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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3177 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3177 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 86, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 385, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 384, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 336, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 435, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 197, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 170, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover Allergologia et Immunopathologia
  [SJR: 0.46]   [H-I: 29]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0301-0546
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3177 journals]
  • Wheezing in infants: A pandemic condition that need to be treated with
           patience
    • Authors: L. Garcia-Marcos
      First page: 209
      Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 3
      Author(s): L. Garcia-Marcos


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2018.03.001
       
  • Low efficacy of atopy patch test in predicting tolerance development in
           non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy
    • Authors: T.A. Gonzaga; F.A. Alves; M.F.A. Cheik; C.P. de Barros; E.R.M.A. Rezende; G.R.S. Segundo
      Pages: 241 - 246
      Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 3
      Author(s): T.A. Gonzaga, F.A. Alves, M.F.A. Cheik, C.P. de Barros, E.R.M.A. Rezende, G.R.S. Segundo
      Background The food atopy patch (APT) test has been used in previous studies to help the diagnosis of non-IgE mediated food allergies (FA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different cow's milk APT preparations to predict oral tolerance in children with previous non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA) diagnosis. Methods Thirty-two patients non-IgE-mediated CMA diagnosed by oral food challenge (OFC) were enrolled to perform APT with three different cow's milk preparations (fresh, 2% in saline solution, 2% in petrolatum) and comparing with a new OFC after at least three months of diet exclusion. Results Only six (18.7%) subjects presented positive OFC to cow's milk. No differences in gender, onset symptoms age, OFC age, Z-score, and exclusion period were found between positive and negative OFC patients. Preparations using fresh milk and powdered milk in petrolatum presented sensitivity equal to zero and specificity 92.3% and 96.1%. The preparation using powdered milk in saline solution showed sensitivity and specificity of 33.3% and 96.1%. Two patients presented typical IgE symptoms after OFC. Conclusion Cow's milk APT presented a low efficacy to predict tolerance in patients with previous non-IgE-mediated CMA and should not be used in clinical routine. The presence of typical IgE reactions after OFC hallmark the necessity of previous IgE-mediated investigation for this patient group.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.07.001
       
  • Component-resolved diagnosis in hymenoptera allergy
    • Authors: D. Antolín-Amérigo; B. Ruiz-León; E. Boni; T. Alfaya-Arias; M. Álvarez-Mon; J. Barbarroja-Escudero; D. González-de-Olano; C. Moreno-Aguilar; M. Rodríguez-Rodríguez; M.J. Sánchez-González; L. Sánchez-Morillas; A. Vega-Castro
      Pages: 253 - 262
      Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 3
      Author(s): D. Antolín-Amérigo, B. Ruiz-León, E. Boni, T. Alfaya-Arias, M. Álvarez-Mon, J. Barbarroja-Escudero, D. González-de-Olano, C. Moreno-Aguilar, M. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, M.J. Sánchez-González, L. Sánchez-Morillas, A. Vega-Castro
      Component-resolved diagnosis based on the use of well-defined, properly characterised and purified natural and recombinant allergens constitutes a new approach in the diagnosis of venom allergy. Prospective readers may benefit from an up-to-date review on the allergens. The best characterised venom is that of Apis mellifera, whose main allergens are phospholipase A2 (Api m1), hyaluronidase (Api m2) and melittin (Api m4). Additionally, in recent years, new allergens of Vespula vulgaris have been identified and include phospholipase A1 (Ves v1), hyaluronidase (Ves v2) and antigen 5 (Ves v5). Polistes species are becoming an increasing cause of allergy in Europe, although only few allergens have been identified in this venom. In this review, we evaluate the current knowledge about molecular diagnosis in hymenoptera venom allergy.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.003
       
  • MHC class II deficiency: Report of a novel mutation and special review
    • Authors: S. Farrokhi; M. Shabani; Z. Aryan; S. Zoghi; A. Krolo; K. Boztug; N. Rezaei
      Pages: 263 - 275
      Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 3
      Author(s): S. Farrokhi, M. Shabani, Z. Aryan, S. Zoghi, A. Krolo, K. Boztug, N. Rezaei
      The MHC II deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency syndrome with increased susceptibility to respiratory and gastrointestinal infections, failure to thrive and early mortality. This syndrome is caused by mutations in transcription regulators of the MHC II gene and results in development of blind lymphocytes due to the lack of indicatory MHC II molecules. Despite homogeneity of clinical manifestations of patients with MHC II deficiency, the genetic defects underlying this disease are heterogeneous. Herein, we report an Iranian patient with MHC II deficiency harbouring a novel mutation in RFXANK and novel misleading clinical features. He had ataxic gait and dysarthria from 30 months of age. Epidemiology, clinical and immunological features, therapeutic options and prognosis of patients with MHC II are reviewed in this paper.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.04.006
       
  • Sublingual immunotherapy in children
    • Authors: M. Tortajada-Girbés; C. Rivas-Juesas
      Pages: 105 - 106
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): M. Tortajada-Girbés, C. Rivas-Juesas


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2018.01.001
       
  • Efficacy and safety of sublingual immunotherapy with Dermatophagoides
           farinae drops in pre-school and school-age children with allergic rhinitis
           
    • Authors: L.-X. Tang; X.-J. Yang; P.-P. Wang; W.-T. Ge; J. Zhang; Y.-L. Guo; J. Lu; J. Tai; Y.-M. Zhang; X. Ni
      Pages: 107 - 111
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): L.-X. Tang, X.-J. Yang, P.-P. Wang, W.-T. Ge, J. Zhang, Y.-L. Guo, J. Lu, J. Tai, Y.-M. Zhang, X. Ni
      Background The safety and efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) have been confirmed by many studies. However, in China, the research on efficacy and safety in young and older children with allergic rhinitis (AR) is still rare. Objective The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SLIT with Dermatophagoides farinae drops in pre-school and school-age children with AR. Methods A total of 282 subjects aged 2–13 years with AR received a two-year course of sublingual immunotherapy along with pharmacotherapy. According to the age, patients were defined as the pre-school group (2–6 years old, n =116) and school-age group (7–13 years old, n =166). Total nasal rhinitis symptom scores (TNSS), visual analogue score (VAS) and total medication scores (TMS) were evaluated at four time points: baseline, after SLIT for half a year, one year and two years. The adverse events (AEs) were evaluated at each visit. Results After two-year SLIT, the four rhinitis symptom scores, TNSS, VAS and TMS scores were significantly lower than baseline (all P <0.05). The comparison of efficacy between one and two-year duration showed no significant difference in global clinical outcomes (all P >0.05). In addition, there were no significant differences between the pre-school and school-age group in TNSS (all P >0.05), VAS (all P >0.05) and TMS scores (P >0.05) after SLIT for half a year, one year and two years. No severe systemic AEs were reported. Conclusion SLIT with D. farinae drops is clinically effective and safe in pre-school and school-age patients with house dust mites (HDMs)-induced AR.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.022
       
  • Incidence of asthma in young adults from Castellon, Spain: A prospective
           cohort study
    • Authors: L. Segura-Navas; A. Arnedo-Pena; R. Tosca-Segura; M.A. Romeu-García; N. Meseguer-Ferrer; E. Silvestre-Silvestre; F. Conde; S. Fernández-González; M. Dubon; M. Ortuño-Forcada; J. Fabregat-Puerto; C. Fenollosa-Amposta; M.R. Pac-Sa; L. Museros-Recatala; A. Vizcaino-Batllés; J.B. Bellido-Blasco
      Pages: 112 - 118
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): L. Segura-Navas, A. Arnedo-Pena, R. Tosca-Segura, M.A. Romeu-García, N. Meseguer-Ferrer, E. Silvestre-Silvestre, F. Conde, S. Fernández-González, M. Dubon, M. Ortuño-Forcada, J. Fabregat-Puerto, C. Fenollosa-Amposta, M.R. Pac-Sa, L. Museros-Recatala, A. Vizcaino-Batllés, J.B. Bellido-Blasco
      Background The objective was to estimate the incidence of asthma in young adults from 13–15 years old to 23–25 years old, and associated factors. Methods In 2012, a population-based prospective cohort study was carried out in Castellon from the cohort who had participated in the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood in 1994 and 2002. A telephone survey was undertaken using the same questionnaires. A new case of asthma was defined as a participant free of the disease in 2002 who suffered asthma, was diagnosed with asthma, or took medications against asthma based on self-report from 2002 to 2012. Results The mean age of participants was 24.9±0.6 with a follow-up of 79.1%. Asthma cumulative incidence was 3.4%: 44 new cases occurred among 1280 participants. The incidence was higher in females than males with relative risk (RR)=2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–3.8). A significant decrease of asthma incidence density was observed (8.2 cases to 3.5 cases per 1000 person/year). Factors associated with the incidence of asthma were allergic rhinitis (RR=4.05; 95% CI 1.7–9.6), bronchitis (RR=2.13; 95% CI 1.0–4.5), mother's age at time of birth (RR=0.87; 95% CI 0.8–0.9) and a pet other than a dog or cat (RR=0.42; 95% CI 0.2–0.9). For gender, some variations in the risk factors were observed. Conclusions A significant decrease in the incidence of asthma was observed. Several risk and protective factors were found.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.03.003
       
  • Autoimmunity and its association with regulatory T cells and B cell
           subsets in patients with common variable immunodeficiency
    • Authors: G. Azizi; H. Abolhassani; F. Kiaee; N. Tavakolinia; H. Rafiemanesh; R. Yazdani; SA. Mahdaviani; S. Mohammadikhajehdehi; M. Tavakol; V. Ziaee; B. Negahdari; J. Mohammadi; A. Mirshafiey; A. Aghamohammadi
      Pages: 127 - 135
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): G. Azizi, H. Abolhassani, F. Kiaee, N. Tavakolinia, H. Rafiemanesh, R. Yazdani, SA. Mahdaviani, S. Mohammadikhajehdehi, M. Tavakol, V. Ziaee, B. Negahdari, J. Mohammadi, A. Mirshafiey, A. Aghamohammadi
      Background Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is one of the most prevalent symptomatic primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs), which manifests a wide clinical variability such as autoimmunity, as well as T cell and B cell abnormalities. Methods A total of 72 patients with CVID were enrolled in this study. Patients were evaluated for clinical manifestations and classified according to the presence or absence of autoimmune disease. We measured regulatory T cells (Tregs) and B-cell subsets using flow cytometry, as well as specific antibody response (SAR) to pneumococcal vaccine, autoantibodies and anti-IgA in patients. Results Twenty-nine patients (40.3%) have shown at least one autoimmune manifestation. Autoimmune cytopenias and autoimmune gastrointestinal diseases were the most common. A significant association was detected between autoimmunity and presence of hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. Among CVID patients, 38.5% and 79.3% presented a defect in Tregs and switched memory B-cells, respectively, whereas 69.0% presented CD21low B cell expansion. Among patients with a defect in Treg, switched memory and CD21low B cell, the frequency of autoimmunity was 80.0%, 52.2% and 55.0%, respectively. A negative correlation was observed between the frequency of Tregs and CD21low B cell population. 82.2% of patients had a defective SAR which was associated with the lack of autoantibodies. Conclusions Autoimmunity may be the first clinical manifestation of CVID, thus routine screening of immunoglobulins is suggested for patients with autoimmunity. Lack of SAR in CVID is associated with the lack of specific autoantibodies in patients with autoimmunity. It is suggested that physicians use alternative diagnostic procedures.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.04.004
       
  • Air pollution and its relationship to lung function among adolescents from
           Taubate, São Paulo, Brazil
    • Authors: M. Froio Toledo; B. Mangueira Saraiva-Romanholo; R. Carvalho Oliveira; L. Ferraz da Silva; D. Solé
      Pages: 160 - 166
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): M. Froio Toledo, B. Mangueira Saraiva-Romanholo, R. Carvalho Oliveira, L. Ferraz da Silva, D. Solé
      Background This paper sought to evaluate individual exposure to air pollution by quantifying the carbon in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and its relationship to lung function. We also examined the proximity of participants’ residences to the Presidente Dutra highway (PDH) in adolescents with asthma from Taubaté, São Paulo, Brazil. Methods This descriptive study examined fifty 13- to 14-year-old adolescents with asthma identified by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) in Taubaté. These adolescents underwent spirometry and sputum induction via the inhalation of 3% hypertonic saline (HSS). Sputum was collected after each nebulisation, and forced expiratory flow in one second (FEV1) was measured. The collected sputum was stored and transported to the laboratory; it was then processed and analysed for ultrafine particles (≤100nm). This analysis was correlated with the residence location and FEV1 of each adolescent. Results A total of 39 adolescents completed the study. The comparison of the carbon fraction within macrophages (CA/MA) showed no differences according to residence in relation to the PDH (p =0.758). After adjustment, a mixed linear model with FEV1 as the dependent variable and CA/MA, location, and evaluation condition as the predictors found that the interactions among the variables were not significant. Conclusions The amount of carbon present within the AMs of adolescents with asthma was not correlated with either lung function or residence location. Evaluations of the topography and local climatic conditions in Taubaté should be considered in future studies.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.04.007
       
  • Immunomodulation of allergic response in children and adolescents: What we
           can learn from lymphatic filarial infection
    • Authors: A.M. Aguiar-Santos; S. Montenegro; Z. Medeiros; A. Rocha; C.N.L. Morais; A.R. Silva; C. Bonfim; T.R. Costa; E.S.C. Sarinho
      Pages: 167 - 174
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): A.M. Aguiar-Santos, S. Montenegro, Z. Medeiros, A. Rocha, C.N.L. Morais, A.R. Silva, C. Bonfim, T.R. Costa, E.S.C. Sarinho
      Background Although it is well known that allergic diseases involve a strong Th2 immune response, with production of high levels of specific IgE allergen, knowledge on the association between filarial infection and allergies, among paediatric patients is scarce. Objective To evaluate the allergic response patterns in cases of filarial infection by comparing peripheral eosinophils, total IgE levels, immediate hypersensitivity and cytokine levels in children and adolescents in Brazil. Methods This was an exploratory study with three groups: (I) with filarial infection and without allergic diseases; (II) without filarial infection and with allergic diseases; and (III) without filarial infection and without allergic diseases. The prick test and specific IgE tests for aeroallergens were performed using five antigens. Peripheral eosinophils and total IgE were also evaluated. IL-4 and IL-5 were determined using whole-blood culture stimulated by three antigens. Results Eosinophilia and elevated levels of total IgE (≥400IU/dl) were observed in all groups. The prick test was positive in 56.6% of the cases. Group I presented hypersensitive responses similar to the allergic disease groups. In the whole-blood culture stimulated by Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, average IL-4 production did not differ significantly among the groups, but IL5 production resulting from stimulation was greater in the allergic disease groups (p <0.05). Conclusions The allergic response pattern in group with filarial infection was similar to that of the groups with and without allergic diseases, but the response to IL-5 in the culture stimulated by D. pteronyssinus was an exclusive characteristic of the allergic group.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.023
       
  • Is eosinophilic esophagitis an equivalent of pollen allergic asthma'
           Analysis of biopsies and therapy guided by component resolved diagnosis
    • Authors: A. Armentia; S. Martín-Armentia; B. Martín-Armentia; J. Santos-Fernández; R. Álvarez; B. Madrigal; D. Fernández-González; S. Gayoso; M.J. Gayoso
      Pages: 181 - 189
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): A. Armentia, S. Martín-Armentia, B. Martín-Armentia, J. Santos-Fernández, R. Álvarez, B. Madrigal, D. Fernández-González, S. Gayoso, M.J. Gayoso
      Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by esophageal dysfunction and, histologically, by eosinophilic inflammation. There is not a clear etiologic treatment. Biopsies analysis using plant histology methods may show callose and pollen tubes in the esophageal mucosa. Component-resolved diagnosis (CRD) with microarrays could detect possible allergens involved and indicate an elimination diet and allergen immunotherapy (AIT). Methods One hundred and twenty-nine patients with EoE were tested for environmental and food allergens. CRD, histological and botanical analysis were performed. Clinical scores and endoscopic biopsy were performed every six months for three years. Fifty healthy patients, 50 asthmatics due to pollen, and 53 celiac disease patients were included as comparison groups. CRD-directed AIT was administered in 91 EoE patients and elimination diet in 140 patients (87 EoE and all 53 CD patients). Results CRD detected allergen hypersensitivity in 87.6% of patients with EoE. The predominant allergens were grass group 1 (55%), lipid transfer proteins (LTP) of peach and mugwort, hazelnuts and walnuts. Callose from pollen tubes was found in 65.6% of biopsies. After CRD-guided elimination diet and/or AIT, 101 (78.3%) EoE patients showed significant clinical improvement (p <0.017) and 97 (75.2%) were discharged (negative biopsy, no symptoms, no medication) without relapse. AIT-treated patients had better outcomes (odds ratio 177.3, 95% CI 16.2–1939.0). Conclusion CRD-directed AIT and/or elimination diet was efficient in treating EoE patients and was well tolerated.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.11.001
       
  • Asthma predictive index in relation to respiratory mechanics by impulse
           oscillometry in recurrent wheezers
    • Authors: T. Arikoglu; S.B. Batmaz; D.D. Yildirim; Ö. Tezol; G. Bozlu; S. Kuyucu
      Pages: 190 - 195
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): T. Arikoglu, S.B. Batmaz, D.D. Yildirim, Ö. Tezol, G. Bozlu, S. Kuyucu
      Background The identification of children who will have persistent asthma has become a focus of recent research. The aim of this study was to assess whether impulse oscillometry (IOS) has a diagnostic value to predict modified API (asthma predictive index) in pre-schoolers with recurrent wheezing. Methods Pre-school children aged 3–6 years with recurrent wheezing were enrolled. The study population was divided into two groups based on mAPI criteria. Lung function was assessed by IOS. Results 115 children were assessed; 75 (65.2%) of them were male. The median age was 39 months (min: 36, max: 68 months). 64 (55.6%) of the children were mAPI positive. The R5-R20% levels of children with positive mAPI were significantly higher compared to negative mAPI. Also, R5-R20% levels of children with parental asthma and R20% pred and resonant frequency (Fres) levels of children with inhalant sensitization were higher than those without. No significant differences were found in IOS indices between groups based on the presence of atopic dermatitis, food sensitization, eosinophilia, inhaled corticosteroid usage or wheezing without colds. R5-R20% and total IgE values were found to be significantly related to positive mAPI (aOR: 1.40, p =0.022 and aOR: 1.02, p =0.001, respectively). In the ROC analysis, R5-R20% levels >14.4 had a sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 53% for predicting a positive mAPI (p =0.003). Conclusion IOS may help clinicians to identify the pre-school wheezers with a high risk of asthma.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.028
       
  • Effect of inhaled medication on dental caries index in asthmatic children
    • Authors: Z. Bahrololoomi; M.H. Bemanian; R. Ghaffourifard; B. Ahmadi
      Pages: 196 - 200
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): Z. Bahrololoomi, M.H. Bemanian, R. Ghaffourifard, B. Ahmadi
      Introduction Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of airways with a high prevalence among children in pre-school ages. Considering controversial results in different studies about the effect of this disease on the indices of dental caries, the aim of this study was to compare dmft (decay, missing, filling teeth) situation in asthmatic and non-asthmatic 6–12-year-old children. Methods This was a case-control study on 46 asthmatic and 47 non-asthmatic children aged 6–12 years. In asthmatic children, the severity of disease, type and dose of the administered inhalational drug, duration of drug consumption, times and technique of drug administration, and washing the mouth after drug consumption was assessed. The index of primary teeth decay or dmft, dental plaque and gingival inflammation were recorded in both groups. Data were analysed by SPSS (ver. 22) using Student's T-test, chi-square test and linear regression. Findings dmft in case and control groups was 5.25±2.25 and 4.15±3.27, respectively and the difference was not statistically significant (P =0.062). None of the variables related to asthma affected dmft (P >0.05). Conclusion Suffering from asthma does not affect the risk of decay in primary teeth.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.019
       
  • The role of regulatory RNAs (miRNAs) in asthma
    • Authors: O.A. Svitich; V.V. Sobolev; L.V. Gankovskaya; P.V. Zhigalkina; V.V. Zverev
      Pages: 201 - 205
      Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2
      Author(s): O.A. Svitich, V.V. Sobolev, L.V. Gankovskaya, P.V. Zhigalkina, V.V. Zverev
      Introduction Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to the investigation of regulatory functions of microRNA. Currently, many different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of asthma are known, but the whole picture of pathogenesis has not yet been studied. Conclusions MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of many cellular processes. Undoubtedly, these regulatory molecules are involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, and therefore can be potential targets for treatment.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.015
       
  • Future prospect of faecal microbiota transplantation as a potential
           therapy in asthma
    • Authors: Kang Cai
      Abstract: Publication date: May–June 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 3
      Author(s): Y. Kang, Y. Cai
      There is convincing evidence from both human and animal studies suggesting that the gut microbiota plays an important role in regulating immune responses associated with the development of asthma. Certain intestinal microbial strains have been demonstrated to suppress or impair immune responsiveness in asthma experimental models, suggesting that specific species among gut commensal microbiota may play either a morbific or phylactic role in the progression of asthma. Evidence to date suggests that the intestinal microbiota represent fertile targets for prevention or management of asthma. The faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a rather straightforward therapy that manipulates the human gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota, by which a healthy donor microbiota is transferred into an existing but disturbed microbial ecosystem. The FMT may therefore represent a therapeutic approach for asthma treatment in the foreseeable future. At present, FMT therapy for asthma is very limited and should be actively studied. Considerable efforts are needed to increase our knowledge in the field of FMT therapy for asthma. In this review, we aimed to provide several insights into the development of FMT therapy for asthma.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
       
  • An international comparison of risk factors between two regions with
           distinct differences in asthma prevalence
    • Authors: K. Madani; E. Vlaski; D.C. Rennie; M. Sears; J.A. Lawson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 March 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): K. Madani, E. Vlaski, D.C. Rennie, M. Sears, J.A. Lawson
      Background and purpose Investigation of the geographic variation in asthma prevalence can improve our understanding of asthma etiology and management. The purpose of our investigation was to compare the prevalence of asthma and wheeze among adolescents living in two distinct international regions and to investigate reasons for observed differences. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 13–14 year olds was completed in Saskatoon, Canada (n =1200) and Skopje, Republic of Macedonia (n =3026), as part of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase 3 study. Surveys were self-completed by students following the ISAAC protocol. Multiple logistic regression models were used to investigate associations with reports of asthma and current wheeze. A mediation analysis was then completed. Results Asthma prevalence was much higher in Saskatoon than Skopje (21.3% vs. 1.7%) as was the prevalence of current wheeze (28.2% vs. 8.8%). Higher paracetamol (acetaminophen) use was a consistent risk factor for asthma and wheeze in both locations and showed dose-response relationships. In both countries, paracetamol use and physical activity mediated some of the association for both asthma and wheeze. In Saskatoon, among those with current wheeze, 42.6% reported ever having a diagnosis of asthma compared to 10.2% among Skopje adolescents. Conclusions The results suggest that the variation in risk factors between the two locations may explain some of the differences in the prevalence of asthma and wheeze between these two study sites. However, diagnostic labeling patterns should not be ruled out as another potential explanatory factor.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2018.01.002
       
  • Assessment of IL-31 levels and disease severity in children with atopic
           dermatitis
    • Authors: D. Ozceker; M. Bulut; A. Celik Ozbay; F. Dilek; M. Koser; Z. Tamay; N. Guler
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): D. Ozceker, M. Bulut, A. Celik Ozbay, F. Dilek, M. Koser, Z. Tamay, N. Guler
      Introduction and objectives Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing, highly pruritic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by typical localization with increasing prevalence of 10–20% in children. Pruritus is one of the major diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis and also the main complaint altering quality-of-life of affected patients, inducing and aggravating inflammation. Although pruritus is the absolute symptom of AD, the etiology has not been fully explained yet and current antihistamine therapies are ineffective. The aim of the study was to assess the correlation between IL-31 level and disease severity in patients with atopic dermatitis through Severity SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index and the degree of itching assessed subjectively. Material and methods One hundred thirty-five children were enrolled in the study in total, 70 children with diagnosis of atopic dermatitis and 65 healthy children in control group. Data on demographic features (age, gender, family history of atopy) and laboratory values of serum eosinophil, total IgE, IgM, IgA, IgG levels and skin prick test results were collected through patient files. The disease severity was assessed by SCORAD index. IL-31 levels were measured with human IL-31 ELISA kit. Results The statistical analysis showed that IL-31 level was significantly higher in AD patients than in the control group (AD vs CG, p 0.0001). There was no significant difference in IL-31 levels between the three subgroups divided according to the SCORAD severity score (p:0.27). Conclusion IL-31 levels were significantly higher in AD patients compared to control group but irrelevant to the disease severity.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.10.005
       
  • Is vitamin D level associated with the natural course of atopic
           dermatitis'
    • Authors: Dogru
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M. Dogru
      Introduction and objectives Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. Apart from its well-known role on calcium metabolism, vitamin D is reported to affect skin functions. The study aims were to: compare the vitamin D levels of children with AD and healthy children; investigate the relationship between the severity of AD and vitamin D levels; and investigate the effect of vitamin D on the natural course of AD. Patients or materials and methods Sixty-nine patients with AD were enrolled. Seventy healthy children were assigned as control group. Clinical and demographic features of groups were recorded. The skin prick test, eosinophil counts, immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels and serum 25 OH cholecalciferol (25OHD3) levels were measured. After at least 4 years of follow-up, patients were re-evaluated for natural course of AD. Results Mean 25OHD3 level was lower in patient group vs. control group; 19.86±6.7ng/mL (min–max: 6.8–40) vs. 24.07±9.08ng/mL, respectively, (p =0.002). Mean 25OHD3 levels, and vitamin D status were significantly different between AD severity groups. (p <0.05). In terms of vitamin D status in the pairwise comparison, vitamin D deficiency was greater in children with severe and moderate AD groups (respectively, p =0.005, p =0.018). In Tukey's post hoc analysis for 25OHD3 level, the 25OHD3 levels of severe AD are significantly lower than mild or moderate AD (respectively, p =0.001, p =0.026). There was a negative correlation between 25OHD3 levels and severity of AD (r =−0.480; p =0.001). In patients reassessed after 4 years: age, the age of AD onset, vitamin D deficiency, SCORAD level and severe AD were higher in the persistent group vs. remission group, 25OHD3 levels were higher in the remission group vs. persistent group (p <0.05). Conclusions Mean vitamin D levels were lower in patients with AD. A negative correlation between vitamin D levels and disease severity was documented. Vitamin D may affect the natural course of atopic dermatitis. There is a need for more comprehensive studies in this regard.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
       
  • Adherence to pharmacotherapy improves school performance in children with
           rhinitis and asthma
    • Authors: Cardona
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 March 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J. Sánchez, A. Sánchez, R. Cardona
      Background Adherence to pharmacotherapy reduces symptoms of asthma and rhinitis, however, little is known of its impact on school performance. Objective To evaluate the impact of pharmacotherapy in absenteeism and school performance in a child population. Methods A cross-sectional study, carried out in eight schools. All participants and their parents were given a questionnaire assessing parameters related to respiratory diseases and pharmacotherapy. Data on school performance was obtained from the academic history of each child who participated in the study. Adherence to pharmacotherapy was classified as a correct use of therapy for more than five days per week. Results 1109 children agreed to participate. Students were divided into two groups: symptomatic (36%) and asymptomatic (63%). The symptomatic group had a higher frequency of school absenteeism (1 vs. 3.1days/year/patient p <0.01) and lower academic performance (failed: 20% vs. 33% p <0.01). After dividing the symptomatic group between adherents and non-adherents to the pharmacotherapy, the group of adherents had a similar school performance to the asymptomatic group and it was significantly different from the no-adherent group. Conclusion Respiratory symptoms are associated with poor school performance and with an increase in school absenteeism, but adherence to pharmacotherapy can reduce these negative impacts in children.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
       
  • Acknowledgment to reviewers
    • Abstract: Publication date: March–April 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
       
  • Parental confusion may result when primary health care professionals show
           heterogeneity in their knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions regarding
           infant nutrition, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis
    • Authors: J.M.S. Yrjänä; R. Bloigu; P. Kulmala
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J.M.S. Yrjänä, R. Bloigu, P. Kulmala
      Introduction and objectives Whether the guidelines on infant nutrition, food allergy and atopic dermatitis confer real health benefits in practice at the population level has not been deeply studied. We aimed here to characterize the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions regarding these issues among primary health care professionals. In addition, we surveyed available parent-reported information sources and the incidence of food-related symptoms, dietary restrictions, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis among one-year-old children in the general population. Materials and methods An online questionnaire was designed for public health nurses and general practitioners. In addition, parents of one-year-old children were recruited to a separate survey at the time of their regular check-up visit. Results Altogether, 80 professionals took part. The median overall knowledge score was 77% and significantly higher among the general practitioners than among the nurses (p = 0.004). However, only 35% of all the professionals recognized either severe airway or cardiovascular symptoms as potential food allergy-related symptoms. Moisturizers and emollients were thought to be adequate treatment for atopic dermatitis by 56%. Among 248 one-year-old children, the incidence of food allergy was 4% and atopic dermatitis 13%. During this period, parents intentionally avoided giving at least one food to 23% of the children, yet more than 80% of these restrictions can be regarded as unnecessary. Conclusion The knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding infant feeding, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis varied significantly among the primary care professionals. This will likely result in heterogeneous guidance practices and confusion among the families at the population level.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.017
       
  • Iberian consensus on cow's milk allergy: The CIBAL Study
    • Authors: E. Alonso-Lebrero; L. Bento; A. Martorell-Aragonés; L. Ribeiro
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E. Alonso-Lebrero, L. Bento, A. Martorell-Aragonés, L. Ribeiro
      Background The present study explores the professional opinion of a wide range of experts from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) and their degree of consensus about CMPA's prevention, diagnosis, treatment and progression. Material and methods A 57-item survey divided in four blocks: Prevention (14 items), Diagnosis (10 items), Treatment (19 items) and Progression (14 items) was completed by 160 panellists, experts in CPMA management (116 Spain, 44 Portugal). Each one answered the questionnaire, formulated in Portuguese and Spanish, by individually accessing an online platform in two consecutive rounds. Five possible answers were possible: “completely agree”, “agree”, “neither agree nor disagree”, “disagree” and “completely disagree”. A modified Delphi method was used. Results Consensus (more than 66% agree) was reached in 39 items (68.4%) and Discrepancy (less than 50% agree) in nine items (15.7%). Block separated analysis offers valuable differences regarding consensus. The Prevention block only reached 50%; the Diagnosis block 90%; the Treatment block 73.68%, showing a high degree of agreement on dietary treatment (15/16 items), and discrepancy or less agreement on immunotherapy treatments. The Progression block reached 71.4% consensus with discrepancy with regard to the time to perform oral food challenge and negatives prognosis consequences of accidental milk ingestion. Conclusions This study displays the current opinions of a wide group of experts on CMPA from the Iberian Peninsula and evidence discussion lines in CMPA management. The questions on which there were situations of discrepancy, provide us with very useful information for promoting new, rigorous research enabling us to draw conclusions on these controversial aspects.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.10.003
       
  • Is food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome only a non IgE-mediated
           food allergy'
    • Authors: S. Miceli Sopo; C. Fantacci; G. Bersani; A. Romano; L. Liotti; S. Monaco
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): S. Miceli Sopo, C. Fantacci, G. Bersani, A. Romano, L. Liotti, S. Monaco
      Food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is classified as non-IgE-mediated or cell-mediated food allergy, although there is an atypical phenotype so defined for the presence of specific IgEs. All diagnostic criteria for FPIES include the absence of skin or respiratory symptoms of IgE-mediated type. We present four cases that suggest that specific IgEs may have a pathogenic role, resulting in the existence of different FPIES phenotypes. This could be important from a diagnostic and therapeutic point of view.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.10.004
       
  • Increase of natural killer cells in children with liver
           transplantation-acquired food allergy
    • Authors: F. Mori; C. Angelucci; A. Cianferoni; S. Barni; G. Indolfi; A. Casini; G. Mangone; M. Materassi; N. Pucci; C. Azzari; E. Novembre
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): F. Mori, C. Angelucci, A. Cianferoni, S. Barni, G. Indolfi, A. Casini, G. Mangone, M. Materassi, N. Pucci, C. Azzari, E. Novembre
      Background Transplantation-acquired food allergies (TAFA) are frequently reported and considered to be caused by immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the allergic and immunologic responses in children who had liver or kidney transplantations. Methods Twelve children receiving liver transplantations and 10 children receiving kidney transplantations were investigated. All children underwent the allergy work-up and in most of them, lymphocyte screening and serum cytokine measurements were also performed. Results TAFA were found in 7/12 (58%) children with liver transplantations and in none of the 10 children with kidney transplantations. The mean age at transplantation was significantly lower in children who underwent liver transplantations (p <0.001). The immunosuppressive therapy administered to children with liver transplantation was tacrolimus in 11 patients and cyclosporine in one patient, while all 10 children with kidney transplantation received tacrolimus plus mycophenolate. The most common antigenic food was egg. The natural killer (NK) cell numbers were significantly higher in liver-transplant children than in kidney-transplant children. No significant differences were found in the serum cytokine levels. Conclusions This study confirms that liver-transplant children treated with tacrolimus alone have a higher risk of developing TAFA than kidney-transplant children treated with tacrolimus plus mycophenolate. NK cells might be involved in this difference.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.030
       
  • Exposure to dogs but not cats is associated to a decrease in the
           prevalence in atopic dermatitis amongst school-children
    • Authors: M. Bedolla-Barajas; J. Morales-Romero; T.I. Bedolla-Pulido; T.R. Bedolla-Pulido; C. Meza-López; N.A. Pulido-Guillén
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M. Bedolla-Barajas, J. Morales-Romero, T.I. Bedolla-Pulido, T.R. Bedolla-Pulido, C. Meza-López, N.A. Pulido-Guillén
      Introduction The association regarding the exposure to pets, especially cats and dogs, and the prevalence of allergic diseases is inconsistent. Objective We analyzed the role played by early exposure to dogs or cats in the prevalence of allergic diseases amongst school-aged children. Method Through a cross-sectional study, we examined 756 children, aged 6–7; these candidates were selected through cluster sampling. We inquired about the exposure that these children had had to dogs and cats, and whether these pets spent most of their time indoors or outdoors during the first year of the child's life. In order to identify the prevalence of allergic diseases and their symptoms, each child's parent completed the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. Results Exposure to outdoor dogs was associated to nocturnal coughing, odds ratio (OR) 0.64, with a confidence interval of 95% (95% CI) 0.43–0.95 and with atopic dermatitis (OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.20–0.76). Interestingly, exposure to outdoor cats was associated to nocturnal coughing (OR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.32–0.83) and current rhinitis symptoms (OR: 0.59; 95% CI 0.36–0.97). After carrying out the multivariate analyses, only exposure to dogs, both indoor and outdoor, was significantly associated to a decrease in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis OR 0.40 (95% CI: 0.20–0.79) and OR 0.38 (95% CI: 0.18–0.83), respectively. Conclusion Our findings suggest that exposure to dogs, whether they be indoor or outdoor pets, is associated to a decreased prevalence in atopic dermatitis.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.032
       
  • Diagnostic criteria for acute food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome.
           Is the work in progress'
    • Authors: S. Miceli Sopo; G. Bersani; C. Fantacci; A. Romano; S. Monaco
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): S. Miceli Sopo, G. Bersani, C. Fantacci, A. Romano, S. Monaco
      Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergic disorder. Some diagnostic criteria have been published for acute FPIES. Of course, they are not all the same, so the clinician must choose which ones to adopt for his/her clinical practice. We present here a brief review of these criteria and, through two clinical cases, show how the choice of one or the other can change the diagnostic destiny of a child with suspect FPIES.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.033
       
  • The roles of toll like receptor 3, 7 and 8 in allergic rhinitis
           pathogenesis
    • Authors: A. Golshiri-Isfahani; M. Amizadeh; M.K. Arababadi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): A. Golshiri-Isfahani, M. Amizadeh, M.K. Arababadi
      Allergic rhinitis, as an allergic and nasal hypersensitivity disease, is associated with the inflammation of nasal mucosa. It appears that innate immune receptors are the important risk factors in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory disease. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the most important receptors of innate immunity; their crucial roles in the recognition of allergens and subsequently pathogenesis of allergic diseases have been evaluated recently. TLR3, 7 and 8 are the intracellular members of the innate immune receptors and recognize intracellular single and double strand RNAs. This review article collected the investigations regarding the roles of TLR3, 7 and 8 in the allergic rhinitis pathogenesis.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.026
       
  • Fluticasone in mild to moderate atopic dermatitis relapse: A randomized
           controlled trial
    • Authors: E. Rubio-Gomis; I. Martinez-Mir; F.J. Morales-Olivas; A. Martorell-Aragones; V. Palop-Larrea; A. Bernalte-Sesé; J.C. Cerda-Mir; P. Polo-Martín; I. Febrer; L. Aranda-Grau; I. Llosa-Cortes; Mª.J. Tejedor-Sanz; J.C. Julia-Benito; T. Alvarez-de-Laviada-Mulero; Mª.V. Planelles-Cantarino; E. Apolinar-Valiente; M. Loriente-Tur; A.M. Abella-Bazataqui; I. Alvarez-Gonzalez; C. Morales-Carpi; Mª.E. Burches-Greus; A.B. Ferrer-Bautista; R. Felix-Toledo; D. Marmaneu-Laguia; V.E. Garcia-Martinez; Mª.A. Beltran-Marques; B. Rodriguez-Gracia
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E. Rubio-Gomis, I. Martinez-Mir, F.J. Morales-Olivas, A. Martorell-Aragones, V. Palop-Larrea, A. Bernalte-Sesé, J.C. Cerda-Mir, P. Polo-Martín, I. Febrer, L. Aranda-Grau, I. Llosa-Cortes, Mª.J. Tejedor-Sanz, J.C. Julia-Benito, T. Alvarez-de-Laviada-Mulero, Mª.V. Planelles-Cantarino, E. Apolinar-Valiente, M. Loriente-Tur, A.M. Abella-Bazataqui, I. Alvarez-Gonzalez, C. Morales-Carpi, Mª.E. Burches-Greus, A.B. Ferrer-Bautista, R. Felix-Toledo, D. Marmaneu-Laguia, V.E. Garcia-Martinez, Mª.A. Beltran-Marques, B. Rodriguez-Gracia
      Background The long-term efficacy of corticosteroids to prevent atopic dermatitis (AD) relapses has partially been addressed in children. This study compared an intermittent dosing regimen of fluticasone propionate (FP) cream 0.05% with its vehicle base in reducing the risk of relapse in children with stabilized AD. Methods A randomized controlled, multicentric, double-blind trial was conducted. Children (2–10 years) with mild/moderate AD (exclusion criteria: >30% affected body surface area and/or head) were enrolled into an Open-label Stabilization Phase (OSP) of up to 2 weeks on twice daily FP. Those who achieved treatment success entered the Double-blind Maintenance Phase (DMP). They were randomly allocated to receive FP or vehicle twice-weekly on consecutive days for 16 weeks. The primary study endpoint was relapse rate; time to relapse and severity of disease were also studied. Kaplan–Meier estimates were calculated. Results Fifty-four patients (29 girls) entered the OSP (23 mild AD) and 49 (26 girls) continued into the DMP. Mean age was 5.5 (SD: 2.8) and 5.1 (SD: 2.3) yrs for FP and vehicle groups, respectively. Four patients withdrew from the DMP (two in every group). Patients treated with FP twice weekly had a 2.7 fold lower risk of experiencing a relapse than patients treated with vehicle (relative risk 2.72, SD: 1.28; p =0.034). FP was also superior to vehicle for delaying time to relapse. Both treatment therapies were well tolerated. Conclusion This long-term study shows that twice weekly FP provides an effective maintenance treatment to control the risk of relapse in children with AD.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.12.001
       
  • Haploidentical stem cell transplantation in a boy with chronic
           granulomatous disease
    • Authors: A. Regueiro-García; S. Fariña-Nogueira; J.Á. Porto-Arceo; J.M. Couselo-Sánchez
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): A. Regueiro-García, S. Fariña-Nogueira, J.Á. Porto-Arceo, J.M. Couselo-Sánchez
      Chronic granulomatous disease is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in any one of the five components of the NADPH oxidase in phagocytic leucocytes. This causes impaired microbial killing, which leads to severe life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Currently, allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative treatment for chronic granulomatous disease, although gene therapy may provide a new therapeutic option for the treatment of patients with CGD. Haploidentical HSCT provides a potentially curative treatment option for patients who lack a suitably HLA-matched donor, but only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a boy with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease treated successfully by haploidentical HSCT with post-transplant cyclophosphamide using a treosulfan-based conditioning regimen.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.020
       
  • Loss of tolerance for fishes previously tolerated in children with fish
           food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome
    • Authors: S. Miceli Sopo; C. Fantacci; G. Bersani; A. Romano; S. Monaco
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): S. Miceli Sopo, C. Fantacci, G. Bersani, A. Romano, S. Monaco
      We describe two case reports presenting some novel information on fish FPIES. Fish FPIES to one fish does not always start at the same time to other fish. Additionally, development of tolerance to the index fish do not necessarily imply tolerance to other reactive fish. This reflects on the best management of children with FPIES fish.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.029
       
  • Development and characterization of an allergoid of cat dander for
           immunotherapy
    • Authors: J.P. Sola; Y. Pedreño; A. Cerezo; M. Peñalver-Mellado
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J.P. Sola, Y. Pedreño, A. Cerezo, M. Peñalver-Mellado
      Background Allergy to cats is a frequent cause of sensitization to indoor allergens and currently there are few alternatives to specific immunotherapy with cat native extracts. The objective is to develop and characterize a new allergoid to increase the tools available for use in clinical practice. Methods The allergoid cat dander extract (ACD) was developed from a native cat dander extract (NCD) by modification with glutaraldehyde, and the optimal process control was determined by SDS-PAGE, DOT BLOT and determination of free amine groups. The ACD was characterized in protein profile by SDS-PAGE, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and peptide footprint. The allergenic profile of ACD was determined by immunoblot, IgE CAP inhibition and IgG competition ELISA. The major allergen content in NCD was obtained by the ELISA sandwich protocol and was extrapolated to ACD. Results The control process determined the optimal development of the allergoid. The ACD obtained contains 182.28μg/mg of protein and 11.90μg/mg of Fel d 1. SDS-PAGE and SEC confirmed the presence of high molecular weight proteins in ACD, and the peptide footprint showed the presence of Fel d 1 and Fel d 7. The high degree of polymerization was evidenced with the determination of the reduction of lysine residues in the allergoid, resulting 91.96%. The ACD showed a significant loss of allergenicity respect to NCD, while the IgG-binding capacity was maintained. Conclusions The ACD obtained presents a good safety profile, so would be a good alternative for treatment of cat allergy.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.12.003
       
  • Small-airway dysfunction precedes the development of asthma in children
           with allergic rhinitis
    • Authors: E. Skylogianni; M. Triga; K. Douros; K. Bolis; K.N. Priftis; S. Fouzas; M.B. Anthracopoulos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 January 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E. Skylogianni, M. Triga, K. Douros, K. Bolis, K.N. Priftis, S. Fouzas, M.B. Anthracopoulos
      Background Epidemiological evidence suggests the existence of a direct link between allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma. Several studies also support the presence of small-airway dysfunction (SAD) in non-asthmatic children with AR. However, it remains unknown whether SAD can predict the progression of AR to asthma. Our objective was to explore the existence of SAD in non-asthmatic children with AR and to assessed its ability to predict the development of asthma. Methods Seventy-three 6-year-old children with intermittent moderate-severe AR but without asthma symptoms/medication within the last two years, underwent spirometry and measurement of respiratory resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs) before and after bronchodilation (BD) (300mcg salbutamol). Lung function measurements were performed in the absence of nasal symptoms and repeated at AR exacerbation. SAD was defined as >30% decrease in Rrs or >50% increase in Xrs at 6 or 8Hz post-BD. Participants were followed for five years. Results Twenty-three children (31.5%) developed asthma; this group presented significant post-BD changes in Rrs and Xrs, but only at AR exacerbation. The ability of these changes to predict the development of asthma was exceptional and superior to that of the spirometric parameters. SAD (22 children, 30.1%), emerged as the single most efficient predictor of asthma, independently of other risk factors such as parental asthma, personal history of eczema and type of allergic sensitisation. Conclusion SAD precedes the development of asthma in children with AR. Changes in respiratory impedance at AR exacerbation may assist in identifying those at risk to progress to asthma.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:43:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.025
       
  • Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the genes encoding IL-10 and TGF-β1 in
           Iranian children with atopic dermatitis
    • Authors: N. Behniafard; A.A. Amirzargar; M. Gharagozlou; F. Delavari; S. Hosseinverdi; S. Sotoudeh; E. Farhadi; M. Mahmoudi; M. Khaledi; Z.G. Moghaddam; A. Aghamohammadi; N. Rezaei
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): N. Behniafard, A.A. Amirzargar, M. Gharagozlou, F. Delavari, S. Hosseinverdi, S. Sotoudeh, E. Farhadi, M. Mahmoudi, M. Khaledi, Z.G. Moghaddam, A. Aghamohammadi, N. Rezaei
      Background Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease in which both genetic and environmental factors interact to determine the susceptibility and severity of the disease. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the association between atopic dermatitis and IL-10 and TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms. Methods The allele and genotype frequencies of genes encoding for IL-10 and TGF-β1 were investigated in 89 patients with atopic dermatitis in comparison with 138 in the control group using the PCR-SSP method. Results A significant increase was found in the frequency of the TGF-β1 codon 10/C allele among patients (p <0.001, OR=6.77), whereas a significant decrease was observed in the frequency of the T allele at the same position (p <0.001, OR=0.14). The frequency of the TGF-β1 codon 25/G allele in the control group was significantly higher than among patients (p <0.001, OR=0.08). A significant positive correlation was seen between CC (p <0.001, OR=15.10) and CG (p <0.001) genotypes and AD at codons 10 and 25, respectively. The most frequent haplotypes among patients was TGF-β1 CG which was significantly higher than in the control subjects (50% in patients vs. 39.9% in controls, p =0.042). A significant increase was found in the frequency of TGF-β CC (36% in patients vs. 7.6% in controls, p <0.001) and TC (14% in patients vs. 0% in controls, p <0.001) haplotypes among patients compared to controls. By contrast, the TGF-β1 TG haplotype was significantly lower in patients than controls (0% in patients vs. 52.5% in controls, p <0.001). There were no significant differences in the frequency of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes of the IL-10 gene. Conclusions We found a strong association between the polymorphisms of the TGF-β1 gene at codon 10 and codon 25 positions and atopic dermatitis.

      PubDate: 2018-01-10T10:01:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.007
       
  • Low dose treatment of mice with bacterial extract (OM-85) for attenuation
           of experimental atopic asthma in mice – Reply
    • Authors: P.M. Pitrez; R.T. Stein
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): P.M. Pitrez, R.T. Stein


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.06.002
       
  • Scabies, crusted (Norwegian) scabies and the diagnosis of mite
           sensitisation
    • Authors: M. Sánchez-Borges; L. González-Aveledo; A. Capriles-Hulett; F. Caballero-Fonseca
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M. Sánchez-Borges, L. González-Aveledo, A. Capriles-Hulett, F. Caballero-Fonseca
      Scabies is observed with relatively high frequency in Allergy and Dermatology clinics in developing countries where poor sanitary conditions are prevalent and increasingly in some areas of the world with increased immigrant populations. Since the immunological response to scabies mites includes the production of IgE class antibodies to Sarcoptes scabiei allergens which cross-react with Dermatophagoides major allergens Der p 1 and Der p 2, positive immediate-type skin tests to house dust mite extracts should be interpreted cautiously. Additionally, scabies should be included routinely in the differential diagnosis of itchy rashes in patients living in those areas.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.006
       
  • iNKT cells are increased in children with severe therapy-resistant asthma
    • Authors: L. Antunes; A.P. Duarte de Souza; P.D. de Araújo; L.A. Pinto; M.H. Jones; R.T. Stein; P.M. Pitrez
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): L. Antunes, A.P. Duarte de Souza, P.D. de Araújo, L.A. Pinto, M.H. Jones, R.T. Stein, P.M. Pitrez
      Background Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells play complex functions in the immune system, releasing both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. The role of iNKT cells in human asthma is still controversial and never described in severe therapy-resistant asthma in children. The objective of this work was to analyse iNKT frequency in peripheral blood of children with severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA), compared to children with milder asthma and healthy controls. Methods Children with asthma (n =136) (non-severe and STRA) from a referral centre and healthy controls (n =40) were recruited. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, stained with anti-CD3 and anti-iNKT (Vα24Jα18), and analysed through flow cytometry. Atopic status was defined by measuring specific IgE in serum. Airway inflammation was assessed by induced sputum. Results Children with asthma presented an increased frequency of CD3+iNKT+ cells (median 0.38% IQR 0.18–1.9), compared to healthy controls (median 0.26% IQR 0.10–0.43) (p =0.025). Children with STRA also showed an increased frequency of iNKT cells (1.5% IQR 1.05–2.73) compared to healthy controls and non-severe asthmatic children (0.35% IQR 0.15–1.6; p =0.002). The frequency of iNKT cells was not different between atopic and non-atopic children. In addition, iNKT cells were not associated with any inflammatory pattern of induced sputum studied. Conclusion Our data suggests that iNKT cells play a role in paediatric asthma, which is also associated with the severity of disease, but independent of the atopic status.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.009
       
  • Flagellated protozoa detected in Dermatophagoides by light microscopy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): R. Martínez-Girón
      House dust mites (HDM) are arthropods of medical importance due to their relationship with allergic diseases. House dust provides a detrital habitat for these organisms, in which human skin scales are a primary food source. For digestion, wall gut cells elaborate potent proteases. Nevertheless, the observation of flagellated protozoa in intestinal extracts of HDM by light microscopy might contribute to digestive processes in mites, opening a new avenue of research regarding the ecological interactions between mites and these microorganisms in the utilisation of such substrates, as well as with regard to allergic diseases.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
       
  • Tear osteopontin level and its relationship with local Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg
           cytokines in children with allergic conjunctivitis
    • Authors: A. Yan; G. Luo; Z. Zhou; W. Hang; D. Qin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): A. Yan, G. Luo, Z. Zhou, W. Hang, D. Qin
      Background Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is one of the most common allergic ocular diseases worldwide. Osteopontin (OPN), as a recently described Th2 inflammation related protein, may play a role in the pathogenesis of AC. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of OPN in children with AC. Methods Eighty AC children (seasonal and perennial AC) and twenty controls were enrolled in this study. Serum and tears of different time points (during and out of the pollen season) were collected and used for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of OPN and T-help cell related cytokines, respectively. The relationship between serum and tears OPN and Th1/2/17Treg related cytokines as well as disease severity were analysed. Results Our results showed that expression of tear OPN protein by perennial AC patients increased significantly compared with controls or seasonal AC patients out of the pollen season. Tear OPN expression was positively related to local Th2/17 cytokines and negatively related to IL-10 and TGF-β expression. The tear OPN expression was also significantly related to disease severity. Conclusion Tear OPN reflects the local clinical status of ocular allergy and might play an important pathophysiological role in local Th2/17/Treg inflammation in children with AC.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.005
       
  • Change in gut microbiota for eczema: Implications for novel therapeutic
           strategies
    • Authors: Y. Kang; Y. Cai; W. Pan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): Y. Kang, Y. Cai, W. Pan
      Eczema is one of the most common inflammatory diseases, often constituting a lifelong burden for afflicted individuals. The complex interaction of host genetic and multiple environmental factors contribute to its pathogenesis. A relationship between maladjustment of gut microbiota and eczema has been brought into the light of day in most previous studies. In eczema preclinical models, specific intestinal microbial species have been demonstrated to prohibit or dwindle immune responsiveness, indicating that these strains among commensal gut bacteria may exert either a morbific or phylactic function in eczema progression. As such, oral probiotics can serve as a medicinal approach for eczema therapy. Given that relative scientific work is still at the early stage, only limited data are available in the field. New sequencing techniques have been fortunately performed to gain access to an extended research on the relationship between gut bacterial flora and human diseases. In the current review, we identified the role of intestinal microbiota in the development of eczema and how specific bacterial strains adjust the immune responsiveness in the midst of disease progression. Probiotics as an applicable treatment for eczema were evaluated in other threads as well.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.010
       
  • Serum periostin is not related to asthma predictive index
    • Authors: J.A. Castro-Rodriguez; I. Atton; G. Villarroel; C.A. Serrano
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J.A. Castro-Rodriguez, I. Atton, G. Villarroel, C.A. Serrano
      Background In contrast to adult asthmatic patients, studies on the role of serum periostin levels in schoolchildren with asthma are still conflictive, and very few studies have been performed in pre-schoolers. The aim of this study was to compare serum periostin levels in recurrent wheezer pre-schoolers according to their asthma predictive index (API) condition. Methods We performed a case–control study enrolling pre-schoolers with recurrent wheezing episodes (>3 episodes confirmed by physician) presented at one paediatric clinic in Santiago, Chile. The population was divided according to stringent API criteria into positive or negative. Results In a one-year period, 60 pre-schoolers were enrolled. After excluding 12 (due to not fulfilment of inclusion criteria or refusal of blood sample extraction), 48 remaining pre-schoolers (27 males, age range from 24 to 71 months) completed the study; 34 were API positive and 14 were API negative. There were no significant differences in demographics between groups. The level of serum periostin levels for pre-schoolers with positive API and negative API were (median 46.7 [25.5–83.1] and 67.5 [20.5–131.8], p =0.9, respectively). The area under the curve for the serum periostin levels for predict positive API was 0.5, 95% CI [0.29–0.70], p =0.9. No significant correlation between serum periostin levels and peripheral blood eosinophils was found. Conclusion Serum periostin levels were no significantly different between wheezer pre-schoolers with positive and negative API. More studies are needed to confirm this finding.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.012
       
  • Cross-over clinical trial for evaluating the safety of camel's milk intake
           in patients who are allergic to cow's milk protein
    • Authors: E.M. Navarrete-Rodríguez; L.A. Ríos-Villalobos; C.R. Alcocer-Arreguín; B.E. Del-Rio-Navarro; J.M. Del Rio-Chivardi; O.J. Saucedo-Ramírez; J.J.L. Sienra-Monge; R.V. Frias
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E.M. Navarrete-Rodríguez, L.A. Ríos-Villalobos, C.R. Alcocer-Arreguín, B.E. Del-Rio-Navarro, J.M. Del Rio-Chivardi, O.J. Saucedo-Ramírez, J.J.L. Sienra-Monge, R.V. Frias
      Background Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) affects between 0.6 and 0.9% of the general population, and its treatment implies the total elimination of the intake of this protein. Camel's milk has been suggested as an alternative for patients over one year of age who suffer from CMPA due to the difference in the amino acid sequence from that of cow's milk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of camel's milk in children with CMPA. Methods Crossed clinical trial for the use of camel's milk vs. amino acid formula, carried out at the Dr. Federico Gómez Children's Hospital of Mexico (HIMFG) on patients between one and 18 years of age with diagnosed CMPA confirmed through double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs). Only those whose allergies were confirmed were randomly placed into two groups: those to be administered camel's milk and those to be administered the amino-acid formula for two weeks, followed by a six-week wash-out period, and then a group crossing for a further two weeks. Results 49 patients with suspected CMPA were included in the study; the diagnosis was confirmed through DBPCFCs in 15 patients, who were those who participated in the study. After having been administered camel's milk, none of the patients presented adverse effects. Conclusions and clinical relevance Camel's milk is safe and tolerable in patients above one year of age with CMPA and can be considered as a good alternative given the benefit of its taste compared to other formulas.

      PubDate: 2017-12-15T08:18:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.06.005
       
  • Comparing the effects of fluticasone, anti-IgE and anti-TNF treatments in
           a chronic asthma model
    • Authors: M.Y. Ozkars; O. Keskin; M. Tokur; M. Ulasli; B. Gogebakan; H. Ciralik; E. Kucukosmanoglu; C. Demirel; S. Oztuzcu; H. Kahraman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M.Y. Ozkars, O. Keskin, M. Tokur, M. Ulasli, B. Gogebakan, H. Ciralik, E. Kucukosmanoglu, C. Demirel, S. Oztuzcu, H. Kahraman
      Background Corticosteroids are used in the treatment of asthma. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of anti-IgE and anti-TNF alpha as asthma treatments. Methods A mouse model of chronic asthma was developed. The fluticasone group was exposed to fluticasone and the anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups were administered anti-IgE or anti-TNF. IL-4, and IgE levels were measured, and histological analysis, pathological analysis and miRNA-126, miRNA-133a analyses were applied. Results The cell concentration in the BAL fluid decreased in all the treatment groups. The rate of perivascular and peribronchial cell infiltration decreased in the lung in the high-dose anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. Smooth muscle thickness decreased in the lung tissue in the low-dose anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. Bronchial wall thickness decreased in the lung tissue in the fluticasone+anti-IgE group. The IL-4 level in BAL fluid decreased in the high-dose anti-IgE, fluticasone+anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. IgE levels increased in the BAL fluid in the high-dose anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. The lymphocyte level increased in the BAL fluid in the high-dose anti-IgE group. The macrophage level decreased in the BAL fluid in the anti-TNF group. The relative expression of miRNA-126 increased in all groups. The relative expression of miRNA-133a decreased in the placebo and fluticasone groups. The relative expression of miRNA-133a increased in the low-dose anti-IgE, high-dose anti-IgE, fluticasone+anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. Conclusions The results showed that anti-IgE is successful as a treatment. Fluticasone+anti-IgE and anti-TNF were seen to be superior to other therapeutic modalities when used for prophylaxis.

      PubDate: 2017-12-15T08:18:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.07.003
       
  • Effects of mesenchymal stromal cells play a role the oxidant/antioxidant
           balance in a murine model of asthma
    • Authors: M.A.S. Malaquias; L.A. Oyama; P.C. Jericó; I. Costa; G. Padilha; S. Nagashima; M. Lopes-Pacheco; C.L.K. Rebelatto; P.V. Michelotto; D.G. Xisto; P.R.S. Brofman; P.R.M. Rocco; L. de Noronha
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M.A.S. Malaquias, L.A. Oyama, P.C. Jericó, I. Costa, G. Padilha, S. Nagashima, M. Lopes-Pacheco, C.L.K. Rebelatto, P.V. Michelotto, D.G. Xisto, P.R.S. Brofman, P.R.M. Rocco, L. de Noronha
      Asthma is a heterogeneous disease characterised by chronic airway inflammation. One of the most devastating consequences of this inflammatory process is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species responsible for oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to analyse the efficiency of treatment with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) in maintaining the oxidative balance in a murine model of allergic asthma by quantifying nitrotyrosine in lung tissues. After confirmation of asthma in the experimental model, samples of lung parenchyma were submitted to immunohistochemical assessment. Intravenous administration of hMSC reduced the levels of nitrotyrosine in the ASTHMA-hMSC group compared to those in the ASTHMA-SAL group. In conclusion, therapeutic administration of hMSC had a beneficial effect on oxidative stress, reducing the levels of nitrotyrosine in lung tissues in a model of allergic asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-12-15T08:18:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.06.003
       
  • Non-protease native allergens partially purified from bodies of eight
           domestic mites using p-aminobenzamidine ligand
    • Authors: T. Erban; R. Klubal
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): T. Erban, R. Klubal
      Background Optimised purification steps for concentrating trace target native antigens are needed. Combining the p-aminobenzamidine ligand with protease inactivation enables partial purification of mite non-protease allergens lacking proteases. Objective We sought to analyse in detail proteins obtained using this method from eight species of synanthropic acaridid mites and tested IgE reactivity using pooled human sera. Materials and methods Proteins affinity bound to p-aminobenzamidine as a ligand were identified by MALDI TOF/TOF. After electroblotting, the proteins were visualised using the fluorescent SYPRO-Ruby protein blot stain, and IgE reactivity was further analysed using pooled human sera collected from patients allergic to house dust mites. Results MS/MS identification confirmed previous results that no proteases were purified. Protein patterns corresponding to the allergens Der f 7, Der f 30 and actins indicated that these proteins are purified using p-aminobenzamidine and are present across a wide spectrum of acaridid mites. When using Dermatophagoides farinae, apolipophorins (Der f 14), chitinase-like Der f 15 and 18, 70-kDa heat shock protein, and a Der f Alt a10 allergen homolog (gi 37958173) were also detected. The target antigens tropomyosins and paramyosins showed similar IgE binding among the mite species tested. IgE reactivity with miscellaneous D. farinae antigen was also observed. Conclusions Partial purification of mite non-protease antigens using a strategy combining p-aminobenzamidine with protease inactivation was verified by 1D-E and 2D-E analyses. IgE binding to p-aminobenzamidine-purified native non-protease mite antigens was tested using pooled sera. This preliminary study allows for further work on individual serum samples, allowing confirmation of immunoreactivity.

      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.07.004
       
 
 
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