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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3049 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3049 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 86, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 229, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 360, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 333, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 416, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 198, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 168, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)

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Journal Cover Advances in Genetics
  [SJR: 2.558]   [H-I: 54]   [15 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0065-2660
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3049 journals]
  • Chapter One Evolving Centromeres and Kinetochores
    • Authors: Steven Friedman; Michael Freitag
      Pages: 1 - 41
      Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 98
      Author(s): Steven Friedman, Michael Freitag
      The genetic material, contained on chromosomes, is often described as the “blueprint for life.” During nuclear division, the chromosomes are pulled into each of the two daughter nuclei by the coordination of spindle microtubules, kinetochores, centromeres, and chromatin. These four functional units must link the chromosomes to the microtubules, signal to the cell when the attachment is made so that division can proceed, and withstand the force generated by pulling the chromosomes to either daughter cell. To perform each of these functions, kinetochores are large protein complexes, approximately 5MDa in size, and they contain at least 45 unique proteins. Many of the central components in the kinetochore are well conserved, yielding a common core of proteins forming consistent structures. However, many of the peripheral subcomplexes vary between different taxonomic groups, including changes in primary sequence and gain or loss of whole proteins. It is still unclear how significant these changes are, and answers to this question may provide insights into adaptation to specific lifestyles or progression of disease that involve chromosome instability.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.07.001
      Issue No: Vol. 98 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Two The Genetics of Parkinson Disease
    • Authors: Lina Mastrangelo
      Pages: 43 - 62
      Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 98
      Author(s): Lina Mastrangelo
      The 200years of research efforts on Parkinson disease (PD) form the basis of our understanding of the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease. This journey has been marked by the revolutionary discovery of a neurotransmitter replacement therapy that provides a longer and healthier life to patients. Since 1997, the advances in the genetics of PD have expanded our understanding of this neurodegenerative disorder and they are opening up new ways to search for disease-modifying therapies. This chapter is a summary of the historical discoveries and latest progress in PD research.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.08.001
      Issue No: Vol. 98 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Three Genetics of Mitochondrial Disease
    • Authors: Russell P. Saneto
      Pages: 63 - 116
      Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 98
      Author(s): Russell P. Saneto
      Mitochondria are intracellular organelles responsible for adenosine triphosphate production. The strict control of intracellular energy needs require proper mitochondrial functioning. The mitochondria are under dual controls of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mitochondrial dysfunction can arise from changes in either mtDNA or nDNA genes regulating function. There are an estimated ∼1500 proteins in the mitoproteome, whereas the mtDNA genome has 37 proteins. There are, to date, ∼275 genes shown to give rise to disease. The unique physiology of mitochondrial functioning contributes to diverse gene expression. The onset and range of phenotypic expression of disease is diverse, with onset from neonatal to seventh decade of life. The range of dysfunction is heterogeneous, ranging from single organ to multisystem involvement. The complexity of disease expression has severely limited gene discovery. Combining phenotypes with improvements in gene sequencing strategies are improving the diagnosis process. This chapter focuses on the interplay of the unique physiology and gene discovery in the current knowledge of genetically derived mitochondrial disease.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.06.002
      Issue No: Vol. 98 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Four Evolutionary Trajectories of Entomopathogenic Fungi ABC
           Transporters
    • Authors: Bikash Baral
      Pages: 117 - 154
      Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 98
      Author(s): Bikash Baral
      The ABC protein superfamily—also called traffic ATPases—are energy-dependent ubiquitous proteins, representing one of the crucial and the largest family in the fungal genomes. The ATP-binding cassette endows a characteristic 200–250 amino acids and is omnipresent in all organisms ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Unlike in bacteria with nutrient import functions, ABC transporters in fungal entomopathogens serve as effective efflux pumps that are largely involved in the shuttle of metabolites across the biological membranes. Thus, the search for ABC proteins may prove of immense importance in elucidating the functional and molecular mechanism at the host-pathogen (insect-fungus) interface. Their sequence homology, domain topology, and functional traits led to the actual identification of nine different families in fungal entomopathogens. Evolutionary relationships within the ABC superfamily are discussed, concentrating on computational approaches for comparative identification of ABC transporters in insect-pathogenic fungi (entomopathogens) with those of animals, plants, and their bacterial orthologs. Ancestors of some fungal candidates have duplicated extensively in some phyla, while others were lost in one lineage or the other, and predictions for the cause of their duplications and/or loss in some phyla are made. ABC transporters of fungal insect-pathogens serve both defensive and offensive functions effective against land-dwelling and ground foraging voracious insects. This study may help to unravel the molecular cascades of ABC proteins to illuminate the means through which insects cope with fungal infection and fungal-related diseases.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.07.002
      Issue No: Vol. 98 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Five Delivery of Biomolecules via Extracellular Vesicles
    • Authors: Devin M. Stranford; Joshua N. Leonard
      Pages: 155 - 175
      Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 98
      Author(s): Devin M. Stranford, Joshua N. Leonard
      Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-enclosed particles that are secreted by nearly all cells and play an important role in intercellular communication by transporting protein and nucleic acids between cells. EV-mediated processes shape phenomena as diverse as cancer progression, immune function, and wound healing. The natural role of EVs in encapsulating and delivering cargo to modify cellular function highlights the potential to use these particles as therapeutic delivery vehicles. In this chapter, we describe emerging strategies for EV engineering and consider how different approaches to EV production, purification, and design may impact the efficacy of EV-based therapeutics.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.08.002
      Issue No: Vol. 98 (2017)
       
  • Chapter One Sixteen Years of Meiotic Silencing by Unpaired DNA
    • Authors: T.M. Hammond
      Pages: 1 - 42
      Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 97
      Author(s): T.M. Hammond
      The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa possesses a process called meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD). MSUD has a remarkable ability to scan homologous chromosomes for unpaired DNA during meiosis. After unpaired DNA is identified, MSUD silences all RNA from the unpaired DNA along with any RNA transcribed from homologous sequences at other locations in the genome, regardless of their pairing state. The mechanism by which unpaired DNA is detected is unknown. Unpaired DNA segments can be as short as 1.3kb, if not shorter, and DNA sequences with only a small level of polymorphism (6%) can be considered unpaired by MSUD. MSUD research has identified nine proteins required for full efficiency of the process, three of which are homologs of the canonical RNA interference (RNAi) proteins Dicer, Argonaute, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Most MSUD proteins, including the RNAi homologs, appear to dock outside of the nuclear envelope during early stages of meiosis. Only two have been observed inside the nucleus, a low number given that the identification of unpaired DNA and the triggering of silencing must begin within this location. These two proteins may participate in the unpaired DNA detection process. Recent evidence indicates that the search for unpaired DNA is spatially constrained, possibly because of restrictions on the arrangement of chromatin loops during or after homolog pairing. This review attempts to provide a complete analysis of past, present, and future directions of MSUD research, starting with its discovery during a search for a conserved regulator of fungal development and ending with some benefits the process may provide to MSUD capable organisms.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2016.11.001
      Issue No: Vol. 97 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Two Sleeping Beauty' Developmental Timing, Sleep, and the
           Circadian Clock in Caenorhabditis elegans
    • Authors: M. Olmedo; M. Merrow; M. Geibel
      Pages: 43 - 80
      Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 97
      Author(s): M. Olmedo, M. Merrow, M. Geibel
      The genetics toolkit is pretty successful in drilling down into minutiae. The big challenge is to integrate the information from this specialty as well as those of biochemistry, physiology, behavior, and anatomy to explain how fundamental biological processes really work. Sleep, the circadian clock and development all qualify as overarching processes that encompass levels from molecule to behavior as part of their known mechanisms. They overlap each other, such that understanding the mechanisms of one can lead to insights into one of the others. In this essay, we consider how the experimental approaches and findings relating to Caenorhabditis elegans development and lethargus on one hand, and to the circadian clock and sleep in higher organisms on the other, could complement and enhance one another.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.05.001
      Issue No: Vol. 97 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Three Integrated Genomic Medicine
    • Authors: N.J. Schork; K. Nazor
      Pages: 81 - 113
      Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 97
      Author(s): N.J. Schork, K. Nazor
      Individualized medicine, or the tailoring of therapeutic interventions to a patient's unique genetic, biochemical, physiological, exposure and behavioral profile, has been enhanced, if not enabled, by modern biomedical technologies such as high-throughput DNA sequencing platforms, induced pluripotent stem cell assays, biomarker discovery protocols, imaging modalities, and wireless monitoring devices. Despite successes in the isolated use of these technologies, however, it is arguable that their combined and integrated use in focused studies of individual patients is the best way to not only tailor interventions for those patients, but also shed light on treatment strategies for patients with similar conditions. This is particularly true for individuals with rare diseases since, by definition, they will require study without recourse to other individuals, or at least without recourse to many other individuals. Such integration and focus will require new biomedical scientific paradigms and infrastructure, including the creation of databases harboring study results, the formation of dedicated multidisciplinary research teams and new training programs. We consider the motivation and potential for such integration, point out areas in need of improvement, and argue for greater emphasis on improving patient health via technological innovations, not merely improving the technologies themselves. We also argue that the paradigm described can, in theory, be extended to the study of individuals with more common diseases.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.06.001
      Issue No: Vol. 97 (2017)
       
  • Chapter One Fungal Light Sensing at the Bench and Beyond
    • Authors: K.K. Fuller; J.C. Dunlap; J.J. Loros
      Pages: 1 - 51
      Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 96
      Author(s): K.K. Fuller, J.C. Dunlap, J.J. Loros
      Visible light is a pervasive environmental signal that orients most organisms in space and time. For a fungus, the detection of light is facilitated by diverse classes of photoreceptor proteins, which in turn coordinate growth, spore dispersal, stress resistance, primary metabolism, and toxin production. We will first provide a discussion on signal input, focusing on recent insights into how fungal photoreceptors detect and transmit information at the biochemical and molecular levels. We will then pivot our discussion to how light influences fungal behaviors that are of industrial, agricultural, or even medical relevance. Because the light environment can be easily manipulated in many contexts, we will argue that understanding fungal photobiology is both an important basic and applied endeavor.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2016.08.002
      Issue No: Vol. 96 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Two Advances in Dyslexia Genetics—New Insights Into the Role
           of Brain Asymmetries
    • Authors: S. Paracchini; R. Diaz; J. Stein
      Pages: 53 - 97
      Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 96
      Author(s): S. Paracchini, R. Diaz, J. Stein
      Dyslexia is a common condition affecting up to 10% school-aged children. There is strong evidence that genetics plays an important role in dyslexia and is expected to be complex in nature. Few specific susceptibility factors have been identified so far, but their functional characterization has provided novel insights into the biology of dyslexia. In particular, they point to an unexpected role of candidate genes for dyslexia in the biology of cilia, cellular organelles required in many processes including the establishment of left-right asymmetries early in development. This observation has brought back into the spotlight the old idea of a link between dyslexia and handedness. Yet much of the genetics contributing to dyslexia remains unexplained. The lack of biological markers, clear diagnostic criteria, and homogeneous assessment strategies are just some of the factors preventing the collection of the cohorts powered enough for large-scale genetic studies. While the technology and methods to generate and handle large-scale data have reached unprecedented potential, the main challenge remains in establishing universal guidelines to collect suitable phenotype information across independent studies. These difficulties reflect the complex nature of dyslexia which is highly heterogeneous and often co-occurs with other neurodevelopmental disorders.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2016.08.003
      Issue No: Vol. 96 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Three Genetics of Schizophrenia
    • Authors: J. van de Leemput; J.L. Hess; S.J. Glatt; M.T. Tsuang
      Pages: 99 - 141
      Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 96
      Author(s): J. van de Leemput, J.L. Hess, S.J. Glatt, M.T. Tsuang
      Schizophrenia's (SZ's) heritability and familial transmission have been known for several decades; however, despite the clear evidence for a genetic component, it has been very difficult to pinpoint specific causative genes. Even so genetic studies have taught us a lot, even in the pregenomic era, about the molecular underpinnings and disease-relevant pathways. Recurring themes emerged revealing the involvement of neurodevelopmental processes, glutamate regulation, and immune system differential activation in SZ etiology. The recent emergence of epigenetic studies aimed at shedding light on the biological mechanisms underlying SZ has provided another layer of information in the investigation of gene and environment interactions. However, this epigenetic insight also brings forth another layer of complexity to the (epi)genomic landscape such as interactions between genetic variants, epigenetic marks—including cross-talk between DNA methylation and histone modification processes—, gene expression regulation, and environmental influences. In this review, we seek to synthesize perspectives, including limitations and obstacles yet to overcome, from genetic and epigenetic literature on SZ through a qualitative review of risk factors and prevailing hypotheses. Encouraged by the findings of both genetic and epigenetic studies to date, as well as the continued development of new technologies to collect and interpret large-scale studies, we are left with a positive outlook for the future of elucidating the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying SZ and other complex neuropsychiatric disorders.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2016.08.001
      Issue No: Vol. 96 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Four The Functionality and Evolution of Eukaryotic Transcriptional
           Enhancers
    • Authors: A.D. Buffry; C.C. Mendes; A.P. McGregor
      Pages: 143 - 206
      Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 96
      Author(s): A.D. Buffry, C.C. Mendes, A.P. McGregor
      Enhancers regulate precise spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression in eukaryotes and, moreover, evolutionary changes in these modular cis-regulatory elements may represent the predominant genetic basis for phenotypic evolution. Here, we review approaches to identify and functionally analyze enhancers and their transcription factor binding sites, including assay for transposable–accessible chromatin-sequencing (ATAC-Seq) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9, respectively. We also explore enhancer functionality, including how transcription factor binding sites combine to regulate transcription, as well as research on shadow and super enhancers, and how enhancers can act over great distances and even in trans. Finally, we discuss recent theoretical and empirical data on how transcription factor binding sites and enhancers evolve. This includes how the function of enhancers is maintained despite the turnover of transcription factor binding sites as well as reviewing studies where mutations in enhancers have been shown to underlie morphological change.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2016.08.004
      Issue No: Vol. 96 (2017)
       
  • Chapter One Studying the Evolution of the Vertebrate Circadian Clock
    • Authors: N.S. Foulkes; D. Whitmore; D. Vallone; C. Bertolucci
      Pages: 1 - 30
      Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 95
      Author(s): N.S. Foulkes, D. Whitmore, D. Vallone, C. Bertolucci
      The utility of any model species cannot be judged solely in terms of the tools and approaches it provides for genetic analysis. A fundamental consideration is also how its biology has been shaped by the environment and the ecological niche which it occupies. By comparing different species occupying very different habitats we can learn how molecular and cellular mechanisms change during evolution in order to optimally adapt to their environment. Such knowledge is as important as understanding how these mechanisms work. This is illustrated by the use of fish models for studying the function and evolution of the circadian clock. In this review we outline our current understanding of how fish clocks sense and respond to light and explain how this differs fundamentally from the situation with mammalian clocks. In addition, we present results from comparative studies involving two species of blind cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus and Phreatichthys andruzzii. This work reveals the consequences of evolution in perpetual darkness for the circadian clock and its regulation by light as well as for other mechanisms such as DNA repair, sleep, and metabolism which directly or indirectly are affected by regular exposure to sunlight. Major differences in the cave habitats inhabited by these two cavefish species have a clear impact on shaping the molecular and cellular adaptations to life in complete darkness.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2016.05.002
      Issue No: Vol. 95 (2017)
       
  • Chapter Two Genomic and Transcriptomic Approaches to Study Cancer in Small
           Aquarium Fish Models
    • Authors: J. Regneri; B. Klotz; M. Schartl
      Pages: 31 - 63
      Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 95
      Author(s): J. Regneri, B. Klotz, M. Schartl
      Zebrafish and medaka that develop tumors have become valuable tools for experimental cancer research. With the advent of microarrays and new sequencing technologies it has become feasible to perform whole genome, exome, and transcriptome analyses in these fish models. Analyses that compare the two fish models with each other and with data from human tumors have revealed a plethora of important insights. An unexpected high degree of comparability of molecular features of fish and human tumors has been detected. Furthermore, analyses of the fish model data have uncovered molecules that have not received appropriate attention in studies on their human tumor counterparts and thus have provided valuable candidates for novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2016.04.001
      Issue No: Vol. 95 (2017)
       
  • Advances in Genetics
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 96


      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
       
  • Advances in Genetics, Volume 96
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 96


      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
       
  • Advances in Genetics
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 95


      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
       
  • Advances in Genetics, Volume 95
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 95


      PubDate: 2017-11-18T23:51:27Z
       
  • Maximizing Power in Phylogenetics and Phylogenomics: A Perspective
           Illuminated by Fungal Big Data
    • Authors: Alex Dornburg; Jeffrey P. Townsend; Zheng Wang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): Alex Dornburg, Jeffrey P. Townsend, Zheng Wang
      Since its original inception over 150 years ago by Darwin, we have made tremendous progress toward the reconstruction of the Tree of Life. In particular, the transition from analyzing datasets comprised of small numbers of loci to those comprised of hundreds of loci, if not entire genomes, has aided in resolving some of the most vexing of evolutionary problems while giving us a new perspective on biodiversity. Correspondingly, phylogenetic trees have taken a central role in fields that span ecology, conservation, and medicine. However, the rise of big data has also presented phylogenomicists with a new set of challenges to experimental design, quantitative analyses, and computation. The sequencing of a number of very first genomes presented significant challenges to phylogenetic inference, leading fungal phylogenomicists to begin addressing pitfalls and postulating solutions to the issues that arise from genome-scale analyses relevant to any lineage across the Tree of Life. Here we highlight insights from fungal phylogenomics for topics including systematics and species delimitation, ecological and phenotypic diversification, and biogeography while providing an overview of progress made on the reconstruction of the fungal Tree of Life. Finally, we provide a review of considerations to phylogenomic experimental design for robust tree inference. We hope that this special issue of Advances in Genetics not only excites the continued progress of fungal evolutionary biology but also motivates the interdisciplinary development of new theory and methods designed to maximize the power of genomic scale data in phylogenetic analyses.

      PubDate: 2017-11-12T23:21:07Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.007
       
  • Multiple Approaches to Phylogenomic Reconstruction of the Fungal Kingdom
    • Authors: Charley G.P. McCarthy; David A. Fitzpatrick
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): Charley G.P. McCarthy, David A. Fitzpatrick
      Fungi are possibly the most diverse eukaryotic kingdom, with over a million member species and an evolutionary history dating back a billion years. Fungi have been at the forefront of eukaryotic genomics, and owing to initiatives like the 1000 Fungal Genomes Project the amount of fungal genomic data has increased considerably over the last 5 years, enabling large-scale comparative genomics of species across the kingdom. In this chapter, we first review fungal evolution and the history of fungal genomics. We then review in detail seven phylogenomic methods and reconstruct the phylogeny of 84 fungal species from 8 phyla using each method. Six methods have seen extensive use in previous fungal studies, while a Bayesian supertree method is novel to fungal phylogenomics. We find that both established and novel phylogenomic methods can accurately reconstruct the fungal kingdom. Finally, we discuss the accuracy and suitability of each phylogenomic method utilized.

      PubDate: 2017-11-12T23:21:07Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.006
       
  • Deciphering Pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum From a Phylogenomics
           Perspective
    • Authors: Yong Zhang; Li-Jun Ma
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): Yong Zhang, Li-Jun Ma
      Fusarium oxysporum is a large species complex of both plant and human pathogens that attack a diverse array of species in a host-specific manner. Comparative genomic studies have revealed that the host-specific pathogenicity of the F. oxysporum species complex (FOSC) was determined by distinct sets of supernumerary (SP) chromosomes. In contrast to common vertical transfer, where genetic materials are transmitted via cell division, SP chromosomes can be transmitted horizontally between phylogenetic lineages, explaining the polyphyletic nature of the host-specific pathogenicity of the FOSC. The existence of a diverse array of SP chromosomes determines the broad host range of this species complex, while the conserved core genome maintains essential house-keeping functions. Recognition of these SP chromosomes enables the functional and structural compartmentalization of F. oxysporum genomes. In this review, we examine the impact of this group of cross-kingdom pathogens on agricultural productivity and human health. Focusing on the pathogenicity of F. oxysporum in the phylogenomic framework of the genus Fusarium, we elucidate the evolution of pathogenicity within the FOSC. We conclude that a population genomics approach within a clearly defined phylogenomic framework is essential not only for understanding the evolution of the pathogenicity mechanism but also for identifying informative candidates associated with pathogenicity that can be developed as targets in disease management programs.

      PubDate: 2017-11-06T06:44:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.010
       
  • Describing Genomic and Epigenomic Traits Underpinning Emerging Fungal
           Pathogens
    • Authors: Rhys A. Farrer; Matthew C. Fisher
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): Rhys A. Farrer, Matthew C. Fisher
      An unprecedented number of pathogenic fungi are emerging and causing disease in animals and plants, putting the resilience of wild and managed ecosystems in jeopardy. While the past decades have seen an increase in the number of pathogenic fungi, they have also seen the birth of new big data technologies and analytical approaches to tackle these emerging pathogens. We review how the linked fields of genomics and epigenomics are transforming our ability to address the challenge of emerging fungal pathogens. We explore the methodologies and bioinformatic toolkits that currently exist to rapidly analyze the genomes of unknown fungi, then discuss how these data can be used to address key questions that shed light on their epidemiology. We show how genomic approaches are leading a revolution into our understanding of emerging fungal diseases and speculate on future approaches that will transform our ability to tackle this increasingly important class of emerging pathogens.

      PubDate: 2017-10-30T06:21:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.009
       
  • Phylogenetics and Phylogenomics of Rust Fungi
    • Authors: M. Catherine Aime; Alistair R. McTaggart; Stephen J. Mondo; Sébastien Duplessis
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): M. Catherine Aime, Alistair R. McTaggart, Stephen J. Mondo, Sébastien Duplessis
      Rust fungi (Pucciniales) are the most speciose and the most complex group of plant pathogens. Historically, rust taxonomy was largely influenced by host and phenotypic characters, which are potentially plastic. Molecular systematic studies suggest that the extant diversity of this group was largely shaped by host jumps and subsequent shifts. However, it has been challenging to reconstruct the evolutionary history for the order, especially at deeper (family-level) nodes. Phylogenomics offer a potentially powerful tool to reconstruct the Pucciniales tree of life, although researchers working at this vanguard still face unprecedented challenges working with nonculturable organisms that possess some of the largest and most repetitive genomes now known in kingdom fungi. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current status and special challenges of rust genomics, and we highlight how phylogenomics may provide new perspectives and answer long-standing questions regarding the biology of rust fungi.

      PubDate: 2017-10-30T06:21:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.011
       
  • Fungal Gene Cluster Diversity and Evolution
    • Authors: Jason C. Slot
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 October 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): Jason C. Slot
      Metabolic gene clusters (MGCs) have provided some of the earliest glimpses at the biochemical machinery of yeast and filamentous fungi. MGCs encode diverse genetic mechanisms for nutrient acquisition and the synthesis/degradation of essential and adaptive metabolites. Beyond encoding the enzymes performing these discrete anabolic or catabolic processes, MGCs may encode a range of mechanisms that enable their persistence as genetic consortia; these include enzymatic mechanisms to protect their host fungi from their inherent toxicities, and integrated regulatory machinery. This modular, self-contained nature of MGCs contributes to the metabolic and ecological adaptability of fungi. The phylogenetic and ecological patterns of MGC distribution reflect the broad diversity of fungal life cycles and nutritional modes. While the origins of most gene clusters are enigmatic, MGCs are thought to be born into a genome through gene duplication, relocation, or horizontal transfer, and analyzing the death and decay of gene clusters provides clues about the mechanisms selecting for their assembly. Gene clustering may provide inherent fitness advantages through metabolic efficiency and specialization, but experimental evidence for this is currently limited. The identification and characterization of gene clusters will continue to be powerful tools for elucidating fungal metabolism as well as understanding the physiology and ecology of fungi.

      PubDate: 2017-10-23T05:29:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.005
       
  • Fungal Phylogeny in the Age of Genomics: Insights Into Phylogenetic
           Inference From Genome-Scale Datasets
    • Authors: László G. Nagy; Gergely Szöllősi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 October 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): László G. Nagy, Gergely Szöllősi
      The genomic era has been transformative for many fields, including our understanding of the phylogenetic relationships between organisms. The wide availability of whole-genome sequences practically eliminated data availability as a limiting factor for inferring phylogenetic trees, providing hundreds to thousands of loci for analyses, leading to molecular phylogenetics gradually being replaced by phylogenomics. The new era has also brought new challenges: systematic errors (resulting from, e.g., model violation) can be more pronounced in phylogenomic datasets and can lead to strongly supported incorrect relationships, creating significant incongruence among studies. Here, we review common practices, technical and biological challenges of phylogenomic analyses, with examples illustrated from fungi. We compare major approaches of phylogenetic inference, and illustrate the advantages conferred and challenges presented in phylogenomic case studies across the fungal tree of life, including cases where genome-scale data could conclusively resolve contentious relationships, and others that remain challenging despite the flood of genomic data.

      PubDate: 2017-10-23T05:29:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.008
       
  • Advances in Fungal Phylogenomics and Its Impact on Fungal Systematics
    • Authors: Ning Zhang; Jing Luo; Debashish Bhattacharya
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 October 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): Ning Zhang, Jing Luo, Debashish Bhattacharya
      In the past decade, advances in next-generation sequencing technologies and bioinformatic pipelines for phylogenomic analysis have led to remarkable progress in fungal systematics and taxonomy. A number of long-standing questions have been addressed using comparative analysis of genome sequence data, resulting in robust multigene phylogenies. These have added to, and often surpassed traditional morphology or single-gene phylogenetic methods. In this chapter, we provide a brief history of fungal systematics and highlight some examples to demonstrate the impact of phylogenomics on this field. We conclude by discussing some of the challenges and promises in fungal biology posed by the ongoing genomics revolution.

      PubDate: 2017-10-23T05:29:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.004
       
  • Series Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 99


      PubDate: 2017-10-23T05:29:31Z
       
  • Advances in Genetics
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 97


      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
       
  • Advances in Genetics, Volume 97
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 97


      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
       
  • Natural Variation in Human Clocks
    • Authors: Malcolm von Schantz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): Malcolm von Schantz
      Our own species has a diurnal activity pattern and an average circadian period of 24.2h. Exact determination of circadian period requires expensive and intrusive protocols, and investigators are therefore using chronotype questionnaires as a proxy quantitative measure. Both measures show a normal distribution suggestive of a polygenic trait. The genetic components of the 24-h feedback loop that generates circadian rhythms within our cells have been mapped in detail, identifying a number of candidate genes which have been investigated for genetic polymorphisms relating to the phenotypic variance. Key in this mechanism is the inhibitory complex containing period and cryptochrome proteins and interacting protein kinases and ubiquitin ligases, and the stability of this complex is recognized as the major determinant of circadian periodicity. The identification of the causative mutations in familial circadian rhythms sleep disorders has shed additional light into this mechanism. Mutations in the negative feedback protein-encoding genes PER2 and CRY2 as well as the CSNK1D gene encoding casein kinase I delta have been shown to cause advanced sleep phase disorder, and a mutation in the CRY1 gene delayed sleep phase disorder. The candidate gene approach has also yielded a number of genetic associations with chronotype as determined by questionnaires. More recently, genome-wide association studies of chronotype have both confirmed associations with the candidate clock gene PER2 and identified a serious of novel genes associated with variability in circadian rhythmicity, which have yet to be explored. While considerable progress has thus been made with mapping the phenotypic diversity in human circadian rhythms and the genomic variability that causes it, studies to date have been mostly focused on individuals of European descent, and there is a strong need for research on other populations.

      PubDate: 2017-10-10T12:01:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.003
       
  • Advances in Genetics
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 98


      PubDate: 2017-09-27T10:09:25Z
       
  • Advances in Genetics, Volume 98
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics, Volume 98


      PubDate: 2017-09-27T10:09:25Z
       
  • Natural Variation of the Circadian Clock in Neurospora
    • Authors: Bala S.C. Koritala; Kwangwon Lee
      Pages: 1 - 37
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): Bala S.C. Koritala, Kwangwon Lee
      Most living organisms on earth experience daily and expected changes from the rotation of the earth. For an organism, the ability to predict and prepare for incoming stresses or resources is a very important skill for survival. This cellular process of measuring daily time of the day is collectively called the circadian clock. Because of its fundamental role in survival in nature, there is a great interest in studying the natural variation of the circadian clock. However, characterizing the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying natural variation of circadian clocks remains a challenging task. In this chapter, we will summarize the progress in studying natural variation of the circadian clock in the successful eukaryotic model Neurospora, which led to discovering many design principles of the molecular mechanisms of the eukaryotic circadian clock. Despite the success of the system in revealing the molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock, Neurospora has not been utilized to extensively study natural variation. We will review the challenges that hindered the natural variation studies in Neurospora, and how they were overcome. We will also review the advantages of Neurospora for natural variation studies. Since Neurospora is the model fungal species for circadian study, it represents over 5 million species of fungi on earth. These fungi play important roles in ecosystems on earth, and as such Neurospora could serve as an important model for understanding the ecological role of natural variation in fungal circadian clocks.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.001
       
  • Natural Variation and Genetics of Photoperiodism in Wyeomyia smithii
    • Authors: William E. Bradshaw; Christina M. Holzapfel
      Pages: 39 - 71
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
      Source:Advances in Genetics
      Author(s): William E. Bradshaw, Christina M. Holzapfel
      Seasonal change in the temperate and polar regions of Earth determines how the world looks around us and, in fact, how we live our day-to-day lives. For biological organisms, seasonal change typically involves complex physiological and metabolic reorganization, the majority of which is regulated by photoperiodism. Photoperiodism is the ability of animals and plants to use day length or night length, resulting in life-historical transformations, including seasonal development, migration, reproduction, and dormancy. Seasonal timing determines not only survival and reproductive success but also the structure and organization of complex communities and, ultimately, the biomes of Earth. Herein, a small mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii, that lives only in the water-filled leaves of a carnivorous plant over a wide geographic range, is used to explore the genetic and evolutionary basis of photoperiodism. Photoperiodism in W. smithii is considered in the context of its historical biogeography in nature to examine the startling finding that recent rapid climate change can drive genetic change in plants and animals at break-neck speed, and to challenge the ponderous 80+ year search for connections between daily and seasonal time-keeping mechanisms. Finally, a model is proposed that reconciles the seemingly disparate 24-h daily clock driven by the invariant rotation of Earth about its axis with the evolutionarily flexible seasonal timer orchestrated by variable seasonality and driven by the rotation of Earth about the Sun.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T12:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.adgen.2017.09.002
       
 
 
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