Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3147 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3147 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 106, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 446, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 431, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 395, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 488, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 266, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 213, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Nurse Education Today
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.154
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 174  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0260-6917 - ISSN (Online) 1532-2793
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3147 journals]
  • Development of undergraduate nursing entrustable professional activities
           to enhance clinical care and practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Siew Tiang, Emily Ang, Dujeepa D. Samarasekera, Shefaly ShoreyAbstractBackgroundNursing education adopts a time-based approach to assess the multifaceted competencies of student nurses. The competency-based approach is preferred historically as it is practical and ensures that individuals deliver effective healthcare practice. However, there remains a gap on how these competencies are actually applied in nursing practice. To facilitate the connection between competencies, competency-based education, and nursing practice, entrustable professional activities (EPAs) can be utilized to translate competencies into clinical practice. EPAs have shown promising results across multiple healthcare specialties and have become the current driving force to facilitate nursing care and practice. Given the limited information of EPAs in nursing education, it is an opportune time to develop EPAs specific to nursing care and practice.ObjectivesTo provide a detailed breakdown on the development of EPAs in nursing education to inform clinical care and practice.MethodsThe development stages of EPAs included: i) the formation of a team, ii) the development of the conceptual framework, and iii) the pooling, reviewing, and revising of core EPAs.ResultsA total of ten core EPAs were developed, with sub-EPAs nested within these core EPAs. The EPAs include: 1) patient engagement, 2) patient care and practice, 3) care management, 4) common procedures, 5) safety, 6) urgent care, 7) transition care, 8) patient education, 9) interprofessional collaboration, and 10) palliative care.ConclusionThe development of EPAs specific to nursing care and practice may offer nursing programs a guide to assist with curricula planning and a basis for developing entrustment assessment tools. The unfamiliarity of EPAs in nursing education may pose as implementation challenges to EPAs. Future research is warranted to evaluate and improve the developed EPAs.
       
  • Evaluation of an undergraduate nursing entrustable professional activities
           framework: An exploratory qualitative research
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Siew Tiang Lau, Emily Ang, Dujeepa D. Samarasekera, Shefaly ShoreyAbstractBackgroundEntrustable professional activities (EPA) are mainly used in graduate medical education and professional development and have not been widely implemented in nursing undergraduate settings. Nursing EPAs were therefore developed by the Alice Lee Centre of Nursing to translate theoretical nursing competencies into clinical practice and as forms of standardized clinical assessment tools. Feedback from various stakeholders is required to further refine the framework.ObjectivesTo explore the perceptions and experiences of using the new EPA framework in nursing students and hospital and university clinical instructors.DesignAn exploratory qualitative study using focus group interviews.ParticipantsSeven year-one nursing undergraduates, 12 year-two undergraduates, seven university clinical instructors, and 18 hospital clinical instructors participated in this study.MethodsThe students formed five groups, while the clinical instructors formed seven groups, each consisting of three to four participants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore stakeholders' experiences and perceptions of the EPA assessment framework. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.ResultsDespite initial mixed reactions of confusion and relief, many students and clinical instructors commended the comprehensive and structured EPA framework and its emphasis on holistic patient-centered care. EPAs also allow flexible assessment methods, encourage critical thinking among students, and promote team-based care and peer teaching. However, the assessment using a two-dimensional matrix with multiple competencies for the EPAs, subjective assessment criteria, the lack of standardization using checklists, subjective assessment criteria, and the lack of, manpower, and time may potentially affect the accuracy of the clinical assessments. The effectiveness of the EPA framework was also dependent on the quality of feedback, students' intrinsic motivations, and learning environments. The refinement of EPAs and entrustment levels, a physical checklist, and an incorporation of EPAs into school curricula were recommended to improve practitioners' learning experiences.ConclusionsThe use of EPAs in nursing education continues to be a novel and evolving process. There remains a need for a further refinement of the EPA framework to tailor to instructors' expectations and students' capabilities.
       
  • Examining mental health clinical placement quality using a
           self-determination theory approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Dana Perlman, Christopher Patterson, Lorna Moxham, Shawn BurnsAbstractNursing clinical placements provide a unique opportunity for students to develop and hone the skills and knowledge that will be used upon graduation in their future professional practice. There is an on-going inquiry into elements that may facilitate better leaning outcomes in a variety of teaching and learning settings, including clinical experiences. Using a Self-Determination Theory approach, this study examined whether undergraduate nursing students would benefit from immersion in an autonomy-supportive clinical setting. Using a two-group pre and post-test design, students were classified into either an autonomy-supportive or comparison clinical placement cohort and measured on their learning using the Mental Health Clinical Placement Survey. Results of a repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance indicated a significant difference on some of the measures of learning housed within the Mental Health Clinical Placement Survey with students in the autonomy-supportive group reporting higher scores at the post-test time point. Findings support the value that teaching and learning in an autonomy-supportive setting has, on the skills and educational development of students.
       
  • Frequency of participation in student response system activities as a
           predictor of final grade: An observational study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2020Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Joni Tornwall, Lin Lu, Kui XieAbstractObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to determine whether frequency of participation in activities offered in a student response system was associated with students' final course grades in four different nursing courses and to explore whether that effect was dependent on the specific pedagogical context of each course.DesignAn observational approach with a predictive model was used to examine the effect of a student's frequency of responses to prompts in a student response system (Nearpod) on final grade.SettingThis investigation was carried out in four high-enrollment nursing courses in a large Midwestern university in the United States.ParticipantsStudents who participated in this study were enrolled in one of four core nursing courses: Pathophysiology, Health Assessment, Nursing Care of the Adult at the undergraduate level, and Pathophysiology at the graduate level.MethodsMultiple regression analysis was conducted to examine the association between a student's frequency of Nearpod use and their final grade.ResultsThe regression model explained 25.42% of the variance in final grade when controlling for course differences. The key finding from this study is that the more a student responded to prompts in Nearpod, the more likely they were to earn a higher final grade, but this effect was statistically significant only in undergraduate Pathophysiology.ConclusionsThe positive association between more frequent Nearpod use and higher final grade appears to be dependent on contextual factors. These factors may include consistent use of Nearpod in class, detailed feedback and elaboration on student responses, and required participation in Nearpod activities.
       
  • Clinical placement anxiety in undergraduate nursing students: A concept
           analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Marie-Claude G. Simpson, Jo-Ann V. SawatzkyAbstractObjectiveThe primary aim of this review was to complete an in-depth analysis of clinical placement anxiety in undergraduate nursing students. Our overall goal was to establish a strong foundation for clinical education strategies and future research on clinical placement anxiety in nursing education.Design & methodsWe utilized Walker and Avant's systematic 8-step approach to concept analysis as a framework to develop a comprehensive understanding of clinical placement anxiety in undergraduate students.Data sourcesA review of existing literature on clinical placement anxiety was conducted using the electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, and PsychInfo, as well as a grey literature and snowball search. Search terms included clinical placement, clinical experience, nursing students, undergraduate nursing students, and anxiety.ResultsThe literature search resulted in 81 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Five defining attributes were identified: a vague or unknown threat, psychological-emotional responses, psychological-cognitive responses, physiological responses, and unfamiliar environments or situations. Antecedents, consequences, and empirical referents of the concept were also highlighted.ConclusionsInsights gleaned from this concept analysis may enhance the ability of clinical nursing educators to effectively prevent and manage student anxiety in the clinical setting. By contextualizing anxiety, we have also validated the importance of further exploration of the anxiety experienced by undergraduate nursing students during their clinical experiences. Thus, this concept analysis establishes the foundation for educational strategies, as well as future research in nursing education.
       
  • Quality of contact counts: The development of interprofessional identity
           in first year students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Ruyi Tong, Lynne D. Roberts, Margo Brewer, Helen FlavellAbstractBackgroundLittle is known about how nursing and other healthcare students develop professional and interprofessional identities.ObjectivesThis study a) measures changes in students' professional and interprofessional identities between the start and end of a faculty-wide interprofessional first year programme, and b) identifies factors influencing interprofessional identity strength at the end of the programme.ParticipantsOne hundred and eight first year nursing, medicine and allied health students.MethodsA single-group pre-post-test design was used. Students completed an online survey at the start and end of the year-long programme. The survey comprised measures of professional and interprofessional identity, stereotypes, contact and demographics. The same survey was used twice.ResultsThere was a small decline in professional identity and a large decline in interprofessional identity across the year. Nursing students, the only group involved in clinical practicums, were exempt from the large fall in interprofessional identity. Quality of contact with students from other professions and autostereotypes about own profession were predictors of interprofessional identity strength at the end of the programme, consistent with intergroup contact theory.ConclusionsIntroductory interprofessional education programmes should include opportunities for quality contact with students from other professions, and for students to develop a clear understanding of their own profession.
       
  • Effects of Senior Simulation Suit Programme on nursing students' attitudes
           towards older adults: A randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Winnie Lai-Sheung ChengAbstractBackgroundAs populations age worldwide, nursing educational institutions need to train nurses not only to provide health care services specific to the elderly, but also to have a positive attitude as they work. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a Senior Simulation Suit Programme (SSSP). The SSSP, which focused on mimicking the physiological experiences of an 80 year-old person, was hypothesized to increase the wearer's positive attitude towards older adult care.MethodsA single-blinded, randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate the efficacies of SSSP. One hundred and thirty-nine (139) nursing students were randomly assigned to either SSSP group (n = 69) or to a control group (n = 70) with “placebo clothing”, i.e. clothing that mimicked old age but did not actually impair faculties. Two instruments—Kogan Attitudes Towards Old People Scale (KAOP) and a 1-item scale on Willingness To Care for Older People Scale (WCOP)—were used for data collection at baseline and at completion of SSSP. A Chinese version of Palmore's Facts Aging Quiz (C-FAQ) was used to assess nursing students' knowledge about adult care, and a questionnaire was developed to collect demographic information at baseline.ResultsNo significant difference between the two groups was found. A significant increase of positive attitudes and of willingness to serve older adults was found in both the control group and the group wearing SSSP.ConclusionBoth the SSSP and control intervention could improve the attitudes of nursing students towards older adult care. This study suggests that wearing whatever the nursing students associate with being old, will improve their attitude towards older adult care.
       
  • Blended learning in undergraduate nursing education – A scoping
           review
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Nurse Education Today, Volume 86Author(s): Don M. Leidl, Lauren Ritchie, Neda MoslemiAbstractObjectivesTo provide a comprehensive scoping review of the existing literature regarding the use of blended learning in undergraduate nursing education. To align the varied educational terms and definitions with the broad definition of blended learning.DesignScoping review following established methodology.Data sourcesIn consultation with library services, the academic literature was searched. Electronic databases searched included ERIC (OVID), Medline (OVID), PubMed, Nursing and Allied Health, and CINAHL Plus.Review methodsA total of 189 potentially relevant nursing research articles published between the years of 2009 and 2019. Three reviewers independently reviewed the articles, leaving 37 relevant primary articles in the nursing field to be included in the scoping review.ResultsNursing content delivered using blended learning approaches were organized into 8 themes. Themes include Professional Nursing Skills; Mental Health Nursing; Bioscience; Pharmacology, Specialty Populations; Nursing Assessment; Acute Care Nursing; and the Art of Nursing. A variety of blended learning approaches are being utilized in Undergraduate nursing education, the majority of which are happening in the classroom.ConclusionThis scoping review presents explicit the degrees to which blended learning is referred to in the nursing education literature and expanded the definition of blended learning to encompass the terminology associated with distributed, decentralized, hybrid, and flexible learning. There is a wide, varied, and expanding number of blended learning approaches currently being utilized in nursing education to teach a wide range of nursing content and skills. An expanded scoping review focused on blended learning in psychiatric nursing, licenced practical nursing, nurse practitioners, and all graduate level nursing education programs is recommended as is additional research into the use of blended learning in the lab or clinical setting.
       
  • Preparing students for clinical practice: The impact of a TeamSTEPPS®
           inter professional education session
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Nurse Education Today, Volume 86Author(s): Eva Williams, Carmen R. Presti, Hector Rivera, Gauri Agarwal
       
  • Using branching path simulations in critical thinking of pain management
           among nursing students: Experimental study
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Nurse Education Today, Volume 86Author(s): Mohammad Rababa, Dina Masha'alAbstractBackgroundNursing education has to promote nursing students' critical thinking skills especially those who are going to work with people with dementia suffering from pain. Therefore, nursing education needs to incorporate new and effective teaching methods in nursing curricula for critical thinking skills promotion. Branching path simulation is an interactive learning tool which helps students; (1) to make decisions about treatment options for patients and get feedback immediately and (2) to demonstrate and promote their critical thinking skills in a safe and supported environment before dealing with complex and real-life case scenarios.ObjectivesThe present study aimed to examine the effectiveness of branching path simulation in promoting the critical thinking skills of undergraduate nursing students.MethodsThis an equivalent control group pretest-posttest experimental study was done in 2019 on 102 undergraduate nursing students who had registered in both practical and theoretical courses of Advanced Adult Health Nursing. A pretest posttest experimental design with concurrent control group and random assignment to the treatment/nontreatment variable was used and a convenience sample of 102 nursing students was recruited in this study. The students were randomly assigned and divided into two equal intervention and control groups and each group attended different training sessions. The control group was trained by traditional lectures while the intervention group was trained by branching path simulation. The researcher used a demographic questionnaire and the Critical Thinking Self-Assessment Scale (CTSAS) for data collection.ResultsAfter the training sessions, the mean scores of the CTSAS and its subscales domain in the intervention group were significantly higher than the control group.ConclusionsBranching path simulation is an effective teaching method to promote students' critical thinking skills. Future studies are recommended to examine the effect of branching path simulation on other nursing students learning outcomes.
       
  • A model to facilitate the teaching of caring to diagnostic radiography
           students: Original research
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Nurse Education Today, Volume 86Author(s): Kathleen Naidoo, Heather Lawrence, Christopher SteinAbstractBackgroundHealthcare has moved towards a patient-centred caring environment. Radiography students have described feeling unprepared for daily patient interactions therefore, it is essential for educators to facilitate the development of caring attributes in students.ObjectiveThe objective of this article is to describe the process that was followed in order to develop a model to facilitate the teaching of caring to diagnostic radiography students.MethodA qualitative, theory-generating, exploratory and descriptive research design was used. Phase one was a descriptive, exploratory study that utilized focus group interviews to explore and describe the concept of caring from the perspective of first year diagnostic radiography students. Phase two, the focus of this article, was the theory generation phase of the study which began with identifying a central concept from the focus group interview results. The central concepts were then defined according to dictionary and literature sources and relationships between the identified concepts were created. Thereafter, the model was developed.ResultsThe central concept was identified as the “facilitation of a culture of caring”. This concept was then defined, classified and described.ConclusionThis model as a framework of reference could assist diagnostic radiography educators in facilitating the teaching of caring among student radiographers.
       
  • Research on the formation of humanistic care ability in nursing students:
           A structural equation approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Nurse Education Today, Volume 86Author(s): Yanhong Wang, Yan Zhang, Minhui Liu, Liyuan Zhou, Junhong Zhang, Hongxia Tao, Xuan LiAbstractObjectiveTo construct and test a hypothetical model linking the caring ability of nursing students with empathy ability, emotional intelligence, and communication ability.MethodParticipants were 851 students from three undergraduate colleges and one junior college in China, Gansu Province. Participating students had to fulfill the following requirements: different levels of nursing majors (undergraduates or junior college students), understand the study purpose, and be willing to participate in this study. Exclusion: secondary college students. Variables were measured by the Caring Ability Inventory, Emotional Intelligence Scale, Supportive Communicative Scale, and Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Data were analyzed with structural equation modeling to explore the path relationships and mutual effects between structural elements.ResultsEmpathy (β = 0.25, P
       
  • Multilingual nursing education: Nursing students' and teachers' interests,
           perceptions and expectations
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Nurse Education Today, Volume 86Author(s): Anja Garone, Piet Van de Craen, Katrien StruyvenAbstractThis study investigates the interests, perceptions and expectations of nursing students and teachers with respect to multilingual nursing education. This mixed methods study included a student survey and teacher interviews from two Dutch speaking institutes of higher education in Brussels. Results show that students preferred separate targeted language skills courses to integrated content and language courses. The teachers were mostly positive towards the idea of integrated multilingual nursing education. Teachers expected more time allocation and linguistic support from experts for integrating foreign languages into the curriculum, as well as setting clear objectives for students. The study concludes that successful multilingual integration in nursing education depends on implementation policies that take into account proper support for the teachers and clear learning objectives for the students.
       
  • Reasons for academic dishonesty during examinations among nursing
           students: Cross-sectional survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Nurse Education Today, Volume 86Author(s): Panagiotis Kiekkas, Eleni Michalopoulos, Nikolaos Stefanopoulos, Kyriaki Samartzi, Panagiota Krania, Martha Giannikopoulou, Michael IgoumenidisAbstractBackgroundUnderstanding why nursing students engage in academic dishonesty is crucial, since cheating is becoming more common and can be followed by unethical professional practice.ObjectivesTo develop and validate a questionnaire for investigating nursing students' perceptions about the reasons for academic dishonesty during examinations, along with identifying the most important of these reasons.DesignCross-sectional survey with the use of a convenience sample.Participants and setting.660 undergraduate students of a nursing department in Greece.MethodsQuestionnaire items were developed based on literature review and student interviews, evaluation of their content validity and intra-rater reliability. The participants completed the questionnaire electronically, which included items referring to behaviors of and reasons for academic dishonesty during examinations. Based on their responses, factor analysis was used to determine structural validity of the items that referred to the reasons for academic dishonesty.ResultsHigh prevalence of academic dishonesty behaviors during examinations was confirmed. Reasons for academic dishonesty were grouped into three factors, which included 17 items in total. Highly-rated items mainly referred to non-realistic demands of and unfair student treatment by academic personnel, absence of severe consequences for cheating, the way examinations are performed, and the importance of achieving high grades. Female, junior and high degree grade students had significantly higher percentages of highly-rated responses in some items.ConclusionsThese findings offered knowledge about the reasons that students perceive to mostly favor cheating, whose identification can guide preventive strategies.
       
  • Bringing simulation to the classroom using an unfolding video patient
           scenario: A quasi-experimental study to examine student satisfaction,
           self-confidence, and perceptions of simulation design
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Nurse Education Today, Volume 86Author(s): Kelly PowersAbstractBackgroundTeaching strategies to promote experiential learning in the classroom are important to facilitate students' clinical reasoning abilities. Using video to simulate unfolding patient scenarios in the classroom has the potential to engage students through active learning and to enhance their ability to connect theory to practice.ObjectivesStudy objectives were to: (1) Evaluate nursing students' satisfaction and self-confidence in learning and perceptions of the design of a simulated patient scenario delivered via video in the classroom and (2) Compare findings to students' satisfaction, self-confidence, and perceptions of the design of prior high-fidelity simulation experiences in the laboratory.DesignA quasi-experimental approach was used.SettingThe study setting was a nursing classroom at a University in the southeast United States.ParticipantsConvenience sampling was utilized and 54 students in their final semester of a pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing program participated.MethodsThe intervention was an unfolding video patient scenario delivered in the classroom. Prior to the intervention, participants completed two measurement tools to collect information about their satisfaction, self-confidence, and perceptions of the design of prior high-fidelity simulations. After the intervention, these tools were administered again to collect data about the video simulation experience in the classroom.ResultsParticipants had a higher level of satisfaction (p = 0.002) and self-confidence (p 
       
  • What is the evidence that can inform the implementation of a preceptorship
           scheme for general practice nurses, and what is the evidence for the
           benefits of such a scheme': A literature review and synthesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Susan H. Walker, Kellie NorrisAbstractObjectivesThis is a literature review of the published evidence of the benefits and suggested structure of preceptorship programmes for General Practice Nursing, with the aim of informing General Practices and networks who are instituting preceptorship programmes.Design & data sourcesA literature search was carried out in the CINAHL Plus database of English language papers from the year 2000–2019 using the search terms; (Precept* or mentor*) AND (“community practice” OR “primary care” or “general practice” or “new GPN” or “new general practice nurse” or “nurse new to general practice” or “induction GPN” or “GPN”).Review methodA literature review and narrative synthesis of the evidence.ResultsOur searches produced twelve papers. Seven papers reported on single preceptorship programmes in General Practice or primary care, with qualitative or quantitative evaluation of their effects. Three qualitative papers reported participant experience of preceptorship, or discussed the learning needs that preceptorship must address. Two literature reviews reported the evidence for preceptorship in General Practice or nurse practitioner programmes.ConclusionThe quality of the evidence on General Practice Nurse preceptorship is low. There is a lack of robust evidence on the effects, and the benefits. These should be evaluated as preceptorship programmes are implemented.The limited available evidence suggests that a structured preceptorship programme, of more than 4 months duration, which allows the development of peer-to-peer support, is a good model for General Practice Nurse preceptorship. The involvement of doctors and the wider practice team is essential for the success of such a programme. Preceptors require training and support in the role. General Practice Nurse preceptorship should support the development of existing professional competencies, including the ability to make real-time autonomous clinical decisions. The financial costs, and cost of time away from clinical care, should be ameliorated as far as possible, when instituting a national General Practice Nurse preceptorship programme.
       
  • Standardized language systems for the design of high-fidelity simulation
           scenarios: A Delphi study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 January 2020Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): M. Raurell-Torredà, M. Llauradó-Serra, M. Lamoglia-Puig, R. Rifà-Ros, J.L. Díaz-Agea, S. García-Mayor, A. Romero-ColladoAbstractPurposeThis study aimed to identify which of the standardised Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) activities should be used in the design of clinical cases with high fidelity simulation for educational preparation of undergraduate nursing students in non-technical skills.Design and methodsA three-round Delphi study was carried out: the first round with taxonomy experts, the second round with academic and clinical lecturers with limited experience in the simulation-based learning methodology, and the third round with academic and clinical lecturers having at least two years of simulation experience. The NIC interventions were grouped into two levels of competence in accordance with the undergraduate nursing degree curriculum (1st- and 2nd-year students, the “novice” level; 3rd- and 4th-year students, the “advanced” level). The NIC allows the description of nurse student competencies in multiple clinical scenarios and throughout various contexts: theory, clinical practice and simulation.FindingsThe experts identified 163 interventions in 8 areas as relevant and feasible, selecting 42 for the “novice” students, in Nursing Fundamentals (13) and Adult Nursing Care 1 (29), and 97 for the “advanced” students: Maternity Care and Child Health Nursing (18), Mental Health (13), Nursing Care of Older People (12), Community Health Nursing (20) and Adult Nursing Care 2 (34). In addition, 24 interventions were identified as cross-cutting, with training to be provided across all four years of the degree.ConclusionA total of 163 interventions of the NIC list were selected by experts as being both relevant and feasible to nursing undergraduate education. This creates the favourable framework to design high-fidelity scenarios for the training of non-technical skills according to the competences required and in line with the health care reality. Therefore, enabling an optimal combination of theoretical education by academic lecturers with practical training by clinical lecturers and staff nurses.
       
  • Students' perceptions of interventions designed to foster empathy: An
           integrative review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 December 2019Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Ruth A. EngbersAbstractObjectiveEmpathy is assumed to be an important element of nursing care, and nursing educators are attempting to find ways to effectively foster empathy in their students. The purpose of this review is to gain a deeper grasp of what undergraduate nursing students are learning from interventions educators have designed to cultivate empathy by synthesizing qualitative data.Review methodsUtilizing the review methodology proposed by Whittemore and Knafl, a survey of the CINAHL, Web of Science, PubMed, and PsychINFO databases was undertaken to answer the question: What are undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of interventions designed to foster empathy'ResultsA thematic synthesis of the students' perceptions from the 17 articles meeting inclusion criteria revealed five themes: Understanding the other's experience, embodying the other's experience, becoming aware of self, informing the role of the nurse, and learning or transforming.ConclusionsAlthough additional conceptual work remains to create a coherent, complete, and parsimonious definition of empathy, the results indicate that the students are gaining many of the facets assumed to be part of the concept of empathy through these educational interventions. Immersive simulations that put students in the role of the “other” were particularly impactful, especially if they created a disorienting dilemma followed by guided reflection. These findings can help nursing educators tailor their interventions for their specific intended learning outcomes.
       
  • “From my Facebook profile”: What do nursing students share on
           Timeline, Photos, Friends, and About sections'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 December 2019Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Feride Eskin Bacaksız, Gulcan Taskiran Eskici, Arzu Kader Harmanci SerenAbstractIntroductionSocial media is a platform where knowledge, experience, and thoughts are shared by society. Like many different users, nursing students also take part in this platform. While some researchers are evaluating social media as a new tool for training nursing students and patients, others are drawing attention to the legal, ethical, and moral problems of non-professional and inappropriate content sharing on social media. Since both sides maybe rightful in different aspects, this study was planned to understand why nursing students usually use Facebook which is one of the most popular tools.AimThe study aimed to define what nursing students are sharing through their Facebook accounts, whom they are befriending with, whether they use privacy settings and/or regret their shared posts.MethodContent of nursing students' Facebook posts were examined in this cross-sectional, descriptive study. The study was conducted with 100 nursing students in a nursing faculty. Each student analysed their own Facebook account retrospectively and recorded their posts on the Facebook Review Criteria Form which was developed by the researchers.ResultsOverall, it was found that 40% of the students “sometimes” hesitated before sharing information on Facebook due to safety concerns. Moreover, 51% of the students “rarely” regretted their Facebook posts. Students were using Facebook mostly for check-in (44%), and a smaller portion of them were sharing information related to health (27%). They mostly shared information and photos about themselves and did not share any photos related to patients and patient relatives.ConclusionNursing students were found to be cautious about their Facebook posts. To maintain and develop students' cautiousness, their awareness should be increased about this issue during their professional education.
       
  • Accelerated programmes in children's nursing to tackle the workforce gap
           in the United Kingdom: A cost-consequences analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 December 2019Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Valerio Benedetto, Karen Whittaker, Neil Wilson, Hannah Storey, Diane DauneAbstractBackgroundWith alarming vacancy rates and dipping availability of European nurses, remedies for the shortage of nurses in the UK are urged. To accelerate the registration of new children's nurses, a health education funder commissioned two education programmes within its region. The first is a 1-year programme designed for UK-registered nurses in adult or mental health. The second is a 2-year programme for individuals, not registered as nurses, who are child or social care graduates with experience of working with children and young people.ObjectivesTo evaluate the economic effectiveness of two accelerated children's nursing education programmes.DesignEconomic evaluation.SettingsTwo accelerated children's nursing education programmes in two sites in England.ParticipantsNursing students enrolled in both programmes (N = 20).MethodsWe adopt a cost-consequences analysis to analyse the programmes' costs and outcomes.ResultsAll graduates were heading for posts within the region where they studied, a favourable outcome for the funder. However, the first programme would deplete the workforce in other nursing fields, whereas the second, by quickening the graduates' career progression, would not dent the long-term shortage in entry roles. Given our small sample size, these impacts may differ if the programmes have wider implementation.ConclusionsOur evaluation measures the effectiveness of two novel accelerated education programmes in tackling the nurses' shortage. Concurrently, it contributes to developing a standardised approach for future economic evaluations in nursing education.
       
  • Exploring the meaning of undergraduate nursing students' experiences and
           confidence in clinical skills using video podcasts
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 December 2019Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Renee Stone, Marie Cooke, Marion MitchellAbstractBackgroundStudents and health care faculty staff report a lack of confidence in graduating nurses' clinical skills practice. Traditional approaches to support nursing students' clinical skills development have relied on small group, face-to-face, practice-based learning in clinical laboratories. However, with changing curricula, increased numbers of students, and pressure on laboratory timetables and availability, alternate methods of delivery are necessary to ensure students gain confidence in the development of their clinical skills. Video podcasting is an innovative approach that is being used to stimulate active and ongoing learning of clinical skills.DesignA hermeneutic phenomenological approach.MethodData were collected through in-depth interviews with 10 second-year, undergraduate nursing students about their experiences using three clinical skills video podcasts and their perceptions of how this impacted on their learning of these clinical skills and confidence in practice.FindingsThree themes emerged from the data: ‘Accessibility for learning the skill’; ‘Preparation for learning and practice’; and ‘Student-directed learning’. These themes provided an insight into the students' engagement with video podcasts, demonstrating their sense of confidence was increased in clinical skills development.ConclusionThe findings of this study provide an insight into the students' engagement with video podcasts in relation to their confidence in clinical skills development, and indicate that undergraduate nursing students value the use of video podcasts in their learning of clinical skills. However, it was evident that students still value face-to-face delivery to guide their study, which suggests that video podcasts could be used as an adjunct to teaching to support learning.
       
  • Population health as a ‘platform’ for nurse education: A qualitative
           study of nursing leaders
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2019Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Kathie Lasater, Iain M. Atherton, Richard G. KyleAbstractBackgroundChallenges to the sustainability of global healthcare systems are prompting a shift towards more population-focused models of care. Nurse educators need to develop courses that prepare students for population health practice. However, the educational approaches that can support this shift are poorly understood. Publication of new standards for nurse education by the United Kingdom's (UK) Nursing and Midwifery Council that place greater emphasis on population health presented an opportunity to seek nursing leaders' views on population health in nurse education.ObjectivesTo assess the views of nursing leaders within a Scottish context on the connection between nurse education and population health for all students, evaluate what student nurses need to know to support population health practice, and draw insights from the UK for pre-registration programmes internationally.DesignQualitative interview study.ParticipantsTwenty-four nursing leaders from academic (n = 15), practice (n = 4) and regulatory (n = 5) sectors.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face (n = 21), by telephone (n = 2) or Skype (n = 1). Interviews were transcribed and analysed, using interview questions as structural themes, followed by thematic and content analyses.ResultsNursing leaders encouraged rebalancing nurse education towards population health, suggesting that population health concepts should sit at the core of spiral curricula to enable students to (re)view learning through a population health lens. Seven outcomes were identified to equip student nurses for practice in any setting. These formed the mnemonic FULCRUM: Find and interpret evidence; Understand the psychology of behavior and change; Link epidemiology to population health; Consider others and themselves in context; Recognise social determinants of health; Understand the impact of policy and politics on health; Motivate to encourage behaviour change.ConclusionsFULCRUM can guide nurse educators globally to support preparation of graduate nurses for the significant shifts in healthcare delivery and service organisation towards improving population outcomes.
       
  • Actual and perceived knowledge of type 1 diabetes mellitus among school
           nurses
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2019Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Ewa Kobos, Jacek Imiela, Tomasz Kryczka, Alicja Szewczyk, Barbara KnoffAbstractBackgroundIn general, school nurses are aware that it is important to have knowledge of type 1 diabetes to give adequate care to children with the disease. Many studies assessing diabetes knowledge have found different deficits among nurses. To our knowledge, however, no study has assessed the knowledge of type 1 diabetes among school nurses.ObjectiveTo assess actual and perceived diabetes knowledge among school nurses.DesignCross-sectional studies.SettingsSeventeen primary care facilities in Warsaw that employed school nurses.ParticipantsTwo hundred and thirty school nurses.MethodsWith the Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ), we assessed actual diabetes knowledge. With the Self-Assessed Diabetes Knowledge (SADK), we assessed perceived diabetes knowledge. Both the DKQ and SADK assessed seven domains of diabetes knowledge: general diabetes knowledge; insulin and glucagon; insulin pumps; diabetes complications; nutrition; physical activity, stress, and comorbidities; and glycemia measurements. We related DKQ and SADK scores to each other and to sociodemographic and work-related factors.ResultsThe rate of correct responses in the DKQ was 46.7%, with the lowest rate regarding knowledge of insulin pumps (36.5%), nutrition (37.4%), and insulin and glucagon (37.9%). Actual and perceived diabetes knowledge were moderately positively correlated (rho = 0.18,p = .009). In six of the seven knowledge domains examined, school nurses perceived their diabetes knowledge better compared with their actual knowledge. DKQ scores were higher in nurses with higher education (p = .024), those who had relatives or friends with diabetes (p = .032), and those who had prior diabetes training (p = .050). Interestingly, DKQ scores were higher among nurses with fewer years of experience (rho = − 0.18, p = .011).ConclusionsThere is a need for additional diabetes training among nursing students and practicing nurses to provide safe and effective care for children with type 1 diabetes.
       
  • Developing Korean nursing students' global health competencies: A mixed
           methods approach to service learning in rural Vietnam
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: Nurse Education TodayAuthor(s): Sangeun Lee, Junghee Kim, Jong gun Kim, Truong Duc Tu, Bừi Thi Thanh Loan, Hyeonkyeong LeeAbstractBackgroundOwing to globalization, there is a need for enhanced global health competencies among nursing students. In this context, global service learning programs are important opportunities for nursing students.ObjectivesTo explore the effect of a short-term service learning program in a developing country on the global health competencies of students attending a South Korean nursing college.DesignA mixed methods design.SettingThe Global Nursing Internship is a two-week pre-experience, eight-day on-site, and one-week post-experience program.ParticipantsThe on-site activities involved 15 nursing students participating in global health activities in a rural Vietnamese community.MethodsA self-reported questionnaire was used to assess changes in global health competencies in six domains, measured on a four-point Likert scale. Student satisfaction with each activity was measured on a five-point Likert scale. After completing the program, the participants wrote a self-reflection essay. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to analyze global health competencies, and content analysis was used to analyze participants' self-reflections.ResultsRegarding global health competencies, the overall mean score showed a significant increase at the post-program evaluation (Z = −3.41, p = .001). A pre-post-program comparison showed that the health care in low-resource settings domain displayed the greatest increase in scores. The mean overall satisfaction with the program was high (mean = 4.31, standard deviation = 0.17). In the students' view, as expressed in their essays, their global health knowledge and attitude had improved.ConclusionsThe program was useful in promoting global health competencies, empathy, and confidence and should be embedded among the essential requirements of nursing curricula. Suggestions are provided to develop an enhanced pre-experience program that could help students prepare better for on-site activities. As cultural competency is crucial for nurses, nursing educators should consider integrating similar global service learning programs into their existing nursing curricula.
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 100.26.179.196
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-