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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3123 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3120 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 378, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 140, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
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Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
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Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 371, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 338, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 433, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 176, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)

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Journal Cover Allergologia et Immunopathologia
  [SJR: 0.46]   [H-I: 29]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0301-0546
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3123 journals]
  • Single and multiple food allergies in infants with proctocolitis
    • Authors: B.T. Koksal; Z. Barıs; F. Ozcay; O. Yilmaz Ozbek
      Pages: 3 - 8
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): B.T. Koksal, Z. Barıs, F. Ozcay, O. Yilmaz Ozbek
      Background Food protein-induced allergic proctocolitis is a frequent cause of rectal bleeding in infants. Characteristics of infants with multiple food allergies have not been defined. Objective This study aimed to identify characteristics of infants with proctocolitis and compare infants with single and multiple food allergies. Methods A total of 132 infants with proctocolitis were evaluated retrospectively. All of the infants were diagnosed by a paediatric allergist and/or a paediatric gastroenterologist according to guidelines. Clinical features of the infants, as well as results of a complete blood count, skin prick test, specific immunoglobulin E, and stool examinations or colonoscopy were recorded. Results Cow's milk (97.7%) was the most common allergen, followed by egg (22%). Forty-five (34.1%) infants had allergies to more than one food. Infants with multiple food allergies had a higher eosinophil count (613±631.2 vs. 375±291.9) and a higher frequency of positive specific IgE and/or positive skin prick test results than that of patients with a single food allergy. Most of the patients whose symptoms persisted after two years of age had multiple food allergies. Conclusions There is no difference in clinical presentations between infants with single and multiple food allergies. However, infants with multiple food allergies have a high blood total eosinophil count and are more likely to have a positive skin prick test and/or positive specific IgE results.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.006
       
  • Influence of the Mediterranean diet during pregnancy in the development of
           wheezing and eczema in infants in Pamplona, Spain
    • Authors: N. Alvarez Zallo; I. Aguinaga-Ontoso; I. Alvarez-Alvarez; B. Marin-Fernandez; F. Guillén-Grima; C. Azcona-San Julián
      Pages: 9 - 14
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): N. Alvarez Zallo, I. Aguinaga-Ontoso, I. Alvarez-Alvarez, B. Marin-Fernandez, F. Guillén-Grima, C. Azcona-San Julián
      Background This study examined the relationship between different food groups and the adherence to a Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and the risk of wheezing and eczema in children aged 12–15 months. Methods The study involves 1087 Spanish infants from the International Study of Wheezing in Infants (Estudio Internacional de Sibilancias en Lactantes, EISL). The study of the association of the different food consumption and Mediterranean diet with wheezing, recurrent wheezing and eczema was performed using different models of unconditional logistic regression to obtain adjusted prevalence odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results No association was found between a good adherence to the Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and the development of wheezing (p =0.372), recurrent wheezing (p =0.118) and eczema (p =0.315). The consumption once or twice a week of white fish (OR: 1.95[1.01–3.75]), cooked potatoes (OR: 1.75[1.22–2.51]) and industrial pastry (OR: 1.59[1.13–2.24]), and the consumption more than three times a week of industrial pastry (OR: 1.47 [1.01–2.13]) during pregnancy increases the risk of “wheezing” at 12 months. Instead, high fruit consumption during the pregnancy has a protective effect against “wheezing” in 12-month-old infants (OR: 0.44 [0.20–0.99]). No statistically significant differences were observed between food intake during pregnancy and “recurrent wheezing”. No statistically significant differences were observed between the consumption of any food during pregnancy and the presence of eczema at 12 months. Conclusions The present study showed that the consumption of Mediterranean diet during pregnancy did not have a protective effect for wheezing, recurrent wheezing or eczema.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.009
       
  • A comparison of two clinical scores for bronchiolitis. A multicentre and
           prospective study conducted in hospitalised infants
    • Authors: C. Rivas-Juesas; J.M. Rius Peris; A.L. García; A.A. Madramany; M.G. Peris; L.V. Álvarez; J. Primo
      Pages: 15 - 23
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): C. Rivas-Juesas, J.M. Rius Peris, A.L. García, A.A. Madramany, M.G. Peris, L.V. Álvarez, J. Primo
      Background There are a number of clinical scores for bronchiolitis but none of them are firmly recommended in the guidelines. Method We designed a study to compare two scales of bronchiolitis (ESBA and Wood Downes Ferres) and determine which of them better predicts the severity. A multicentre prospective study with patients <12 months with acute bronchiolitis was conducted. Each patient was assessed with the two scales when admission was decided. We created a new variable “severe condition” to determine whether one scale afforded better discrimination of severity. A diagnostic test analysis of sensitivity and specificity was made, with a comparison of the AUC. Based on the optimum cut-off points of the ROC curves for classifying bronchiolitis as severe we calculated new Se, Sp, LR+ and LR− for each scale in our sample. Results 201 patients were included, 66.7% males and median age 2.3 months (IQR=1.3–4.4). Thirteen patients suffered bronchiolitis considered to be severe, according to the variable severe condition. ESBA showed a Se=3.6%, Sp=98.1%, and WDF showed Se=46.2% and Sp=91.5%. The difference between the two AUC for each scale was 0.02 (95%CI: 0.01–0.15), p =0.72. With new cut-off points we could increase Se and Sp for ESBA: Se=84.6%, Sp=78.7%, and WDF showed Se=92.3% and Sp=54.8%; with higher LR. Conclusions None of the scales studied was considered optimum for assessing our patients. With new cut-off points, the scales increased the ability to classify severe infants. New validation studies are needed to prove these new cut-off points.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.012
       
  • Impact of meteorological factors on the emergence of bronchiolitis in
           North-western Greece
    • Authors: S. Tsabouri; A. Gkoutsias; C.J. Lolis; A. Makis; N. Chaliasos; A. Bartzokas
      Pages: 24 - 30
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): S. Tsabouri, A. Gkoutsias, C.J. Lolis, A. Makis, N. Chaliasos, A. Bartzokas
      Objective To evaluate the relationship between meteorological factors in North-western Greece and the incidence of bronchiolitis. Methods Meteorological data (air temperature and rainfall) for Ioannina city in North-western Greece and medical data from hospitalised patients at University Hospital of Ioannina were collected between January 2002 and December 2013. The association between meteorological factors and rate of hospitalisation due to bronchiolitis was investigated. The data processing was done using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and applying the chi-square test at contingency tables of the parameters. Results Of the 792 hospitalised cases, 670 related to infants (<1 year) and 122 concerned patients aged 1–2 years old. The disease is more common among boys (59.5%) than girls (40.5%). The disease course through the year has a double variation with a main maximum in March and a main minimum in August. The statistical study showed statistically significant correlation of bronchiolitis with: (a) the temperature parameters on an annual basis; (b) precipitation in autumn and dryness in spring; and (c) with sudden changes in diurnal temperature range on an annual basis. Conclusion A peak incidence of bronchiolitis was noticed in cold and wet seasons during the five days preceding hospitalisation.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.009
       
  • A rural environment does not protect against asthma or other allergic
           diseases amongst Mexican children
    • Authors: M. Bedolla-Barajas; F. Javier Ramírez-Cervantes; J. Morales-Romero; J. Jesús Pérez-Molina; C. Meza-López; N. Delgado-Figueroa
      Pages: 31 - 38
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): M. Bedolla-Barajas, F. Javier Ramírez-Cervantes, J. Morales-Romero, J. Jesús Pérez-Molina, C. Meza-López, N. Delgado-Figueroa
      Introduction The commonly held notion that a rural environment decreases the frequency of allergic diseases has proven to be inconsistent amongst children. Objective Our objective was to contrast the prevalence of bronchial asthma (BA), allergic rhinitis (AR), and atopic dermatitis (AD) between children that live in a rural environment and those that live in urban areas. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study amongst children aged six to seven; they were selected through probabilistic, stratified and conglomerated sampling. The prevalence of BA, AR, and AD was identified with the use of the questionnaire provided by The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, additionally, we inquired about each child's family history of atopy, their exposure to farm animals, the intake of unpasteurised cow's milk, and the number of siblings related to every child. We used logistic regression and multivariate analysis to determine the correlation between asthma, allergic diseases, and rural environment. Results We included 189/1003 (18.8%) children from a rural environment, and 814/1003 (81.2%) from an urban area. BA and AR were associated to a family history of atopy (OR=2.15, p =0.001; OR=2.58, p =0.002, respectively). BA was more prevalent in males (OR=1.92, p =0.007). Notably, a higher number of siblings seems to protect against AR (OR=0.45, p =0.008). A paternal history of allergies was associated to AD. Conclusions In our study, we were unable to find protective factors in a rural environment that might decrease the prevalence of asthma or allergic diseases.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.010
       
  • Correlation between serum vitamin D status and immunological changes in
           children affected by gastrointestinal food allergy
    • Authors: H. Guo; Y. Zheng; X. Cai; H. Yang; Y. Zhang; L. Hao; Y. Jin; G. Yang
      Pages: 39 - 44
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): H. Guo, Y. Zheng, X. Cai, H. Yang, Y. Zhang, L. Hao, Y. Jin, G. Yang
      Background Low vitamin D status is linked to increased incidence of food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Whether vitamin D status is associated with immunological changes in children with gastrointestinal food allergy (GFA) remains unclear. Methods Forty-nine GFA children (aged 2–11 years old) were enrolled in this study. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) level, total immunoglobulin E (IgE), specific IgE against allergens, circulating regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs), and blood eosinophil numbers were measured. Results Levels of serum 25OHD in the GFA children ranged 35.5–156.4nmol/L, with a mean value similar to that of the healthy controls. Compared to those with normal 25OHD (≥75nmol/L), GFA children with low 25OHD (<75nmol/L) had increased total IgE (84% vs. 54%, P <0.05), persistent blood eosinophilia (56% vs. 25%, P <0.05), and delayed resolution of symptoms after food allergen elimination (odds ratio 3.51, 95% CI 1.00–12.36, P <0.05). Among the GFA children with elevated total IgE, those with low 25OHD had lower circulatory Tregs (8.79±2.4% vs. 10.21±1.37%, P <0.05), higher total IgE (1197.5±1209.8 vs. 418.5±304.6kU/L, P <0.05), and persistent eosinophilia (0.61±0.52 vs. 0.31±0.15×109 cells/L, P <0.05) compared to those with normal 25OHD. In addition, serum 25OHD concentrations inversely correlated with total IgE (R =−0.434, P <0.05), and positively with Treg population (R =0.356, P <0.05). Conclusion Low serum vitamin D status correlates with stronger allergic immune response in GFA children.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.03.005
       
  • Evaluation of the frequency of food allergens based on skin prick test in
           children in Kurdistan Province – Iran
    • Authors: R. Kalmarzi; P. Ataee; Gh. Homagostar; M. Tagik; E. Ghaderi; W. Kooti
      Pages: 45 - 57
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): R. Kalmarzi, P. Ataee, Gh. Homagostar, M. Tagik, E. Ghaderi, W. Kooti
      Introduction Food allergy refers to abnormal reactions of the body caused by an immune system response to food. This study was conducted aiming to investigate allergy to food allergens in children with food allergies. Materials and methods This study was conducted as a cross-sectional one on 304 children aged six months to seven years with food allergies admitted to the tertiary referral hospital in Kurdistan Province – Iran, during 2014–2015. All the patients were examined for skin prick test using 49 allergens. Finally, the obtained data were analysed using SPSS15 and chi-square and t tests. Results The highest percentage of occurrence of bump reaction (wheal) and redness (flare) was due to the consumption of fish, eggs, tomatoes, and cocoa. Moreover, the lowest rate of wheal and flare was caused by exposure to allergens like latex, tea, malt, and wheat flour. The reaction most created due to the consumption of foods was flare which was higher among under three-year-olds group (p <0.05), and between the sexes, girls showed the most common allergic reactions (p <0.05). Conclusion Since food allergy has a high prevalence in children, it should be considered with great interest. Considering that avoiding food allergens is the first step in the treatment of food allergies, the present study may be a useful guide in this regard.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.005
       
  • Recent thymic emigrants, T regulatory cells, and BAFF level in children
           with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia in association with chronic respiratory
           disease
    • Authors: S.O. Sharapova; O.E. Pashchenko; I.E. Guryanova; A.A. Migas; I.V. Kondratenko; O.V. Aleinikova
      Pages: 58 - 66
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): S.O. Sharapova, O.E. Pashchenko, I.E. Guryanova, A.A. Migas, I.V. Kondratenko, O.V. Aleinikova
      Background X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) is a genetic disorder affecting B cell maturation, which is characterised by a low number of B cells, agammaglobulinaemia and increased susceptibility to a variety of bacterial infections. This study was performed to assess T cell subpopulations in a group of children with XLA in association with chronic respiratory disease (CRD). Methods Numbers of T cell subpopulations (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD3+DR+, naïve, memory, recent thymic emigrants (RTE), regulatory T cells, follicular T helpers) were measured by eight-colour flow cytometry in 22 XLA patients and 50 controls. BAFF level was measured by ELISA. Results XLA patients with CRD had a significantly lower percentage of RTE numbers and Tregs, while significantly higher absolute counts of lymphocytes, CD3+, CD8+, CD3+DR+ and CD4+CD45RO+ T cells were detected as compared with healthy controls. In patients with XLA without CRD, the number of follicular T helper cells was altered significantly (percentage and absolute), as compared with healthy controls. Additionally, they had significantly higher counts (percentage and absolute) of CD4+CD45RA+ cells and lower percentage of CD4+CD45RO+ cells in comparison with healthy controls. Conclusions Our study affords new information concerning CRD and T cell subsets that differentiate or are maintained in the absence of B cells in children with XLA. T cell's homeostasis depends on the presence of chronic respiratory disease that may be caused by the delay in diagnosis.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.011
       
  • Sinomenine ameliorates the airway remodelling, apoptosis of airway
           epithelial cells, and Th2 immune response in a murine model of chronic
           asthma
    • Authors: S. Işık; M. Karaman; S.Ç. Micili; Ş. Çağlayan-Sözmen; H.A. Bağrıyanık; Z. Arıkan-Ayyıldız; N. Uzuner; Ö. Karaman
      Pages: 67 - 75
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): S. Işık, M. Karaman, S.Ç. Micili, Ş. Çağlayan-Sözmen, H.A. Bağrıyanık, Z. Arıkan-Ayyıldız, N. Uzuner, Ö. Karaman
      Background Sinomenine (SIN), an alkaloid isolated from the root of Sinomenium acutum which has a variety of pharmacological effects, including anti-inflammation, immunosuppression and anti-angiogenesis. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of SIN on airway remodelling, epithelial apoptosis, and T Helper (Th)-2 derived cytokine levels in a murine model of chronic asthma. Methods Twenty-two BALB/c mice were divided into four groups; I (control), II (placebo), III, IV. Mice in groups III and IV received the SIN (100mg/kg), and dexamethasone (1mg/kg) respectively. Epithelium thickness, sub-epithelial smooth muscle thickness, number of mast and goblet cells of samples isolated from the lung were measured. Immunohistochemical scorings of the lung tissue for matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEG-F), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick endlabeling (TUNEL) and cysteine-dependent aspartate-specific proteases (caspase)-3 were determined. IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, Nitric oxide in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E in serum were quantified by standard ELISA protocols. Results The dose of 100mg/kg SIN treatment provided beneficial effects on all of the histopathological findings of airway remodelling compared to placebo (p <0.05). All cytokine levels in BALF and serum and immunohistochemical scores were significantly lower in 100mg/kg SIN treated group compared to the placebo (p <0.05). Conclusions These findings suggested that the dose of 100mg/kg SIN improved all histopathological changes of airway remodelling and its beneficial effects might be related to modulating Th-2 derived cytokines and the inhibition of apoptosis of airway epithelial cells.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.004
       
  • Helicobacter pylori seropositivity protects against childhood asthma and
           inversely correlates to its clinical and functional severity
    • Authors: E.M. Fouda; T.B. Kamel; E.S. Nabih; A.A. Abdelazem
      Pages: 76 - 81
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): E.M. Fouda, T.B. Kamel, E.S. Nabih, A.A. Abdelazem
      Background In recent years, the prevalence of asthma has risen in developed countries, and its extent related to a change in our indigenous microbiota. Helicobacter pylori disappearance across the population represents a fundamental change in our human microbiota and has preceded the rise in asthma prevalence. Objective To assess the relationship between childhood asthma and Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods Quantitative determination of Helicobacter pylori IgG among 90 asthmatic children and 90 – age and gender – matched non-atopic, non-asthmatic healthy children was performed using ELISA in serum of all participants. Results Helicobacter pylori IgG seropositivity was found in 25.6% of asthmatics compared to 44.4% of controls. Asthmatics showed lower median Helicobacter pylori IgG titre compared to healthy controls. We also detected a significant inverse relationship between Helicobacter pylori IgG titre and asthma severity. Conclusion Helicobacter pylori seropositivity protects against childhood asthma and inversely correlates to its clinical and functional severity.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.03.004
       
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia as a risk factor for asthma in school children
           and adolescents: A systematic review
    • Authors: S. Pérez Tarazona; P. Solano Galán; E. Bartoll Alguacil; J. Alfonso Diego
      Pages: 87 - 98
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): S. Pérez Tarazona, P. Solano Galán, E. Bartoll Alguacil, J. Alfonso Diego
      Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease that mainly affects extremely pre-term infants, and remains the most common complication of prematurity. Several studies have shown that prematurity predisposes to the development of asthma in school children and adolescents. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what extent a history of BPD involves an additional risk. Methods A systematic review of studies assessing the association between BPD and asthma in school-children and adolescents was made. A literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to retrieve articles published between 1 January 2000 and 31 August 2016. Results A total of 17 studies comprising 7433 patients were included in the review. There was considerable heterogeneity in the definitions of BPD and asthma among studies. Overall, the prevalence of asthma was higher in children and adolescents with a history of prematurity and BPD compared with those who did not develop BPD. However, in only one of the studies did this difference reach statistical significance. The main limitation of this review was potential bias due to the lack of adjustment for confounding factors between exposure (BPD) and outcome (asthma) in most of the studies. Conclusion Based on the studies reviewed, it cannot be argued that BPD, as an independent factor of prematurity, increases the risk of asthma defined by clinical parameters in school-children and adolescents. Further studies of greater methodological quality and homogeneous diagnostic criteria of BPD and asthma are needed for improved assessment of this association.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.004
       
  • True and false contraindications to vaccines
    • Authors: R. Opri; G. Zanoni; C. Caffarelli; P. Bottau; S. Caimmi; G. Crisafulli; F. Franceschini; L. Liotti; F. Saretta; M. Vernich; D.G. Peroni
      Pages: 99 - 104
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): R. Opri, G. Zanoni, C. Caffarelli, P. Bottau, S. Caimmi, G. Crisafulli, F. Franceschini, L. Liotti, F. Saretta, M. Vernich, D.G. Peroni
      Nowadays, the awareness of risks related to infectious diseases has decreased, whereas THE perception of risks related to vaccination is growing. Therefore, it may be difficult for health care providers to convince people of the importance of vaccination and adherence to the immunisation schedule. Selected situations that might raise uncertainties about vaccine recommendations are discussed in order to help health care providers to identify real and perceived contraindications to vaccines, and cases to be referred to specialised pre-vaccination consultation due to an increased risk of adverse events to vaccines.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.003
       
  • Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the genes encoding IL-10 and TGF-β1 in
           Iranian children with atopic dermatitis
    • Authors: N. Behniafard; A.A. Amirzargar; M. Gharagozlou; F. Delavari; S. Hosseinverdi; S. Sotoudeh; E. Farhadi; M. Mahmoudi; M. Khaledi; Z.G. Moghaddam; A. Aghamohammadi; N. Rezaei
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): N. Behniafard, A.A. Amirzargar, M. Gharagozlou, F. Delavari, S. Hosseinverdi, S. Sotoudeh, E. Farhadi, M. Mahmoudi, M. Khaledi, Z.G. Moghaddam, A. Aghamohammadi, N. Rezaei
      Background Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease in which both genetic and environmental factors interact to determine the susceptibility and severity of the disease. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the association between atopic dermatitis and IL-10 and TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms. Methods The allele and genotype frequencies of genes encoding for IL-10 and TGF-β1 were investigated in 89 patients with atopic dermatitis in comparison with 138 in the control group using the PCR-SSP method. Results A significant increase was found in the frequency of the TGF-β1 codon 10/C allele among patients (p <0.001, OR=6.77), whereas a significant decrease was observed in the frequency of the T allele at the same position (p <0.001, OR=0.14). The frequency of the TGF-β1 codon 25/G allele in the control group was significantly higher than among patients (p <0.001, OR=0.08). A significant positive correlation was seen between CC (p <0.001, OR=15.10) and CG (p <0.001) genotypes and AD at codons 10 and 25, respectively. The most frequent haplotypes among patients was TGF-β1 CG which was significantly higher than in the control subjects (50% in patients vs. 39.9% in controls, p =0.042). A significant increase was found in the frequency of TGF-β CC (36% in patients vs. 7.6% in controls, p <0.001) and TC (14% in patients vs. 0% in controls, p <0.001) haplotypes among patients compared to controls. By contrast, the TGF-β1 TG haplotype was significantly lower in patients than controls (0% in patients vs. 52.5% in controls, p <0.001). There were no significant differences in the frequency of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes of the IL-10 gene. Conclusions We found a strong association between the polymorphisms of the TGF-β1 gene at codon 10 and codon 25 positions and atopic dermatitis.

      PubDate: 2018-01-10T10:01:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.007
       
  • Food Protein-Induced Proctocolitis. The shadow of allergic disorders
    • Authors: C.A.
      Abstract: Publication date: January–February 2018
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 46, Issue 1
      Author(s): C.A. Sánchez-Salguero


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
       
  • Low dose treatment of mice with bacterial extract (OM-85) for attenuation
           of experimental atopic asthma in mice – Reply
    • Authors: P.M. Pitrez; R.T. Stein
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): P.M. Pitrez, R.T. Stein


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.06.002
       
  • Recommendations for the prevention and diagnosis of asthma in children:
           Evidence from international guidelines adapted for Mexico
    • Authors: D.E.S. Larenas; Linnemann B.E. del Navarro J.A. Luna Pech Romero
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): D.E.S. Larenas Linnemann, B.E. del Río Navarro, J.A. Luna Pech, J. Romero Lombard, J. Villaverde Rosas, M.C. Cano Salas, M. Fernández Vega, J.A. Ortega Martell, E.C. López Estrada, J.L. Mayorga Butrón, J. Salas Hernández, J.C. Vázquez García, I. Ortiz Aldana, M.H. Vargas Becerra, M. Bedolla Barajas, N. Rodríguez Pérez, A. Aguilar Aranda, C.A. Jiménez González, C. García Bolaños, C. Garrido Galindo, D.A. Mendoza Hernández, E. Mendoza López, G. López Pérez, G.H. Wakida Kuzonoki, H.H. Ruiz Gutiérrez, H. León Molina, H. Martínez de la Lanza, H. Stone Aguilar, J. Gómez Vera, J. Olvera Salinas, J.J. Oyoqui Flores, J.L. Gálvez Romero, J.S. Lozano Saenz, J.I. Salgado Gama, M.A. Jiménez Chobillon, M.A. García Avilés, M.P. Guinto Balanzar, M.A. Medina Ávalos, R. Camargo Angeles, R. García Torrentera, S. Toral Freyre, G. Montes Narvaez, H. Solorio Gómez, J. Rosas Peña, S.J. Romero Tapia, A. Reyes Herrera, F. Cuevas Schacht, J. Esquer Flores, J.A. Sacre Hazouri, L. Compean Martínez, P.J. Medina Sánchez, S. Garza Salinas, C. Baez Loyola, I. Romero Alvarado, J.L. Miguel Reyes, L.E. Huerta Espinosa, M.Á. Correa Flores, R. Castro Martínez
      Background With the availability of high-quality asthma guidelines worldwide, one possible approach of developing a valid guideline, without re-working the evidence, already analysed by major guidelines, is the ADAPTE approach, as was used for the development of National Guidelines on asthma. Methods The guidelines development group (GDG) covered a broad range of experts from medical specialities, primary care physicians and methodologists. The core group of the GDG searched the literature for asthma guidelines 2005 onward, and analysed the 11 best guidelines with AGREE-II to select three mother guidelines. Key clinical questions were formulated covering each step of the asthma management. Results The selected mother guidelines are British Thoracic Society (BTS), GINA and GEMA 2015. Responses to the questions were formulated according to the evidence in the mother guidelines. Recommendations or suggestions were made for asthma treatment in Mexico by the core group, and adjusted during several rounds of a Delphi process, taking into account: 1. Evidence; 2. Safety; 3. Cost; 4. Patient preference – all these set against the background of the local reality. Here the detailed analysis of the evidence present in BTS/GINA/GEMA sections on prevention and diagnosis in paediatric asthma are presented for three age-groups: children with asthma ≤5 years, 6–11 years and ≥12 years. Conclusions For the prevention and diagnosis sections, applying the AGREE-II method is useful to develop a scientifically-sustained document, adjusted to the local reality per country, as is the Mexican Guideline on Asthma.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T09:00:36Z
       
  • The influence of microorganisms in allergic diseases
    • Authors: M. Tortajada-Girbés; Javier Torres-Borrego
      Pages: 519 - 520
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): M. Tortajada-Girbés, Javier Torres-Borrego


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.10.001
       
  • The protective role of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein
           in childhood asthma
    • Authors: A. Karakullukcu; H.B. Tokman; S. Nepesov; M. Demirci; S. Saribas; S. Vehid; R. Caliskan; Z. Taner; H. Cokugras; T. Ziver; S. Demiryas; B. Kocazeybek
      Pages: 521 - 527
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): A. Karakullukcu, H.B. Tokman, S. Nepesov, M. Demirci, S. Saribas, S. Vehid, R. Caliskan, Z. Taner, H. Cokugras, T. Ziver, S. Demiryas, B. Kocazeybek
      Background Helicobacter pylori quantity and HP-NAP gene expression were evaluated in the faeces of healthy and asthmatic children. Methods H. pylori DNAs and RNAs were isolated from the stool samples of 92 asthmatic children (AC; 3–8 years) and 88 healthy controls (HC). Quantitative PCR was used to determine the quantity of H. pylori and HP-NAP expression relative to the 16S rRNA (reference gene). Gene expression was analysed using the delta delta-Ct method. Results H. pylori DNA was detected in the stool samples of 18 (20.4%) of the 88 HC (p <0.0001, OR=0.79) and none of AC. No meaningful statistical differences were found between individuals with positive and negative family histories for asthma in AC and HC (p >0.05). H. pylori quantity was higher in seven of 18 H. pylori-positive samples, but HP-NAP expression levels were low in four of these seven samples. Based on a multivariate logistic regression analysis of these three variables together, only males displayed a significant difference based on gender differences (p <0.02) and it was determined that, based on the OR value of 0.46 and the 95% CI range of 0.241–0.888, male gender was an independent protective factor in asthma. Conclusions HP-NAP levels vary to the relative concentrations of bacteria in the stationary or late logarithmic phases. Different napA expression levels may be caused by different endogenous napA gene expression or different environmental conditions.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.008
       
  • Prenatal paracetamol use and asthma in childhood: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis
    • Authors: G. Fan; B. Wang; C. Liu; D. Li
      Pages: 528 - 533
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): G. Fan, B. Wang, C. Liu, D. Li
      Objectives Some studies have suggested that prenatal paracetamol exposure might associate with the risk of child asthma. However, other studies have not confirmed this result. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate their relationship. Methods Two authors searched Pubmed and Embase databases up to June 2016. The strength of the association was calculated with the OR and respective 95% CIs. The random-effects model was chosen to calculate the pooled OR. Results A total of 13 articles of more than 1,043,109 individuals were included in the meta-analysis. A statistically significant association between prenatal paracetamol exposure and child asthma risk was found. The data showed that prenatal paracetamol exposure could increase the risk of child asthma (OR=1.19; 95% CI, 1.12–1.27; P <0.00001) in a random-effect model. Six studies reported paracetamol exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy. We found that paracetamol exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with increased risk of child asthma (OR=1.21; 95% CI, 1.14–1.28; P <0.00001). Furthermore, we observed that paracetamol exposure during the 2–3 trimesters of pregnancy was also associated with child asthma risk (OR=1.13; 95% CI, 1.04–1.23; P =0.005). Conclusions This study suggested that prenatal paracetamol exposure was significantly associated with the increased risk of child asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.10.014
       
  • Is there any difference regarding atopy between children with familial
           Mediterranean fever and healthy controls'
    • Authors: Ç. Aydoğmuş; N.A. Ayaz; M. Çakan; F. Çipe; N. Topal; Ö.B. Öner; G. Keskindemirci; A. Akçay
      Pages: 549 - 552
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): Ç. Aydoğmuş, N.A. Ayaz, M. Çakan, F. Çipe, N. Topal, Ö.B. Öner, G. Keskindemirci, A. Akçay
      Introduction There are only a few studies regarding the prevalence of atopy in Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients, and their results are conflicting. Methods In this study children with the diagnosis of FMF were evaluated for the presence of atopy by comparing with controls. One hundred and eighteen children diagnosed as FMF and 50 healthy age and sex matched controls were enrolled. They were evaluated for the presence of rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, urticaria and asthma. Laboratory assessment was done by measuring IgA, IgM, IgG, IgE levels, total eosinophil count and by performing skin prick test (SPT) panels for common allergens to children with FMF and healthy controls. Results One hundred and eighteen children (61girls and 57 boys) diagnosed as FMF with a median age of 120±47 months (range 36–204 months) were compared with 50 healthy controls (31 girls and 19 boys) having a median age of 126±37 (range 48–192 months). The mean percentage of total eosinophil count of patients was similar to that of the control group. The mean level of IgE was significantly higher in children with FMF than controls (136±268, 87±201, respectively; p values <0.05). The percentage of skin prick test positivity was similar for both patients and controls (13% and 8.2%, respectively; p >0.05). The prevalences of atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, and asthma in the patient group were 5.08%, 28.8%, and 15.25%, respectively, while the control group had the prevalences of 0%, 36%, and 14% respectively. Conclusion Children with FMF did not show an increase of atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and asthma with respect to controls.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.12.006
       
  • Allergy is associated with reduced risk of glioma: A meta-analysis
    • Authors: C. Zhang; Q.-X. Zhu
      Pages: 553 - 559
      Abstract: Publication date: November–December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia, Volume 45, Issue 6
      Author(s): C. Zhang, Q.-X. Zhu
      Background Increasing evidences suggest that allergy may reduce the risk of glioma, so it is necessary to perform an up-to-data literature search and investigate this relationship by meta-analysis. Methods We identified the included studies by searching PubMed and Web of Science and excluding irrelevant or ineligible articles. Nineteen studies from 15 articles, including 8435 cases and 118,719 controls, were selected for data extraction and synthesis. Results Pooled outcomes showed that there was an inverse association between allergy and risk of glioma (OR=0.64, 95% CI=0.52–0.78, P <0.001). Meanwhile, asthma and eczema would reduce the risk of glioma by 33% and 23% (OR=0.67, 95% CI=0.59–0.75, P <0.001; OR=0.77, 95% CI=0.68–0.86, P <0.001), respectively. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the stability of these findings. Besides, no publication biases were detected regarding all the investigations. Conclusions Overall or specific allergy is protective against glioma. More prospective cohort studies or molecular laboratory experiments are warranted to elucidate the causation and key mechanism.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2016.12.005
       
  • Scabies, crusted (Norwegian) scabies and the diagnosis of mite
           sensitisation
    • Authors: M. Sánchez-Borges; L. González-Aveledo; A. Capriles-Hulett; F. Caballero-Fonseca
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M. Sánchez-Borges, L. González-Aveledo, A. Capriles-Hulett, F. Caballero-Fonseca
      Scabies is observed with relatively high frequency in Allergy and Dermatology clinics in developing countries where poor sanitary conditions are prevalent and increasingly in some areas of the world with increased immigrant populations. Since the immunological response to scabies mites includes the production of IgE class antibodies to Sarcoptes scabiei allergens which cross-react with Dermatophagoides major allergens Der p 1 and Der p 2, positive immediate-type skin tests to house dust mite extracts should be interpreted cautiously. Additionally, scabies should be included routinely in the differential diagnosis of itchy rashes in patients living in those areas.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.006
       
  • iNKT cells are increased in children with severe therapy-resistant asthma
    • Authors: L. Antunes; A.P. Duarte de Souza; P.D. de Araújo; L.A. Pinto; M.H. Jones; R.T. Stein; P.M. Pitrez
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): L. Antunes, A.P. Duarte de Souza, P.D. de Araújo, L.A. Pinto, M.H. Jones, R.T. Stein, P.M. Pitrez
      Background Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells play complex functions in the immune system, releasing both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. The role of iNKT cells in human asthma is still controversial and never described in severe therapy-resistant asthma in children. The objective of this work was to analyse iNKT frequency in peripheral blood of children with severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA), compared to children with milder asthma and healthy controls. Methods Children with asthma (n =136) (non-severe and STRA) from a referral centre and healthy controls (n =40) were recruited. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, stained with anti-CD3 and anti-iNKT (Vα24Jα18), and analysed through flow cytometry. Atopic status was defined by measuring specific IgE in serum. Airway inflammation was assessed by induced sputum. Results Children with asthma presented an increased frequency of CD3+iNKT+ cells (median 0.38% IQR 0.18–1.9), compared to healthy controls (median 0.26% IQR 0.10–0.43) (p =0.025). Children with STRA also showed an increased frequency of iNKT cells (1.5% IQR 1.05–2.73) compared to healthy controls and non-severe asthmatic children (0.35% IQR 0.15–1.6; p =0.002). The frequency of iNKT cells was not different between atopic and non-atopic children. In addition, iNKT cells were not associated with any inflammatory pattern of induced sputum studied. Conclusion Our data suggests that iNKT cells play a role in paediatric asthma, which is also associated with the severity of disease, but independent of the atopic status.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.009
       
  • Flagellated protozoa detected in Dermatophagoides by light microscopy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): R. Martínez-Girón
      House dust mites (HDM) are arthropods of medical importance due to their relationship with allergic diseases. House dust provides a detrital habitat for these organisms, in which human skin scales are a primary food source. For digestion, wall gut cells elaborate potent proteases. Nevertheless, the observation of flagellated protozoa in intestinal extracts of HDM by light microscopy might contribute to digestive processes in mites, opening a new avenue of research regarding the ecological interactions between mites and these microorganisms in the utilisation of such substrates, as well as with regard to allergic diseases.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
       
  • Tear osteopontin level and its relationship with local Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg
           cytokines in children with allergic conjunctivitis
    • Authors: A. Yan; G. Luo; Z. Zhou; W. Hang; D. Qin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): A. Yan, G. Luo, Z. Zhou, W. Hang, D. Qin
      Background Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is one of the most common allergic ocular diseases worldwide. Osteopontin (OPN), as a recently described Th2 inflammation related protein, may play a role in the pathogenesis of AC. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of OPN in children with AC. Methods Eighty AC children (seasonal and perennial AC) and twenty controls were enrolled in this study. Serum and tears of different time points (during and out of the pollen season) were collected and used for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of OPN and T-help cell related cytokines, respectively. The relationship between serum and tears OPN and Th1/2/17Treg related cytokines as well as disease severity were analysed. Results Our results showed that expression of tear OPN protein by perennial AC patients increased significantly compared with controls or seasonal AC patients out of the pollen season. Tear OPN expression was positively related to local Th2/17 cytokines and negatively related to IL-10 and TGF-β expression. The tear OPN expression was also significantly related to disease severity. Conclusion Tear OPN reflects the local clinical status of ocular allergy and might play an important pathophysiological role in local Th2/17/Treg inflammation in children with AC.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.005
       
  • Change in gut microbiota for eczema: Implications for novel therapeutic
           strategies
    • Authors: Y. Kang; Y. Cai; W. Pan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): Y. Kang, Y. Cai, W. Pan
      Eczema is one of the most common inflammatory diseases, often constituting a lifelong burden for afflicted individuals. The complex interaction of host genetic and multiple environmental factors contribute to its pathogenesis. A relationship between maladjustment of gut microbiota and eczema has been brought into the light of day in most previous studies. In eczema preclinical models, specific intestinal microbial species have been demonstrated to prohibit or dwindle immune responsiveness, indicating that these strains among commensal gut bacteria may exert either a morbific or phylactic function in eczema progression. As such, oral probiotics can serve as a medicinal approach for eczema therapy. Given that relative scientific work is still at the early stage, only limited data are available in the field. New sequencing techniques have been fortunately performed to gain access to an extended research on the relationship between gut bacterial flora and human diseases. In the current review, we identified the role of intestinal microbiota in the development of eczema and how specific bacterial strains adjust the immune responsiveness in the midst of disease progression. Probiotics as an applicable treatment for eczema were evaluated in other threads as well.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.010
       
  • Serum periostin is not related to asthma predictive index
    • Authors: J.A. Castro-Rodriguez; I. Atton; G. Villarroel; C.A. Serrano
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J.A. Castro-Rodriguez, I. Atton, G. Villarroel, C.A. Serrano
      Background In contrast to adult asthmatic patients, studies on the role of serum periostin levels in schoolchildren with asthma are still conflictive, and very few studies have been performed in pre-schoolers. The aim of this study was to compare serum periostin levels in recurrent wheezer pre-schoolers according to their asthma predictive index (API) condition. Methods We performed a case–control study enrolling pre-schoolers with recurrent wheezing episodes (>3 episodes confirmed by physician) presented at one paediatric clinic in Santiago, Chile. The population was divided according to stringent API criteria into positive or negative. Results In a one-year period, 60 pre-schoolers were enrolled. After excluding 12 (due to not fulfilment of inclusion criteria or refusal of blood sample extraction), 48 remaining pre-schoolers (27 males, age range from 24 to 71 months) completed the study; 34 were API positive and 14 were API negative. There were no significant differences in demographics between groups. The level of serum periostin levels for pre-schoolers with positive API and negative API were (median 46.7 [25.5–83.1] and 67.5 [20.5–131.8], p =0.9, respectively). The area under the curve for the serum periostin levels for predict positive API was 0.5, 95% CI [0.29–0.70], p =0.9. No significant correlation between serum periostin levels and peripheral blood eosinophils was found. Conclusion Serum periostin levels were no significantly different between wheezer pre-schoolers with positive and negative API. More studies are needed to confirm this finding.

      PubDate: 2017-12-25T08:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.05.012
       
  • Cross-over clinical trial for evaluating the safety of camel's milk intake
           in patients who are allergic to cow's milk protein
    • Authors: E.M. Navarrete-Rodríguez; L.A. Ríos-Villalobos; C.R. Alcocer-Arreguín; B.E. Del-Rio-Navarro; J.M. Del Rio-Chivardi; O.J. Saucedo-Ramírez; J.J.L. Sienra-Monge; R.V. Frias
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E.M. Navarrete-Rodríguez, L.A. Ríos-Villalobos, C.R. Alcocer-Arreguín, B.E. Del-Rio-Navarro, J.M. Del Rio-Chivardi, O.J. Saucedo-Ramírez, J.J.L. Sienra-Monge, R.V. Frias
      Background Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) affects between 0.6 and 0.9% of the general population, and its treatment implies the total elimination of the intake of this protein. Camel's milk has been suggested as an alternative for patients over one year of age who suffer from CMPA due to the difference in the amino acid sequence from that of cow's milk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of camel's milk in children with CMPA. Methods Crossed clinical trial for the use of camel's milk vs. amino acid formula, carried out at the Dr. Federico Gómez Children's Hospital of Mexico (HIMFG) on patients between one and 18 years of age with diagnosed CMPA confirmed through double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs). Only those whose allergies were confirmed were randomly placed into two groups: those to be administered camel's milk and those to be administered the amino-acid formula for two weeks, followed by a six-week wash-out period, and then a group crossing for a further two weeks. Results 49 patients with suspected CMPA were included in the study; the diagnosis was confirmed through DBPCFCs in 15 patients, who were those who participated in the study. After having been administered camel's milk, none of the patients presented adverse effects. Conclusions and clinical relevance Camel's milk is safe and tolerable in patients above one year of age with CMPA and can be considered as a good alternative given the benefit of its taste compared to other formulas.

      PubDate: 2017-12-15T08:18:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.06.005
       
  • Comparing the effects of fluticasone, anti-IgE and anti-TNF treatments in
           a chronic asthma model
    • Authors: M.Y. Ozkars; O. Keskin; M. Tokur; M. Ulasli; B. Gogebakan; H. Ciralik; E. Kucukosmanoglu; C. Demirel; S. Oztuzcu; H. Kahraman
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M.Y. Ozkars, O. Keskin, M. Tokur, M. Ulasli, B. Gogebakan, H. Ciralik, E. Kucukosmanoglu, C. Demirel, S. Oztuzcu, H. Kahraman
      Background Corticosteroids are used in the treatment of asthma. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of anti-IgE and anti-TNF alpha as asthma treatments. Methods A mouse model of chronic asthma was developed. The fluticasone group was exposed to fluticasone and the anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups were administered anti-IgE or anti-TNF. IL-4, and IgE levels were measured, and histological analysis, pathological analysis and miRNA-126, miRNA-133a analyses were applied. Results The cell concentration in the BAL fluid decreased in all the treatment groups. The rate of perivascular and peribronchial cell infiltration decreased in the lung in the high-dose anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. Smooth muscle thickness decreased in the lung tissue in the low-dose anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. Bronchial wall thickness decreased in the lung tissue in the fluticasone+anti-IgE group. The IL-4 level in BAL fluid decreased in the high-dose anti-IgE, fluticasone+anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. IgE levels increased in the BAL fluid in the high-dose anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. The lymphocyte level increased in the BAL fluid in the high-dose anti-IgE group. The macrophage level decreased in the BAL fluid in the anti-TNF group. The relative expression of miRNA-126 increased in all groups. The relative expression of miRNA-133a decreased in the placebo and fluticasone groups. The relative expression of miRNA-133a increased in the low-dose anti-IgE, high-dose anti-IgE, fluticasone+anti-IgE and anti-TNF groups. Conclusions The results showed that anti-IgE is successful as a treatment. Fluticasone+anti-IgE and anti-TNF were seen to be superior to other therapeutic modalities when used for prophylaxis.

      PubDate: 2017-12-15T08:18:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.07.003
       
  • Effects of mesenchymal stromal cells play a role the oxidant/antioxidant
           balance in a murine model of asthma
    • Authors: M.A.S. Malaquias; L.A. Oyama; P.C. Jericó; I. Costa; G. Padilha; S. Nagashima; M. Lopes-Pacheco; C.L.K. Rebelatto; P.V. Michelotto; D.G. Xisto; P.R.S. Brofman; P.R.M. Rocco; L. de Noronha
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M.A.S. Malaquias, L.A. Oyama, P.C. Jericó, I. Costa, G. Padilha, S. Nagashima, M. Lopes-Pacheco, C.L.K. Rebelatto, P.V. Michelotto, D.G. Xisto, P.R.S. Brofman, P.R.M. Rocco, L. de Noronha
      Asthma is a heterogeneous disease characterised by chronic airway inflammation. One of the most devastating consequences of this inflammatory process is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species responsible for oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to analyse the efficiency of treatment with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) in maintaining the oxidative balance in a murine model of allergic asthma by quantifying nitrotyrosine in lung tissues. After confirmation of asthma in the experimental model, samples of lung parenchyma were submitted to immunohistochemical assessment. Intravenous administration of hMSC reduced the levels of nitrotyrosine in the ASTHMA-hMSC group compared to those in the ASTHMA-SAL group. In conclusion, therapeutic administration of hMSC had a beneficial effect on oxidative stress, reducing the levels of nitrotyrosine in lung tissues in a model of allergic asthma.

      PubDate: 2017-12-15T08:18:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.06.003
       
  • Tablet-based sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy
    • Authors: Prieto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): L. Prieto
      Allergic respiratory disease represents a significant and expanding health problem worldwide. The gold standard of therapeutic intervention is still grucocorticosteroids, although they are not effective in all patients and may cause side effects. Allergen Immunotherapy has been administrated as subcutaneous injections for treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma and has been practiced for the past century. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablets are now available for grass- or ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis and will be available in Spain for house dust mite (HDM)-induced rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma in the next months. In this review, new developments in the field of tablet-based SLIT for respiratory allergy are summarized, with special emphasis on HDM-induced allergic rhinitis and asthma. SLIT tablets are the best-documented immunotherapy products on the market and represent a more patient-friendly concept because they can be self-administrated at home.

      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
       
  • Requirements of a new allergen regulation
    • Authors: Cristina Rivas-Juesas; Joan Tomás Bartra; Ana M. Purroy Tabar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): Cristina Rivas-Juesas, Joan Tomás Bartra, Ana M. Purroy Tabar


      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.004
       
  • New routes of allergen immunotherapy
    • Authors: C.R. Juesas; C.M. Aguilar; S. Vieths
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): C.R. Juesas, C.M. Aguilar, S. Vieths


      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.010
       
  • The future of immunotherapy with individual allergens: Immunotherapy with
           fungi
    • Authors: Pineda
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): F. Pineda


      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
       
  • Quality requirements for allergen extracts and allergoids for allergen
           immunotherapy
    • Authors: J. Zimmer; A. Bonertz; S. Vieths
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J. Zimmer, A. Bonertz, S. Vieths
      All allergen products for allergen immunotherapy currently marketed in the European Union are pharmaceutical preparations derived from allergen-containing source materials like pollens, mites and moulds. Especially this natural origin results in particular demands for the regulatory requirements governing allergen products. Furthermore, the development of regulatory requirements is complicated by the so far missing universal link between certain quality parameters, in particular biological potency, on the one hand and clinical efficacy on the other hand. As a consequence, each allergen product for specific immunotherapy has to be assessed individually for its quality, safety and efficacy. At the same time, biological potency of allergen products is most commonly determined using IgE inhibition assays based on human sera relative to product-specific in house references, ruling out full comparability of products from different manufacturers. This review article aims to summarize the current quality requirements for allergen products including the special requirements implemented for control of chemically modified allergen extracts (allergoids).

      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.002
       
  • Non-protease native allergens partially purified from bodies of eight
           domestic mites using p-aminobenzamidine ligand
    • Authors: T. Erban; R. Klubal
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): T. Erban, R. Klubal
      Background Optimised purification steps for concentrating trace target native antigens are needed. Combining the p-aminobenzamidine ligand with protease inactivation enables partial purification of mite non-protease allergens lacking proteases. Objective We sought to analyse in detail proteins obtained using this method from eight species of synanthropic acaridid mites and tested IgE reactivity using pooled human sera. Materials and methods Proteins affinity bound to p-aminobenzamidine as a ligand were identified by MALDI TOF/TOF. After electroblotting, the proteins were visualised using the fluorescent SYPRO-Ruby protein blot stain, and IgE reactivity was further analysed using pooled human sera collected from patients allergic to house dust mites. Results MS/MS identification confirmed previous results that no proteases were purified. Protein patterns corresponding to the allergens Der f 7, Der f 30 and actins indicated that these proteins are purified using p-aminobenzamidine and are present across a wide spectrum of acaridid mites. When using Dermatophagoides farinae, apolipophorins (Der f 14), chitinase-like Der f 15 and 18, 70-kDa heat shock protein, and a Der f Alt a10 allergen homolog (gi 37958173) were also detected. The target antigens tropomyosins and paramyosins showed similar IgE binding among the mite species tested. IgE reactivity with miscellaneous D. farinae antigen was also observed. Conclusions Partial purification of mite non-protease antigens using a strategy combining p-aminobenzamidine with protease inactivation was verified by 1D-E and 2D-E analyses. IgE binding to p-aminobenzamidine-purified native non-protease mite antigens was tested using pooled sera. This preliminary study allows for further work on individual serum samples, allowing confirmation of immunoreactivity.

      PubDate: 2017-11-13T23:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.07.004
       
  • Proposals for harmonization of allergens regulation in the European Union
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M. Timón
      Allergen medicinal products in the European Union are regulated differently across the different Member States. Thus, whereas in some countries strict quality, safety and efficacy requirements are in place, in others, most allergens are on the market as Named Patient Products, without any regulatory oversight. This situation results on European allergic patients being exposed to totally different standards depending on where they live. Initiatives to correct this situation are needed.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
       
  • Worldwide allergen immunotherapy guidelines: Evidence and experience-based
    • Authors: D.E.S. Larenas-Linnemann
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): D.E.S. Larenas-Linnemann


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.005
       
  • Debates in allergy, regarding the symposium on: “Position Statements and
           Therapeutic Guidelines”
    • Authors: P. Rodríguez del Río; A. Cisteró-Bahima; R. van Ree
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): P. Rodríguez del Río, A. Cisteró-Bahima, R. van Ree


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.006
       
  • Non-allergenic immunotherapy
    • Authors: E. Ibáñez Echevarría; J. Bartra Tomás; D. Hernández Fernández de Rojas
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E. Ibáñez Echevarría, J. Bartra Tomás, D. Hernández Fernández de Rojas


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.014
       
  • Epicutaneous immunotherapy
    • Authors: S. Scheurer; M. Toda
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): S. Scheurer, M. Toda


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.007
       
  • Predictive biomarkers in allergen specific immunotherapy
    • Authors: D. Barber; M.M. Escribese
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): D. Barber, M.M. Escribese


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.003
       
  • Biologics in the treatment of severe asthma
    • Authors: S. Quirce; E. Phillips-Angles; J. Domínguez-Ortega; P. Barranco
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): S. Quirce, E. Phillips-Angles, J. Domínguez-Ortega, P. Barranco
      Severe asthma is defined as asthma which requires treatment with high dose inhaled corticosteroids and with a second controller drug to prevent it from becoming uncontrolled or which remains uncontrolled despite this therapy. Patients with uncontrolled severe asthma require additional treatment options as add-on therapy, including biologics. Biologic therapies in asthma are designed to block key immune regulators, such as IgE, or certain pro-inflammatory cytokines, e.g. interleukin (IL)-5, IL-4, IL-13 or IL-17. Patients with severe asthma and eosinophilic phenotype may benefit from biologic therapies aimed at reducing blood and tissue eosinophils, such as mepolizumab, reslizumab and benralizumab. Patients with Th2-high phenotype may also benefit from therapy with anti-IL-4/anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibodies (dupilumab). The main limitations of asthma treatment with biologic agents are the crossover and overlap of the different pathways in the pathogenesis of asthma which may cause lack of complete success of these therapies, in addition of high costs, which make pharmacoeconomic studies necessary to identify the ideal target patient population to receive these biologic drugs.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.012
       
  • New insight into cancer immunotherapy
    • Authors: M.M. Escribese; D. Barber
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M.M. Escribese, D. Barber
      A key point for maintenance of the immune system homeostasis is the balance between the capacity to recognize and fight exogenous molecules and the capacity to avoid auto reactivity. The disruption of this balance induces the progression of several immune diseases such as autoimmune diseases, allergies, infections or cancer. A promising therapeutic approach to treat these diseases is immunotherapy. In cancer, both active and passive immunotherapies have been tested with promising results, such as the blocking of immunological checkpoints like CTLA-4 and PD-1. These treatments, in the market since a few years ago, aim to redirect the patient's immunological response by inhibiting the induction of regulatory T cells, both in the priming and effector phases. This strategy sheds light on the immunological mechanisms that control the regulatory response mediated by T cells and opens new lines of research into other immunological diseases such as allergy, in which the induction of a regulatory response is necessary to avoid allergic progression and which is the main objective of allergen-specific immunotherapies available today.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.013
       
  • Biologics in chronic urticaria
    • Authors: M. Ferrer; R. Madamba
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): M. Ferrer, R. Madamba


      PubDate: 2017-11-06T22:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.09.011
       
  • The safety profile of subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy in children with
           asthma in Hangzhou, East China
    • Authors: J.-L. Liu; W.-X. Ning; S.-X. Li; Y.-C. Xu; L. Wu; Y.-S. Wang; X.-F. Xu; Y. Jiang; Y.-J. Sheng; Y.-L. Zhou; J.-H. Wang; L.-F. Tang; Z.-M. Chen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J.-L. Liu, W.-X. Ning, S.-X. Li, Y.-C. Xu, L. Wu, Y.-S. Wang, X.-F. Xu, Y. Jiang, Y.-J. Sheng, Y.-L. Zhou, J.-H. Wang, L.-F. Tang, Z.-M. Chen
      Background The aim of the current study is to evaluate the prevalence, severity and possible risk factors of systemic reactions (SRs) to subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) in children and adolescents with asthma in Hangzhou, east China's Zhejiang province. Methods From January 2011 to December 2016, this survey analysed the SCIT-related SRs involving 429 patients (265 children and 134 adolescents) affected by allergic asthma. Recorded data included demographics, diagnosis, patient statuses, pulmonary function testing results before and after each injection, allergen dosage, and details of SRs. Results All patients finished the initial phase and six patients withdrew during the maintenance phase. There were 2.59% (328/12,655) SRs in all injections (3.28% in children and 1.47% in adolescents); 15.62% (67/429) patients experienced SRs (18.49% children and 10.98% adolescents). There were 54.57% SRs of grade 1; 42.37% SRs of grade 2; 3.05% SRs of grade 3; and no grades 4 or grade 5 SRs occurred in patients. Most reactions were mild, and were readily controlled by immediate emergency treatment. There was no need for hospitalisation. The occurrence of SRs was significantly higher in children than that in adolescents (p <0.01). A higher ratio of SRs was found among patients with moderate asthma. Conclusion This retrospective survey showed that properly-conducted SCIT was a safe treatment for children and adolescents with asthma in Hangzhou, East China. Children and patients with moderate asthma may be prone to develop SRs.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.04.002
       
  • Validation of a Spanish version of the EuroPrevall Food Allergy Quality of
           Life Questionnaire-Parental Form
    • Authors: E. Bartoll; M. Nieto; B. Selva; R. Badillo; G. Pereira; S. Uixera; A. Nieto; Á. Mazón
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 October 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): E. Bartoll, M. Nieto, B. Selva, R. Badillo, G. Pereira, S. Uixera, A. Nieto, Á. Mazón
      Background Food allergy can have a major impact on quality of life of children and their parents. Questionnaires have been developed to measure the impact of this disorder. We aimed to validate the EuroPrevall questionnaire on Food Allergy-Quality of Life Questionnaire, Parent Form (FAQLQ-PF) and the Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM), translated into Spanish. Methods The internal consistency of the FAQLQ-PF and the FAIM, translated into Spanish (Spain) and completed by the parents of 74 children with IgE-mediated food allergy, were evaluated with Cronbach's alpha. To test construct validity of the FAQLQ-PF, its correlation with the FAIM was also calculated. To assess their discriminant validity, we compared the values of both depending on the number of offending foods and for children with and without anaphylaxis. Results The values of Cronbach's alpha for the three domains in the FAQLQ-PF were over 0.9. The value of alpha for FAIM questions was below 0.6, which was attributed to the wording of one question. When this question was removed, alpha increased to over 0.70. There was a significant correlation between the FAQLQ-PF score and the FAIM. There were significantly poorer FAQLQ-PF scores in children with more food allergies and worse FAIM in those who had had anaphylaxis. Conclusions The Spanish version of the FAQLQ-PF had a good internal consistency, good construct validity and validity to discriminate patients with more food allergies and anaphylaxis. It can be used as a tool to evaluate and monitor the quality of life in families with food allergic children.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.06.004
       
  • Tolerance to baked and fermented cow's milk in children with IgE-mediated
           and non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy in patients under two years of age
           
    • Authors: A. Uncuoglu; N. Yologlu; I.E. Simsek; Z.S. Uyan; M. Aydogan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): A. Uncuoglu, N. Yologlu, I.E. Simsek, Z.S. Uyan, M. Aydogan
      Background IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA) has been shown consistent in milder heated-milk tolerant and severe heated-milk reactant groups in patients older than two years. Little is known whether fermentation of milk gives rise to similar clinical phenotypes. We aimed to determine the influence of extensively heated and fermented cow's milk on the IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated CMA in children younger than two years. Methods Subjects followed with the diagnosis of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated CMA for at least six months underwent unheated milk challenge. IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated groups were categorised as unheated milk-reactive and tolerant, separately. Unheated milk-reactive groups were further challenged sequentially with fermented milk (yoghurt) and baked milk, 15 days apart. Allergy evaluation with skin tests, prick-to-prick tests and atopy patch tests were performed. Results Fifty-seven children (median age: 14 months; range: 7–24 months) underwent unheated milk challenge. Eleven of 27 children with IgE-mediated CMA and 14 of 30 children with non-IgE-mediated CMA tolerated unheated milk. Among subjects who reacted to unheated milk; 15 of 16 subjects (93%) with IgE-mediated CMA also reacted to yoghurt, whereas 11 of 16 subjects (68%) with non-IgE-mediated CMA tolerated fermented milk. Thirteen subjects (81%) of the unheated milk-reactive IgE-mediated group tolerated to heated milk. None of 16 subjects of unheated milk-reactive non-IgE-mediated group reacted to baked milk. Conclusion The majority of children under the age of two years with both IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated CMA tolerated baked-milk products. Yoghurt was tolerated in two thirds of unheated milk reactive patients suffering from non-IgE-mediated CMA.

      PubDate: 2017-07-23T06:26:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.008
       
  • Effects of icariin on asthma mouse model are associated with regulation of
           prostaglandin D2 level
    • Authors: J. Qiao; S. Sun; L. Yuan; J. Wang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): J. Qiao, S. Sun, L. Yuan, J. Wang
      Background We aimed to observe the effect of icariin on an asthma mouse model and explore the potential underlying mechanisms. Methods The asthma mouse model was established by ovalbumin (OVA) sensitisation and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and then treated with icariin. Airway resistance was assessed by whole body plethysmograph. In addition, pathological slides were stained with haematoxylin–eosin, and the peribronchial inflammation was observed microscopically. The concentration of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was detected by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The relative level of prostaglandin D2 receptor 2 (CRTH2) mRNA was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Results Compared with the icariin-untreated group, there was a significant reduction of Penh in the treated group. Total leucocyte amount and all sorts of leukocytes were lower in the treated group than in the untreated group. HE staining results revealed that a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated into the peribronchial tissues of untreated group, and the degree of airway inflammation decreased significantly in the treated group. PGD2 in serum and BALF, as well as CRTH2 mRNA level in lung tissues were lower in the treated group than in the untreated group. Conclusion Icariin is a promising therapeutic strategy for asthma, and PGD2 might be a new target for asthma therapy in OVA-induced and RSV-infected asthma model.

      PubDate: 2017-07-13T05:27:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.02.007
       
  • Biomarkers of airway and systemic inflammation in obese asthmatic
           paediatric patients
    • Authors: H.T. Nacaroglu; O.B. Gayret; M. Erol; O. Buke; O. Zengi; M. Tasdemir; Z. Tasdemir; O. Yigit
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2017
      Source:Allergologia et Immunopathologia
      Author(s): H.T. Nacaroglu, O.B. Gayret, M. Erol, O. Buke, O. Zengi, M. Tasdemir, Z. Tasdemir, O. Yigit
      Background It is thought that airway inflammation is more common in obese asthmatic patients because inflammation is harder to control and does not respond well to glucocorticoid treatment. Objective This study's aim was to investigate the effect of obesity on airway and systemic inflammation in children with asthma and to identify the biomarkers that play a role in this inflammation. Methods The study included patients aged 6–16 years who were diagnosed with asthma in the paediatric allergy outpatient clinic of Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital in Turkey. Complete blood count parameters were compared between three groups: obese asthmatic (n =43), obese non-asthmatic (n =45), and non-obese non-asthmatic (control group, n =30). Levels of high-sensitive CRP (hs-CRP), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), osteopontin (OPN), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and 25(OH)-vitamin D were compared between the groups. Results No statistically significant differences were observed in 25(OH)-vitamin D, NGAL, OPN, hs-CRP, and MMP-9 levels between groups. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between FEV1/FVC and NGAL and MMP-9. Conclusion This is the first study to investigate levels of hs-CRP, NGAL, OPN, MMP-9, and 25(OH)-vitamin D in obese asthmatic children. Larger studies with sputum and BAL examinations are required to determine the potential of biomarkers for identifying inflammation in obese asthmatic children.

      PubDate: 2017-07-13T05:27:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aller.2017.01.013
       
 
 
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