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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3184 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3184 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 100, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 430, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 293, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 180, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 414, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 365, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 469, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 64, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 202, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 208, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Medicine
Number of Followers: 49  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0002-9343 - ISSN (Online) 1555-7162
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3184 journals]
  • Profound hypoglycemia in hospitalized patient: paraneoplastic insulin-like
           growth factor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): George Cockey, Angela Fernandez-Manovel, Josue Hernandez, Andrea Ramirez, Diana Barb
       
  • Intractable nausea and vomiting: gut is not always the answer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Thomas Frapard, Zahir Amoura, Marc Pineton de Chambrun
       
  • Poliosis Circumscripta: A Mark of Melanoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s):
       
  • High-Intensity Statins Are Associated With Increased Incidence of
           Hypoglycemia During Hospitalization of Individuals Not Critically Ill
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Israel Khanimov, Gadi Segal, Julio Wainstein, Mona Boaz, M. Shimonov, Eyal Leibovitz IntroductionSerum cholesterol is inversely associated with incident hypoglycemia among patients admitted to internal medicine wards. We examined the association between statin use and incidence of hypoglycemia among patients who were not critically ill.MethodsIn this retrospective study, we included all patients discharged between January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2013 from internal medicine units at the Wolfson Medical Center. Excluded were patients with hepatocellular or cholestatic liver disease upon admission. Patients were allocated to 4 groups, according to diabetes mellitus status (yes or no) and serum albumin
       
  • On Becoming a Doctor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Arthur L. Frank
       
  • Collateral damages by magic bullets: hemolytic uremic and capillary leak
           syndromes after moxetumomab pasudotox therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Yeong-Hau H. Lien, Michael Boxer
       
  • Retrieved Arterial Clot Helps Guide Antibiotic Therapy in Infective
           Endocarditis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Lama Abdel-Wahed, Amir Shaban, Minako Hayakawa, Kaustubh Limaye
       
  • Cognitive Function in Dementia-Free Subjects and Survival in The Old Age:
           The PROSPER Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Somayeh Rostamian, Sandra de Haan, Jeroen van der Grond, Mark A van Buchem, Ian Ford, J. Wouter Jukema, Behnam Sabayan BACKGROUNDImpairment in domain-specific cognitive function is associated with the increased risk of mortality. We prospectively evaluated the association of executive function and memory with the risk of long-term mortality in dementia-free older subjects. Moreover, we investigated the role of structural brain abnormalities in this association.METHODSWe included 547 dementia-free participants (mean age 78 years, 56.5% male) from the nested magnetic resonance imaging sub-study of the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). Cox proportional hazard models were used to model 10-year risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality in relation to performance in executive function and memory. Moreover, we evaluated the role of total brain parenchymal volume, cerebral blood flow, white matter hyperintensity and the presence of microbleeds and infarcts in the link between cognitive function and mortality.RESULTSIn the multivariable model, lower performance in executive function was associated with greater risk of all-cause (hazard ratio [HR] 1.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–1.70), cardiovascular (HR 1.69, 95%CI 1.36–2.11) and non-cardiovascular (HR 1.36, 95%CI 1.15–1.62) mortality. Similarly, poorer performance in memory tests associated with higher risk of all-cause (HR 1.47, 95%CI 1.29–1.68), cardiovascular (HR 1.45, 95%CI 1.15–1.83) and non-cardiovascular (HR 1.49, 95%CI 1.27–1.76) mortality. The associations were similar in subjects with various levels of brain structural abnormalities and cerebral blood flow (all p for interaction> 0.05).CONCLUSIONSPoorer performance in both executive function and memory tests associates with all-cause, cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality in elderly individuals. This association is independent of cardiovascular risk factors and diseases, brain structural abnormalities and cerebral blood flow.
       
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary Candidiasis mimicking COPD
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): D CAILLAUD, F COSTES, P CHALMET, F PAYEN
       
  • Writing Wrongs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Vinay Guduguntla, Tessa Adzemovic, Vineet Chopra
       
  • Geriatric “Crohn-ic” Abdominal Pain: An Unusual Presentation
           of a Common Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Prihatha Narasimmaraj, Huat Chye Lim, Kendall R. Beck, Andrew R. Lai
       
  • The Internist's Role in Ending the HIV Epidemic in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Lori E Fantry, Elizabeth Connick
       
  • Is Long-Standing Atrial Fibrillation a Biomarker of or Contributor to the
           Symptoms or Progression of Chronic Heart Failure'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Milton Packer
       
  • A Fateful Miss: Ground-Level Fall Revealing Occult Cervical Spinal
           Stenosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Ami Schattner, Yair Glick, Ina Dubin
       
  • Clinician's Guide to the Updated ABCs of Cardiovascular Disease
           Prevention: A Review Part 1
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Kelly Arps, Vincent A. Pallazola, Rhanderson Cardoso, Joseph Meyer, Richard Jones, Jacqueline Latina, Ty J. Gluckman, Neil J. Stone, Roger S. Blumenthal, John W. McEvoy Efforts to better control risk factors for cardiovascular disease and prevent the development of subsequent events are crucial to maintaining healthy populations. In today's busy practice environment and with the overwhelming pace of new research findings, ensuring appropriate emphasis and implementation of evidence-based preventive cardiovascular care can be challenging. The ABCDEF approach to cardiovascular disease prevention is intended to improve dissemination of contemporary best practices and facilitate the implementation of comprehensive preventive strategies for clinicians. This review serves as a succinct yet authoritative overview for internists and subspecialty cardiologists not otherwise focused on cardiovascular prevention. The goal of this 2-part series is to compile a state-of-the-art list of elements central to both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, using an ABCDEF checklist, with particular focus on recent society guideline updates. In Part 1 we highlight developments in cardiovascular risk assessment tools, summarize important recent aspirin trials, discuss prevention considerations in atrial fibrillation, and review guidelines for blood pressure categorization, goals, and therapy.
       
  • Net Clinical Benefit of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist vs Vitamin K Antagonist
           Anticoagulants in Elderly Patients with Atrial Fibrillation
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Giuseppe Patti, Ladislav Pecen, Markus Lucerna, Kurt Huber, Miklos Rohla, Giulia Renda, Jolanta Siller-Matula, Fabrizio Ricci, Paulus Kirchhof, Raffaele De Caterina BackgroundThe risks of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events in patients with atrial fibrillation both increase with age; therefore, net clinical benefit analyses of anticoagulant treatments in the elderly population are crucial to guide treatment. We evaluated the 1-year clinical outcomes with non-vitamin-K antagonist and vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs vs VKAs) in elderly (≥75 years) patients with atrial fibrillation in a prospective registry setting.MethodsData on 3825 elderly patients were pooled from the PREFER in AF and PREFER in AF PROLONGATION registries. The primary outcome was the incidence of the net composite endpoint, including major bleeding and ischemic cardiovascular events on NOACs (n = 1556) compared with VKAs (n = 2269).ResultsThe rates of the net composite endpoint were 6.6%/year with NOACs vs 9.1%/year with VKAs (odds ratio [OR] 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.51-0.99; P = .042). NOAC therapy was associated with a lower rate of major bleeding compared with VKA use (OR 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38-0.90; P = .013). Ischemic events were nominally reduced too (OR 0.71; 95% CI, 0.51-1.00; P = .050). Major bleeding with NOACs was numerically lower in higher-risk patients with low body mass index (BMI; OR 0.50; 95% CI, 0.22-1.12; P = .07) or with age ≥85 years (OR 0.44; 95% CI, 0.13-1.49; P = .17).ConclusionsOur real-world data indicate that, compared with VKAs, NOAC use is associated with a better net clinical benefit in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation, primarily due to lower rates of major bleeding. Major bleeding with NOACs was numerically lower also in higher-risk patients with low BMI or age ≥85 years.
       
  • Pulse Pressure, Cardiovascular Events, and Intensive Blood-Pressure
           Lowering in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT)
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Manan Pareek, Muthiah Vaduganathan, Tor Biering-Sørensen, Christina Byrne, Arman Qamar, Zaid Almarzooq, Ambarish Pandey, Michael Hecht Olsen, Deepak L. BhattABSTRACTBackgroundThe efficacy and tolerability of intensive blood-pressure lowering may vary by pulse pressure (systolic minus diastolic blood pressure).MethodsSPRINT randomized 9361 high-risk adults without diabetes and who were ≥50 years with systolic blood pressure 130-180 mm Hg to intensive or standard antihypertensive treatment. The primary efficacy end point was the composite of acute coronary syndromes, stroke, heart failure, or death from cardiovascular causes. The primary safety end point was composite serious adverse events. We examined the prognostic implications of baseline pulse pressure and the effects of intensive blood-pressure lowering on clinical outcomes across the spectrum of pulse-pressure values using restricted cubic splines.ResultsMean baseline pulse pressure was similar between the 2 study groups (intensive treatment 61±14 mm Hg vs standard treatment 62±14 mm Hg; P = 0.59). Except stroke, for which the association with pulse pressure was best defined as linear, pulse pressure displayed a nonlinear U-shaped relationship with the risk of all tested clinical end points (P 0.05). The benefit of intensive blood-pressure management on mortality appeared greatest in patients with a pulse pressure ∼60 mm Hg (P = 0.03 for interaction). Pulse pressure did not modify the effect of intensive blood-pressure lowering for other clinical end points (P>0.05 for interaction).ConclusionIn a large randomized clinical trial of patients with a high risk of cardiovascular events, risks and benefits of intensive blood-pressure lowering did not appear to be modified by baseline pulse pressure. Selection of appropriate candidates for intensive blood-pressure lowering should not be limited by this parameter.
       
  • Burden of 30-Day Readmissions Associated With Discharge Against Medical
           Advice Among Inpatients in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Nilay Kumar BackgroundDischarges against medical advice are common among inpatients in the United States. The impact of discharge against medical advice on readmission rates and subsequent hospitalization outcomes is uncertain. We sought to ascertain the effect of discharge against medical advice on 30-day readmission rates and outcomes of readmission.MethodsWe used the 2014 Nationwide Readmissions Database to identify index hospitalizations among patients older than 18 years of age. The primary exposure variable was discharge against medical advice, and the primary outcome measure was all-cause unplanned 30-day readmission. We used multivariate hierarchical logistic regression modeling to ascertain the effect of discharge against medical advice on 30-day readmission rates.ResultsThere were an estimated 23,110,641 index hospitalizations nationwide with an overall unplanned 30-day readmission rate of 10.2%. 1.3% of index admissions resulted in a discharge against medical advice. Patients who were discharged against medical advice were younger (mean age 47.1 years vs 56.5 years, P 
       
  • Spontaneous Pneumothorax in a Young Woman
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Charles J. Van Hook, Paul R. Sullivan, Michael Seymour
       
  • Limp and Fever Leading to a Surprising Diagnosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Liliana Andrade Chebli, Pedro Duarte Gaburri, Julio Maria Fonseca Chebli
       
  • Fever and Rash in an Adult: Varicella Re-infection in Conjunction with
           Newly Diagnosed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Arpan Shah, Kanika Goel, Jeffery Uchin, Sai Krishna Patibandla, Zaw Min, Nitin Bhanot
       
  • Clinical Characteristics and Etiologies of Miliary Nodules in the US: A
           Single-Center Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Moiz Salahuddin, Siddharth Karanth, Daniel Ocazionez, Rosa M Estrada-Y-Martin, Sujith V. Cherian BackgroundMiliary nodules have been typically described as a radiological manifestation of disseminated tuberculosis. However, miliary nodules are known to occur in a wide variety of conditions. The primary objective of the study was to identify clinical characteristics and etiologies of miliary nodules within our institution.MethodsUsing International Classification of Diseases, Ninth and Tenth Revision codes, electronic medical records were used to retrospectively identify 53 patients who fulfilled criteria of miliary nodules over the last 10 years. Demographic and clinical data were extracted for all the patients in this cross-sectional study.ResultsThe diagnosis of tuberculosis was made in 15 (28.3%) patients, sarcoidosis in 12 (22.6%), silicosis in 7 (13.2%), extrathoracic malignancy in 5 (9.4%), and histoplasmosis in 4 (7.6%) patients. Four of 9 HIV patients had histoplasmosis. There was 1 case each of hypersensitivity pneumonitis, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, Mycobacterium-avium complex, Epstein-Barr virus pneumonia, cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, and primary lung cancer. Sputum was positive for acid fast bacilli in 4 cases (28%), and bronchoscopy had a 57% successful yield in miliary tuberculosis.ConclusionOur study is the largest single-center data review evaluating the etiology of miliary nodules within the United States; most of the data exist in case reports.
       
  • Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction: Is Ischemia Due to
           Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction a Mechanistic Factor'
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Islam Y. Elgendy, Carl J. Pepine Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is increasing in prevalence and has no guideline-recommended therapy, related in part to a lack of mechanism. Traditionally, HFpEF was thought to be secondary to afterload overload due to systemic hypertension; however, accumulating evidence suggests that HFpEF continues to worsen despite adequate control of blood pressure. Emerging data support the suggestion that myocardial ischemia secondary to coronary microvascular dysfunction could be the new paradigm pathophysiology. Several prospective, observational cohort studies indicate that the outcomes of patients with microvascular dysfunction, after an interval of several years, are dominated by HFpEF hospitalizations. Further, the most prevalent clinical phenotype (eg older women with multiple comorbidities) of patients with HFpEF resembles those with coronary microvascular dysfunction, albeit older. In this review, we provide in-depth insight about this emerging HFpEF paradigm, discuss potential therapeutic implications of this pathophysiology, and summarize some important knowledge gaps.
       
  • Pearls and Myths in the Evaluation of Patients with Suspected Acute
           Pulmonary Embolism
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Melina Stüssi-Helbling, Mattia Arrigo, Lars C. Huber Significant improvement has been achieved in diagnostic accuracy, validation of probability scores, and standardized treatment algorithms for patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism. These developments have provided the tools for a safe and cost-effective management for most of these patients. In our experience, however, the presence of medical myths and ongoing controversies seem to hinder the implementation of these tools in everyday clinical practice. This review provides a selection of such dilemmas and controversies and discusses the published evidence beyond them. By doing so, we try to overcome these dilemmas and suggest pragmatic approaches guided by the available evidence and current guidelines.
       
  • New Treatment Options for Depression: A Primer for Internists
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Tina H. Byun, Swarna S. Chaliki, Kenneth G. PooleABSTRACTDepression continues to be a challenging condition to treat despite the myriad treatment options available. Primary care providers are increasingly tasked with providing second- and third-line treatments for major depressive disorder, and thus, should be familiar with newer medication therapies that are available. In this article, we aim to provide the general internist and other providers who treat depression in their practice with a succinct review of recent developments in the treatment of depression.
       
  • America's Health Care System Is Broken: What Went Wrong and How We Can Fix
           It. Introduction to the Series
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Edward P. Hoffer Over the last half-century, medical science has dramatically improved throughout the world. Although costs have risen in all western countries as new technologies have been widely adopted, costs in the United States have risen much more than they have in any other country. Despite using fewer resources (eg, numbers of physicians and nurses, hospital beds) than do peer countries, per-capita spending on health care in the United States is double that in similar countries. The major driving force behind this difference is that we in the United States pay much more for the same products and services. There is no evidence that this increased spending gives better outcomes. Neither the general public nor doctors are happy with our current health care system. Subsequent articles will discuss the components of our system and how they are failing and how they can be improved.
       
  • The Importance of Being Curious
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Eli Y. Adashi, Abdul-Kareem H. Ahmed, Philip A. Gruppuso
       
  • Etiological Research Using Observational Data, and Net Clinical Benefit.
           Simplicity and Practicality Matter
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Peter Brønnum Nielsen, Iain Buchan, Gregory Y.H. Lip
       
  • Mass Screening for Atrial Fibrillation: The Hype, The Methods, and The
           Application
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): James A. Reiffel
       
  • An Alternative to Medicare for All
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): James E. Dalen, Jennifer L. Plitt, Neha Jaswal, Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • How Accurate Are the Findings Noted During a Physical Examination':
           Will Physicians Stop Performing Physical Examinations' (Part 2)
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • Inappropriate Communication During Internal Medicine Fellowship
           Recruitment: A Mixed-Methods Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Christopher M. Williams, Richard L. Alweis, Alec B. O’Connor, Bhavin Dalal, Devesh Rai, Abdullah Abdullah, Richard Kopelman, Patricia Cornett, Michael O. Frank, Vera P. Luther, Elaine A. Muchmore
       
  • The Luckiest Man onthe Face of the Earth
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Leonard J. Hoenig
       
  • The Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Nir Flint, Felix Thomas, Saman Setareh-Shenas, Robert J. Siegel
       
  • Toward the ‘Shazam-Like’ Identification of Valve Diseases with
           Digital Auscultation'
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Frédéric Michard, Apurva Badheka
       
  • The Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Monica Aggarwal
       
  • Do Physicians Need a Storyteller Education in the Field of Nutrition'
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Vincent Baty
       
  • A Case of Miller Fisher Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Hunter Mwansa, Obinna Obiekezie, Samir Kaneria
       
  • Overlapping Syndrome of Systemic Scleroderma and Cryoglobulinemic
           Vasculitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Taro Horino, Kazu Hamada-Ode, Osamu Ichii, Yoshio Terada
       
  • A Case of Catatonia Nearly Mistaken for Hepatic Encephalopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Kevin G. Buell, S.B. Kiser, Eduard E. Vasilevskis
       
  • Aortic Root Abscess in a Patient with Marfan's Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Eamon P. McCarron, Glen Clarke, Shiva Sreenivasan, Monica Monaghan
       
  • An Uncommon Presentation of Pancreatic Carcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Monica Greco, Simone Negrini, Chiara Schiavi, Francesca Giusti, Matteo Borro, Chiara Vassallo, Francesco Puppo, Giuseppe Murdaca
       
  • What Lurks Beneath: A Subaortic Membrane
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 132, Issue 6Author(s): Lily Chen, Aaron Schelegle, Jeong Choi, Ezra A. Amsterdam
       
  • Consistency of Direct to Consumer Genetic Testing Results Among Identical
           Twins
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Anne M. Huml, Catherine Sullivan, Maria Figueroa, Karen Scott, Ashwini R. Sehgal PurposeTo evaluate the consistency of 3 commonly used direct to consumer genetic testing kits.BackgroundGenetic testing kits are widely marketed by several companies but the consistency of their results is unclear. Since identical twins share the same DNA, their genetic testing results should provide insight into test consistency.Methods42 identical twins (21 pairs) provided samples for three testing companies. Outcomes were concordance of ancestry results when i) twin pairs were tested by the same company and ii) the same participant was tested by different companies. Concordance of 8 self-reported traits with 23andMe genetic analyses were also examined.ResultsConcordance of ancestry results when twin pairs were tested by the same company was high, with mean percent agreement ranging from 94.5%–99.2%. Concordance of ancestry results when participants were tested by two different companies was lower, with mean percent agreement ranging from 52.7%–84.1%. Concordance of trait results was variable, ranging from 34.1% for deep sleep and detached earlobes to 90.2% for cleft chin.ConclusionThe consistency of consumer genetic testing is high for ancestry results within companies but lower and more variable for ancestry results across companies and for specific traits. These results raise questions about the usefulness of such testing.
       
  • Sudden Cardiac Death in the Adolescent Athlete: History, Diagnosis, and
           Prevention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Steven F. DeFroda, Christopher McDonald, Christopher Myers, Aristides I. Cruz, Brett D. Owens, Alan H. Daniels Sudden cardiac death in young athletes is a devastating condition that occurs without warning. While most middle and high school athletes require pre-participation screening, many predisposing conditions go undiagnosed until they occur. The frequency of sudden cardiac death is often under reported because there is no mandatory system for reporting sports-related death in high school sports. Additionally, there is debate regarding the cost-effectiveness of more advanced screening tests such as electrocardiogram (ECG) due to high false positive rates. It is, however, accepted that participants with a family history of sudden cardiac death should undergo more in depth screening. If sudden cardiac arrest occurs, it is important for the patient to undergo immediate defibrillation. Community outreach to ensure that automated external defibrillators (AED) are present at athletic events, as well as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training for coaches could potentially save lives. Ultimately, prevention of sudden cardiac death depends on physician awareness of how to properly screen and identify those at risk, and how to best be prepared if sudden cardiac arrest occurs.
       
  • Class of 1969
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): William H. Frishman, Joseph Alpert
       
  • AAIM Guidelines for Interview and Post-Interview Communication for
           Graduate Medical Education Recruitment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Richard L. Alweis, Christopher M. Williams, Vera P. Luther, Debra L. Simmons, Richard Kopelman, Steven V. Angus, Solomon Liao, Sri Nagalla, Elaine A. Muchmore
       
  • Determinants and outcomes of acute kidney injury among older patients
           undergoing invasive coronary angiography for acute myocardial infarction:
           The SILVER-AMI Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): John A. Dodson, Alexandra Hajduk, Jeptha Curtis, Mary Geda, Harlan M. Krumholz, Xuemei Song, Sui Tsang, Caroline Blaum, Paula Miller, Chirag R. Parikh, Sarwat I. Chaudhry BackgroundAmong older adults (age ≥ 75) hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction, acute kidney injury after coronary angiography is common. Aging-related conditions may independently predict acute kidney injury, but have not yet been analyzed in large acute myocardial infarction cohorts.MethodsWe analyzed data from 2212 participants age ≥ 75 in the SILVER-AMI study who underwent coronary angiography. Acute kidney injury was defined using KDIGO criteria (serum Cr increase ≥ 0.3 mg/dL from baseline or ≥ 1.5 times baseline). We analyzed the associations of traditional acute kidney injury risk factors and aging-related conditions (ADL impairment, prior falls, cachexia, low physical activity) with acute kidney injury, and then performed logistic regression to identify independent predictors.ResultsParticipants' mean age was 81.3 years, 45.2% were female, and 9.5% were nonwhite; 421 (19.0%) experienced acute kidney injury. Comorbid diseases and aging-related conditions were both more common among individuals experiencing acute kidney injury. However, after multivariable adjustment, no aging-related conditions were retained. There were 11 risk factors in the final model; the strongest were heart failure on presentation (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.41–2.59), BMI> 30 (vs. BMI 18–25: OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.27–2.42), and nonwhite race (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.16–2.33). The final model achieved an AUC of 0.72 and was well calibrated (Hosmer-Lemeshow P = 0.50). Acute kidney injury was independently associated with 6 month mortality (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.36–2.88) but not readmission (OR 1.26, 95% CI 0.98–1.61).ConclusionsAcute kidney injury is common among older adults with acute myocardial infarction undergoing coronary angiography. Predictors largely mirrored those in previous studies of younger individuals, which suggests that geriatric conditions mediate their influence through other risk factors.
       
  • A Pregnant Woman with Anterior Chest Mass and Respiratory Failure:
           Blastomycosis in a Historically Non-Endemic Area
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Adam Austin, David M. Jones, Amit Chopra
       
  • An Electrocardiogram Based Diagnosis of Coma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Camille Simard, Blair Carl Schwartz
       
  • The Reply to Vaccination in the Adult Patient Infected With HIV: A Review
           of Vaccine Efficacy and Immunogenicity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Firas El Chaer, Hana M. El Sahly
       
  • A Meta-analysis of Aspirin for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular
           Diseases in the Context of Contemporary Preventive Strategies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Rahman Shah, Babar Khan, Samuel B Latham, Sajjad A Khan, Sunil V Rao BackgroundThe role of aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases remains controversial, particularly in the context of contemporary aggressive preventive strategies.MethodsRelevant randomized clinical trials were included, and risk ratios (RRs) were calculated using random-effects models. Additional moderator analyses were performed to compare the pooled treatment effects from recent trials (those reported after the guidelines of the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel were published in 2001; thus conducted on the background of contemporary preventive strategies) to the results of older trials.ResultsData from 14 RCTs involving 164,751 patients were included. Aspirin use decreased myocardial infarction risk by 16%, compared to placebo (RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.75–0.94); however, in the moderator analyses, aspirin was not associated with a decreased risk of myocardial infarction in recent trials, but was in older trials (P-interaction = .02). Overall, aspirin use significantly increased the occurrence of major bleeding (RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.32–1.69) and hemorrhagic stroke (RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01–1.54). In moderator analyses, the risk of major bleeding (P-interaction = .12) or hemorrhagic stroke (P-interaction = .44) with aspirin was not significantly different between the older and new trials. Differences between aspirin and placebo in the risks for all-cause stroke, cardiac death, and all-cause mortality were not found.ConclusionsIn the context of contemporary primary prevention guidelines, the effect of aspirin on myocardial infarction risk was significantly attenuated, whereas its major bleeding and hemorrhagic stroke complications were retained. Therefore, in contemporary practice routine use of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events may have a net harmful effect.
       
  • Latent Tuberculosis Infection, Treatment initiation and completion rates
           in Persons seeking immigration and healthcare workers.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Amos Lal, Ahmed Al Hammadi, Alwyn Rapose ObjectiveTo assess the factors associated with initiation and completion rates of Latent Tuberculosis infection treatment in persons evaluated at an infectious diseases outpatient clinic in central Massachusetts. The CDC estimates that there may be up to 14 million persons with latent tuberculosis infection in the US. The risk of developing active TB in these persons can range from 5 to 15%. Hence treatment of latent tuberculosis infection is an important aspect of any plan attempting to eliminate TB from the US.MethodsWe performed a retrospective chart review of patients referred to our outpatient Infectious Diseases clinic, from December 2006 to October 2010.ResultsOverall treatment initiation and completion rates were 76% and 68% respectively in our cohort. Two factors that were statistically significant for higher rates of treatment completion were four or more follow up visits during the course of treatment (P 
       
  • America's Health Care System is Broken: What Went Wrong and How We Can Fix
           It. Part 6: Social Factors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Edward P Hoffer While previous articles in the series have focused on the key players in our health care system, even larger factors that impact the cost and outcome of the nation's health lie in areas that are not traditionally thought of as “health care.” Diet and exercise play a huge role in longevity and well-being. The best health care systems are unable to do much to lower deaths from firearms and motor vehicle crashes. Changing our focus from health care institutions to how to better support patients in the community will both lower cost and improve satisfaction. We need to learn how to better integrate patients' wishes into end-of-life care to provide more humanistic as well as less expensive care.
       
  • Eosinopenia as an adverse marker of clinical outcomes in patients
           presenting with acute myocardial infarction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Mohammad Alkhalil, Aileen Kearney, Mairead Hegarty, Catherine Stewart, Peadar Devlin, Colum G. Owens, Mark S. Spence BackgroundEosinopenia is considered a surrogate of inflammation in several disease settings. Following ST- segment elevation myocardial infarction, eosinopenia is presumed to be a marker of infarct severity. We sought to study the relationship between eosinopenia and infarct severity and how this relationship determined the long-term outcomes following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.Methods606 consecutive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention from a large volume single centre were enrolled. Low eosinophil count was defined as
       
  • Meigs' Syndrome: A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Jenny A. Shih, Leslie A. Garrett, Alexander R. Carbo
       
  • Common Sense and Medical Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • A Case of “Pernicious Angina”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Michelle Lundholm, Laurent Loganathan, Amit Dayal, Brian Schmitt
       
  • Cannabis and Cannabinoids: Kinetics and Interactions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Brian C. Foster, Hanan Abramovici, Cory S. Harris Cannabis sativa and related products are widely used but their potential to cause significant clinical interactions remains unclear, particularly for cannabinoid-enriched or otherwise concentrated products. The pharmacokinetics of most cannabis products is not known. Where information is known, there is wide variation. Extrapolation of limited clinical data is complicated by the complexity and variability of cannabis products as well as their delivery through various routes of administration. In vitro evidence shows that the major cannabinoids are substrates for numerous metabolic enzymes, including the cytochrome P450 metabolizing enzymes. Whereas many consumers consider cannabis products to be safe relative to alternative prescription or narcotic drugs, clinical reports of cannabis-related drug interactions and adverse events are increasing in frequency. Patients using these products, whether for medical or non-medical purposes, together with conventional therapeutic agents may be at increased risk of adverse events, including therapeutic failure, and require enhanced monitoring.
       
  • COPD: To be or not to be, that is the question
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Francesca Polverino, Afshin Sam, Stefano Guerra As our knowledge on the natural history of COPD progresses, a conceptual model simply based on an accelerated decline of lung function in adult life in response to smoking has become inadequate to capture the complexity of this disease and increasing attention is being given to possible contributions from events and/or alterations of developmental processes that take place earlier in life. In addition, a remarkable heterogeneity has emerged among the pathobiological mechanisms that are involved in different phenotypes of COPD, suggesting that an effective disease management will require individualised treatment approaches largely based on the underlying biological mechanisms (endotypes). In this review, we will discuss the many faces of COPD from an epidemiological, pathobiological, and clinical standpoint and argue that airflow limitation encompasses a number of manifestations that are too diverse to be still clustered under the same diagnostic label.
       
  • The Family Meeting
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): J. Rush Pierce
       
  • Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors for the Treatment of High Altitude Hypoxia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Philip L Hooper, Erik R Swenson, Richard J Johnson
       
  • Cannabis Use and Markers of Systemic Inflammation The Coronary Artery Risk
           Development in Young Adults Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Omayma Alshaarawy, Stephen Sidney, Reto Auer, David Green, Elsayed Z. Soliman, David C. Goff, James C. Anthony BackgroundWhether cannabis use in humans plays a role in the regulation of inflammatory responses is unclear. The objective of the current research is to study cannabis-attributable immunomodulation as manifest in levels of fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP), and interleukin-6 (IL-6).MethodsThe Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study is a cohort of 5115 black and white men and women enrolled in 1985–1986, and followed up for over 25 years, with repeated measures of cannabis use. Fibrinogen levels were measured at Y5, Y7, and Y20, CRP levels were measured at Y7, Y15, Y20, and Y25, and IL-6 levels were measured at Y20. We estimated the association of cannabis use and each biomarker using Generalized Estimating Equations adjusting for demographic factors, tobacco cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and body mass index.ResultsCompared to never use (reference), recent cannabis use was not associated with any of the biomarkers studied here after adjusting for potential confounding variables. Former cannabis use was inversely associated with fibrinogen levels (β = − 5.4; 95% CI = − 9.9, − 0.9), whereas the associations were weaker for serum CRP (β = − 0.02; 95% CI = − 0.10, 0.06) and IL-6 (β = − 0.06; 95% CI = − 0.13, 0.02).ConclusionsA modest inverse association between former cannabis use and fibrinogen was observed. Additional studies are needed to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of cannabis while considering different cannabis preparation and mode of use.
       
  • The Consequences of Untreated Gout: Is this a tophus'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Jaren R. Trost, Konstantin N. Konstantinov
       
  • Digoxin Use and Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced
           Ejection Fraction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Syed Z. Qamer, Awais Malik, Essraa Bayoumi, Phillip H. Lam, Steven Singh, Milton Packer, Ioannis E. Kanonidis, Charity J. Morgan, Ahmed Abdelmawgoud, Richard M. Allman, Gregg C. Fonarow, Ali Ahmed BackgroundHeart failure is a leading cause for hospital readmission. Digoxin use may lower this risk in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), but data on contemporary patients receiving other evidence-based therapies are lacking.MethodsOf the 11,900 patients with HFrEF (ejection fraction ≤ 45%) in Medicare-linked OPTIMIZE-HF, 8401 were not on digoxin, of whom 1571 received discharge prescriptions for digoxin. We matched 1531 of these patients with 1531 not receiving digoxin by propensity scores for digoxin use. The matched cohort (n = 3062; mean age, 76 years; 44% women; 14% African American) was balanced on 52 baseline characteristics. We assembled a second matched cohort of 2850 patients after excluding those with estimated glomerular filtration rate 
       
  • Paraneoplastic Migratory Oligoarthritis in a Patient with Malignant
           Mesothelioma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Matthew Eidenschink, Albertine Beard, David Ewart
       
  • “Then Came the Measles”:Tom Sawyer’s Rubeola Infection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Leonard J. Hoenig
       
  • America's Health Care System is Broken: What Went Wrong and How We Can Fix
           It. Part 5: Malpractice, Fraud, Waste, the EMR
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Edward P Hoffer While the exact sums can only be estimated, large amounts of money are wasted by the US health care system through fraud and by spending on tests, procedures, and medicine that are of no proven benefit. The adversarial fault-finding malpractice system siphons off large amounts of money from patients to lawyers and legal costs and is a deterrent to system improvement. While electronic records have the potential to improve care and lower costs through information sharing, their current implementation neither improves care nor lowers costs. If care is to be improved while costs are reduced, changes must be made in all these areas.
       
  • Pay Air-Tension: Anorexia and Tension Pneumomediastinum
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Louisa Cheong, Esabella S. Koh, Desmond B. Teo
       
  • Peripheral Artery Disease: Past, Present, and Future
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Umberto Campia, Marie Gerhard-Herman, Gregory Piazza, Samuel Z. Goldhaber Peripheral artery disease is a prevalent but underdiagnosed manifestation of atherosclerosis.There is insufficient awareness of its clinical manifestations, including intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia, and of its risk of adverse cardiovascular and limb outcomes. In addition, our inadequate knowledge of its pathophysiology has also limited the development of effective treatments, particularly in the presence of critical limb ischemia. This review aims to highlight essential elements of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of peripheral artery disease; bring attention to the often-atypical manifestations of occlusive arterial disease of the lower extremity and to increase awareness of critical limb ischemia; briefly describe the diagnostic role of the ankle brachial index; and go over the contemporary management of peripheral arterial disease. An emphasis is placed on evidence-based medical treatments to improve symptoms and quality of life and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular and limb events in these patients, including supervised exercise training, smoking cessation, antagonism of the angiotensin system, lipid lowering, and antiplatelet and antithrombotic therapy.
       
  • Western Osteoporosis Alliance Clinical Practice Series: Treat-to-Target
           for Osteoporosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): EM Lewiecki, DL Kendler, KS Davison, DA Hanley, ST Harris, MR McClung, PD Miller Patients often start treatment to reduce fracture risk because of a bone mineral density T-score consistent with osteoporosis (≤ − 2.5). Others with a T-score above − 2.5 may be treated when there is a history of fragility fracture or when a fracture risk algorithm categorizes them as having high fracture risk. It is common to initiate therapy with a generic oral bisphosphonate, unless contraindicated, and continue therapy if the patient is responding as assessed by stability or an increase in bone mineral density. However, some patients may respond well to an oral bisphosphonate, yet remain with an unacceptably high fracture risk. Recognition of this occurrence has led to the development of an alternative strategy: treat-to-target. This involves identifying a biological marker (treatment target) that represents an acceptable fracture risk, then initiating treatment with an agent likely to reach this target. If the patient is on a path to reaching the target with initial therapy, treatment is continued. If it appears the target will not be reached with initial therapy, treatment is changed to an agent more likely to achieve the goal.
       
  • Outcomes of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Patients with Influenza & Other
           Viral Respiratory Infections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Pimprapa Vejpongsa, Danai Kitkungvan, Mohammad Madjid, Konstantinos Charitakis, H Vernon Anderson, Salman Arain, Prakash Balan, Richard W Smalling, Abhijeet Dhoble BackgroundAcute influenza infection can trigger acute myocardial infarction, however, outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction during influenza infection is largely unknown.MethodPatients ≥ 18 years old with ST-elevation and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction during January2013-December2014 were identified using the National Inpatient Sample(NIS). The clinical outcomes were compared among patients who had no respiratory infection to the ones with influenza and other viral respiratory infections using propensity score-matched analysis.ResultsOut of 1,884,985 admissions for acute myocardial infarction, acute influenza and other viral infections were diagnosed in 9885 and 11,485 patients respectively, accounting for 1.1% of patients. Acute myocardial infarction patients with concomitant influenza infection had a worse outcome than those with acute myocardial infarction alone, in terms of in-hospital case fatality rate, development of shock, acute respiratory failure, acute kidney injury, and higher rate of blood transfusion after propensity scores. The length of stay is also significantly longer in influenza patients with acute myocardial infarction compared with patients with acute myocardial infarction alone. However, patients who developed acute myocardial infarction during other viral respiratory infection only has higher rate of acute respiratory failure but overall lower mortality rate, less likely to develop shock or require blood transfusion after propensity-match. Despite presenting with acute myocardial infarction, less than one-fourth of patients with concomitant influenza infection underwent coronary angiography, but more than half (51.4%) required revascularization.ConclusionInfluenza infection is associated with worse outcomes in acute myocardial infarction patients and patients were less likely to receive further evaluation with invasive coronary angiography.
       
  • Walking Speed Drives the Prognosis of Older Adults with Cardiovascular and
           Neuropsychiatric Multimorbidity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Davide L Vetrano, Debora Rizzuto, Amaia Calderón-Larrañaga, Graziano Onder, Anna-Karin Welmer, Chengxuan Qiu, Roberto Bernabei, Alessandra Marengoni, Laura Fratiglioni BackgroundWe investigated the impact of multiple cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric diseases on all-cause and cause-specific mortality in older adults, considering their functional status.MethodsThis cohort study included 3241 participants (aged ≥ 60 years) in the Swedish National study of Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K). Number of cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric diseases was categorized as 0, 1, or ≥ 2. Functional impairment was defined as walking speed of 
       
  • Fulminant human granulocytic anaplasmosis after CABG – an unusual
           occurrence
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Brian Kim, Osamudiamen Idahosa, Jeffrey A Jahre
       
  • Lack of Measles Vaccination of a Few Portends Future Epidemics and
           Vaccination of Many
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Rachael Silverberg, Jennifer Caceres, Sara Greene, Mark Hart, Charles H. Hennekens
       
  • The Association of Peptic Ulcer Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Oscar M.P. Jolobe
       
  • Syncope in the elderly
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Joseph S. Alpert
       
  • The Effects of Dairy Consumption on Blood Pressure and Risk of
           Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Massimo Leggio, Cristina Tiberti, Massimo Armeni, Giorgio Limongelli, Andrea Mazza
       
  • The Great Masquerador: A young female with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia
           Type 2A and bilateral pheochromocytomas
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Chua Wei Jie Marvin, Kathleen Su-Yen Sek, Tai E Shyong
       
  • Laying Hands on the Unstable Patient: Bedside Diagnosis in Medical
           Emergencies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Michael Y. Lin, Mukund Ramkumar, John F. Kugler
       
  • Brief observation: Prostate artery embolization in patients with acute
           urinary retention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Alberto G Kenny, Olivier Pellerin, Gregory Amouyal, François Desgranchamps, M.D Paul Méria, M.D Amaury De Gouvello, M.D Charles Darianne, Carole Déan, Helena Pereira, Nicolas Thiounn, Marc Sapoval ObjectiveThe objective of this prospective study was to assess the efficacy of prostate artery embolization after failure of a trial without catheter in patients suffering a first episode of acute urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.MethodsPatients with failure of a trial without catheter despite alpha-blocker therapy were invited to participate to this protocol. Twenty consecutive patients were included in the study. All patients underwent prostate artery embolization with calibrated PVA microspheres (Bead Block®, BTG Ltd., Farnham, UK).ResultsSuccessful removal of the indwelling bladder catheter and spontaneous voiding was achieved in 15/20 (75%) patients and the overall clinical success at 6 months after prostate embolization was 14/20 (70%). No patient experienced severe adverse events.ConclusionsProstate artery embolization might be a valuable treatment after a failure of a trial without catheter. Further studies are needed to better define his place in this setting.
       
  • Bony bump of the oral cavity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Sarah Soon Khe Wei, Ranjeet Bapat, Tanay Chaubal
       
  • Leisure-Time Running Reduces the Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Yuehan Wang, Duck-chul Lee, Angelique G. Brellenthin, Thijs M.H. Eijsvogels, Xuemei Sui, Timothy S. Church, Carl J. Lavie, Steven N. Blair ObjectivesWe examined the overall association as well as the dose–response relationship between leisure-time running and incident type 2 diabetes.MethodsParticipants were 19,347 adults aged 18–100 years who were free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes at baseline, and who received at least two extensive preventive medical examinations between 1974 and 2006. Running and other types of aerobic physical activity were assessed by self-reported leisure-time activities. Type 2 diabetes was defined as fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dl (7.0 mmol/l), physician diagnosis, or insulin use.ResultsDuring an average follow-up of 6.5 years, 1015 adults developed type 2 diabetes. Approximately 29.5% of adults participated in leisure-time running at baseline. Runners had a 28% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.62–0.84) lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with non-runners during follow-up. The HRs (95% CIs) of type 2 diabetes were 0.98 (0.75–1.28), 0.69 (0.51–0.92), 0.62 (0.45–0.85), 0.78 (0.59–1.04), and 0.57 (0.42–0.79) across quintiles of running time (minutes/week) compared with non-runners after adjusting for potential confounders, including levels of non-running aerobic physical activity. Similar dose–response relationships between running distance (miles/week), frequency (times/week), total amount (MET-minutes/week), and speed (mph) were also observed.ConclusionsParticipating in leisure-time running is associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes in adults. Consistent linear dose–response relationships were observed between various running parameters and incident type 2 diabetes, supporting the prescription of running to prevent type 2 diabetes.
       
  • Words Matter: Removing the Word Pimp from Medical Education
           Discourse
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Amulya Nagarur, John W. McEvoy, David A. Hirsh, Benjamin C. James
       
  • A case report of afebrile malaria
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Nima Madanchi, Rukma Govindu, Hussam Ammar
       
  • Severe metastatic pulmonary calcification
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Masaya Taniwaki, Kazuma Kawamoto, Masahiro Yamasaki, M.D Kunihiko Funaishi, M.D Yu Matsumoto, M.D Naoko Matsumoto, Nobuyuki Ohashi, Noboru Hattori
       
  • A Challenge is Brewing: false-positive urine alcohol in an elderly
           diabetic male.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Saif M Borgan, Kirolus Sourial, Ernesto Robalino Gonzaga, Kathlyn Camargo Macias, Minh Ho
       
  • Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis: histopathological
           confirmation despite negative serology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2019Source: The American Journal of MedicineAuthor(s): Anusha M. Kumar, Gordon H. Bae, Justin Besen, Bernice Y. Kwong, Kerri E. Rieger
       
 
 
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