for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3162 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3162 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 403, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.732, CiteScore: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 138, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 391, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 336, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 442, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 170, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
Aeolian Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.117
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1875-9637
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3162 journals]
  • The response of live plants to airflow – Implication for reducing
           erosion
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 33Author(s): Abbas Miri, Deirdre Dragovich, Zhibao Dong The form response of a plant to airflow is a critical factor influencing plant resistance to strong winds and thus the effectiveness of vegetation in reducing wind erosion. As this response is determined by the morphology of the plant and is different in different plant species, the responses of two morphologically different plants to airflow were investigated in wind tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic characteristics of frontal area (FA), optical porosity (OP), frontal area efficiency (FAeff) and wind drag force (FD) in a range of wind velocities were determined for narrow-leafed Cosmos bipinnatus and broad-leafed Ligustrum lucidum Ait. FA and OP reflect a plant’s ability to absorb momentum and allow throughflow, and changes in both measures are linked to wind velocity. In higher wind velocities, FA and OP of both plant types decreased, although L. lucidum lost less frontal area and more porosity than C. bipinnatus. E values (a reconfiguration measure of changes in form) were greater and FD values were less for C. bipinnatus than for L. lucidum. As broad-leafed L. lucidum provided a greater resistance to strong winds than C. bipinnatus, investigating the aerodynamic properties of suitable broad-leafed plants for erosion control in arid lands is recommended.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Projected changes in dust emissions and regional air quality due to the
           shrinking Salton Sea
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 33Author(s): Sagar P. Parajuli, Charles S. Zender The Salton Sea lake level in California is expected to transition in 2018 from a period of gradual decline to a new era of rapid decline that will expose about 40% of the year 2000 lakebed to wind erosion by 2030. The newly exposed Playa substrate can emit large amounts of particulate matter (PM) and thus degrade regional air quality. We use the Weather Research Forecast model (WRF-Chem) to estimate changes in dust aerosol emission and distribution in the Salton Sea region from 2000 to 2030. First, we evaluate simulations of present day wind speed, mineral dust emission, concentration, and optical depth over the region. WRF-Chem at 4 km spatial resolution satisfactorily reproduces the present-day spatio-temporal pattern of dust emission. With an estimated 38% exposure of the Salton Sea by 2030, the domain-averaged PM10 in the 2 × 2 degree domain enclosing the Sea increases on average by 11% and by nearly a factor of ten in localized source areas. The simulated increases in dust emission are consistent with earlier empirical estimates although our estimates are comparatively lower. Our regional model provides more spatially detailed and quantitative attribution of the projected air quality degradation. For example, our model suggests that newly exposed playa emissions will emanate more from the southwest than southeast side of the lake, even though most of the new playa will be on the southeast side. These results may inform decisions that affect trade-offs between environmental quality, human health, and water-use issues in the Salton Sea region.
       
  • Variation and interplay of the Siberian High and westerlies in
           central-east Asia during the past 1200 kyr
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 33Author(s): Fei Wang, Zaijun Li, Xin Wang, Baofeng Li, Fahu Chen The Siberian High (SH) and the westerlies interact in the central-east Asia and jointly influence the aeolian variations in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the spatiotemporal variations of the two climatic systems, as well as their interaction, are still unclear. Here, we present a reconstruction of the variation of two systems during the past 1200 kyr based on grain-size analyses of multiple aeolian sequences from central-east Asia along the path of the westerlies and from the area downwind of the SH. The results show that the SH and the resulting winds exhibited a stepwise enhancement at 900, 700 and 300 ka, and that the SH expanded significantly towards western China at 300 ka. In addition, the westerlies dominated western China as far east as the Badain Jaran area during 1200–500 kyr with an enhancement at 900 ka, and then gradually weakened following a striking enhancement at 500 ka; subsequently, their influence on aeolian activity in western China progressively decreased and was replaced by an enhanced SH at 300 ka. With the gradual increase of the SH at 700 and 300 ka, its influence reached the altitude of the westerlies and thus significantly affected the westerlies dust size. The mid-Pleistocene uplift of the Tibetan Plateau (1200–600 kyr) intensified the SH and resulted in the blocking of the westerlies, weakening the wind strength and producing dry conditions in western China at 500 ka. Increasing global ice volume is also responsible for the variations and interplay of SH and westerlies, especially at 300 ka.
       
  • Automatic extraction of yardangs using Landsat 8 and UAV images: A case
           study in the Qaidam Basin, China
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 33Author(s): Yanhui Zhao, Ninghua Chen, Jianyu Chen, Chengqing Hu Yardangs are ridge features of various scales indicating the direction of prevailing wind when they evolved. In this paper, we apply an integrated approach for the automatic extraction of yardangs in typical areas of the Qaidam Basin. Canny’s edge detection algorithm is used for yardangs in 15-m Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) data to acquire the spatial distribution patterns of yardangs, and ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to get the morphological parameters of yardangs in 1.7-m Digital Elevation Model (DEM) generated by unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images. Both the spatial distribution patterns and morphological parameters can improve knowledge of yardangs. The experimental results illustrate the accuracy and feasibility of the proposed extraction approach for the spatial distribution patterns of yardangs with an average relative error no more than 10%. The statistical analysis shows that most of yardangs developed near anticlines and few in synclines; most yardangs are in Pliocene strata, and a few in lower and middle Pleistocene strata. For the automatically extracted morphological parameters, the relative error of each parameter is less than 6%, which is meaningful for the type identification of yardangs.
       
  • Quartz OSL and K-feldspar post-IR IRSL dating of loess in the Huangshui
           river valley, northeastern Tibetan plateau
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 33Author(s): Yixuan Wang, Tianyuan Chen, Chongyi E., Fuyuan An, Zhongping Lai, Lin Zhao, Xiang-Jun Liu The northeastern Tibetan Plateau (NETP) is located in the climatically sensitive semiarid zone between the regions controlled by the East Asian monsoon and the Westerlies and loess deposits there may preserve a record of regional paleoenvironmental change. Establishing a robust loess chronology is critical for interpreting and correlating environmental records. In this study, quartz optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) and K-feldspar post-IR infrared (IR) stimulated luminescence (pIR-IRSL) dating methods have been used to date the Ledu loess section in the Huangshui river valley, on the NETP. In terms of quartz OSL dating, the results from both the 63–90 μm and 38–63 μm quartz fractions are consistent within errors. The reliability of the 63–90 μm K-feldspar pIRIR dating was confirmed by internal check using preheat plateau, dose recovery, anomalous fading, and residual dose tests. The results suggest that the K-feldspar pIRIR signals at stimulation temperatures of 170 and 225 °C were well bleached before deposition of Ledu loess. Comparison between quartz OSL and K-feldspar pIRIR dating indicates that quartz ages older than 50 ka (∼150 Gy) may be underestimated. In establishing the chronological framework for the study section, we selected quartz OSL results for ages 50 ka. The results demonstrate that aeolian dust accumulated continuously between 67 and 25 ka, and there were two gaps in deposition, between 25 and 2 ka and from 80 to 67 ka.
       
  • Evaluation of the relationship between PM10 concentrations and heavy
           metals during normal and dusty days in Ahvaz, Iran
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 33Author(s): Mohammad Heidari Farsani, Mohammad Shirmardi, Nadali Alavi, Heidar Maleki, Armin Sorooshian, Aliakbar Babaei, Hosseinali Asgharnia, Mohammad Bagherian Marzouni, Gholamreza Goudarzi This study aimed to survey the concentration of PM10 and heavy metals (cadmium, chromium, cobalt, nickel, lead, and zinc) on normal and dusty days in Ahvaz, Iran. Concentrations of PM10 in a high-traffic area of the city were measured from October 2012 to September 2013 using a high-volume sampler (HVS). Extracted heavy metals were speciated and quantified using Inductivity Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The results of this study showed that the average concentration of PM10 in the autumn (October, November, and December), winter (January, February, and March), spring (April, May, and June), and summer (July, August, and September) was 131, 189, 145, and 127 µg/m3 on normal days, respectively. The corresponding values on dusty days were 410, 742, 300, and 278 µg/m3, respectively. The concentrations of the heavy metals during dusty days were higher than those on normal days. The ratio of the overall mean concentration of the heavy metals on dust storm days relative to normal days (D/N ratio) ranged from 1.21 to 2.53. Due to the importance and impacts of PM10 and associated heavy metals on human health, further studies should be conducted to evaluate the concentrations, impacts, and the associated diseases during pollution periods to establish and implement strategies to minimize harmful effects of PM inhalation.
       
  • Determining sand strip characteristics using Argus video monitoring
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 33Author(s): P.M. Hage, B.G. Ruessink, J.J.A. Donker The wind transports sand from the beach to the dunes and is therefore important for dune growth and recovery after a storm. Identifying the conditions that favour aeolian sand transport is especially important for narrow beaches, where measured long-term (seasons to years) deposition volumes on the foredune are often substantially less than the potential input from the beach. One of the most visually distinct signs of aeolian transport can be seen when relatively dry sand moves over a wet beach and organises itself to form low, slipfaceless bedforms. These features are known as sand strips. Here, we investigate the presence and characteristics of sand strips and their dependence on regional wind conditions by using a multi-year data set of video images of the Argus tower at Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands. The dataset average wavelength and migration rate of the sand strips is 12.0 m and 1.24 m/h, respectively. Little to no relation was found between these two sand-strip characteristics and the wind velocity. The presence of these bedforms does not depend on wind velocity either, provided the wind velocity exceeds ∼8 m/s. Instead, the wind direction determines if fully-developed sand strips form, as they are seen during alongshore or almost alongshore winds only. Our observations are indicative of topographic steering of the wind by the 25-m high foredune into the alongshore direction, as sand strips move alongshore even under onshore-oblique, regional winds.
       
  • Quantitative analysis of ground penetrating radar data in the Mu Us
           Sandland
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Tianyang Fu, Lihua Tan, Yongqiu Wu, Yanglei Wen, Dawei Li, Jinlong Duan Ground penetrating radar (GPR), which can reveal the sedimentary structure and development process of dunes, is widely used to evaluate aeolian landforms. The interpretations for GPR profiles are mostly based on qualitative descriptions of geometric features of the radar reflections. This research quantitatively analyzed the waveform parameter characteristics of different radar units by extracting the amplitude and time interval parameters of GPR data in the Mu Us Sandland in China, and then identified and interpreted different sedimentary structures. The results showed that different types of radar units had specific waveform parameter characteristics. The main waveform parameter characteristics of sand dune radar facies and sandstone radar facies included low amplitudes and wide ranges of time intervals, ranging from 0 to 0.25 and 4 to 33 ns respectively, and the mean amplitudes changed gradually with time intervals. The amplitude distribution curves of various sand dune radar facies were similar as unimodal distributions. The radar surfaces showed high amplitudes with time intervals concentrated in high-value areas, ranging from 0.08 to 0.61 and 9 to 34 ns respectively, and the mean amplitudes changed drastically with time intervals. The amplitude and time interval values of lacustrine radar facies were between that of sand dune radar facies and radar surfaces, ranging from 0.08 to 0.29 and 11 to 30 ns respectively, and the mean amplitude and time interval curve was approximately trapezoidal. The quantitative extraction and analysis of GPR reflections could help distinguish various radar units and provide evidence for identifying sedimentary structure in aeolian landforms.
       
  • Palaeoenvironmental implication of grain-size compositions of terrace
           deposits on the western Chinese Loess Plateau
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Xingxing Liu, Youbin Sun, Jef Vandenberghe, Ying Li, Zhisheng An Sedimentary sequences that developed on river terraces have been widely investigated to reconstruct high-resolution palaeoclimatic changes since the last deglaciation. However, frequent changes in sedimentary facies make palaeoenvironmental interpretation of grain-size variations relatively complicated. In this paper, we employed multiple grain-size parameters to discriminate the sedimentary characteristics of aeolian and fluvial facies in the Dadiwan (DDW) section on the western Chinese Loess Plateau. We found that wind and fluvial dynamics have quite different impacts on the grain-size compositions, with distinctive imprints on the distribution pattern. By using a lognormal distribution fitting approach, two major grain-size components sensitive to aeolian and fluvial processes, respectively, were distinguished from the grain-size compositions of the DDW terrace deposits. The fine grain-size component (GSC2) represents mixing of long-distance aeolian and short-distance fluvial inputs, whilst the coarse grain-size component (GSC3) is mainly transported by wind from short-distance sources. Thus GSC3 can be used to infer the wind intensity. Grain-size variations reveal that the wind intensity experienced a stepwise shift from large-amplitude variations during the last deglaciation to small-amplitude oscillations in the Holocene, corresponding well to climate changes from regional to global context.
       
  • Simulations of wind erosion along the Qinghai-Tibet Railway in
           north-central Tibet
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Yingsha Jiang, Yanhong Gao, Zhibao Dong, Benli Liu, Lin Zhao Wind erosion along the Qinghai-Tibet Railway causes sand hazard and poses threats to the safety of trains and passengers. A coupled land-surface erosion model (Noah-MPWE) was developed to simulate the wind erosion along the railway. Comparison with the data from the 137Cs isotope analysis shows that this coupled model could simulate the mean erosion amount reasonably. The coupled model was then applied to eight sites along the railway to investigate the wind-erosion distribution and variations from 1979 to 2012. Factors affecting wind erosion spatially and temporally were assessed as well. Majority wind erosion occurs in the non-monsoon season from December to April of the next year except for the site located in desert. The region between Wudaoliang and Tanggula has higher wind erosion occurrences and soil lose amount because of higher frequency of strong wind and relatively lower soil moisture than other sites. Inter-annually, all sites present a significant decreasing trend of annual soil loss with an average rate of −0.18 kg m−2 a−1 in 1979–2012. Decreased frequency of strong wind, increased precipitation and soil moisture contribute to the reduction of wind erosion in 1979–2012. Snow cover duration and vegetation coverage also have great impact on the occurrence of wind erosion.
       
  • Effects of low-scale landscape structures on aeolian transport processes
           on arable land
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Nicole Siegmund, Roger Funk, Sylvia Koszinsky, Daniel Eduardo Buschiazzo, Michael Sommer The landscape of the semiarid Pampa in central Argentina is characterized by late Pleistocene aeolian deposits, covering large plains with sporadic dune structures. Since the current land use changed from extensive livestock production within the Caldenal forest ecosystem to arable land, the wind erosion risk increased distinctly. We measured wind erosion and deposition patterns at the plot scale and investigated the spatial variability of the erosion processes. The wind-induced mass-transport was measured with 18 Modified Wilson and Cooke samplers (MWAC), installed on a 1.44 ha large field in a 20 × 40 m grid. Physical and chemical soil properties from the upper soil as well as a digital elevation model were recorded in a 20 × 20 m grid. In a 5-month measuring campaign data from seven storms with three different wind directions was obtained. Results show very heterogeneous patterns of erosion and deposition for each storm and indicate favoured erosion on windward and deposits on leeward terrain positions. Furthermore, a multiple regression model was build, explaining up to 70% of the spatial variance of erosion by just using four predictors: topsoil thickness, relative elevation, soil organic carbon content and slope direction. Our findings suggest a structure-process-structure complex where the landscape structure determines the effects of recent wind erosion processes which again slowly influence the structure, leading to a gradual increase of soil heterogeneity.
       
  • New research on the origin of mottled clay in Quaternary basins in the
           coastal area of south China
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Jing Wang, Zhen Chen, Quanzhou Gao, Guoneng Chen Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) mottled clay occurs widely in Late Quaternary basins in south China coastal areas. Current research attributes its origin to exposure weathering of Late Pleistocene marine/fluvial deposits during the LGM. However, field data suggest that this is not the case as there is no gradual transition in lithology, grain size, structure and material composition among these layers. Instead, the mottled clay possesses sedimentary characteristics of exotic dust. In this study, three typical drill cores in the Pearl River Delta were studied using grain size analysis, diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and geochemical analysis to ascertain the clay’s sedimentary characteristics and origin. Grain size distribution patterns and parameters of the mottled clay were similar to those of a typical loess, indicating aeolian origin. In DRS curves, the peak height of hematite > goethite, indicating that the mottled clay had not experienced strong hydration and constitutes a continental product. This conforms to a typical loess but differs from the underlying marine/fluvial deposits. The chemical composition of the mottled clay was homogeneous in the vertical and planar directions. Upper continental crust (UCC) normalized curves of major and trace elements of the mottled clay were close to the average UCC and were consistent with typical aeolian deposits. The spatial and temporal distribution characteristics and relationship with the underlying layer suggest that the mottled clay was a loess-like deposit during the LGM and its mottled structure originated from strong modification of oxidation during the postglacial period after homogeneous dust had accumulated.
       
  • Exploring dust emission responses to land cover change using an ecological
           land classification
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Magda S. Galloza, Nicholas P. Webb, Max P. Bleiweiss, Craig Winters, Jeffrey E. Herrick, Eldon Ayers Despite efforts to quantify the impacts of land cover change on wind erosion, assessment uncertainty remains large. We address this uncertainty by evaluating the application of ecological site concepts and state-and-transition models (STMs) for detecting and quantitatively describing the impacts of land cover change on wind erosion. We apply a dust emission model over a rangeland study area in the northern Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA, and evaluate spatiotemporal patterns of modelled horizontal sediment mass flux and dust emission in the context of ecological sites and their vegetation states; representing a diversity of land cover types. Our results demonstrate how the impacts of land cover change on dust emission can be quantified, compared across land cover classes, and interpreted in the context of an ecological model that encapsulates land management intensity and change. Results also reveal the importance of established weaknesses in the dust model soil characterisation and drag partition scheme, which appeared generally insensitive to the impacts of land cover change. New models that address these weaknesses, coupled with ecological site concepts and field measurements across land cover types, could significantly reduce assessment uncertainties and provide opportunities for identifying land management options.
       
  • On the frequency response of a Wenglor particle-counting system for
           aeolian transport measurements
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Bernard O. Bauer, Robin G.D. Davidson-Arnott, Michael J. Hilton, Douglas Fraser A commonly deployed particle-counting system for aeolian saltation flux, consisting of a Wenglor fork sensor and an Onset Hobo Pulse Input Adapter linked to an Onset Hobo Energy Logger Pro data logger, was tested for frequency response. The Wenglor fork sensor is an optical gate device that has very fast switching capacity that can accommodate the time of flight of saltating sand particles through the sensing volume with the exception of very fine sand or silt and very quickly moving particles. The Pulse Input Adapter, in contrast, imposes limitations on the frequency response of the system. The manufacturer of the pulse adapter specifies an upper limit of 120 Hz, although bench tests with an electronic pulse generator indicate that the frequency response of the Pulse Input Adapter, in isolation, is excellent up to 3000 Hz, with only small error (less than 1.6%) due to under-counting during data transfer intervals. A mechanical test of the integrated system (fork sensor, pulse input adapter, and data logger) demonstrates excellent performance up to about 700 Hz (less than 2% error), but significant under-counting above 1000 Hz for unknown reasons. This specific particle-counting system therefore has a frequency response that is well suited for investigation of the dynamics of aeolian saltation as typically encountered in most field conditions on coastal beaches with the exception of extreme wind events and very small particle sizes.
       
  • Interaction of petroleum mulching, vegetation restoration and dust fallout
           on the conditions of sand dunes in southwest of Iran
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Liela Azoogh, Bijan Khalili moghadam, Siroos Jafari In the past half-century, petroleum mulching-biological fixation (PM-BF) practices have been employed to stabilize sand dunes in Iran. However, the effects of PM-BF practices on the attributes of sand dunes and the dispersion of heavy metals of mulch have been poorly understood. To this end, three regions treated with PM-BF for 5, 20, and 40 years and a control region with no PM-BF were studied. Samples of soil properties were taken at the depths of 0–10 cm and 10–50 cm, with three replications, in Khuzestan Province. The results showed that PM-BF practices promoted the restoration of vegetation cover in the sand dunes. In addition, these practices increased the deposition of dust particles, gradually increasing the magnitudes of palygorskite and smectite clays over time. The interactions between dust deposition and PM-BF practices significantly altered the chemical and physical properties of the dunes. PM-BF practices increased soil organic matter (184–287%), cation exchangeable capacity (142–209%), electrical conductivity (144–493%), clay content (134–196%), and penetration resistance (107–170%) compared to the region with no PM-BF practices. Furthermore, petroleum mulching significantly increased the amount of Ni (1.19%), Cd (1.55%), Pb (1.08%), Cu (1.34%), Zn (1.38%), Mn (1.66%), and Fe (1.15%). However, in the long term, these elements will probably leach linearly as a consequence of an increase in organic matter and soil salinity in the light texture of sand dunes.
       
  • PM10 emission efficiency for agricultural soils: Comparing a wind tunnel,
           a dust generator, and the open-air plot
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Fernando Avecilla, Juan E. Panebianco, Mariano J. Mendez, Daniel E. Buschiazzo The PM10 emission efficiency of soils has been determined through different methods. Although these methods imply important physical differences, their outputs have never been compared. In the present study the PM10 emission efficiency was determined for soils through a wide range of textures, using three typical methodologies: a rotary-chamber dust generator (EDG), a laboratory wind tunnel on a prepared soil bed, and field measurements on an experimental plot. Statistically significant linear correlation was found (p 
       
  • Provenance of aeolian sands in the Hetao Plain, northwestern China
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Xingchen Yang, Maotang Cai, Peisheng Ye, Mengni Ye, Chenglu Li, Hang Wu, Jing Lu, Tao Wang, Zhirong Zhao, Yangfan Luzhou, Chao Liu Patches of aeolian sand are distributed throughout the Hetao Plain, which pose threats to farming and agriculture. Identification of the provenance of the aeolian sands may help with efforts to alleviate ecological stress in Inner Mongolia and in the paleoenvironmental interpretation of sandy sequences. This study uses geochemical data to determine the provenance of aeolian sands from the Hetao Plain. Provenance discrimination diagrams revealed that the aeolian sands were mainly derived from mixed source felsic granites and granodiorites, which have undergone weak sedimentary recycling. The chemical index of alteration and A–CN–K data indicated that the aeolian sediments were transported over a short distance. Comparison of trace element and rare earth element (REE) ratios of the aeolian sands with rock samples from potential source areas has revealed that aeolian sand deposits in the Hetao Plain were mainly derived from Sertengshan and Yellow River sediments. The Langshan and Ordos Plateau may represent additional sand sources for the Hetao Plain.
       
  • Spatial variation in the flux of atmospheric deposition and its ecological
           effects in arid Asia
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Linlin Jiao, Xunming Wang, Danfeng Li Atmospheric deposition is one of the key land surface processes, and plays important roles in regional ecosystems and global climate change. Previous studies have focused on the magnitude of and the temporal and spatial variations in the flux of atmospheric deposition, and the composition of atmospheric deposition on a local scale. However, there have been no comprehensive studies of atmospheric deposition on a regional scale and its ecological effects in arid Asia. The temporal and spatial patterns, composition of atmospheric deposition, and its potential effects on regional ecosystems in arid Asia are investigated in this study. The results show that the annual deposition flux is high on the Turan Plain, Aral Sea Desert, and Tarim Basin. The seasonal deposition flux also varies remarkably among different regions. The Tarim Basin shows higher deposition flux in both spring and summer, southern Mongolian Plateau has a higher deposition flux in spring, and the deposition flux of Iran Plateau is higher in summer. Multiple sources of elements in deposited particles are identified. Calcium, iron, aluminum, and magnesium are mainly derived from remote regions, while zinc, copper and lead have predominantly anthropogenic sources. Atmospheric deposition can provide abundant nutrients to vegetation and consequently play a role in the succession of regional ecosystems by affecting the structure, function, diversity, and primary production of the vegetation, especially the exotic or short-lived opportunistic species in arid Asia. Nevertheless, there is not much evidence of the ecological effects of atmospheric deposition on the regional and local scale. The present results may help in further understanding the mechanism of atmospheric deposition as well as providing a motivation for the protection of the ecological environment in arid Asia.
       
  • Geochemical evidence for the provenance of aeolian deposits in the Qaidam
           Basin, Tibetan Plateau
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Shisong Du, Yongqiu Wu, Lihua Tan The main purpose of this study is to analyse the material source of different grain-size components of dune sand in the Qaidam Basin. We determined the trace and rare earth element (REE) compositions and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the coarse (75–500 μm) and fine (
       
  • Field and laboratory comparison of PM10 instruments in high winds
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Brenton Sharratt, Huawei Pi Instruments capable of measuring PM10 (particulate matter ≤10 µm in aerodynamic diameter) concentrations may vary in performance as a result of different technologies utilized in measuring PM10. Therefore, the performance of five instruments capable of measuring PM10 concentrations above eroding soil surfaces was tested during high wind events at field sites in the Columbia Plateau and inside a wind tunnel. Comparisons among the Big Spring Number Eight (BSNE) sampler, DustTrak monitor, E-sampler, High-Volume sampler, and Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) monitor were made at field sites during nine wind erosion events and inside a wind tunnel at two wind speeds (7 and 12 m s−1) and two ambient PM10 concentrations (2 and 50 mg m−3). PM10 concentrations were similar for the High-Volume sampler and TEOM monitor as well as for the BSNE samplers and DustTrak monitors but higher for the High-Volume sampler and TEOM monitor than the E-sampler during field erosion events. Based upon wind tunnel experiments, the TEOM monitor measured the highest PM10 concentration while the DustTrak monitor typically measured the lowest PM10 concentration as compared with other instruments. In addition, PM10 concentration appeared to lower for all instruments at a wind speed of 12 as compared with 7 m s−1 inside the wind tunnel. Differences in the performance of instruments in measuring PM10 concentration poses risks in comparing PM10 concentration among different instrument types or using multiple instrument types to jointly measure concentrations in the field or laboratory or even the same instrument type subject to different wind speeds.
       
  • Using rare earth elements to trace wind-driven dispersion of sediments
           from a point source
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): R. Scott Van Pelt, Melanie C.W. Barnes, John E. Strack The entrainment and movement of aeolian sediments is determined by the direction and intensity of erosive winds. Although erosive winds may blow from all directions, in most regions there is a predominant direction. Dust emission causes the removal preferentially of soil nutrients and contaminants which may be transported tens to even thousands of kilometers from the source and deposited into other ecosystems. It would be beneficial to understand spatially and temporally how the soil source may be degraded and depositional zones enriched. A stable chemical tracer not found in the soil but applied to the surface of all particles in the surface soil would facilitate this endeavor. This study examined whether solution-applied rare earth elements (REEs) could be used to trace aeolian sediment movement from a point source through space and time at the field scale. We applied erbium nitrate solution to a 5 m2 area in the center of a 100 m diameter field 7854 m2 on the Southern High Plains of Texas. The solution application resulted in a soil-borne concentration three orders of magnitude greater than natively found in the field soil. We installed BSNE sampler masts in circular configurations and collected the trapped sediment weekly. We found that REE-tagged sediment was blown into every sampler mast during the course of the study but that there was a predominant direction of transport during the spring. This preliminary investigation suggests that the REEs provide a viable and incisive technique to study spatial and temporal variation of aeolian sediment movement from specific sources to identifiable locations of deposition or locations through which the sediments were transported as horizontal mass flux and the relative contribution of the specific source to the total mass flux.
       
  • Application of fuzzy logic approach for wind erosion hazard mapping in
           Laghouat region (Algeria) using remote sensing and GIS
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Djouher Saadoud, Mohamed Hassani, Francisco José Martin Peinado, Mohamed Saïd Guettouche Wind erosion is one of the most serious environmental problems in Algeria that threatens human activities and socio-economic development. The main goal of this study is to apply a fuzzy logic approach to wind erosion sensitivity mapping in the Laghouat region, Algeria. Six causative factors, obtained by applying fuzzy membership functions to each used parameter, are considered: soil, vegetation cover, wind factor, soil dryness, land topography and land cover sensitivity. Different fuzzy operators (AND, OR, SUM, PRODUCT, and GAMMA) are applied to generate wind-erosion hazard map. Success rate curves reveal that the fuzzy gamma (γ) operator, with γ equal to 0.9, gives the best prediction accuracy with an area under curve of 85.2%. The resulting wind-erosion sensitivity map delineates the area into different zones of five relative sensitivity classes: very high, high, moderate, low and very low. The estimated result was verified by field measurements and the high statistically significant value of a chi-square test.
       
  • Field testing, comparison, and discussion of five aeolian sand transport
           measuring devices operating on different measuring principles
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Dirk Goossens, Corjan Nolet, Vicken Etyemezian, Leonardo Duarte-Campos, Gerben Bakker, Michel Riksen Five types of sediment samplers designed to measure aeolian sand transport were tested during a wind erosion event on the Sand Motor, an area on the west coast of the Netherlands prone to severe wind erosion. Each of the samplers operates on a different principle. The MWAC (Modified Wilson And Cooke) is a passive segmented trap. The modified Leatherman sampler is a passive vertically integrating trap. The Saltiphone is an acoustic sampler that registers grain impacts on a microphone. The Wenglor sampler is an optical sensor that detects particles as they pass through a laser beam. The SANTRI (Standalone AeoliaN Transport Real-time Instrument) detects particles travelling through an infrared beam, but in different channels each associated with a particular grain size spectrum. A procedure is presented to transform the data output, which is different for each sampler, to a common standard so that the samplers can be objectively compared and their relative efficiency calculated. Results show that the efficiency of the samplers is comparable despite the differences in operating principle and the instrumental and environmental uncertainties associated to working with particle samplers in field conditions. The ability of the samplers to register the temporal evolution of a wind erosion event is investigated. The strengths and weaknesses of the samplers are discussed. Some problems inherent to optical sensors are looked at in more detail. Finally, suggestions are made for further improvement of the samplers.
       
  • A clarion call for aeolian research to engage with global land degradation
           and climate change
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Adrian Chappell, Jeffrey A. Lee, Matthew Baddock, Thomas E. Gill, Jeffrey E. Herrick, John F. Leys, Beatrice Marticorena, Lynda Petherick, Kerstin Schepanski, John Tatarko, Matt Telfer, Nicholas P. Webb
       
  • The response of source-bordering aeolian dunefields to sediment-supply
           changes 1: Effects of wind variability and river-valley morphodynamics
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: Aeolian Research, Volume 32Author(s): Joel B. Sankey, Alan Kasprak, Joshua Caster, Amy E. East, Helen C. Fairley Source-bordering dunefields (SBDs), which are primarily built and maintained with river-derived sediment, are found in many large river valleys and are currently impacted by changes in sediment supply due to climate change, land use changes, and river regulation. Despite their importance, a physically based, applied approach for quantifying the response of SBDs to changes in sediment supply does not exist. To address this knowledge gap, here we develop an approach for quantifying the geomorphic responses to sediment-supply alteration based on the interpretation of dunefield morphodynamics from geomorphic change detection and wind characteristics. We use the approach to test hypotheses about the response of individual dunefields to variability in sediment supply at three SBDs along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA during the 11 years between 2002 and 2013 when several river floods rebuilt some river sandbars and channel margin deposits that serve as sediment source areas for the SBDs. We demonstrate that resupply of fluvially sourced aeolian sediment occurred at one of the SBDs, but not at the other two, and attribute this differential response to site-specific variability in geomorphology, wind, and sediment source areas. The approach we present is applied in a companion study to shorter time periods with high-resolution topographic data that bracket individual floods in order to infer the resupply of fluvially sourced aeolian sediment to SBDs by managed river flows. Such an applied methodology could also be useful for measuring sediment connectivity and anthropogenic alterations of connectivity in other coupled fluvial-aeolian environments.
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.224.60.122
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-