás Bartra; Ana M. Purroy Tabar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): Cristina Rivas-Juesas, Joan Tomás Bartra, Ana M. Purroy Tabar


      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.004
       
  • New routes of allergen immunotherapy
    • Authors: C.R. Juesas; C.M. Aguilar; S. Vieths
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): C.R. Juesas, C.M. Aguilar, S. Vieths


      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.010
       
  • The future of immunotherapy with individual allergens: Immunotherapy with
           fungi
    • Authors: Pineda
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): F. Pineda


      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
       
  • Quality requirements for allergen extracts and allergoids for allergen
           immunotherapy
    • Authors: J. Zimmer; A. Bonertz; S. Vieths
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J. Zimmer, A. Bonertz, S. Vieths
      All allergen products for allergen immunotherapy currently marketed in the European Union are pharmaceutical preparations derived from allergen-containing source materials like pollens, mites and moulds. Especially this natural origin results in particular demands for the regulatory requirements governing allergen products. Furthermore, the development of regulatory requirements is complicated by the so far missing universal link between certain quality parameters, in particular biological potency, on the one hand and clinical efficacy on the other hand. As a consequence, each allergen product for specific immunotherapy has to be assessed individually for its quality, safety and efficacy. At the same time, biological potency of allergen products is most commonly determined using IgE inhibition assays based on human sera relative to product-specific in house references, ruling out full comparability of products from different manufacturers. This review article aims to summarize the current quality requirements for allergen products including the special requirements implemented for control of chemically modified allergen extracts (allergoids).

      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.002
       
  • Non-protease native allergens partially purified from bodies of eight
           domestic mites using p-aminobenzamidine ligand
    • Authors: T. Erban; R. Klubal
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): T. Erban, R. Klubal
      Background Optimised purification steps for concentrating trace target native antigens are needed. Combining the p-aminobenzamidine ligand with protease inactivation enables partial purification of mite non-protease allergens lacking proteases. Objective We sought to analyse in detail proteins obtained using this method from eight species of synanthropic acaridid mites and tested IgE reactivity using pooled human sera. Materials and methods Proteins affinity bound to p-aminobenzamidine as a ligand were identified by MALDI TOF/TOF. After electroblotting, the proteins were visualised using the fluorescent SYPRO-Ruby protein blot stain, and IgE reactivity was further analysed using pooled human sera collected from patients allergic to house dust mites. Results MS/MS identification confirmed previous results that no proteases were purified. Protein patterns corresponding to the allergens Der f 7, Der f 30 and actins indicated that these proteins are purified using p-aminobenzamidine and are present across a wide spectrum of acaridid mites. When using Dermatophagoides farinae, apolipophorins (Der f 14), chitinase-like Der f 15 and 18, 70-kDa heat shock protein, and a Der f Alt a10 allergen homolog (gi 37958173) were also detected. The target antigens tropomyosins and paramyosins showed similar IgE binding among the mite species tested. IgE reactivity with miscellaneous D. farinae antigen was also observed. Conclusions Partial purification of mite non-protease antigens using a strategy combining p-aminobenzamidine with protease inactivation was verified by 1D-E and 2D-E analyses. IgE binding to p-aminobenzamidine-purified native non-protease mite antigens was tested using pooled sera. This preliminary study allows for further work on individual serum samples, allowing confirmation of immunoreactivity.

      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.07.004
       
  • Proposals for harmonization of allergens regulation in the European Union
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M. Timón
      Allergen medicinal products in the European Union are regulated differently across the different Member States. Thus, whereas in some countries strict quality, safety and efficacy requirements are in place, in others, most allergens are on the market as Named Patient Products, without any regulatory oversight. This situation results on European allergic patients being exposed to totally different standards depending on where they live. Initiatives to correct this situation are needed.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
       
  • Worldwide allergen immunotherapy guidelines: Evidence and experience-based
    • Authors: D.E.S. Larenas-Linnemann
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): D.E.S. Larenas-Linnemann


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.005
       
  • Debates in allergy, regarding the symposium on: “Position Statements and
           Therapeutic Guidelines”
    • Authors: P. Rodríguez del Río; A. Cisteró-Bahima; R. van Ree
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): P. Rodríguez del Río, A. Cisteró-Bahima, R. van Ree


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.006
       
  • Non-allergenic immunotherapy
    • Authors: E. Ibáñez Echevarría; J. Bartra Tomás; D. Hernández Fernández de Rojas
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E. Ibáñez Echevarría, J. Bartra Tomás, D. Hernández Fernández de Rojas


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.014
       
  • Epicutaneous immunotherapy
    • Authors: S. Scheurer; M. Toda
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): S. Scheurer, M. Toda


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.007
       
  • Predictive biomarkers in allergen specific immunotherapy
    • Authors: D. Barber; M.M. Escribese
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): D. Barber, M.M. Escribese


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.003
       
  • Biologics in the treatment of severe asthma
    • Authors: S. Quirce; E. Phillips-Angles; J. Domínguez-Ortega; P. Barranco
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): S. Quirce, E. Phillips-Angles, J. Domínguez-Ortega, P. Barranco
      Severe asthma is defined as asthma which requires treatment with high dose inhaled corticosteroids and with a second controller drug to prevent it from becoming uncontrolled or which remains uncontrolled despite this therapy. Patients with uncontrolled severe asthma require additional treatment options as add-on therapy, including biologics. Biologic therapies in asthma are designed to block key immune regulators, such as IgE, or certain pro-inflammatory cytokines, e.g. interleukin (IL)-5, IL-4, IL-13 or IL-17. Patients with severe asthma and eosinophilic phenotype may benefit from biologic therapies aimed at reducing blood and tissue eosinophils, such as mepolizumab, reslizumab and benralizumab. Patients with Th2-high phenotype may also benefit from therapy with anti-IL-4/anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibodies (dupilumab). The main limitations of asthma treatment with biologic agents are the crossover and overlap of the different pathways in the pathogenesis of asthma which may cause lack of complete success of these therapies, in addition of high costs, which make pharmacoeconomic studies necessary to identify the ideal target patient population to receive these biologic drugs.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.012
       
  • New insight into cancer immunotherapy
    • Authors: M.M. Escribese; D. Barber
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M.M. Escribese, D. Barber
      A key point for maintenance of the immune system homeostasis is the balance between the capacity to recognize and fight exogenous molecules and the capacity to avoid auto reactivity. The disruption of this balance induces the progression of several immune diseases such as autoimmune diseases, allergies, infections or cancer. A promising therapeutic approach to treat these diseases is immunotherapy. In cancer, both active and passive immunotherapies have been tested with promising results, such as the blocking of immunological checkpoints like CTLA-4 and PD-1. These treatments, in the market since a few years ago, aim to redirect the patient's immunological response by inhibiting the induction of regulatory T cells, both in the priming and effector phases. This strategy sheds light on the immunological mechanisms that control the regulatory response mediated by T cells and opens new lines of research into other immunological diseases such as allergy, in which the induction of a regulatory response is necessary to avoid allergic progression and which is the main objective of allergen-specific immunotherapies available today.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.013
       
  • Biologics in chronic urticaria
    • Authors: M. Ferrer; R. Madamba
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M. Ferrer, R. Madamba


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.011
       
  • A critical review on serine protease: Key immune manipulator and pathology
           mediator
    • Authors: Patel
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): S. Patel
      Proteolytic activity is fundamental to survival, so it is not surprising that all living organisms have proteases, especially seine protease. This enzyme in its numerous isoforms and homologues, constitutes the quintessential offence and defence factors, in the form of surface proteins, secreted molecules, gut digestive enzymes, venom in specialised glands or plant latex, among other manifestations. Occurring as trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, collagenase, thrombin, subtilisin etc., it mediates a diverse array of functions, including pathological roles as inflammatory, coagulatory to haemorrhagic. This review emphasizes that despite the superficial differences in mechanisms, most health issues, be they infectious, allergic, metabolic, or neural have a common conduit. This enzyme, in its various glycosylated forms leads to signal misinterpretations, wreaking havoc. However, organisms are endowed with serine protease inhibitors which might restrain this ubiquitous yet deleterious enzyme. Hence, serine proteases-driven pathogenesis and antagonising role of inhibitors is the focal point of this critical review.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
       
  • Under the superficial dichotomy pathogen and allergen are two
           manifestations of same immune activation and pathogenesis mechanisms
    • Authors: Patel
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): S. Patel
      Pathogens and allergens are deemed as two contrasting facets of host immune status, deficiency and exuberant. In silico domain analysis of a diverse panel of pathogen and allergen proteins has revealed the shortcoming of this notion. Both the pathogen and allergen proteins elicit immune activation, with the outcome of immune agitation depending on the pathogen strain, allergen exposure duration, and host factors. Pathogens can replicate within the host and constantly irritate the immune system, leading to blood coagulation, respiratory collapse and death. Allergens, being non-viable, can only provoke the immune system transiently; however, depending on the allergen dose and extent exposed to, inflammation and fatality can occur. In silico analysis of pathogen and allergen proteins showed the conserved domains to be AAA, WR1, VKc, Kelch, Hr1, HAMP, HELICc, Dak2, CHAD, CHASE2, Galanin, PKS_TE, Robl_LC7, Excalibur, DISIN, etc. This exciting discovery can have far-reaching effects in drug target identification approaches.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
       
  • The safety profile of subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy in children with
           asthma in Hangzhou, East China
    • Authors: J.-L. Liu; W.-X. Ning; S.-X. Li; Y.-C. Xu; L. Wu; Y.-S. Wang; X.-F. Xu; Y. Jiang; Y.-J. Sheng; Y.-L. Zhou; J.-H. Wang; L.-F. Tang; Z.-M. Chen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J.-L. Liu, W.-X. Ning, S.-X. Li, Y.-C. Xu, L. Wu, Y.-S. Wang, X.-F. Xu, Y. Jiang, Y.-J. Sheng, Y.-L. Zhou, J.-H. Wang, L.-F. Tang, Z.-M. Chen
      Background The aim of the current study is to evaluate the prevalence, severity and possible risk factors of systemic reactions (SRs) to subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) in children and adolescents with asthma in Hangzhou, east China's Zhejiang province. Methods From January 2011 to December 2016, this survey analysed the SCIT-related SRs involving 429 patients (265 children and 134 adolescents) affected by allergic asthma. Recorded data included demographics, diagnosis, patient statuses, pulmonary function testing results before and after each injection, allergen dosage, and details of SRs. Results All patients finished the initial phase and six patients withdrew during the maintenance phase. There were 2.59% (328/12,655) SRs in all injections (3.28% in children and 1.47% in adolescents); 15.62% (67/429) patients experienced SRs (18.49% children and 10.98% adolescents). There were 54.57% SRs of grade 1; 42.37% SRs of grade 2; 3.05% SRs of grade 3; and no grades 4 or grade 5 SRs occurred in patients. Most reactions were mild, and were readily controlled by immediate emergency treatment. There was no need for hospitalisation. The occurrence of SRs was significantly higher in children than that in adolescents (p <0.01). A higher ratio of SRs was found among patients with moderate asthma. Conclusion This retrospective survey showed that properly-conducted SCIT was a safe treatment for children and adolescents with asthma in Hangzhou, East China. Children and patients with moderate asthma may be prone to develop SRs.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.04.002
       
  • Validation of a Spanish version of the EuroPrevall Food Allergy Quality of
           Life Questionnaire-Parental Form
    • Authors: E. Bartoll; M. Nieto; B. Selva; R. Badillo; G. Pereira; S. Uixera; A. Nieto; Á. Mazón
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E. Bartoll, M. Nieto, B. Selva, R. Badillo, G. Pereira, S. Uixera, A. Nieto, Á. Mazón
      Background Food allergy can have a major impact on quality of life of children and their parents. Questionnaires have been developed to measure the impact of this disorder. We aimed to validate the EuroPrevall questionnaire on Food Allergy-Quality of Life Questionnaire, Parent Form (FAQLQ-PF) and the Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM), translated into Spanish. Methods The internal consistency of the FAQLQ-PF and the FAIM, translated into Spanish (Spain) and completed by the parents of 74 children with IgE-mediated food allergy, were evaluated with Cronbach's alpha. To test construct validity of the FAQLQ-PF, its correlation with the FAIM was also calculated. To assess their discriminant validity, we compared the values of both depending on the number of offending foods and for children with and without anaphylaxis. Results The values of Cronbach's alpha for the three domains in the FAQLQ-PF were over 0.9. The value of alpha for FAIM questions was below 0.6, which was attributed to the wording of one question. When this question was removed, alpha increased to over 0.70. There was a significant correlation between the FAQLQ-PF score and the FAIM. There were significantly poorer FAQLQ-PF scores in children with more food allergies and worse FAIM in those who had had anaphylaxis. Conclusions The Spanish version of the FAQLQ-PF had a good internal consistency, good construct validity and validity to discriminate patients with more food allergies and anaphylaxis. It can be used as a tool to evaluate and monitor the quality of life in families with food allergic children.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.06.004
       
  • Low efficacy of atopy patch test in predicting tolerance development in
           non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy
    • Authors: T.A. Gonzaga; F.A. Alves; M.F.A. Cheik; C.P. de Barros; E.R.M.A. Rezende; G.R.S. Segundo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): T.A. Gonzaga, F.A. Alves, M.F.A. Cheik, C.P. de Barros, E.R.M.A. Rezende, G.R.S. Segundo
      Background The food atopy patch (APT) test has been used in previous studies to help the diagnosis of non-IgE mediated food allergies (FA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different cow's milk APT preparations to predict oral tolerance in children with previous non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA) diagnosis. Methods Thirty-two patients non-IgE-mediated CMA diagnosed by oral food challenge (OFC) were enrolled to perform APT with three different cow's milk preparations (fresh, 2% in saline solution, 2% in petrolatum) and comparing with a new OFC after at least three months of diet exclusion. Results Only six (18.7%) subjects presented positive OFC to cow's milk. No differences in gender, onset symptoms age, OFC age, Z-score, and exclusion period were found between positive and negative OFC patients. Preparations using fresh milk and powdered milk in petrolatum presented sensitivity equal to zero and specificity 92.3% and 96.1%. The preparation using powdered milk in saline solution showed sensitivity and specificity of 33.3% and 96.1%. Two patients presented typical IgE symptoms after OFC. Conclusion Cow's milk APT presented a low efficacy to predict tolerance in patients with previous non-IgE-mediated CMA and should not be used in clinical routine. The presence of typical IgE reactions after OFC hallmark the necessity of previous IgE-mediated investigation for this patient group.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.07.001
       
  • Changing perspectives in atopic dermatitis
    • Authors: E. Serra-Baldrich; J.O. de Frutos; I. Jáuregui; J.C. Armario-Hita; J.F. Silvestre; L. Herraez; A. Martín-Santiago; A. Valero; J. Sastre
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E. Serra-Baldrich, J.O. de Frutos, I. Jáuregui, J.C. Armario-Hita, J.F. Silvestre, L. Herraez, A. Martín-Santiago, A. Valero, J. Sastre
      Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifaceted disease that involves a complex interplay between the skin and the immune system. The course of the disease depends strongly on the genetic background of the patient and on yet poorly-defined environmental factors. Changes in lifestyle could be behind the dramatic rise in the prevalence of AD across continents; including hygienic conditions, food, social habits, skin microbiome or exposure to a number of allergens. Although AD typically develops in childhood and disappears after a few years, in a relatively large number of patients it continues into adulthood. Adult AD can also appear de novo but it is often underdiagnosed and its treatment can be challenging. New, highly effective drugs are being developed to manage moderate and severe forms of the disease in adults. In this review, we highlight the most recent developments in diagnostic tools, current insights into the mechanistic basis of this disease, and therapeutic innovations.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.07.002
       
  • Use of anti-allergic drugs in children
    • Abstract: Publication date: September–October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 5
      Author(s): C. Suárez-Castañón, G. Modroño-Riaño, G. Solís-Sánchez
      Allergic rhinitis is one of the most frequent chronic diseases in children. We have analysed the prescriptions habits of anti-allergic medications in children (<14 years old) in 2011. We calculated the DHD (N°DDD/1000 children/day) for oral antihistamines and intranasal therapies (corticoids and antihistamines) in the region (sanitary districts I–VIII) and specifically in sanitary district V (health centres 1–15). We also reviewed the clinical records in six health centres in sanitary district V to know more details about age and diagnosis and to value if these prescriptions are adequate. We observed a use of 8.78 DHD in the group of oral antihistamines, with a predominance of desloratadine (3.48 DHD), a 3rd generation drug of this group, and in second place the intranasal therapy with a preference of corticoids (budesonide 3.5 DHD and mometasone 2.25 DHD). We think that it is necessary to improve the knowledge of anti-allergic drugs in children.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T08:03:19Z
       
  • Future prospect of faecal microbiota transplantation as a potential
           therapy in asthma
    • Authors: Kang Cai
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): Y. Kang, Y. Cai
      There is convincing evidence from both human and animal studies suggesting that the gut microbiota plays an important role in regulating immune responses associated with the development of asthma. Certain intestinal microbial strains have been demonstrated to suppress or impair immune responsiveness in asthma experimental models, suggesting that specific species among gut commensal microbiota may play either a morbific or phylactic role in the progression of asthma. Evidence to date suggests that the intestinal microbiota represent fertile targets for prevention or management of asthma. The faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a rather straightforward therapy that manipulates the human gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota, by which a healthy donor microbiota is transferred into an existing but disturbed microbial ecosystem. The FMT may therefore represent a therapeutic approach for asthma treatment in the foreseeable future. At present, FMT therapy for asthma is very limited and should be actively studied. Considerable efforts are needed to increase our knowledge in the field of FMT therapy for asthma. In this review, we aimed to provide several insights into the development of FMT therapy for asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-08-18T07:26:46Z
       
  • Sinomenine ameliorates the airway remodelling, apoptosis of airway
           epithelial cells, and Th2 immune response in a murine model of chronic
           asthma
    • Authors: S. Işık; M. Karaman; S.Ç. Micili; Ş. Çağlayan-Sözmen; H.A. Bağrıyanık; Z. Arıkan-Ayyıldız; N. Uzuner; Ö. Karaman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): S. Işık, M. Karaman, S.Ç. Micili, Ş. Çağlayan-Sözmen, H.A. Bağrıyanık, Z. Arıkan-Ayyıldız, N. Uzuner, Ö. Karaman
      Background Sinomenine (SIN), an alkaloid isolated from the root of Sinomenium acutum which has a variety of pharmacological effects, including anti-inflammation, immunosuppression and anti-angiogenesis. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of SIN on airway remodelling, epithelial apoptosis, and T Helper (Th)-2 derived cytokine levels in a murine model of chronic asthma. Methods Twenty-two BALB/c mice were divided into four groups; I (control), II (placebo), III, IV. Mice in groups III and IV received the SIN (100mg/kg), and dexamethasone (1mg/kg) respectively. Epithelium thickness, sub-epithelial smooth muscle thickness, number of mast and goblet cells of samples isolated from the lung were measured. Immunohistochemical scorings of the lung tissue for matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEG-F), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick endlabeling (TUNEL) and cysteine-dependent aspartate-specific proteases (caspase)-3 were determined. IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, Nitric oxide in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E in serum were quantified by standard ELISA protocols. Results The dose of 100mg/kg SIN treatment provided beneficial effects on all of the histopathological findings of airway remodelling compared to placebo (p <0.05). All cytokine levels in BALF and serum and immunohistochemical scores were significantly lower in 100mg/kg SIN treated group compared to the placebo (p <0.05). Conclusions These findings suggested that the dose of 100mg/kg SIN improved all histopathological changes of airway remodelling and its beneficial effects might be related to modulating Th-2 derived cytokines and the inhibition of apoptosis of airway epithelial cells.

      PubDate: 2017-08-08T07:13:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.004
       
  • Tolerance to baked and fermented cow's milk in children with IgE-mediated
           and non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy in patients under two years of age
           
    • Authors: A. Uncuoglu; N. Yologlu; I.E. Simsek; Z.S. Uyan; M. Aydogan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): A. Uncuoglu, N. Yologlu, I.E. Simsek, Z.S. Uyan, M. Aydogan
      Background IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA) has been shown consistent in milder heated-milk tolerant and severe heated-milk reactant groups in patients older than two years. Little is known whether fermentation of milk gives rise to similar clinical phenotypes. We aimed to determine the influence of extensively heated and fermented cow's milk on the IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated CMA in children younger than two years. Methods Subjects followed with the diagnosis of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated CMA for at least six months underwent unheated milk challenge. IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated groups were categorised as unheated milk-reactive and tolerant, separately. Unheated milk-reactive groups were further challenged sequentially with fermented milk (yoghurt) and baked milk, 15 days apart. Allergy evaluation with skin tests, prick-to-prick tests and atopy patch tests were performed. Results Fifty-seven children (median age: 14 months; range: 7–24 months) underwent unheated milk challenge. Eleven of 27 children with IgE-mediated CMA and 14 of 30 children with non-IgE-mediated CMA tolerated unheated milk. Among subjects who reacted to unheated milk; 15 of 16 subjects (93%) with IgE-mediated CMA also reacted to yoghurt, whereas 11 of 16 subjects (68%) with non-IgE-mediated CMA tolerated fermented milk. Thirteen subjects (81%) of the unheated milk-reactive IgE-mediated group tolerated to heated milk. None of 16 subjects of unheated milk-reactive non-IgE-mediated group reacted to baked milk. Conclusion The majority of children under the age of two years with both IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated CMA tolerated baked-milk products. Yoghurt was tolerated in two thirds of unheated milk reactive patients suffering from non-IgE-mediated CMA.

      PubDate: 2017-07-23T06:26:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.008
       
  • Effects of icariin on asthma mouse model are associated with regulation of
           prostaglandin D2 level
    • Authors: J. Qiao; S. Sun; L. Yuan; J. Wang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J. Qiao, S. Sun, L. Yuan, J. Wang
      Background We aimed to observe the effect of icariin on an asthma mouse model and explore the potential underlying mechanisms. Methods The asthma mouse model was established by ovalbumin (OVA) sensitisation and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and then treated with icariin. Airway resistance was assessed by whole body plethysmograph. In addition, pathological slides were stained with haematoxylin–eosin, and the peribronchial inflammation was observed microscopically. The concentration of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was detected by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The relative level of prostaglandin D2 receptor 2 (CRTH2) mRNA was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Results Compared with the icariin-untreated group, there was a significant reduction of Penh in the treated group. Total leucocyte amount and all sorts of leukocytes were lower in the treated group than in the untreated group. HE staining results revealed that a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated into the peribronchial tissues of untreated group, and the degree of airway inflammation decreased significantly in the treated group. PGD2 in serum and BALF, as well as CRTH2 mRNA level in lung tissues were lower in the treated group than in the untreated group. Conclusion Icariin is a promising therapeutic strategy for asthma, and PGD2 might be a new target for asthma therapy in OVA-induced and RSV-infected asthma model.

      PubDate: 2017-07-13T05:27:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.007
       
  • Biomarkers of airway and systemic inflammation in obese asthmatic
           paediatric patients
    • Authors: H.T. Nacaroglu; O.B. Gayret; M. Erol; O. Buke; O. Zengi; M. Tasdemir; Z. Tasdemir; O. Yigit
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): H.T. Nacaroglu, O.B. Gayret, M. Erol, O. Buke, O. Zengi, M. Tasdemir, Z. Tasdemir, O. Yigit
      Background It is thought that airway inflammation is more common in obese asthmatic patients because inflammation is harder to control and does not respond well to glucocorticoid treatment. Objective This study's aim was to investigate the effect of obesity on airway and systemic inflammation in children with asthma and to identify the biomarkers that play a role in this inflammation. Methods The study included patients aged 6–16 years who were diagnosed with asthma in the paediatric allergy outpatient clinic of Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital in Turkey. Complete blood count parameters were compared between three groups: obese asthmatic (n =43), obese non-asthmatic (n =45), and non-obese non-asthmatic (control group, n =30). Levels of high-sensitive CRP (hs-CRP), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), osteopontin (OPN), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and 25(OH)-vitamin D were compared between the groups. Results No statistically significant differences were observed in 25(OH)-vitamin D, NGAL, OPN, hs-CRP, and MMP-9 levels between groups. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between FEV1/FVC and NGAL and MMP-9. Conclusion This is the first study to investigate levels of hs-CRP, NGAL, OPN, MMP-9, and 25(OH)-vitamin D in obese asthmatic children. Larger studies with sputum and BAL examinations are required to determine the potential of biomarkers for identifying inflammation in obese asthmatic children.

      PubDate: 2017-07-13T05:27:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.013
       
  • Oral immunisation with Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide
           adjuvant with recombinant Lactococcus lactis-expressing Proteus mirabilis
           ompA confers optimal protection in mice
    • Authors: J. Zhou; K. Wei; C. Wang; W. Dong; N. Ma; L. Zhu; L.P. Hu; H. Huang; R. Zhu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 June 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J. Zhou, K. Wei, C. Wang, W. Dong, N. Ma, L. Zhu, L.P. Hu, H. Huang, R. Zhu
      Background Proteus mirabilis poses a critical burden on the breeding industry, but no efficient vaccine is available for animals. Method A recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing the ompA of P. mirabilis was used to develop a vaccine. The mucosal and systemic immune responses of the recombinant vaccine were evaluated in mice after oral immunisation. The inhibition on P. mirabilis colonisation of vaccines was also determined. Moreover, Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS) were used as adjuvants to examine the immunomodulatory effects. Results The pure recombinant L. lactis vaccine significantly induced the production of specific IgA and IgG, IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ, and T lymphocyte proliferation, and the immunised mice exhibited significant resistance to P. mirabilis colonisation. Notably, the TPPPS adjuvant vaccines induced higher levels of immune responses than the pure L. lactis. Conclusions The L. lactis as a vaccine vehicle combined with TPPPS adjuvant provides a feasible method for preventing P. mirabilis infection.

      PubDate: 2017-07-13T05:27:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.04.005
       
  • Plasticity of immune system vs. memory therapy IST
    • Authors: A. Tammaro; I. Romano; F. Persechino; F.R. Parisella; I. Trimarchi; S. Persechino
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 May 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): A. Tammaro, I. Romano, F. Persechino, F.R. Parisella, I. Trimarchi, S. Persechino
      Background Pharmacotherapy and immunotherapy are the main treatments for allergic diseases to inhalants. Objective This study investigates whether to repeat short cycles of immunotherapy after 3 or 5 years the from interruption of the first therapeutic cycle, lasting 3–4 years, to maintain immune memory in individuals subjected to IST. Methods and Results We have compared two groups, one of 452 patients who, after the first treatment for 3–4 years of IST, performed a cycle of four months after three and 10 years from the suspension, and a second group of 126 individuals who have performed only the IST treatment for 3–4 years. The best results were obtained in the first group. Conclusions These results are due to the immune system's plasticity, a very important concept in clinical practice.

      PubDate: 2017-07-13T05:27:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.007
       
 
 
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