for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3030 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3030 Journals sorted alphabetically
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 79, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 303, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 196, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 120, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 332, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 304, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 390, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access  
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 154, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription  
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.711, h-index: 78)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.394, h-index: 30)
Annales d'Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.177, h-index: 13)
Annales de Chirurgie de la Main et du Membre Supérieur     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Chirurgie Plastique Esthétique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 22)
Annales de Chirurgie Vasculaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Advances in Accounting
  [SJR: 0.299]   [H-I: 15]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0882-6110
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3030 journals]
  • Organized labor, audit quality, and internal control
    • Authors: David B. Bryan
      Pages: 11 - 26
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting, Volume 36
      Author(s): David B. Bryan
      This study investigates whether labor union strength is associated with the quality of audits and internal control. Labor unions have reason to demand high quality audits and strong systems of internal control because they rely on financial information in collective bargaining negotiations. However, organized labor creates incentives for managers to procure lower quality audits and provide weaker internal control in order to hold greater influence over the content of the financial information that unions receive. I provide evidence that union strength is associated with higher audit quality and better internal control. Specifically, I find that union strength is associated with higher audit fees, fewer audit failures, and fewer material weaknesses.

      PubDate: 2017-03-28T07:12:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.09.005
      Issue No: Vol. 36 (2017)
       
  • The impact of self-deception and professional skepticism on perceptions of
           ethicality
    • Authors: Sobhesh Kumar Agarwalla; Naman Desai; Arindam Tripathy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Sobhesh Kumar Agarwalla, Naman Desai, Arindam Tripathy
      This paper examines the impact of two contradictory psychological traits, self-deception (SD) and professional skepticism (PS), on individuals' assessment of ethicality of various earnings management choices. Whereas, SD allows individuals to reduce cognitive dissonance arising from self-serving unethical behavior, PS would force individuals to question such self-serving behavior and, as a result, could make them less likely to act unethically. Our results indicate that SD, PS, and participant type significantly affected the participants' ethicality ratings. Managers exhibiting high (low) SD and low (high) PS view the earnings management techniques that were generally considered to be unethical, as relatively more (less) ethical. However, the SD and PS scores of accountants are not significantly related to their ethicality ratings. This result could be driven by the fact that accountants tend to have greater exposure to information that emphasizes ethics (professional standards and education) and hence psychological traits have a lesser effect on their ethicality ratings.

      PubDate: 2017-04-25T17:02:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2017.04.002
       
  • Refocusing through discontinued operations in response to acquisitions and
           diversification
    • Authors: Richard A. Lord; Yoshie Saito
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Richard A. Lord, Yoshie Saito
      We examine how prior acquisitions and the extent of corporate diversification affect decisions to discontinue operations. These choices comprise a very important class of publicly announced disposal decisions, and analyzing them allows us to utilize a much larger sample than most prior studies of divestitures. We employ a multinomial logistic regression setting to test our three hypotheses; this framework allows us to assess the difference in choices regarding positive- and negative-valued announcements of discontinued operations. We find that firms are less liable to report negative-valued divestitures in the year of an acquisition, and are more likely to discontinue operations, especially with negative values, two and three years after. The effects of the size of an acquisition on disposal decisions differ sharply between large and small firms. The magnitude of an acquisition has little influence on subsequent divestiture choices by smaller enterprises. However, large companies are more likely to make positive-valued discontinuations in the year of and year following a major acquisition, which is consistent with the view that valuable but unwanted units are often shed soon after large complex acquisitions. We find strong support for the Corporate Focus Hypothesis, positing that highly diverse firms are more likely to divest assets. We also show that when a company announces its first discontinued operation, this normally follows a period of increasing corporate diversification, and the majority of subsequent disposals take place as intermediate steps in a down-sizing process.

      PubDate: 2017-04-18T15:41:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2017.04.001
       
  • Annual Editor Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting, Volume 36


      PubDate: 2017-03-28T07:12:23Z
       
  • Author Information Packet
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting, Volume 36


      PubDate: 2017-03-28T07:12:23Z
       
  • Does Enterprise risk management enhance operating performance?
    • Authors: Carolyn Callahan; Jared Soileau
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Carolyn Callahan, Jared Soileau
      The Committee of Sponsoring Organizations (COSO) Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework (COSO-ERM) indicates that the development of an enterprise-wide risk assessment and management process is designed to “provide reasonable assurance regarding the achievement of entity objectives.” We examine this issue and hypothesize that firms with mature ERM processes should achieve greater operational performance than those with less mature risk management processes. This study relies on internal audit function management survey responses matched with archival firm level data to gain a better understanding of the expected operating performance impact of the multi-stage ERM implementation process. After controlling for board governance and other known effects, we find that firms with higher levels of ERM process maturity are characterized by higher operating performance than their industry peers utilizing performance metrics closely related to the earnings process. Our study provides support for the linkage of enhanced operating performance associated with the maturity of ERM processes and suggests other potential areas of ERM research.

      PubDate: 2017-03-09T14:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2017.01.001
       
  • Auditor search periods as signals of engagement risk: Effects on auditor
           choice and audit pricing
    • Authors: Vivek Mande; Myungsoo Son; Hakjoon Song
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Vivek Mande, Myungsoo Son, Hakjoon Song
      We examine the effect of auditor search periods (time taken from the dismissal/resignation of the old auditor to the appointment of the new auditor) on successor auditor choice and audit fees. Using a sample of auditor changes during the period 2002–2012, we find that clients associated with long search periods are less likely to be accepted by Big N auditors. Our results also show that successor auditors charge their clients higher initial audit fees following lengthier searches. Finally, we document that delays in appointing successor auditors following resignations are associated with a significantly negative stock market response. Our results suggest that investors, regulators and academics should be heedful of lengthy auditor search periods in their evaluations of audit quality and client risks.

      PubDate: 2017-03-09T14:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2017.03.001
       
  • Fair value accounting and corporate debt structure
    • Authors: Haiping Wang; Jing Zhang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Haiping Wang, Jing Zhang
      In this study, we examine the impact of fair value accounting on corporate debt structures, i.e., debt conversion privilege and maturity term. We argue that fair value accounting affects agency conflicts between debtholders and shareholders via its impact on financial reporting quality. Consequently, it should affect corporate decisions on the debt structure. Our empirical results show that ceteris paribus, more use of fair value measures in financial statements are associated with a greater demand for convertible debt and debt with short maturity, and the results are mainly driven by Level 2 and Level 3 fair value measures. These findings suggest that it is the lack of reliability of fair value measures that gives rise to more demand for debt structure tools that mitigate debtholder-shareholder agency conflicts. In addition, we find that the negative association between the use of Level 3 fair value measures and the debt conversion privilege or debt maturity term is more pronounced for high-performance firms, suggesting that high-performance firms benefit more by issuing convertible debt or shortening debt maturity. This study provides novel insights regarding the impact of fair value accounting on corporate debt structure. It also provides regulatory implications, calling for better measurement guidance on fair value inputs.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T22:39:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2017.02.002
       
  • Does diversity improve profits and shareholder returns? Evidence from top
           rated companies for diversity by DiversityInc
    • Authors: Greg Filbeck; Benjamin Foster; Dianna Preece; Xin Zhao
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 February 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Greg Filbeck, Benjamin Foster, Dianna Preece, Xin Zhao
      In this study, we examine the relationship between the diversity efforts of firms listed in DiversityInc's list of Top 50 Companies for Diversity and their financial performance. We examine both an announcement effect and the risk-adjusted performance of diverse firms to a matched sample and the S&P 500 index. We find a positive effect related to the announcement of the DiversityInc Top Companies for Diversity list. When examining long-term performance using the risk-adjusted performance of listed companies, DiversityInc firms outperform the S&P 500 index but have performance that is either indistinguishable or inferior to a matched sample. DiversityInc firms exhibit superior return on assets compared to the matched sample, but this difference is explained by differences in firm size. Overall, we find limited support that inclusion in DiversityInc's list of top firms for diversity indicates improved performance over a matched sample.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T22:39:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2017.02.001
       
  • Fair value accounting and analyst forecast accuracy
    • Authors: Douglas Ayres; Xuerong (Sharon) Huang; Mark Myring
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Douglas Ayres, Xuerong (Sharon) Huang, Mark Myring
      This study examines the effect of fair value accounting on the behavior of analysts using a large, generalizable sample of U.S. firms. By employing a measure of firms' fair value intensity, we provide evidence showing that firms with higher fair value intensity have more accurate analyst earnings forecasts, a significant main effect elusive to Magnan, Menini, and Parbonetti (2015). Furthermore, by using disclosures required by Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 157, we find significant positive associations between analyst forecast accuracy and Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements, but we do not find such association for Level 3 measurements. We document that these main effects are predominantly concentrated in non-financial industry firms in contrast to financial industry firms. This suggests that qualitative features of fair value measurements, including their business purpose and on-average accounting treatment (e.g., trading assets, available for sale, etc.), could also have an impact on analyst forecasting accuracy beyond mere measurement issues. Our results contribute to the debate over fair value accounting by showing the impact of fair value accounting upon an important participant in the capital markets.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T21:24:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.12.004
       
  • Impact of strategy on analyst information
    • Authors: Ozer Asdemir; Guy D Fernando; Richard A. Schneible; Arindam Tripathy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Ozer Asdemir, Guy D Fernando, Richard A. Schneible, Arindam Tripathy
      In this paper, we investigate the impact of firm strategy on the properties of analyst' information. We argue that analysts' total information (common and idiosyncratic information together) about a firm depends on how clearly evident the chosen strategy of a firm is. Second, we argue that financial analysts will see more opportunities for value addition in differentiators, and hence, will gravitate more towards such firms. Analysts add value by gathering private information and, thus, individual analyst's private information will be a greater percentage of total information for a firm pursuing a differentiation strategy than for a firm pursuing a cost leadership strategy. Our results confirm our hypotheses.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T21:24:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.12.003
       
  • Target ownership plans and earnings management
    • Authors: Kareen Brown; Changling Chen; Duane Kennedy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Kareen Brown, Changling Chen, Duane Kennedy
      We examine the effect of target ownership plans (TOPs) on earnings management, after controlling for self-selection bias originating from firm characteristics underlying the determinants of TOPs. Our analyses show that firms engage in less accruals management for up to two years following plan adoption. Additionally, we find that the reduction in accruals management is concentrated in adopting firms whose CEOs' ownership levels are increasing because they have not yet met the ownership requirements. Interestingly, we find that TOPs are associated with less use of income-increasing accruals and less real earnings management, particularly through manipulation of discretionary expenditures. Finally, our results suggest that firms adopt TOPs not only in response to poor performance as documented by prior research, but also as a means to mitigate moral hazard concerns and in response to peer pressure. Our findings support the argument that TOPs align CEOs' incentives with shareholders' in that these plans result in reduced management short-termism. Data availability All data used in the study are available from the public sources identified in the text.

      PubDate: 2017-01-08T21:14:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.12.002
       
  • Executive tournament incentives and audit fees
    • Authors: David B. Bryan; Terry W. Mason
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): David B. Bryan, Terry W. Mason
      This study investigates whether the incentives for non-CEO executives to become the next CEO, commonly known as “tournament incentives,” influence auditor perceptions of risk. We argue that auditors are likely to view tournament incentives as affecting the risk of a material misstatement as well as the risk of litigation arising against the auditor, leading to an impact on audit fees. Using three alternative measures of tournament incentives from prior literature, we provide consistent evidence that stronger tournament incentives are associated with higher audit fees. We also find that the relation between tournament incentives and audit fees is moderated by insider CEO succession, CEO tenure, CEO age, auditor tenure, and abnormal accruals.

      PubDate: 2017-01-08T21:14:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.12.001
       
  • Toward resolving the debate surrounding slippery slope versus licensing
           behavior: The importance of individual differences in accounting ethical
           decision making
    • Authors: Philip Reckers; Melissa Samuelson
      Pages: 1 - 16
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Philip Reckers, Melissa Samuelson
      A great deal of attention, research and print space has been devoted to the role of the “slippery slope” in corporate malfeasance. Slippery slope refers to a pattern of behavior in which small unethical infractions lead to more egregious behaviors over time. In accounting, this escalation can relate to increasing dollar amounts or engaging in different behaviors reflecting increasing degrees of ethical grayness. Much of corporate malfeasance indeed relates accounting practices: theft fraud (Wells 2000, 2001a, 2001b, 2002) or fraudulent financial reporting (e.g., AIG, 2005; Bernie Madoff, 2008; Enron, 2001; Diamond Foods, 2012; HealthSouth, 2003; Lehman Brothers, 2008; Saytam, 2009; WorldCom, 2002). More recent research on compensatory ethics in psychology and business, however, has shown conflicting findings: that performing an initial unethical act can create an internal incentive to end or curtail subsequent unethical behavior; this behavior has also been referred to as a “licensing effect”, in which bad behavior is limited in how much individuals can license and still preserve their reputation or moral identity (Beaman et al., 1983; Brown, Rennekamp, Seybert, & Zhu, 2014; Freedman and Fraser, 1966; Gino and Bazerman, 2009; Joosetn et al., 2014; Murphy & Dacin, 2011; Zhong et al., 2010). It is our belief that both theories may be found to co-exist in accounting practice depending on individual characteristics. We conduct two studies to examine the role of individual differences in instances of malfeasance specifically related to accounting practices, heretofore largely ignored in the accounting literature. In Study One, we investigate the role of locus of control (Rotter, 1966) and negative affect (Crawford and Henry, 2004; Lowe and Reckers, 2012; Watson and Tellegen, 1985). In Study Two, we examine narcissism (Johnson et al., 2013; Little et al., 1992; Young et al., 2015) and moral disengagement (Bandura, 1999; Detert et al., 2008). Findings confirm hypotheses that both slippery slope and licensing patterns of behavior will manifest depending on individual differences among the participants.

      PubDate: 2016-08-09T11:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.07.003
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2016)
       
  • Tax compliance in a social setting: The influence of social norms, trust
           in government, and perceived fairness on taxpayer compliance
    • Authors: Peggy Jimenez; Govind S. Iyer
      Pages: 17 - 26
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Peggy Jimenez, Govind S. Iyer
      Voluntary tax compliance is important for governments around the world as they try to manage budget deficits. Traditional methods to improve tax compliance, such as increased audits, can be costly to implement. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence that social factors have on individuals' tax compliance intentions. Results of a survey of 217 U.S. taxpayers found support for the influence of social factors on tax compliance. This research concludes that social norms influence compliance intentions indirectly through internalization as personal norms. Specifically, as the strength of social norms in favor of tax compliance increases, personal norms of tax compliance also increase, and this leads to a subsequent increase in compliance intentions. We also conclude that trust in government has a significant influence on both perceived fairness of the tax system and compliance decisions. This study adds to current tax research in two important ways. First, the results suggest that the influence of social norms on tax compliance is largely through internalization as personal norms. Second, to the best of our knowledge this is also the first tax compliance study in which perception of fairness is modeled as a function of trust rather than vice-versa. This research may help taxing authorities develop less costly and more effective strategies for increasing taxpayer compliance.

      PubDate: 2016-08-09T11:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.07.001
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2016)
       
  • Industry contagion effects of internal control material weakness
           disclosures
    • Authors: Brian Bolton; Qin Lian; Kathleen Rupley; Jing Zhao
      Pages: 27 - 40
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Brian Bolton, Qin Lian, Kathleen Rupley, Jing Zhao
      This study examines whether there is an industry contagion effect for negative market reactions to internal control material weakness (ICMW) disclosures. From a sample of companies experiencing market share price declines to disclosures of ICMW over the years 2005–2014, results indicate that peer industry companies also experience market share price declines. We also find that the decline in share prices is related to accounting quality in that peer industry companies with higher accrual, relative to cash flow, components of earnings have larger negative market reaction compared to companies with lower accrual components of earnings. Our study contributes to the literature streams examining accounting information transfer and internal control quality. Data availability: Data are publicly available from sources identified in the paper.

      PubDate: 2016-08-09T11:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.07.004
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2016)
       
  • Do firms follow GAAP when they record share repurchases?
    • Authors: Monica Banyi; Dennis Caplan
      Pages: 41 - 54
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Monica Banyi, Dennis Caplan
      This paper examines U.S. firms' accounting for share repurchases and the accounting choice provided to Delaware-incorporated firms between the treasury and retirement methods. This accounting choice does not affect income, cash flows, or net assets, but it nevertheless affects financial reporting transparency and the allocation of equity between retained earnings and contributed capital. According to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), the accounting choice to record share repurchases should reflect management's intended disposition of the repurchased shares. We compare characteristics of Delaware-incorporated treasury and retirement firms and find that the choice between the two accounting methods is not always consistent with GAAP, but neither is it random; rather, this choice is related to a number of firm characteristics including firm growth, industry membership, trading exchange, and price–earnings ratio. We also find that a firm's accounting method for share repurchases is associated with a firm's propensity to make future share repurchases.

      PubDate: 2016-08-09T11:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.07.005
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2016)
       
  • The impact of tax rate changes on intercorporate investment
    • Authors: Robert F. Gary; Jared A. Moore; Craig A. Sisneros; William D. Terando
      Pages: 55 - 63
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Robert F. Gary, Jared A. Moore, Craig A. Sisneros, William D. Terando
      We examine how tax rates impact investment by corporations in the stock market. We regress changes in intercorporate investment on changes in the various individual and corporate top statutory marginal tax rates (MTRs). We find a significant negative association between changes in individual capital gains MTRs and changes in intercorporate investment, while no such association is evident for changes in either individual ordinary or dividend MTRs. These results support the notion that corporations respond to the after-tax rate of return and/or market efficiency consequences brought about by a change in individual capital gains MTRs. We find a significant positive relation between changes in intercorporate investment and changes in corporate MTRs on ordinary income. These results are consistent with corporations scaling back expansion plans and instead investing free cash flows in equity securities as MTRs increase.

      PubDate: 2016-08-09T11:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.07.002
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2016)
       
  • Are more able CEOs getting more compensated? Evidence from the
           pay-for-performance sensitivity of equity-based incentives
    • Authors: Huiqi Gan; Myung Seok Park
      Pages: 64 - 76
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Huiqi Gan, Myung Seok Park
      This study investigates whether the managerial ability of a chief executive officer (CEO) is associated with the CEO's pay-for-performance sensitivity (PPS) of the equity-based compensation. We predict that more talented CEOs receive a higher PPS of equity incentives. Using the managerial ability score (Demerjian, Lev, & McVay, 2012) and PPS measures of options and stocks (Core & Guay, 1999), we find that a CEO's PPS of the equity-based compensation is significantly increasing in the CEO's ability. We also find that the association between managerial ability and the PPS of stock incentives is more evident for small firms. Furthermore, our results show that high ability CEOs are associated with a steeper PPS of option incentives, especially when they are not near retirement. Together, our findings suggest that firms generally incorporate the relative efficiency factor of CEO's ability in designing the CEO's equity-based compensation contracts, and thus the cross-sectional variation in the CEO's PPS is positively influenced by the CEO's ability. Data availability: Data used in this study are available from public sources identified in the study.

      PubDate: 2016-08-14T11:16:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.07.008
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2016)
       
  • The effects of the method used to present a complex item on the face of a
           financial statement on nonprofessional investors' judgments
    • Authors: Linda Ragland; Jacqueline L. Reck
      Pages: 77 - 89
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Linda Ragland, Jacqueline L. Reck
      Our study is motivated by standard setters' (FASB, 2010; IASB, 2010a) interest in better understanding the effects of item complexity and disaggregation of financial information on users' decision processes. We examine whether the method used to present a complex item on a financial statement influences nonprofessional investors' judgments. We also examine whether disaggregation influences how different levels of item complexity are associated with judgments. Using a 2×2 between-subjects experiment, we manipulate variables representing presentation method (disaggregation versus aggregation) and level of item complexity (which is defined pension cost with high versus low volatility). With a sample of 114 nonprofessional investors, we find that when the complex item defined pension cost is disaggregated into its component parts and displayed in different sections of the statement of comprehensive income, nonprofessional investors acquire more information about the item and are able to more accurately understand the function of the item. This, in turn, helps the nonprofessional investors decide whether the information is useful in certain judgments. Additionally, we find that when a complex item is disaggregated, nonprofessional investors place even greater weight on their perceptions of level of item complexity in certain judgments. The results of this study are of value to managers, standard setters, and investors. For instance, results suggest that disaggregating a complex item across a financial statement can help nonprofessional investors learn how the component(s) driving a complex item relates to different economic events, improving their ability to understand and process the information in their judgments.

      PubDate: 2016-08-09T11:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.07.006
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2016)
       
  • The influence of family firm dynamics on voluntary disclosures
    • Authors: Joanna Golden; Mark J. Kohlbeck
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Joanna Golden, Mark J. Kohlbeck
      We examine the voluntary disclosure practices of family firms. Family firms have longer investment horizons and lower agency conflicts between owners and managers. However, they also exhibit higher agency conflicts between controlling and non-controlling shareholders, and greater concerns about their own reputations. We therefore hypothesize that the previously documented association between stock-based incentives and voluntary disclosures is dampened for family firms. In comparison to non-family firms, we find that family firms are less likely to provide management earnings forecasts when their CEO's wealth (linked to the firm) is higher. We note this influence only in larger firms, which is consistent with the finding that larger firms have a significantly higher number of stock-based incentives than smaller firms. Additionally, the main result continues to hold when a family member serves as CEO or on the board of directors. We contribute to the literature by extending the research on stock-based incentives and voluntary disclosure, linking this research to family firms, and providing insight on the conflicting results found in prior family firm research.

      PubDate: 2016-12-28T11:00:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.11.003
       
  • Economic consequences of SEC regulation pertaining to financial expert
           definition
    • Authors: Steve A. Garner; Paul D. Hutchison; Teresa L. Conover
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Steve A. Garner, Paul D. Hutchison, Teresa L. Conover
      This paper examines the economic effects of issue dates pertaining to the definition of audit committee financial expert regulation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and discussion of the definition by news services on firms traded on U.S. equity exchanges. This research study uses the methodology of Zhang (2007) to extend DeFond, Hann and Hu (2005) and Krishnan and Visvanathan (2008) by using event dates previously untested to provide additional insights regarding SOX regulation and market perceptions of this required disclosure of voluntary appointment of financial experts to corporate audit committees. Using stock market returns, the findings from this study suggest that companies traded on U.S. capital markets and subject to SEC regulatory requirements experienced significant negative returns around SEC financial expert regulation event dates, while media disclosure events were mostly not significant. Also, larger firms were more negatively impacted than smaller firms by this new SOX requirement.

      PubDate: 2016-12-07T10:33:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.11.002
       
  • Earnings management surrounding M&A: Role of economic development
           and investor protection
    • Authors: Mohammad A Karim; Sayan Sarkar; Shaorong Zhang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Mohammad A Karim, Sayan Sarkar, Shaorong Zhang
      We examine accruals based earnings management by acquiring firms surrounding merger and acquisition events from thirty countries for the period 2004–2015. We find that the acquiring firms do manage earnings surrounding mergers when the method of payment is acquirer's stock, but there is no such evidence when the method of payment is cash. We also examine whether level of economic development and country-specific institutional characteristics play any role in acquiring firms' earnings manipulation. Using two groups of countries based on the level of economic development and nine different institutional variables we find evidence that acquirers' accrual manipulation differs based on such characteristics.

      PubDate: 2016-11-29T10:21:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.10.002
       
  • Leader-follower dynamics in ethical lapses in tax practice
    • Authors: Govind Iyer; Philip Reckers
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Govind Iyer, Philip Reckers
      This study posits that unethical behavior in the corporate arena is often a result of destructive leaders influencing willing followers. Destructive leaders manipulate followers using either their dominant/coercive power or their prestige/charisma. Followers obey the instructions of destructive leaders because they are either conformers (afraid to confront the leader) or colluders (believe in the leader or participate for material gain). Based on an experiment, we show that unethical acts are performed in the presence of dominant leaders. We also find that charismatic leaders influence colluders to engage in unethical acts.

      PubDate: 2016-11-22T12:11:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.09.004
       
  • Corporate tax aggressiveness and the maturity structure of debt
    • Authors: Thomas R. Kubick; G. Brandon Lockhart
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Thomas R. Kubick, G. Brandon Lockhart
      We investigate the association between tax aggressiveness and corporate debt maturity, and we find strong evidence that shorter debt maturity is more prevalent for tax aggressive firms. The results survive numerous robustness tests, including controlling for compensation-induced incentives for risk-taking, firm and CEO effects, changes regressions, and instrumental variables estimation. The results suggest that lenders view tax aggressiveness as a risky activity and therefore restrict the maturity structure of debt to provide a monitoring mechanism for debt contracts with tax-aggressive borrowers. We conclude that tax aggressiveness has a meaningful influence on debt contracting.

      PubDate: 2016-11-22T12:11:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.10.001
       
  • Advances in international accounting: A retrospective commentary
    • Authors: Robert K. Larson; J. Timothy Sale
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Robert K. Larson, J. Timothy Sale
      International accounting research made huge strides over the last 30years. Advances in International Accounting was first published in 1987 and ends in December 2016 having published over 400 articles to help advance our understanding of various topics in international accounting. This retrospective commentary provides a brief history of the journal with an emphasis on its editors, editorial boards, expanse of articles, and significance of its contributions to the literature.

      PubDate: 2016-11-22T12:11:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.11.001
       
  • Beyond accounting and back: An empirical examination of the relative
           relevance of earnings and “other” information
    • Authors: Philipp D. Schaberl
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 October 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Philipp D. Schaberl
      Ohlson (1995) models firm value as a function of book value, earnings, and analysts' earnings forecasts which capture “other” information not yet reflected in the financial statements. Within this framework, stock returns reflect information from earnings and forecasts, each of which is different in terms of reliability and timeliness. For the period 1984–2012, this paper examines time trends and the influence of aggregate market conditions on the relative relevance of earnings and forecasts. In this context, relative relevance is defined as the incremental explanatory power of earnings or forecasts, relative to their combined explanatory power with respect to the cross-section of stock returns. This inquiry is motivated by anecdotal evidence and recent research, which suggests that aggregate market conditions influence the usefulness of accounting information for investors. The findings show that while the relative relevance of earnings has remained stable, the relative relevance of forecasts has increased over time. I also find that the relative relevance of earnings is higher in bad years, i.e. years with low market returns or elevated market uncertainty. Overall, the results reported in this study suggest that despite the increase in the relevance of timely “other” information, investors tend to rely more on reliable accounting information during bad years.

      PubDate: 2016-10-16T05:19:30Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.08.004
       
  • Auditors and net transfers of Level 3 fair-valued financial instruments
    • Authors: Mark Kohlbeck; Thomas Smith; Adrian Valencia
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Mark Kohlbeck, Thomas Smith, Adrian Valencia
      Prior research shows that managers use discretion in estimating Level 3 financial instruments to opportunistically manage capital and earnings. We investigate an earlier decision, subsequent classification changes that result in net transfers into the Level 3 classification, to examine whether firms use their discretion to engage in opportunistic transfers. We then investigate whether auditors influence the decision to transfer into the Level 3 classification and/or alter audit fees. Using a hand collected sample of public bank fair value disclosures from 2008 through 2010, we find evidence consistent with firms engaging in opportunistic transfers into the Level 3 classification. We further find evidence that high quality auditors appear to constrain this behavior, consistent with higher quality auditors mitigating some risks associated with Level 3 instruments. We also find evidence that auditors increase fees when managers transfer instruments into the Level 3 classification. Collectively, our findings suggest that auditors manage risks related to Level 3 by both restricting transfers into the Level 3 classification and charging higher audit fees when transfers occur.

      PubDate: 2016-10-05T05:04:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.09.003
       
  • Board structure and the informativeness of risk disclosure: Evidence from
           MENA emerging markets
    • Authors: Néjia Moumen; Hakim Ben Othman; Khaled Hussainey
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Néjia Moumen, Hakim Ben Othman, Khaled Hussainey
      We examine whether board characteristics affect firms' decision to voluntarily disclose informative information about their risk profiles. We base our study on data from 320 listed firms in nine MENA emerging markets (789 observations) over the period from 2007 to 2009. Our study offers significant contributions to the growing risk disclosure literature. It provides new empirical evidence that information driven by some board characteristics affects the perceived relevance of narrative risk information. Our findings suggest that the composition of the board and its size enhance the informativeness of risk disclosure as it allows investors to better predict future earnings growth. A further finding is that a CEO/Chairperson duality does not impact the way investors trust risk disclosures.

      PubDate: 2016-09-28T03:04:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.09.001
       
  • Cooperative social and environmental disclosure and financial performance
           of savings and credit cooperatives in Kenya
    • Authors: David Mutua Mathuva; Josephat Mboya Kiweu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): David Mutua Mathuva, Josephat Mboya Kiweu
      This study examines the association between cooperative social and environmental disclosure (CSED) and financial performance of deposit-taking savings and credit cooperatives (SACCOs) in Kenya. Using data comprising of 1272 observations for 212 deposit-taking SACCOs in Kenya over the period 2008–2013, panel OLS analyses are performed to establish the association between SACCOs' CSED levels and financial performance. The results reveal a relatively low level of CSED by deposit-taking SACCOs in Kenya at 29.3%. As a departure from findings in mainstream studies, the study reveals a negative association between CSED and financial performance. We argue that the negative association could be due to changed regulatory landscape or a signal that Kenyan SACCOs are transitioning to financially (profit) oriented goals. The results are useful to regulators and policy makers in designing an optimal disclosure policy for SACCOs.

      PubDate: 2016-09-28T03:04:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.09.002
       
  • The effect of the US subprime crisis on Canadian banks
    • Authors: Satiprasad Bandyopadhyay; Ranjini Jha; Duane Kennedy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Satiprasad Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini Jha, Duane Kennedy
      We examine whether the Canadian banking sector was afflicted by financial contagion from the 2008 subprime crisis in the United States financial sector. We find that Canadian banks were affected by contagion, though those with higher liquidity withstood better its adverse effects. Our results indicate that Canadian banks that had more transparent asset practices appear to be less adversely affected by contagion. However, higher levels of real estate-related assets including mortgage-backed securities worsened the impact of contagion.

      PubDate: 2016-09-22T02:45:53Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.08.005
       
  • Geographic distance and municipal internal control reporting
    • Authors: Dennis M. López; Kevin T. Rich
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Dennis M. López, Kevin T. Rich
      Prior research has investigated various factors affecting auditor performance when examining the internal control system of an entity. However, one factor that remains relatively unexplored is the geographic distance between auditors and their municipal clients. This study explores whether geographic distance, measured as the driving distance between U.S. municipalities and their external auditors, plays a role in the likelihood and severity of internal control weaknesses identified during Circular A-133 audits. We find evidence of a positive association between the disclosure of internal control exceptions and driving distance, suggesting that audit rigor is greater for geographically distant clients. Overall, our findings contribute to our understanding of the factors affecting auditor independence and performance in the municipal audit market.

      PubDate: 2016-09-09T10:24:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.08.003
       
  • Asset liquidity and stock returns
    • Authors: Samuel Yau Man Ze-To
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Samuel Yau Man Ze-To
      We document the significant predictive power of firms' asset liquidity in the cross section of subsequent stock returns. The annual return spread between portfolios featuring the highest and lowest levels of asset liquidity is significantly positive. Our proposed measure of asset liquidity outperforms those measures developed by Gopalan et al. (2012) in predicting returns. The asset liquidity anomaly also provides significantly positive alphas when controlling for the asset pricing factors in the Fama and French (1993) three-factor model and the Carhart (1997) four-factor model. Asset liquidity exhibits strong return forecasting power even after controlling for acknowledged cross-sectional determinants of return. The positive relation between asset liquidity and future returns tends to be stronger for firms with greater asset productivity, higher quality cash flow and lower capital investment.

      PubDate: 2016-09-09T10:24:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.08.002
       
  • Do changes in the SG&A ratio provide different information about
           changes in future earnings, analyst forecast revisions, and stock returns
           under different circumstances?
    • Authors: Scott Johnson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): E. Scott Johnson
      In fundamental analysis, increases (decreases) in the ratio of selling, general and administrative (SG&A) costs to sales (SG&A ratio) are perceived as negative (positive) signals regarding future firm performance. However, this interpretation focuses on the overall change in the SG&A ratio and ignores the underlying changes in the components of the ratio (sales and SG&A costs). Although prior research examines the changes in the SG&A ratio under some different circumstances, there is no study that examines all the ways that managers adjust costs in reaction to changes in sales. Therefore, I create six subsamples representing all possible combinations of changes in sales, SG&A costs, and the SG&A ratio and test whether changes in the SG&A ratio are informative about future earnings, analyst forecast revisions, and stock returns under these different circumstances. I find that changes in the SG&A ratio in four of my six subsamples provide information about changes in future earnings. I also find that analysts do not impound all of the information contained in the signals into their forecast revisions and in some cases investors appear to understand this fact.

      PubDate: 2016-08-19T11:23:04Z
       
  • Empirical findings from the reconciliations in the first IFRS compliant
           reports prepared by Japanese-owned subsidiaries in Australia
    • Authors: Sachiko Sugiyama; Jesmin Islam
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Sachiko Sugiyama, Jesmin Islam
      In Japan, a Japanese version of International Financial Reporting Standards (J-IFRS or JMIS) 2 2 Although the term of ‘J-IFRS’ was also widely used in Japan, the official name was announced by the ASBJ as ‘Japan’s Modified International Standards (JMIS): Accounting Standards Comprising IFRSs and the ASBJ Modifications’ as at 30 June 2015. Source: Accounting Standards Board of Japan (ASBJ) 2015, JMIS, viewed 30 April 2016, <https://www.asb.or.jp/asb/asb_e/endorsement/jmis/20150630.jsp>. will be adopted from March-ending in 2016, but exactly when the IFRS mandate will start is still unknown. The Australian regulators required not only publicly listed companies but also private and foreign-owned entities to prepare their financial statements to comply with Australian IFRS (A-IFRS) on or after 1 January 2005. Around the time of the transition to A-IFRS, more than 400 local subsidiary companies in Australia operated businesses which were invested in by Japanese multinational corporations. Thus, Australia was in a unique place to explore the IFRS reporting practices for Japanese-owned entities. We examined the reconciliations of the accounting figures made under the prior Australian generally accepted accounting principles (AGAAP) to those made under A-IFRS, and explored explanations for the reconciliations stated in the first A-IFRS compliant annual reports. On average, the net profits reported under AGAAP were 13% higher than those measured by A-IFRS for the Japanese subsidiaries, while the matched sample Australian companies' profits were on average 2% lower under AGAAP than the accounting figures reported under A-IFRS. Moreover, we described the following four accounting standards which were most frequently cited in the explanations of the impacts of the A-IFRS implementation: financial instruments, income taxes, provisions and employee benefits. Firstly, this study found that the reporting practices of the Japanese subsidiaries and Australian matched sample firms were less likely to be similar in the same Australian institutional setting. Secondly, the differences of the institutional factors in the countries of origin somewhat influenced the financial reporting of the Australian subsidiaries. Finally, the strict and wide scope of recognition and disclosure requirements under A-IFRS led to a significant increase in assets and liabilities. The monetary values materially changed under AGAAP compared with those made under A-IFRS, but these reporting entities attempted to comply with the new accounting regulations on time. We expect that information disclosure will increase and become more standardised under A-IFRS, compared with under AGAAP.

      PubDate: 2016-08-14T11:16:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.06.003
       
  • Managerial discretion and agency cost in Indian market
    • Authors: Chakkappanthodiyil Namitha; Santhakumar Shijin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Chakkappanthodiyil Namitha, Santhakumar Shijin
      This paper investigates empirically the impact of managerial discretion on agency cost from the perspective of SG&A cost asymmetry and examines how corporate governance moderates this relationship. The analysis shows mixed evidence in favor for cost behavior and managerial choices in the Indian market. The cost asymmetry involves not only cost stickiness but also the anti-sticky behavior of SG&A cost under certain circumstances. The main drivers for this disparity are owing to manager's resource adjustment decision, the future expectation of sales and managers' empire-building behavior. Furthermore, findings suggest that strong corporate governance alleviates empire-building behavior of managers. Additional analysis shows, the asymmetric behavior of SG&A cost in crisis period is mainly a result of managers' resource adjustment decision and future expectation of sales change. Manager's empire-building behavior does not play an explicit role in this period. Next, the findings show that managers' discretion is influenced by future value creation potential of SG&A cost. Manager's empire-building behavior is more pronounced in low-value creation sample firms compared to high-value creation sample. Thus, manager's choice for resource adjustment decision and empire-building behavior changes according to the future value creation of SG&A cost, financial conditions and corporate governance mechanisms in Indian companies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study performed in Indian capital market where the SG&A cost asymmetry tests the managers' empire-building behavior. Overall, findings of the study indicate manager's resource adjustment decisions and empire-building behavior caused by their consideration and this results in a form of agency costs. In comparison with developed markets, Indian markets have relatively less agency problem due to managerial empire-building behavior.

      PubDate: 2016-07-30T10:54:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.06.002
       
  • Complementary relationship between female directors and financial literacy
           in deterring earnings management: The case of high-technology firms
    • Authors: Ester Chen; Ilanit Gavious
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 July 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Ester Chen, Ilanit Gavious
      We explore whether the presence of female directors on the boards of high-technology firms has an impact on the boards' monitoring and oversight of earnings management. Using difference-in-difference analyses, we utilize an exogenous change in Israel to examine the changes in, and the effects of, female director representation in constraining earnings management in a changing accounting environment that increased managers' ability to report earnings opportunistically. We find that a high representation of women on the board does not make an incremental contribution to the explanation of earnings management over and above the presence of a female director with financial literacy. However, the presence of one financially literate female director on the board does have a significant effect on restraining earnings management. Moreover, financially literate female directors are more effective than their financially literate male counterparts in deterring earnings management. Our results are robust to controlling for firm characteristics related to the selection of a woman to participate on the BOD as well as to the selection of a financially literate woman in particular. We conclude that financial literacy is complementary to female representation on the board in constraining earnings management. An important economic implication of our findings is that a regulatory move to increase the representation of women on corporate BODs should refer specifically to the inclusion of at least one woman with financial literacy on the board.

      PubDate: 2016-07-30T10:54:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.06.001
       
  • Does management accounting mediate the relationship between cost system
           design and performance?
    • Authors: Ali Uyar; Cemil Kuzey
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 July 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Ali Uyar, Cemil Kuzey
      This study aimed at investigating the mediating effect of management accounting practices (MAPs) upon the association between cost system design (CSD) and performance. Covariance-Based Structural Equation Model methodology was applied to investigate the complex relationship between the latent constructs. The findings indicated that cost system design alone does not impact firm performance. However, it affects performance via MAPs. We projected that MAPs play a full mediating role between CSD and performance. Thus, this study indicates that incurring high costs for the establishment of a functional cost system might be justifiable, on condition that the firm will utilize the obtained cost data through various decision-making tools; otherwise there is no point in bearing the cost of building such a system.

      PubDate: 2016-07-24T10:44:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.06.004
       
  • R&amp;D capitalization and audit fees: Evidence from China
    • Authors: Jia-Chi Cheng; Chia-Chi Nan-Ting Kuo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 June 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Jia-Chi Cheng, Chia-Chi Lu, Nan-Ting Kuo
      Our study investigates the association between capitalized R&D costs and audit fees and whether this association reflects the effect of earnings management. By exploring Chinese listed firms, we find that capitalized R&D costs are positively associated with audit fees, where such positive association holds for both the discretionary and nondiscretionary portions of capitalized R&D costs. Moreover, the positive association between the discretionary portion of capitalized R&D costs and audit fees is more pronounced for firms with stronger incentives to manipulate earnings. Overall, our findings imply that firms' reporting incentives affect how auditors react to clients' accounting choices. This in turn suggests that auditors believe some firms capitalize R&D to manipulate earnings, and the resulting earnings-management concerns lead them to charge higher fees.

      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:04:14Z
       
  • Changes in the value relevance of research and development expenses after
           IFRS adoption
    • Authors: James Jianxin Gong; Sophia I-Ling Wang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 June 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): James Jianxin Gong, Sophia I-Ling Wang
      We investigate whether the nature of differences between national GAAP and IFRS is associated with differential changes in the value relevance of R&D expenses after the adoption of IFRS across countries. Using a difference-in-differences study on a sample of public companies in nine countries that covers pre-IFRS and post-IFRS periods during 1997–2012, we find that the value relevance of R&D expenses declines after IFRS adoption in countries that previously mandated immediate expensing or allowed optional capitalization of R&D costs. On the contrary, there is no change in the value relevance of R&D expenses for countries that switched from the mandatory capitalization rule to IFRS. We also investigate the moderating effects of national institutions on the changes in the value relevance of R&D expenses after IFRS adoption. We find that in countries with stronger investor protection, the changes in the value relevance of R&D expenses are larger. In addition, changes in the value relevance of R&D expenses are smaller for countries whose national culture is characterized by higher uncertainty avoidance. Our findings highlight the importance of both accounting standards and national institutions in explaining the changes in the value relevance of accounting information after IFRS adoption.

      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:04:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.05.002
       
  • Financial reporting quality and outsourcing of accounting tasks: Evidence
           from small private firms
    • Authors: Henrik Höglund; Dennis Sundvik
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Henrik Höglund, Dennis Sundvik
      This study explores whether the financial reporting quality of small firms differs between firms that outsource accounting tasks and firms that perform these tasks internally. Using accruals quality as a measure for the financial reporting quality and a sample of small Finnish limited liability firms, we find that the quality among the firms is positively related to the decision of purchasing accounting services from an external service provider. This result is also economically significant. The evidence shows that outsourcing of accounting tasks such as the preparation of the statutory financial statements and longer outsourcing relationships increases reporting quality. However, outsourcing of additional tasks, such as payroll processing, does not result in higher quality. These findings are consistent with previous studies showing that small firms in general lack the resources and expertise to prepare high quality financial reports. We provide evidence of an important yet under-researched area of financial reporting quality among small firms.

      PubDate: 2016-05-14T18:23:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.03.001
       
  • Theory and practice of the proposed conceptual framework: Evidence from
           the field
    • Authors: Kevin Ow Yong; Chu Yeong Lim; Pearl Tan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 May 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Kevin Ow Yong, Chu Yeong Lim, Pearl Tan
      We provide survey evidence of chartered accountants' perspectives on the proposed conceptual framework of the International Accounting Standards Board. Our survey obtains their views on the changes in the definitions of assets and liabilities, recognition criterion, and additional guidance in these areas, as well as issues relating to other comprehensive income, business model-based accounting, and choice of measurement basis. Our field evidence suggests broad consensus with respect to most of these changes. The areas that generate the most disagreement among our respondents relate to the removal of economic benefits in the proposed asset definition, the proposal to remove the minimum probability threshold from the asset recognition criterion, and the use of fair value as a measurement basis for certain difficult to measure assets. Overall, our results provide interesting insights regarding how chartered accountants view the proposed conceptual framework.

      PubDate: 2016-05-14T18:23:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.04.001
       
  • Are financial professionals ready for IFRS?: An exploratory study
    • Authors: James L. Bierstaker; Lori S. Kopp; Danielle R. Lombardi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 May 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): James L. Bierstaker, Lori S. Kopp, Danielle R. Lombardi
      Despite a move towards convergence between principles-based International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and rules-based U.S. GAAP, and the likelihood that many foreign affiliates of U.S. firms use IFRS, little research has examined whether United States financial managers appropriately record and summarize transactions in accordance with IFRS. This paper investigates the ability of 176 U.S. financial managers to appropriately apply the revenue recognition standard under IFRS when given the relevant guidance. About half of the participants selected the U.S. GAAP answer, and only 40 percent identified the correct answer under IFRS. More experienced financial managers, and financial managers with relevant industry experience were more likely to appropriately apply the standard, but a substantial percentage of them still selected the GAAP choice rather than the correct choice under IFRS. This suggests that more IFRS training in the U.S. is needed prior to IFRS adoption.

      PubDate: 2016-05-14T18:23:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.04.004
       
  • Does intellectual capital disclosure in analysts' reports vary by firm
           characteristics?
    • Authors: Subhash Abhayawansa; James Guthrie
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 May 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Subhash Abhayawansa, James Guthrie
      In this paper, we explore how Australian sell-side financial analysts contribute to the supply of intellectual capital (IC) information in the capital market. Toward this end, we examine how types and semantic properties of IC disclosures in analyst reports vary by a number of firm-specific characteristics likely to be associated with voluntary corporate disclosure. Consistent with our expectations, we find that the uncertainty associated with forecasting firm's earnings and the IC intensity of the industry in which the firm operates are associated positively with the extent as well as several semantic properties of IC disclosure in analyst reports. Highlighting that IC disclosure in analyst reports is not always a function of the extent of IC disclosed by firm, we find a statistically significant but negative association between firm profitability and the extent and certain semantic properties of IC disclosure in analyst reports. Firm size was significantly and positively associated with only the extent of forward-looking IC disclosure. Of the three categories of IC, only relation capital disclosure varied with any of the explanatory variables. Our findings highlight the importance of analyst reports as an IC communication media that could complement corporate communications of IC not only for firms disclosing less IC information voluntarily but also for those firms known to disclose more.

      PubDate: 2016-05-07T18:08:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.04.002
       
  • Disclosure indexes and compliance with mandatory disclosure—The case of
           intangible assets in the Italian market
    • Authors: Alain Devalle; Fabio Rizzato; Donatella Busso
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 May 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Alain Devalle, Fabio Rizzato, Donatella Busso
      Disclosure of financial statements is an important topic both for investors and for preparers as disclosure allows investors to understand the application of the accounting principles used by companies. This research examines the 2010 financial statements under IFRS of 189 Italian listed groups and their compliance with mandatory disclosure on intangible assets and presents an in depth empirical analysis of the Italian market—that belongs to the Continental European accounting cluster. Different variables were tested to analyze the compliance with the mandatory disclosure such as size variables, performance variables, financial interest variables and market variables. Many studies on mandatory disclosure are based on one disclosure index method and results are affected by the different approaches used: Cooke's dichotomous approach, Partial Compliance method, weighted and unweighted. In this paper, the decision was taken to run all the previous methods: results show that the only significant variable for all Dscore indexes is the weight of interests on revenues and this result is a distinctive feature of the Italian market where the role of the banking systems is more important than in other countries.

      PubDate: 2016-05-02T17:59:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.04.003
       
  • The impact of board quality and nomination committee on corporate
           bankruptcy
    • Authors: Kingsley Opoku Appiah; Amon Chizema
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 April 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Kingsley Opoku Appiah, Amon Chizema
      This paper examines the effects of board quality on the relationship between corporate bankruptcy and nomination committee effectiveness. We argue that the proportion of outside directors, a proxy of board quality, arguably captures the extent of board control and resources. Based on dataset from 1835 firm-year observations for 98 bankrupt and 269 non-bankrupt UK listed non-financial firms between 1994 and 2011 and using the agency and resource dependence theories, we predict and find that nomination committee effectiveness negatively affects corporate bankruptcy and that board quality mitigates the negative effects. The results lend support to the notion that firms benefit from board quality in terms of outside directors' ability to monitor CEO on behalf of shareholders and also provide advice, counsel and legitimacy to the firm. This study extends the present research on corporate bankruptcy by providing evidence on the impact of board quality and nomination committee effectiveness on UK corporate bankruptcy.

      PubDate: 2016-04-12T17:04:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.02.004
       
  • Does the classification of intangibles matter? An equivalence testing
    • Authors: Indra Abeysekera
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2016
      Source:Advances in Accounting
      Author(s): Indra Abeysekera
      Many studies confirm that intangibles have future economic benefits included in them. This study examined whether analysts consider intangibles to be similar in economic value, regardless of the accounting treatment assigned to them. It conducted four experiments by providing 26 analysts with future earnings potentials, and asking them to forecast stock prices for three companies over three firms’ continuous years. One firm had an internally produced brand, the second company had a bought brand, and the third firm had an internally produced brand and bought brands. These three firms were used in four forecasting environments designed for this study. Each forecasting environment constituted an experiment. Each forecasting environment differed, with capital market information specific to each firm. Provided with this information, the analysts forecast stock prices for the three firms in each of the four experiments. Comparing the forecast stock prices, the study found that the two brand classes had similar influence on analysts’ stock pricing forecasts, to infer them as equivalent in economic value, in each of the four forecasting environments.

      PubDate: 2016-04-07T11:29:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.adiac.2016.02.003
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.145.81.105
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016