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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3030 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3030 Journals sorted alphabetically
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 79, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 303, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 196, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 120, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 332, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 304, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 390, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access  
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 154, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription  
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.711, h-index: 78)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.394, h-index: 30)
Annales d'Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.177, h-index: 13)
Annales de Chirurgie de la Main et du Membre Supérieur     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Chirurgie Plastique Esthétique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 22)
Annales de Chirurgie Vasculaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover Advances in Life Course Research
  [SJR: 0.764]   [H-I: 15]   [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1040-2608
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3030 journals]
  • Family Planning under Financial Constraints
    • Authors: Petra Buhr; Laura Castiglioni
      Pages: 12 - 20
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Petra Buhr, Laura Castiglioni
      International evidence shows that contraceptive behavior depends, among other things, on socio-economic factors such as income and education. The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between low-income status and contraceptive behavior in Germany in more detail. As an indicator of low income we use the receipt of a means-tested benefit called “Unemployment Benefit II” (UB II). We assume that the transition into this benefit program is related to a change in women's contraceptive choices, in favor of using unpaid methods or no contraceptives at all. Using data from the German Family Panel pairfam, we focused on the use of any contraceptive method which involves costs to the user, as opposed to the use of methods which do not incur monetary costs (e.g., natural contraception) or the disuse of any contraceptives. Our bivariate logistic model on the pooled dataset shows that women receiving UB II without the intent to have children in the next two years are less likely to use paid contraceptives than non-recipients. However, this appears to be a spurious correlation, as the longitudinal hybrid model shows no relation between intrapersonal changes regarding UB II and the use of contraceptives subject to cost. This model also provides evidence that women with a migration background and lower education are less likely to use paid contraceptives.

      PubDate: 2017-03-07T07:55:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.02.001
      Issue No: Vol. 32 (2017)
       
  • Development is a life-long process
    • Authors: Laura Bernardi; Juho Härkönen
      Pages: 68 - 69
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 31
      Author(s): Laura Bernardi, Juho Härkönen


      PubDate: 2017-03-31T12:41:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.03.002
      Issue No: Vol. 31 (2017)
       
  • IFC. Editorial Board / Aims and Scope
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 31


      PubDate: 2017-03-31T12:41:42Z
       
  • The transition to adulthood and pathways out of the parental home: A
           cross-national analysis
    • Authors: Katrin Schwanitz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 March 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Katrin Schwanitz
      This study uses the second Wave of the Generations and Gender Survey (GGS) to examine young adults’ transition to adulthood in eight European countries (Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Hungary, Lithuania, and the Netherlands). I use reconstructed life courses from age 18 to 34 (N=21,696) to simultaneously study key life course trajectories employing multichannel sequence analysis. In doing so, I adopt a comparative framework which specifically addresses cross-national differences in young adults’ life course trajectories and cross-national differences in the educational gradient of life course trajectories. The aim of this paper is to provide a holistic picture of young adults’ different pathways out of the parental home and their transition to adulthood in contemporary Europe. The main results indicate that young adults’ life course trajectories differ by education, country and sex, but also that the educational gradient is highly context-specific across European countries.

      PubDate: 2017-03-25T12:09:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.03.001
       
  • The labour market intentions and behaviour of stay-at-home mothers in
           Western and Eastern Europe
    • Authors: Anne H. Gauthier; Tom Emery; Alzbeta Bartova
      Pages: 1 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 30
      Author(s): Anne H. Gauthier, Tom Emery, Alzbeta Bartova
      Despite recent increases in female labour force participation across Europe, a non-negligible proportion of women continue to remain out of the labour force for short or longer periods of time. Among the six countries included in this paper, stay-at-home mothers represent on average 33% of all mothers with children under the age of 12. Using two waves of data from the Generations and Gender Survey, we examine cross-national differences in the labour market intentions and behaviour of stay-at-home mothers. In particular, we ask the questions of what individual- and societal-level factors influence stay-at-home mothers’ intention to join the labour force, and what factors allow (or prevent) them from realizing their intentions. The results reveal that traditional personal attitudes towards working mothers deter stay-at-home mothers from intending to join the labour force. Moreover, such traditional personal attitudes, combined with financial security, further boost mothers’ realization of negative work intention (i.e. the intention to stay at home). We also found some evidence of the role of societal context but only in the realization of negative intention.

      PubDate: 2016-12-05T09:08:32Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2015.12.002
      Issue No: Vol. 30 (2016)
       
  • Parental leave and careers: Women’s and men’s wages after
           parental leave in Sweden
    • Authors: Marie Evertsson
      Pages: 26 - 40
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Marie Evertsson
      Persistent gender differences in caretaking and the parental leave length have been proposed as one important reason why the gender wage and income gap has remained stable in Sweden for a long period of time. In this article, we study whether and how parental leave uptake (PL) affects mothers’ and fathers’ earned income and wages during a period of up to eight years after the first child is born. Focusing on those who had their first child in 1999, the descriptive results based on Swedish population registers show that social transfers compensate for a large part of the loss in earned income for mothers. Multivariate analyses of fixed effect models indicate small wage effects of PL. PL results in greater wage reductions (or the loss of wage increases) for the higher educated than for others. For women, the longer their leaves are, the more their wages suffer. For men, the negative wage effect is more immediate but increases less with time in parental leave, which leads to the conclusion that human capital depreciation most likely is not the main reason for the wage decreases that fathers experience. Instead, it seems that men’s leave taking is perceived as a signal of work commitment by employers, given that the negative wage effect appears already at very short leaves.

      PubDate: 2016-02-15T05:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.02.002
      Issue No: Vol. 29 (2016)
       
  • Gender inequalities in occupational prestige across the working life: An
           analysis of the careers of West Germans and Swedes born from the 1920s to
           the 1970s
    • Authors: Juho Härkönen; Anna Manzoni; Erik Bihagen
      Pages: 41 - 51
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 January 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Juho Härkönen, Anna Manzoni, Erik Bihagen
      Using retrospective occupational biography data from West Germany and Sweden we analyze gender inequalities in occupational careers in three birth cohorts (1920s to early 1940s, mid-1940s to early-1960s, and mid-1960s to late 1970s). We ask whether gender inequalities are generated at labour market entry, whether career progression and parenthood weaken or strengthen such gender inequalities, and how they differ across cohorts in the two countries. With data from the German Life History Study and the Swedish Level of Living Surveys, we used growth curve analysis to model career developments in occupational prestige. We find less change in occupational prestige across careers in Germany than in Sweden. In both countries a clear female disadvantage in occupational prestige in the oldest cohort has turned into a female advantage in the youngest cohort. This is only partially explained by changes in educational attainment levels. We also find a substantial motherhood penalty in careers in both countries, which has shifted to a fatherhood premium in Sweden over time.

      PubDate: 2016-01-31T12:27:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.01.001
      Issue No: Vol. 29 (2016)
       
  • Housework over the course of relationships: Gender ideology, resources,
           and the division of housework from a growth curve perspective
    • Authors: Natalie Nitsche; Daniela Grunow
      Pages: 80 - 94
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Natalie Nitsche, Daniela Grunow
      In the 21st century, the division of housework remains gendered, with women on average still spending more time doing chores than their male partners. While research has studied why this phenomenon is so persistent, few studies have yet been able to assess the effect of gender ideology and socio-economic resources at the same time, usually due to data restrictions. We use data from the pairfam, a new and innovative German panel study, in order to test the effect of absolute and relative resources as well as his and her gender ideology on the division of housework. We employ a life course perspective and analyze trajectories of couples’ housework division over time, using multi-level random effects growth curve models. We find that an egalitarian gender ideology of both him and her significantly predicts more egalitarian division-trajectories, while neither absolute nor relative resources appear to have an effect on the division of housework over time. Furthermore, our results expand the literature by investigating how these processes differ among childless couples and couples who experience the first birth.

      PubDate: 2016-02-23T23:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.02.001
      Issue No: Vol. 29 (2016)
       
  • Social networks and support for parents and childless adults in the second
           half of life: convergence, divergence, or stability'
    • Authors: Daniela Klaus; Sebastian Schnettler
      Pages: 95 - 105
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Daniela Klaus, Sebastian Schnettler
      Building on previous cross-sectional research that shows childless individuals tend to have smaller networks and receive less support than parents in later life, we compare the dynamics of network size and support patterns for these two groups during the second half of their lives, that is, starting at age 40. We expect that childless older adults are likely to have more friends and collateral kin in their networks than parents, and that, due to the different composition of their networks, they experience a steeper decline in network size and available support than parents. Based on data from four panel waves of the German Ageing Survey (between 1996 and 2011), and employing fixed-effects panel regression models, we find a surprising degree of similarity in the network and support trajectories of parents and childless adults as they age. Childless adults neither experience a steeper decline in network size nor a greater reduction in social support than parents do. Compared against previous research, our findings counter the rather one-sided negative view of childless adults that depicts them as socially isolated and utterly lacking in support. Our results further provide indirect evidence that some childless people not only successfully substitute friends and collateral kin for children and lineal kin, but also seem to have ties that are more efficient in providing them with support. Limitations of our sample size prevented us from conducting a gender-specific analysis and from studying care giving as type of support that is often provided through social relationships in late life.

      PubDate: 2016-01-20T12:40:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2015.12.004
      Issue No: Vol. 29 (2016)
       
  • Criminal careers and demographic outcomes: An introduction to the special
           issue
    • Authors: Catrien Bijleveld; Mioara Zoutewelle-Terovan; Doreen Huschek; Aart C. Liefbroer
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 May 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Catrien Bijleveld, Mioara Zoutewelle-Terovan, Doreen Huschek, Aart C. Liefbroer


      PubDate: 2016-05-30T02:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.05.001
      Issue No: Vol. 28 (2016)
       
  • The impact of adolescent risk behavior on partner relationships
    • Authors: Terence P. Thornberry; Marvin D. Krohn; Megan Bears Augustyn; Molly Buchanan; Sarah J. Greenman
      Pages: 6 - 21
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 28
      Author(s): Terence P. Thornberry, Marvin D. Krohn, Megan Bears Augustyn, Molly Buchanan, Sarah J. Greenman
      Prior literature suggests that involvement in adolescent risk behaviors will have short- and long-term consequences that disrupt the orderly flow of later development, including impacts on patterns of partner relationships. In this study, we explore how adolescent involvement in delinquency, drug use, and sexual behavior at an early age affects the likelihood and timing of both marriage and cohabitation using a sample from the Rochester Youth Development Study. We also examine the direct effects of dropping out of high school, teenage parenthood, and financial stress during emerging adulthood as well as their potential role as mediators of the relationships between adolescent risk behaviors and partnering for both males and females. Overall, there is not very strong support for a direct relationship between adolescent delinquency, drug use, or early sexual behavior and patterns of partner formation. In contrast, the more proximal relationships, indicated by precocious transitions to adulthood and financial instability, are more consistently related to partner formation. These findings support models of cumulative disadvantage: early adolescent problem behaviors are weakly related to partner formation, but appear to set in motion cascading consequences that influence the transition to adulthood and, in turn, these more proximal variables are more consistently related to partner formation.

      PubDate: 2016-06-14T14:51:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2015.04.002
      Issue No: Vol. 28 (2016)
       
  • Crime involvement and family formation: Evidence from the British birth
           cohort study
    • Authors: Ingrid Schoon; Annabel J.C. Mullin
      Pages: 22 - 30
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Ingrid Schoon, Annabel J.C. Mullin


      PubDate: 2016-03-26T12:59:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.03.003
      Issue No: Vol. 28 (2016)
       
  • Parental Criminality and Entry into Parenthood among Sons and Daughters
    • Authors: Catrien Bijleveld; Doreen Huschek; Aart C. Liefbroer
      Pages: 81 - 90
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Catrien Bijleveld, Doreen Huschek, Aat Liefbroer
      In this article, we examined to what extent parental offending influences the timing of entry into parenthood of children. Based on a literature review, we hypothesized that children of delinquent parents would be more likely to enter into parenthood at a relatively young age, and that part of that association could be explained by differences between children of delinquent and non-delinquent parents in the timing of entry into marriage and in their own delinquent behaviour. Using data from a five-generation study of high risk families in the Netherlands, we found that parental delinquency increases the chance of early childbearing among daughters, but not among sons. Among sons, parental delinquency increased son's delinquency, suggesting that parental delinquency has different consequences for the life courses of their sons and daughters.

      PubDate: 2016-04-09T13:36:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.03.006
      Issue No: Vol. 28 (2016)
       
  • IFC. Editorial Board / Aims and Scope
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 30


      PubDate: 2016-12-05T09:08:32Z
       
  • Acknowledgment of Reviewers 2016
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 30


      PubDate: 2016-12-05T09:08:32Z
       
  • Drug Abuse and Life-Chances—Do Childhood Conditions Matter? Results from
           a Swedish Life Course Study
    • Authors: Susanne Alm
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Susanne Alm
      It is well known that people whose childhoods are characterized by various types of resource deficiencies are at significantly higher risk than others of developing serious drug-abuse. Having confirmed the existence of this correlation in the study's data set, this study asked whether the different childhood conditions experienced by individuals with serious drug-abuse problems continue to affect their life chances once these problems have become established, or whether the drug abuse appears to produce such radically new life conditions that childhood conditions no longer play a significant role. Analyses were based on the Stockholm Birth Cohort study which includes data on a cohort of individuals (n=15,117) from birth to middle age, and in addition to measurements of social and economic problems during childhood, the analysis also included a measurement of the family's socio-economic status and a measurement of the individual's own childhood resources in the form of school performance. Drug abuse was measured using an indicator of whether the individual had been admitted for inpatient treatment with a drug-related diagnosis at least once at ages 16-30 (n=229). On basis of Cox and OLS regression models, the most important conclusion from the study was that heavy drug-abuse seems to involve such a fundamental change to individuals' life situation that variations in childhood conditions lose some of their power to explain subsequent life course outcomes. However, the study did find a tendency for SES of family of origin to be related to mortality risk up to age 56, in that those from less privileged homes died to a somewhat higher extent. Individuals from more privileged homes did not manage to recover to a higher extent though, but tended to remain in heavy abuse. The study found no relationship between childhood conditions and recovery from heavy abuse.

      PubDate: 2016-11-20T20:27:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.11.002
       
  • Depressive Symptoms and the Salience of Job Satisfaction Over the Life
           Course of Professionals
    • Authors: Gabriele Plickert; Fiona Kay; John Hagan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Gabriele Plickert, Fiona Kay, John Hagan
      Despite growing interest in the relationship between job satisfaction and well-being, little is known about how job satisfaction and mental health may vary with age or stage of career. The professions, in particular, represent somewhat of a black box. Rewards associated with being a professional include prestige, autonomy, high income, heavy responsibilities, long working hours, and tight deadlines. Are professional jobs healthy jobs' The purpose of this paper is to investigate how mental health trajectories of legal professionals are a function of job satisfaction and how this relationship varies over stages of the life course. We apply a life course perspective and incorporate theories of work-family interface, role identity, and job-demands control. Using growth curve models with longitudinal panel data tracking the careers and lives of lawyers, we find declines in the trajectories of depressive symptoms over the life course. Job satisfaction is salient to trajectories of depressive symptoms, with pronounced effects during the early career years. We also find that mental health is improved by authority and control in the workplace as well as by marriage/cohabitation. These processes are observed to differ for men and women during the early career to periods of midlife.

      PubDate: 2016-11-13T20:03:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.11.001
       
  • Trajectories of economic, work- and health-related disadvantage and
           subsequent mortality risk: Findings from the 1953 Stockholm Birth Cohort
    • Authors: Jenny Torssander; Ylva B. Almquist
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Jenny Torssander, Ylva B. Almquist
      To experience difficulties such as poverty, joblessness, or mental disease, may not only impair one’s current life situation but could also involve increased later-life mortality risks. Although various types of disadvantage often are interrelated, little attention has been paid to the multifaceted interplay between disadvantages and subsequent mortality. We extended the current research by (1) identifying life-course trajectories of economic, work- and health-related disadvantage, and (2) assessing relative mortality risks for different life-course trajectories. The disadvantages included were unemployment, social assistance recipiency, and severe mental illness in 1992-1999, whereas the follow-up of all-cause mortality covered the years 2000-2008. Results based on the Stockholm Birth Cohort study of individuals born 1953, utilizing (1) sequence and (2) survival analyses, revealed seven life-course trajectories of disadvantage, some of which were related to elevated mortality risks. In particular, life courses characterized by persistent and coexisting disadvantages during the 1990s were associated with high relative mortality in the 2000s. Yet, any temporary disadvantage, even if characterized by high intensity and/or combined with other difficulties, was not associated with increased mortality risks. To pay simultaneous attention to different types of disadvantages, as well as the routes in and out of them, is thus central for understanding inequalities in mortality.

      PubDate: 2016-11-13T20:03:24Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.10.002
       
  • The long arm of childhood circumstances on health in old age: Evidence
           from SHARELIFE
    • Authors: Eduwin Pakpahan; Rasmus Hoffmann; Hannes Kröger
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Eduwin Pakpahan, Rasmus Hoffmann, Hannes Kröger
      Socioeconomic status (SES) and health during childhood have been consistently observed to be associated with health in old age in many studies. However, the exact mechanisms behind these two associations have not yet been fully understood. The key challenge is to understand how childhood SES and health are associated. Furthermore, data on childhood factors and life course mediators are sometimes unavailable, limiting potential analyses. Using SHARELIFE data (N=17230) we measure childhood SES and health circumstances, and examine their associations with old age health and their possible pathways via education, adult SES, behavioural risks, and labour market deprivation. We employ structural equation modelling to examine the mechanism of the long lasting impact of childhood SES and health on later life health, and how mediators partly contribute to these associations. The results show that childhood SES is substantially associated with old age health, albeit almost fully mediated by education and adult SES. Childhood health and behavioural risks have a strong effect on old age health, but they do not mediate the association between childhood SES and old age health. Childhood health in contrast retains a strong association with old age health after taking adulthood characteristics into account. This paper discusses the notion of the ‘long arm of childhood’, and concludes that it is a lengthy, mediated, incremental progression rather than a direct effect. Policies should certainly focus on childhood, especially when it comes to addressing childhood health conditions, but our results suggest other important entry points for improving old age health when it comes to socioeconomic determinants.

      PubDate: 2016-10-31T13:14:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.10.003
       
  • Retirement and Cognition: A Life Course View
    • Authors: Nicole Denier; Sean A.P. Clouston; Marcus Richards; Scott M. Hofer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Nicole Denier, Sean A.P. Clouston, Marcus Richards, Scott M. Hofer
      This study examines the relationship between retirement and cognitive aging. We build on previous research by exploring how different specifications of retirement that reflect diverse pathways out of the labor market, including reason for leaving the pre-retirement job and duration spent in retirement, impact three domains of cognitive functioning. We further assess how early-life factors, including adolescent cognition, and mid-life work experiences, condition these relationships. To do so, we draw on longitudinal data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a cohort study of Wisconsin high school graduates collected prospectively starting in 1957 until most recently in 2011 when individuals were aged 71. Results indicate that retirement, on average, is associated with improved abstract reasoning, but not with verbal memory or verbal fluency. Yet, when accounting for the reason individuals left their pre-retirement job, those who had retired for health reasons had both lower verbal memory and verbal fluency scores and those who had retired voluntarily or for family reasons had improved abstract memory scores. Together, the results suggest that retirement has an inconsistent effect on cognitive aging across cognitive domains and that the conditions surrounding the retirement decision are important to understanding cognitive functioning at older ages.

      PubDate: 2016-10-31T13:14:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.10.004
       
  • Transition to Adulthood in France: Do children of immigrants differ from
           natives?
    • Authors: Giulia Ferrari; Ariane Pailhé
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 October 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Giulia Ferrari, Ariane Pailhé
      This study examines differences in patterns of transition to adulthood among children of immigrants and natives in France. We simultaneously analyze the demographic events that make up the transition to adulthood for two main groups of immigrants’ children (i.e., North African and Southern European) and compare them to the pathway of native-born French. We identify five groups of similar trajectories using sequence and cluster analysis. In order to analyze how trajectories to adulthood are shaped by ethnic origin, gender and background characteristics, we estimate multinomial logistic regression on the likelihood of belonging to each of the five selected clusters. We do not find huge differences between children of immigrants and natives. However, specific patterns do emerge for immigrants’ children. They less frequently follow paths with long periods of autonomy and adopt the more economically constrained pathways to adulthood. In particular, they stay significantly longer in the parental home, partly because their parents come from societies characterized by strong family ties, and partly because they have greater difficulties in becoming economically self-sufficient. For children of immigrants from North Africa, especially women, the entry into adulthood is slower and is less marked by union formation, whether cohabitation or marriage. Finally, children of immigrants from Southern Europe behave more like native French.

      PubDate: 2016-10-16T10:39:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.10.001
       
  • Education Delayed but Not Denied: The Chinese Cultural Revolution Cohort
           Returning to School
    • Authors: Wen Fan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Wen Fan
      Schooling decisions made in later life tend to be overlooked in conventional studies of educational attainment. Even when they are examined, too often focus is placed on individual biographies, while the roles of historical timing and the state are neglected. This paper adds to the literature by investigating to what extent cohort membership is directly associated with returning to school and intersects with social origins, gender, and political credentials to shape one’s returning-to-school decision. I compare three Chinese cohorts who turned age 19 in different historical periods. Coming of age during the turbulent decade of the Culture Revolution (1966–76, CR), members of the CR cohort lost the chance to receive a higher education “on time” and were subject to a state intervention that deliberately demolished early-life advantages conferred by families, whereas adjacent cohorts (pre-CR and post-CR cohort) were largely able to climb the educational ladder “on time.” Drawing on detailed life history data from the 2003 Chinese General Social Survey, Cox proportional hazards models show that members of the CR cohort are more likely to return to school from their mid-20s on compared with adjacent cohorts, thereby narrowing but not closing their educational gap. Cohort membership is also a contingency factor. Parental education does not predict college reentry rates for members of the pre- and post-CR cohorts, but does for members of the Cultural Revolution cohort, reflecting their early-life discrimination during the Cultural Revolution and their regained resources following it. Women are less likely to return compared with men, and the gender gap is particularly large for the CR cohort at the associate college level. Party members are more apt to return, suggesting party-sponsored patronage, and their advantages are most pronounced among members of the CR and post-CR cohorts. Taken together, this study highlights the roles of the state and historical timing in the shaping of decisions around returning to school.

      PubDate: 2016-10-03T09:55:01Z
       
  • First a job, then a child' Subgroup variation in women’s
           employment-fertility link
    • Authors: Jonas Wood; Karel Neels
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Jonas Wood, Karel Neels
      Both macro and micro level research exhibits signs of a turnaround in the relation between female labour force participation and fertility. However, it can be expected that this association varies considerably between population subgroups. Drawing on 2001 Belgian census data combined with birth registers for first, second and third births for the period 2002–2005, we assess within-state differences in the female employment-fertility link by education and ethnic origin. In line with the theory of the value of children, our results indicate that groups with limited labour market opportunities are more likely to have a child in response to unemployment or inactivity. Women with low education or a migrant background are more likely to adopt childbearing strategies as an alternative to labour market participation, whereas for Belgian women or highly educated women labour market participation is more positively related to childbearing.

      PubDate: 2016-09-22T09:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.09.003
       
  • His Way, Her Way: Retirement Timing Among Dual-Earner Couples
    • Authors: Jonathan Jackson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Jonathan Jackson
      This article examines how the retirement timing of husbands and wives has evolved in the face of women’s rising economic resources. Using 11 waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study, I trace individuals into retirement, examining how spousal employment characteristics may facilitate or hinder one’s own ability to retire and if such spousal influences have changed across cohorts. Results from event history models indicate that the retirement trajectories have changed for the leading baby boom cohort, as evidence implies they are delaying retirement longer than previous cohorts. Despite women’s rising labor force attachment, the findings do not generally support the notion that wives are influencing their husbands’ retirement timing more or that the influence of husbands on wives’ retirement timing has declined across cohorts.

      PubDate: 2016-09-22T09:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.09.002
       
  • Vignettes as tool for research and teaching in life course studies:
           interdisciplinary approaches
    • Authors: Michelle Kelly-Irving; Alexandra Soulier; Laurence Mabile; Melanie Bartley; Jean-Philippe Raynaud; Lidia Panico; David Blane
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Michelle Kelly-Irving, Alexandra Soulier, Laurence Mabile, Melanie Bartley, Jean-Philippe Raynaud, Lidia Panico, David Blane
      Background Interdisciplinary research and teaching often present similar challenges to investigators and teachers in higher education settings. Capturing and harnessing disciplinary knowledge from different fields to strengthen the process is desirable. However, in practice, this may be difficult to achieve. In this paper we set out a methodology developed in both research and teaching settings which has successfully brought researchers and participants from different disciplinary backgrounds together to work within a life course framework. Methods The methodology centres on using what we will describe as vignettes, or descriptive case histories and is divided into three stages. In stage 1 participants work together to write a vignette based on instructions. In stage two, participants work together in a group to analyse and deconstruct a different vignette. Here In stage 3 all groups present and discussed the analysed vignettes. Results We provide results from stage 1 on a specific vignette written by a group of participants. Here the participants get to grips with general life course concepts. In stage 2 participants learn about life course principles and constructs by deconstructing and analyzing a vignette. In stage 3 the participants are encouraged to shift from thinking about individuals, to population dynamics. Discussion We discuss the strengths and limitations of this method within the context of interdisciplinary life course research and teaching in higher education. Conclusion Using vignettes to both construct and deconstruct life courses has proved a useful tool for deriving new research questions and research material within the framework of life course theory.

      PubDate: 2016-09-11T14:06:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.09.001
       
  • IFC. Editorial Board / Aims and Scope
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 29


      PubDate: 2016-08-11T11:51:48Z
       
  • How does transitioning into retirement impact the individual emotional
           system' Evidence from the Swiss context
    • Authors: Valérie-Anne Ryser; Boris Wernli
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Valérie-Anne Ryser, Boris Wernli
      This article aims to document from a life course perspective the impact and timing of the transition to retirement on individuals’ emotions—i.e., positive and negative affects—while taking into account their working conditions prior to retirement, and their social participation. Based on the Swiss Household Panel (SHP) dataset, a representative sample of individuals living in Switzerland, results demonstrate that working conditions play a key role in shaping individuals’ affective well-being after retirement. Positive work identification is detrimental to affective dimensions after retirement; conversely precarious working conditions before retirement increase positive affects after retirement. Nevertheless, to a lesser extent, the timing of retirement and the capacity of individuals to endorse different roles through social participation also tend to affect the level of affective well-being. Early retirement decreases negative affects, whereas satisfaction with leisure activities upon retirement increases positive affects for men. Finally, these results highlight the heterogeneity in the transition to retirement and the necessity of considering the wide variety of preretirement professional trajectories in the Swiss context.

      PubDate: 2016-08-11T11:51:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.08.001
       
  • The Relationship Timeline: A Method for the Study of Shared Lived
           Experiences in Relational Contexts
    • Authors: Brian de Vries; Allen J. LeBlanc; David M. Frost; Eli Alston-Stepnitz; Rob Stephenson; Cory R. Woodyatt
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 July 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Brian de Vries, Allen J. LeBlanc, David M. Frost, Eli Alston-Stepnitz, Rob Stephenson, Cory Woodyatt
      Lifeline methods—graphic illustrations of the pathways of lived experience traveled by individuals from birth to anticipated death—have been useful in the study of lived experience. Existing lifeline methods and research focus on the individual experience; absent from this literature are the collective experiences of those in intimate relationships. In this paper, based on our research with 120 same-sex couples, we present a method to allow for the joint creation of relationship timelines, which serve as the basis for eliciting dyadic data in multiple forms: graphic representations of relationship development through couples’ creation of a timeline of key events and periods; qualitative narratives of couples’ shared experiences; and quantitative ratings of significant events and periods in their lives together. Lessons learned from the application of this Relationship Timeline Method are discussed, as are implications for future study of the shared lived experience.

      PubDate: 2016-07-28T10:45:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.07.002
       
  • Pathways from poor family relationships in adolescence to economic
           adversity in mid-adulthood
    • Authors: Noora Berg; Olli Kiviruusu; Sakari Karvonen; Ossi Rahkonen; Taina Huurre
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 July 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Noora Berg, Olli Kiviruusu, Sakari Karvonen, Ossi Rahkonen, Taina Huurre
      Previous studies have found that troubled childhood family conditions have long-term detrimental effects on a person’s economic situation in adulthood. However, the mechanisms behind these effects are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between poor adolescent family relationships and the economic adversity in mid-adulthood and whether different adversities in early adulthood mediate this association. Participants of a Finnish cohort study at 16 years in 1983 were followed up when aged 22, 32 and 42 (N=1,334). Family relationships were measured according to adolescents’ perceived lack of emotional parental support (e.g. My mother is close to me (reversed)), lack of parental support in the individuation process and poor atmosphere at home. We analysed the direct effects of poor family relationships at age 16 on the economic adversity at age 42 and also indirect effects via various adversities at ages 22 and 32. The examined adversities were poor somatic and mental health, lack of an intimate relationship, low education and heavy drinking. Poor adolescent family relationships were associated with economic adversity in mid-adulthood. For women, poor relationships were associated with their economic adversity (42y) through poor mental health and low education in early adulthood. For men, the effect was transmitted via low education, although this was not the case after adjusting for school achievement in adolescence. The quality of family relationships in adolescence is associated with an individual’s economic situation well into mid-adulthood in women. Moreover, this association was not explained by family structure and parental SEP in adolescence. Early promotion of parent-child interaction, as well as health and education of individuals from troubled family conditions, might reduce economic inequality in adulthood.

      PubDate: 2016-07-23T10:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.07.001
       
  • Cumulative disadvantages of non-employment and non-standard work for
           career patterns and subjective well-being in retirement
    • Authors: Valentina Ponomarenko
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 June 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Valentina Ponomarenko
      This paper investigates how cumulative disadvantages of non-employment and non-standard work are affecting careers and subjective well-being of older Europeans from 13 countries. In previous research, unemployment, labour market inactivity and part-time work had negative effects, however they were seldom addressed in a common study and over the whole career. In two complementary analyses, first, the employment history of older Europeans is analysed with sequence analysis methods to show how non-employment and part-time work shape careers and to illustrate gender differences. In a second step, adverse career components are used to exemplify cumulative disadvantages on subjective well-being in old age. Data from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) is used for the analyses. After optimal matching and clustering of the retrospective employment history, the results indicate that women experience more turbulent careers with more periods of non-employment and part-time employment. The analyses of subjective well-being show that labour market inactivity and unemployment have negative effects in old age for men, but less for women. Part-time employment has a differentiated effect for women, however not for men.

      PubDate: 2016-07-23T10:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.06.003
       
  • TURNING POINTS IN THE LIVES OF LESBIAN AND GAY ADULTS AGE 50 AND OVER
    • Authors: Anna Muraco; Karen I. Fredriksen-Goldsen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 June 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Anna Muraco, Karen I. Fredriksen-Goldsen
      Little is known about how lesbians and gay men perceive the turning points that define their life trajectories. This study uses qualitative interview data to understand which experiences lesbian women and gay men age 50 and older identify as turning points and explore gender differences. In depth, face-to-face qualitative interviews were conducted with a subset of participants (n=33) from the Caring and Aging with Pride survey. The most common turning points identified were relationship and occupation-related. Lesbians more frequently identified the break-up of a relationship and occupational and educational related experiences as turning points. Gay men more commonly indicated that the beginning of a relationship and HIV/AIDS related experiences were turning points. The turning points were analyzed according to principles of the life course theory and narrative analysis.

      PubDate: 2016-06-18T18:27:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.06.002
       
  • IFC. Editorial Board / Aims and Scope
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 28


      PubDate: 2016-06-14T14:51:06Z
       
  • Residential mobility across the life course: continuity and change across
           three cohorts in Britain
    • Authors: Jane Falkingham; Jo Sage; Juliet Stone; Athina Vlachantoni
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 June 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Jane Falkingham, Jo Sage, Juliet Stone, Athina Vlachantoni
      Although a buoyant literature has emerged examining residential mobility across sections of the life course, a full life course perspective has remained lacking. This paper exploits an as yet under-used data source − the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing lifetime residential histories − to achieve this. The lifetime residential mobility trajectories of older men and women in three birth cohorts born between 1918-1947 are compared, examining how these are associated with changes in cohort members’ socio-historical contexts, and life course events in the domains of employment, partnership and fertility. Results indicate that change in residential mobility between cohorts is gendered, with persistent continuity between male cohorts, and marked change between female cohorts. Such gender differentials are particularly notable during young adulthood, highlighting the significance of de-standardising pathways to adulthood and the changing role of women in society. Generalised mobility pathways from birth to age 60 for men and women are identified using sequence analysis, and the paper discusses how these may be associated with contextual changes and life course characteristics. In conclusion, the research reflects on the benefits of the life course perspective for understanding the complexities of residential mobility, and the importance of socio-historical context in understanding trends and patterns in this area.

      PubDate: 2016-06-09T14:31:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.06.001
       
  • Life course similarities on social networking sites
    • Authors: T. Dávid-Barrett; I. Behncke Izquierdo; J. Carney; K. Nowak; J. Launay; A. Rotkirch
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): T. Dávid-Barrett, I. Behncke Izquierdo, J. Carney, K. Nowak, J. Launay, A. Rotkirch
      Dyadic social relations are known to exhibit homophily – attraction and bonding between similar individuals – and recent studies have detected homophily also on the social network level. Here, we investigate whether social media networks exhibit signs of homophily with regards to life stages. Using a large and global database (N=111,863) of social media profile pictures, we investigate proportions of picture types in an individual’s social network. Typical stages of young adulthood include peer group formation, mate searching, union formation, and parenting. We studied to what extent different association categories with pictures of one or several individuals correlated with each other. Results showed that users with a profile picture of a single individual were more likely to have other profile pictures of single individuals of the opposite sex, but not of the same sex, in their social media network. Profile pictures of heterosexual couples were more likely to appear with other heterosexual couple pictures, and profiles with baby pictures were strongly associated with the frequency of other baby pictures within the same network; both of these types were negatively associated with the frequency of pictures of singles. Pictures of two females together were positively linked with the largest number of other association types. The results probably reflect both selection and contagion effects. We conclude that contemporary social media networks appear to exhibit homophily in displays related to mate searching, pair bonds, and the transition to parenthood.

      PubDate: 2016-05-30T02:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.04.002
       
  • Employment trajectories of German baby boomers and their effect on
           statutory pension entitlements
    • Authors: Silke Tophoven; Anita Tisch
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 May 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Silke Tophoven, Anita Tisch
      Increasing disruptions and heterogeneity in employment biographies, a growing number of unemployment experiences, later labour market entries, and an increase in atypical forms of employment lead to declines of statutory pension entitlement accumulation over the life course. Moreover, in accordance with Easterlin, significant economic disadvantages can be expected for large generations. In fact, the German baby boomers born in the 1950s and 1960s, the next generation of pensioners, will have to accept several additional pension cuts due to pension reforms. Against this background, we ask how different employment patterns are related to disproportional statutory pension entitlements for German baby boomers in the middle of their working life. We examine work trajectories and their implications for accrued statutory pension entitlements by the age of 42 for two baby boomer cohorts in comparison to two older cohorts. For our analyses, we employ the Biographical Data of Selected Insurance Agencies in Germany (BASiD) for those born in 1947, 1953, 1959 and 1965 (N=25,863). In the first step, we summarise the most important employment patterns of the cohorts under study. In the second step, we test the influence of these employment patterns on the accumulation of individual statutory pension entitlements until the age of 42 and compare the baby boomer cohorts to previous cohorts. We find that late entries to employment as well as diversified and unstable employment are related to lower levels of statutory pension entitlements for particular groups of German baby boomers.

      PubDate: 2016-05-30T02:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.04.003
       
  • How does parenthood affect life satisfaction in Russia'
    • Authors: Malgorzata Mikucka
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Malgorzata Mikucka
      The literature on life satisfaction dynamics during parenthood relies largely on data from Western countries. This paper tests if previously described empirical patterns and theoretical models are general by confronting them with estimates from Russia. We apply fixed effect regression for panel data to the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey data covering the period 1994–2015. We estimate the long-term dynamics of life satisfaction during parenthood and we investigate the moderating effect of age at first birth, income, and education. The results show that in Russia parental life satisfaction increases during a first birth, but the increase is stronger at a second birth. The effect of parenthood on life satisfaction is positive in the long run. Moreover, younger age at first birth temporarily (but not in the long run) suppresses the long-term positive effect of parenthood on life satisfaction. These results provide little support to the set-point theory of happiness, but are consistent with selection to parenthood and with the demands and rewards approach.

      PubDate: 2016-05-30T02:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.03.004
       
  • Income trajectories after graduation: An intergenerational approach
    • Authors: Outi Sirniö; Timo M. Kauppinen; Pekka Martikainen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 April 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Outi Sirniö, Timo M. Kauppinen, Pekka Martikainen
      Labor-market outcomes depend on educational attainment, but parental background also plays a role. By applying sociological perspective to income and combining the classical intergenerational approach with a study of intragenerational mobility, we analyze the direct association between parental background and achieved labor-market outcomes. We focus on income trajectories within the same level of achieved education by parental income. Using register-based data covering the whole Finnish population, we analyze those who graduated in 1995–2000 for eight years after graduation by means of repeated-measures linear regression. The results show that following entry into the labor market higher parental income is associated with higher incomes even after adjustment for education, labor market status, and childbearing. The effects of parental income are observed within all education groups except for those with highest education, and for men and women. We further demonstrate that parental income is associated with either higher starting level or faster growth of incomes within most education groups. The implication is that intergenerational associations are complex processes that are shaped across the whole life course.

      PubDate: 2016-05-30T02:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.04.001
       
  • Are Leisure Activity and Health Interconnected after Retirement:
           Educational Differences
    • Authors: Martin Wetzel; Oliver Huxhold
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Martin Wetzel, Oliver Huxhold
      Objectives Retirement is a critical life event accompanied by profound changes in life circumstances to which people have to actively adapt. Two important dimensions for the success of adjustment are health and activity. Therefore, we examined developments of physical health and leisure activity over the first 12-years of retirement and their bi-directional interconnections. In this study, we questioned whether all retirees have the same chances for successful aging. Methods We used longitudinal data of the German Ageing Survey (DEAS) and identified 2,897retirees. We estimated a bivariate dual change score model simultaneously for retirees who have more and retirees who have less education. Physical health was assessed via the number of self-reported chronic conditions and leisure activity via the number of hobbies engaged in at least monthly. Results At the transition into retirement, retirees with less education showed a slightly lower level in health and a distinctly lower level in leisure activity than retirees with more education. These mean level differences persisted over 12 years since an increase of educational difference was neither found for leisure activities nor for physical health. Furthermore, level of activity did not predict changes in physical health. Additionally, only retirees who had less education were sensitive to their levels of health. For those, worse health predicted a reduction in leisure activity. Discussion Illness seem to limit leisure activities only for less educated individuals. We discussed these findings under a cumulative inequality perspective. Retirees who have less education are double-jeopardized. They report not only lower levels in health and activity, they are also dependent in their activity on their physical health status. This shows that people have unequal chances for successful aging in retirement.

      PubDate: 2016-04-05T13:27:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.03.007
       
  • Does family matter for recent immigrants’ life satisfaction'
    • Authors: Claudia Masferrer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Claudia Masferrer
      Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, a nationally representative survey of recent immigrants, this paper explores the influence of coresidents on satisfaction with life in Canada. Results of cross-sectional logistic regression models indicate that except for living with young children shortly after arrival, living arrangements have a null influence on life satisfaction, when taking into account explanatory factors of demographic characteristics and modes of incorporation. To study how living arrangements influence changes in life satisfaction over time, I estimate fixed- and random-effects logistic regression models. Results from longitudinal analyses show that coresidents and changes in coresidents have null effects on changes in life satisfaction. Putting together results from cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, findings suggest that characteristics of family living arrangements may be significant for interpersonal comparisons of satisfaction, but not for intrapersonal comparisons. This indicates that time-constant characteristics including personality, a key factor influencing satisfaction, as well as immigrant entry status and ethnicity may be selecting individuals into types of living arrangements. Overall, findings show large and significant influences of indicators of economic integration on satisfaction in the destination country, while coresidents and living arrangements have a small influence.

      PubDate: 2016-04-05T13:27:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.03.008
       
  • Towards a socio-structural framework for life course analysis
    • Authors: René Levy; Felix Bühlmann
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): René Levy, Felix Bühlmann
      In spite of several decades of development, the theoretical underpinnings of life course research go rarely beyond the five general principles formulated by Elder. This article proposes a socio-structural framework based on a definition of the life course as an individual movement through social space. It integrates structural and cultural aspects, but gives priority to the former, and considers social space to be defined by three basic dimensions of differentiation: hierarchical ranks, specialisation, and system levels. In a second part, we discuss how Elder’s principles relate to and can be used in the framework we propose. Since several disciplines are interested in this topic, our approach includes a series of docking points not only for other theoretical perspectives from sociology, but also from other disciplines such as social psychology or political science.

      PubDate: 2016-03-31T13:15:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.03.005
       
  • Introduction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 March 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research


      PubDate: 2016-03-22T12:44:46Z
       
  • The relationship between a parental conviction and a son’s family
           formation
    • Authors: Sytske Besemer; David Farrington Delphine Theobald
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 December 2015
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Sytske Besemer, David P. Farrington, Delphine Theobald
      This study investigated whether a parental conviction is related to a son's family formation. Using data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development we found that parental crime was not related to whether sons marry, the age at which they marry, or the number of children they have. However, sons of convicted parents were younger when their first child was born, they separated more often than sons of unconvicted parents, and they also more often had a shotgun marriage. A son's own offending, impulsive behaviour, low socio-economic status (SES), and his parents' age at birth of the first child were all significant predictors decreasing the predictive power of parental crime for a son's family formation. Parental separation was not a significant predictor of a son's separation and parental violence did not increase the risk of a shotgun marriage. These results support the idea of intergenerational transmission of risky behaviour or an impulsive lifestyle. We also find some support for the intergenerational transmission of family formation characteristics. Third, adding low SES to the analysis reduced the strength of the relationship between parental crime and a son's family formation. We find less support for an escape from home mechanism; or the idea that offspring use a pregnancy or shotgun marriage to escape from an unsatisfactory home situation. We conclude that crime and some family formation variables are related, but that other variables are often stronger predictors of a son's family formation and therefore it is vital to investigate such relationships in multivariate analyses.

      PubDate: 2016-01-01T02:24:57Z
       
  • Gender, Education, and Family Life Courses in East and West Germany:
           Insights from New Sequence Analysis Techniques
    • Authors: Emanuela Struffolino; Matthias Studer Anette Eva Fasang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 December 2015
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Emanuela Struffolino, Matthias Studer, Anette Eva Fasang
      How do men and women's family life courses differ' Are gender differences in family life courses greater at higher or lower educational levels' And how does the intersection of gender, education and family life courses vary across different macro-structural contexts' This paper addresses these questions comparing East and West Germany during the German division (1961-1990). We thereby compare a strong male breadwinner model in a social market economy in West Germany and a universal breadwinner model in a state socialist system in the East. The analysis uses data from the German National Education Panel (NEPS) and employs two new sequence analysis tools: sequence discrepancy analysis and the implicative statistic for analyzing sequences of typical states. These tools enable us to scrutinize the degree, content, and timing of differences in family trajectories between men and women of different educational levels in the two sub-societies. In line with our expectations, family life courses were more de-standardized in the West compared to the East, and this occurred to the same extent for men and women in both contexts. While we find moderate gender differences in family life courses across all educational groups in the strong male breadwinner context in West Germany, for East Germany gender differences were significant among the medium and lower educated, but not among the highly educated. These findings underline the fact that the intersection of gender and education for family life courses is highly context-specific. They further suggest that different patterns of assortative mating play a key role for gender differences in family life courses. We demonstrate the added value of sequence discrepancy analysis and the implicative statistic to illuminate differences in longitudinal life courses between men and women or other social groups.

      PubDate: 2016-01-01T02:24:57Z
       
 
 
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