Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3161 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3161 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 106, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 446, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 322, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 188, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 431, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 394, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 488, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 264, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 214, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Nurse Education in Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.764
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 56  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1471-5953
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3161 journals]
  • Midwifery student's perceptions of completing a portfolio of evidence for
           initial registration: A qualitative exploratory study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2020Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Michelle Gray, Terri Downer, Tanya CapperAbstractThe Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC) has set regulatory standards, that require midwifery students to verify how they have met ANMAC standard 8.11 requirements prior to registration as a midwife. The most common formats for recording achievement of the ANMAC requirements are paper-based or electronic portfolios. Research was conducted to compare student's experiences of completing their university portfolio format. Focus group interviews were held at two south east Queensland universities. This study has found that there is disparity between universities in the level of detail documenting evidence of midwifery experiences. The paper-based portfolio was criticised for not having sufficient space for the students to explain the extent of their experiences, in contrast students completing the ePortfolio felt their reflective entries were excessive.Some students felt the portfolio was not being used to its full potential with suggestions that all experiences that fall within the midwife scope of practice should be recorded as evidence of practice experiences. Students felt the current ANMAC Standard 8.11 requirements limit the range of experiences and are repetitive in requiring up to 100 recordings for some experiences. No nationally agreed format exists of how students are required to document their required ANMAC experiences.
       
  • The psychometric validation of the quality practical experience (QPE)
           instruments (nurses and student nurse) to evaluate clinical supervision of
           undergraduate student nurses
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2020Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Amanda Towell-Barnard, Linda Coventry, L. Foster, Susan Davis, Dianne E. Twigg, C. Bharat, J. BostonAbstractIt is important to evaluate stakeholder feedback regarding any change to a clinical supervision model to maintain quality. The Quality Practical Experience (QPE) instruments offer both the nurse on the ward involved with supervising student learning and the student nurse the opportunity to evaluate their satisfaction with the supervision model.This paper reports on the evaluation of the construct validity and the reliability of the QPE instruments measuring nurse and nursing student satisfaction with the clinical supervision model. Methodological design for the reliability and validation of a measuring instrument.The nurse and the student QPE instruments were tested with convenience samples of 488 nurses and 1116 student nurses, respectively. Psychometric tests included internal reliability, test-retest reliability and factor analyses. Exploratory factor analysis for both QPEs supported a three-factor solution; the nurse QPE explained 48% and student nurse QPE 45% of variance. Internal reliability and test-retest reliability were stable over time (nurse QPE ICC = 0.82; student nurse QPE ICC = 0.71).Both QPE instruments were found to be valid and reliable. Feedback from all stakeholders involved with supporting student nurses during clinical placement is important.
       
  • Midwives' experiences of learning and teaching being ‘with woman’: A
           descriptive phenomenological study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2020Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Zoe Bradfield, Yvonne Hauck, Ravani Duggan, Michelle KellyAbstractBeing ‘with woman’ is a fundamental concept of midwifery philosophy. Minimal evidence explicates ways this important construct is learned or taught. This paper reflects one part of a larger study and explored midwives' experiences of learning and teaching related to the phenomenon of being ‘with woman’. Using a descriptive phenomenological approach, 31 midwives working in a variety of models in Western Australia were interviewed to explore the phenomenon of being ‘with woman’. Rich descriptions of how midwives learned and taught others to be ‘with woman’ were obtained. Descriptive phenomenology is useful in revealing features of the phenomenon through description of lived experiences of purposively sampled participants. Giorgi's method was used to analyse data from the two main interview questions. The themes for learning to be ‘with woman’ were observing midwives; inspirational leaders; learning from the women; a variety of experiences enhances learning; and, develops over time. The themes for teaching being ‘with woman’ were, approaches for teaching; teaching is implicit; reliance on observation, comprehension and assimilation. Insights into the learning and teaching of practices supported by professional philosophy offer educators and leaders new knowledge and ways to enhance the transfer of knowledge and skills of being ‘with woman’.
       
  • The Utilization Of Debriefing For Simulation In Healthcare: A Literature
           Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2020Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Young-Ju Kim, Jee-Hye YooAbstractThe aim of this review was to examine how debriefings have been conducted in healthcare simulations. Using keywords, our search yielded 962 studies through databases. After removing duplicates, we found 20 studies that met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Through ancestry searches, we found two more studies. A total of 22 studies were reviewed. From each study, detailed information about debriefing was extracted based on six criteria, namely, timing, facilitator, place of occurrence, method, length, and structure. Various types of debriefings were available according to learning objectives, learners’ abilities, availability of resources, and context of simulations. We found that peer-led debriefing might be more appropriate for experienced healthcare professionals than unlicensed students due to a gap in knowledge and problem-solving skills between them. In addition, we found that tele-debriefing was feasible in some studies. Although types of individual debriefing varied across the studies, a substantial number of debriefings closely aligned to the standards for high-quality debriefing.
       
  • Corrigendum to “Design and development of a spiritual care competency
           framework for pre-registration nurses and midwives: A modified Delphi
           study” [Nurse Education in Practice Volume 40, October 2019, 102604]
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2020Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Josephine Attard, Linda Ross, Keith W. Weeks
       
  • Discovering the memory thief: MOOC participants’ personal
           experiences of dementia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: Nurse Education in Practice, Volume 42Author(s): David Robertshaw, Ivana BabicovaAbstractDementia is one of the greatest social issues of our time. There are brief explorations of experiences of dementia in the literature, however this study seeks to further explore the experiences of the general public in relation to dementia. This study aimed to characterise experiences of dementia in the general population.This characterisation was achieved by developing and opening a massive open online course on dementia, which collected information from participants who responded to the question “share your own personal experience of dementia”. This data was then analysed by two researchers using Framework Analysis.Four themes (the condition, caring, perception, and control) and indicative quotes are presented and discussed. Experiences of dementia are positive as well as negative. Findings update understanding of these experiences and demonstrate new insights.
       
  • A case study - Implementing a registered nurse professional recognition
           program across a Queensland hospital and health service
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: Nurse Education in Practice, Volume 42Author(s): Anita Bamford-Wade, Samantha Lavender, Debbie Massey, Vinah Anderson, Samantha Clayton, Amy JohnstonAbstractOngoing advancement and documentation of professional development is required to maintain nursing registration and competency to practise in Australia and many other countries. All Australian registered nurses are required to undertake a minimum of 20 h of continuing professional development annually and demonstrate competence to practice; this is a criterion for nursing registration. Many health care organisations nationally and internationally develop programs to support such processes, assisting nurses to formally document their ongoing education and commitment to best practice, and clearly demonstrate their ongoing continuing professional development. Such programs align with the MAGNET ® principles of providing structural empowerment, exemplary professional practice and new knowledge, innovations and improvements. This study describes the implementation, evaluation and impact of the registered nurse professional recognition program undertaken by one Hospital and Health Service in South East Queensland using Donabedian's structure, process outcome framework. The registered nurse professional recognition program was implemented to invest in and develop the nursing workforce by providing an opportunity for registered nurses to assess and document their professional skills, knowledge and expertise that are critical to the provision of safe and cost-effective patient and family-centred care.
       
  • Work-integrated learning as a pedagogical tool to integrate theory and
           practice in nursing education – An integrative literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: Nurse Education in Practice, Volume 42Author(s): Ina Berndtsson, Elisabeth Dahlborg, Sandra PennbrantAbstractIt can be challenging for nursing students to navigate between theory and practice and to implement theoretical knowledge in real work situations and vice-versa. Work-integrated learning can support the students by enabling them to combine theoretical studies with practical work experience during their clinical placement. The aim of this integrative literature review was to identify models for the integration of theory and practice during clinical placements in nursing education by using work-integrated learning. Sixteen articles were found and analyzed using an integrative review method. Three themes were identified: 1) Supervisor support to enable students to develop a professional identity 2) Variety of modalities for teaching and 3) Collaboration between academic lecturers and clinical supervisors aimed at integrating theoretical and practical knowledge. Work-integrated learning enables students to integrate theory and practice, develop skills for knowledge-in-practice and prepares them for working life. It also supports the sharing of experiences between various healthcare professionals. This review identified a need for further research on work-integrated learning as a method for enhancing nursing students’ workplace learning.
       
  • Describing and evaluating a foundational education/training program
           preparing nurses, midwives and other helping professionals as supervisors
           of clinical supervision using the Role Development Model
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: Nurse Education in Practice, Volume 42Author(s): Susan Harvey, Paul Spurr, Mary Sidebotham, Jennifer FenwickAbstractClinical supervision is a strategy supporting nurses, midwives and other healthcare professionals in the provision of quality healthcare. Clinical supervision involves regular, protected time for reflection. Adequately prepared supervisors are essential, however there is limited knowledge about education/training programs and even less about those that are not discipline-specific. This paper 1) describes an eight-day foundational program, Clinical Supervision for Role Development Training as situated within the Spurr Supervisor Training Model and, 2) presents the results from routinely collected evaluation data. Simple descriptive analysis and latent content analysis were used to analyse data from 226 participants who filled out a self-administered questionnaire. Participants reported increased knowledge (87.5%), skills (87%) and confidence to apply the techniques learnt (85.5%); 95% found practice sessions to be useful, and expectations of the training had been met. Qualitative data supported the positive quantitative results. The program was positively assessed by participants, irrespective of professional discipline. The pragmatic nature of the training and the safe learning environment was considered important to the development of skills and confidence as a supervisor. A more robust evaluation process and prospective, longitudinal research is needed to better understand the expectations and learning experience of participants, and implementation in the healthcare environment.
       
  • Exploration of empathy in Cyprus nursing and health care students: A mixed
           method study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: Nurse Education in Practice, Volume 42Author(s): George Karayiannis, Evridiki Papastavrou, Antonis Farmakas, Haritini Tsangari, Maria Noula, Zoe RoupaAbstractDeveloping professionals who are perceptive to the needs of patients and can respond by expressing empathetic behavior is one of the aims of health care education. The aim of this study was to explore the level of empathy in health care students through a mixed method. The quantitative approach included the use of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy and the qualitative a focus group approach to further deepen into the descriptive results. 869 health care students (RR=81%) participated in the study and the level of empathy ranged from 42 to 139 with a mean score of 100.6 (20-140 scale). Significant statistical differences were found between the disciplines (F=8.6, p-value
       
  • The learning environment and supportive supervision promote learning and
           are based on the relationship between students and supervisors - A
           qualitative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: Nurse Education in Practice, Volume 42Author(s): J. Nyqvist, K. Brolin, T. Nilsson, V. LindströmAbstractDuring clinical education, teaching and supervision are essential. Teaching is a process intended to facilitate students' learning, and to lead and support the students in discovering knowledge by themselves. But, the understanding of learning is not only to understand the students' learning process but also to understand conditions that influence that process. Therefore the aim of this study was to identify what factors support students learning in the ambulance service from both the students' and supervisors' perspectives. An inductive qualitative study design with four group interviews and content analysis was used. One main theme was identified including the sub-themes; reflection in practice, preparations for clinical education, motivation to learn, mutual trust in students' abilities and contextual factors supporting learning Conclusion: Reflection, preparations, motivation, trust, sense of belonging in a community and the context are essential factors supporting undergraduate nursing students' learning. However, supervisors sometimes had a hard time reflecting, teaching and supporting learning about care and caring science. The lack of knowledge and/or interest about caring science among supervisors needs to be addressed in the ambulance service otherwise it will be difficult to support undergraduate nursing students’ learning about caring skills.
       
  • Stressors and coping of nursing students in clinical placement: A
           qualitative study contextualizing their resilience and burnout
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: Nurse Education in Practice, Volume 42Author(s): Shirley Siu Yin Ching, Kin Cheung, Desley Hegney, Clare S. ReesAbstractThe aim of this study was to explore the stressors and coping of nursing students with differing levels of resilience and burnout during clinical placement. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted with twenty-four final-year baccalaureate nursing students, who were identified in the quantitative phase of the study as having scores indicating either: a) low resilience and high burnout; or b) high resilience and low burnout. Ten focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. A thematic analysis of the data identified two main themes: a) stressors arising from the students aligning their expectations with the demands of the clinical placement (i.e., practice demands in busy wards, striving for learning opportunities, and discovering the social rules), and b) coping as a process of fitting into the ward culture. Those students with high resilience and low burnout scores had self-directed goals and coped by using self-regulation strategies. Those with low resilience and high burnout adopted external orientation and self-blame strategies. As suggested by the findings, the following approaches are recommended: offering interventions to enable students to fit actively into the clinical environment; encouraging engagement in reflection to facilitate self-awareness; and encouraging flexible use of personal and external resources.
       
  • The impact of debriefing modalities on nurse practitioner students’
           knowledge and leadership skills in managing fatal dysrhythmias: A pilot
           study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: Nurse Education in Practice, Volume 42Author(s): Abeer Alhaj Ali, Elaine Miller, Kathleen Ballman, Tamilyn Bakas, Gary Geis, Jun YingAbstractAcute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) require special training and educational preparation to meet their role expectations. Using high fidelity simulation with debriefing modalities is considered one of the innovative learning strategies in graduate nursing. No studies have investigated debriefing modalities in nurse practitioner programs specially ACNPs leadership skills. The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in students' knowledge, code team leader skills and self-efficacy using two debriefing modalities. A two group, pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was used. Students were divided into video-assisted debriefing group vs. verbal debriefing following a simulation scenario of managing emergency codes. There were no significant differences between the two groups in knowledge acquisition/retention, leadership skills, and self-efficacy, but there was a significant difference in self-efficacy in both groups between two-time points. There was a general improvement in teams' performance. Students preferred verbal debriefing over video-assisted debriefing. The debriefing session plays an important role in graduate nursing education. Acute care nurse practitioners are lacking a formal leadership training to meet their advanced role. Nurse Educators, and simulation/debriefing leaders may benefit from our study results to develop a structured, formal curriculum and educational instruction focusing on acute care nurse practitioners’ role change especially leading a resuscitation team.
       
  • Academic reawakening: Situated experiences of undertaking a post graduate
           masters course in dementia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: Nurse Education in Practice, Volume 42Author(s): Simon Burrow, Hilary Mairs, Timothy Bradshaw, Helen Pusey, John KeadyAbstractMaster's level education can play important function in developing the knowledge and skills for nurses and allied professionals working in advanced roles in dementia care. However, little is known about the challenges experienced by professionals when making the transition to post-graduate study. This was a qualitative study comprising individual interviews with 15 graduates, nine of whom were nurses, who had experience of attending a part-time Master's in Dementia Care in the Northwest of England. Four sequential themes emerged from the data: ‘Deciding what to do’, ‘Taking it on’, ‘Keeping going’ and ‘Endings and New beginnings’. Findings confirmed that Master's education for nurses and other professionals is significant in developing knowledge and instilling confidence in changing practice. Nevertheless, professionals experienced challenges in juggling the competing demands of education, family and work and were seen to navigate and negotiate their student journey by drawing on internal resources and external supports. The study adds to evidence that Master's level study is likely to benefit practice in dementia care; however, employers and Higher Education Institutions need to develop effective and flexible supports to enable nurses and allied professionals to engage effectively in part-time taught post graduate education.
       
  • THE LIVED EXPERIENCES OF EMOTIONALLY INSECURE NURSING STUDENTS: A
           QUALITATIVE STUDY
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Tina Kirstine Vestphal, Karen Steenvinkel Pedersen, Birthe D. PedersenAbstractResearch shows that students who feel emotionally insecure are at risk of dropping out of nursing educational program. It is, therefore, important to support student resilience in the international nursing education. The aim of this study was to investigate the lived experiences of undergoing a nursing education as an emotionally insecure student. The method was conducted within a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur’s theory of narrative and interpretation, which is conducted in a three-phased structure: Naïve reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation and discussion. Seven participants were included in the study. The findings show that feeling emotionally insecure can be linked to not feeling good enough and feeling misunderstood – yet, with hidden resources. Nurse educators must be aware that emotionally insecure students can easily feel shame, must be willing to help clear up potential misunderstandings and should be curious about resources that might be hidden, such as competence awareness. Hidden resources might be related to protective factors and resilience. The study points to ways in which the relation between nurse educators and students can affect resilience, and that students are not solely either resilient or emotionally insecure; resilience may exist within vulnerability.
       
  • Current issues with the identification of threshold concepts in nursing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Patrick A. Crookes, Peter A. Lewis, Fabienne C. Else, Kay CrookesAbstractWhile there has been some growth in the body of literature on threshold concepts in health science disciplines, the nature of this discourse and which approaches have proved successful remains unclear. This paper illustrates one of the primary issues facing the development of threshold concepts in nursing education literature specifically – a lack of transparent and rigorous processes for their identification. The paper briefly examines the methods that have been utilised to identify threshold concepts in the nursing education literature, and what issues using these approaches raise. It then considers how the field might further develop in order to best engage the benefits that threshold concept analysis and identification may have for curriculum development and teaching in nursing.
       
  • The Impact Of A Gerontology Nursing Course With A Service-Learning
           Component On Student Attitudes Towards Working With Older Adults: A Mixed
           Methods Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Jason T. Garbarino, Laura Foran Lewis, Jason T. GarbarinoAbstractA growing older adult population requires educational programs which prepare nursing students to care for and increase their interest in working with this population. Faculty at a large public university developed a course specific to gerontology to address this need, including designing a service-learning intervention entitled Aging is Very Personal. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of this course on student attitudes towards working with older adults. Using a convergent parallel mixed-methods design, 79 students completed pre-course and post-course quantitative surveys and open-ended questions using the Senses Framework survey. Quantitative data were analyzed using a paired-sample t-test. Qualitative data were analyzed using Krippendorff’s method of qualitative content analysis. Participants showed statistically significant positive changes in attitudes towards working with older adults on 11 of 15 items. Qualitative findings included 5 themes: acknowledgement of preconceptions prior to course; positive shift in perceptions about older adults; growing interest in working with older adults; appreciation of gerontological nursing as a highly skilled profession; and service learning as a valuable opportunity to form connections with older adults. A designated course in gerontology with a service-learning component can markedly improve student attitudes towards working with older adults.
       
  • Corrigendum to “Communication skills training in undergraduate nursing
           programs in Spain” [Nurse Educ. Pract. 42 (2020) 102653]
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Teresa Ferrández-Antón, Guillermo Ferreira-Padilla, Rafael del-Pino-Casado, Pilar Ferrández-Antón, Jose Baleriola-Júlvez, Jose Ramón Martínez-Riera
       
  • Nurse Practitioners’ Experiences with Role Transition: Supporting the
           Learning Curve Through Preceptorship
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Viktoriya Pleshkan, Leslie Hussey
       
  • Students’ perceptions of debating as a learning strategy: A
           qualitative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Daniel Rodger, Adele Stewart-LordAbstractDebate has been shown to develop critical thinking skills, enhance communication, and encourage teamwork in a range of different disciplines, including nursing. The objective of this study was to explore students' perceptions of the educational value of debate. A semi-structured focus group was conducted with 13 undergraduate Operating Department Practice students following a debate on the opt-out system of organ donation. Transcripts were analysed thematically, identifying three main themes that described the students’ perceptions of the debate. These were: (1) openness to diverse viewpoints; (2) developing non-technical skills, and (3) encouraging deep learning. The analysis showed participants perceived debate to be a valuable educational method that enhanced their learning. Engaging in debate encouraged students to critically reflect on their prior beliefs about organ donation—in some cases leading them to reconsider their original position. The findings from this study suggest that debate can be a valuable pedagogical tool to incorporate into healthcare education. Future research should consider the use of debate to develop non-technical skills that have utility in healthcare.
       
  • Simulation-based learning to enhance students’ knowledge and skills in
           educating older patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Goodarz Torkshavand, Mahnaz Khatiban, Ali Reza SoltanianAbstractTraining nursing students in older patient education may be facilitated by the student elderly simulated-patient strategy. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of simulation-based learning on students' skills in providing education to older patients. A quasi-experimental design with repeated measures was used. Nursing students enrolled in clinical courses in their semesters 7 and 8 of the program were randomly assigned to simulation-based learning (SBL) group (n = 35) or lecture-based learning (LBL) group (n = 35). In SBL, the student simulated-elderly patients equipped with devices for the age-related hearing loss, vision impairment, and neck, finger, and arm joint stiffness was trained to present the educational content to the students. Outcome (knowledge, attitudes, and skills) data were collected at pre-test, post-test, and one-month follow-up, using reliable measures. Data were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance. Students in the SBL and LBL groups were comparable at pre-test. All students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and skills in older patient education over time; however, students in the SBL group had larger and more durable improvements in these outcomes than those in the LBL group (all p's 
       
  • Undergraduate nursing student perceptions of directed self-guidance in a
           learning laboratory: An educational strategy to enhance confidence and
           workplace readiness
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Debra Kerr, Jennifer Ratcliff, Lisa Tabb, Ruby WaltersAbstractA self-directed learning laboratory (SDL Lab) was established in which undergraduate nursing students were provided access to experienced nurses in a simulated ward environment to enhance preparedness for clinical practice. The aim of this study was to explore perspectives of final year, undergraduate student nurses about the SDL Lab and directed self-guidance, with particular focus on the impact on learning and preparedness for professional practice. The study was framed within a qualitative descriptive approach using semi-structured, digitally recorded face-to-face interviews. The purposive sample included undergraduate students enrolled in their final year of a Bachelor of Nursing program, who had accessed the SDL Lab on at least two occasions. Thematic analysis was used. Twelve students participated. Three main themes were identified: 1) A safe environment that fosters effective learning; 2) Directed self-guidance strengthens confidence and competence during workplace experiences; 3) Enhancing accessibility and realism will improve learning. Reports of increased confidence in performing nursing skills was found in this study. Evaluation of the SDL Lab found that this alternative teaching strategy was favourable, and students appreciated the safe learning environment. Future research might explore measurement of the effect of directed self-guidance in an SDL facility on competence and confidence.
       
  • The awareness of contextual factors, placebo and nocebo effects among
           nursing students: Findings from a cross-sectional study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Lucia Cadorin, Giacomo Rossettini, Marco Testa, Tommaso Geri, Alvisa PaleseAbstractContextual Factors (CFs) have been documented to influence nursing interventions and patients' outcomes triggering placebo/nocebo effects. However, given that no studies to date have explored the beliefs and the use of CFs among nursing students, a cross-sectional study was undertaken. Two Italian nursing programmes were involved and a self-administered survey tool was used. A total of 510 students participated. The majority (266; 52.2%) defined CFs as an intervention without a specific effect on the condition being treated, but with a possible nonspecific effect. They reported a substantial level of confidence in CFs and in using them more than twice/week in addition to nursing interventions to optimise clinical outcomes. Physiological and psychological therapeutic effects were mostly reported by participants in treating insomnia (n = 351; 68.8%) and chronic pain (n = 310; 60.8%). The use of CF was considered ethically acceptable when it exerted beneficial psychological effects (n = 188; 36.8%). Participants communicated to patients that a CF is a treatment that can help and will not hurt (n = 128; 25.1%). Students are aware of the value of CFs. Increasing their emphasis in nursing programmes can promote nursing students’ consideration with regards to their use, their underlying mechanisms, their potential effects, as well as their ethical and comunicative implications.
       
  • Preceptors' Experiences of using structured learning activities as part of
           the peer learning model: A qualitative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Marie Stenberg, Mariette Bengtsson, Elisabeth Mangrio, Elisabeth CarlsonAbstractThe clinical environment is a vital component of nurse education, constantly changing due to constraints of the current health care systems such as increasing number of students and a limited number of preceptors. Peer learning, is gaining momentum as an educational model highly suitable for clinical placements. The peer learning model incorporates structured learning activities that support student activity, but little is reported of the actual structure and content of those activities. Thereby, the aim of this study was to explore precepting nurses' experience of using structured learning activities as part of the peer learning model during clinical placement. We used a qualitative research approach, using two open self-administered global questions. The result is based on the analysis of the written responses from 62 preceptors. Four categories followed the analysis: An opportunity for collaboration, An occasion for reflection, A new educational structure, and Recommendations for development. The preceptors perceived the structured learning activities as beneficial for increased collaboration and reflection among students. Moreover, utilizing the structured learning activities was perceived to be time saving for the preceptors, however this is an area where further research is needed.
       
  • Communication skills training in undergraduate nursing programs in Spain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Teresa Ferrández-Antón, Guillermo Ferreira-Padilla, Rafael del Pino Casado, Pilar Ferrández-Antón, Jose Baleriola-Júlvez, Jose Ramón Martínez-RieraAbstractObjectivesof the present cross sectional study were to analyze the offer of subjects with communication skills in the nursing degree in Spain and to describe the distribution of these subjects. Documentary, systematic and independent search of web pages from Spanish universities was carried out to collect the following variables: subjects with communication skills, course in which the subject is taught, type of teaching (exclusive or combined), type of subject (compulsory or optional) and number of credits on communication skills. Although an average of 3.6 subjects per center was offered, most of the subjects were combined and with little communication content load. In one third of the centers, the offer was below 2.3 credits. Only 1 in 6 centers had exclusive communication skills subjects, and a quarter of them were optional. The teaching load of communication contents was highest in optional subjects. The offer of communication skills contents in Spanish Nursing Schools was scarce and very heterogeneous between centers and between courses in a center, with excessive presence of combined and optional subjects. Our results may be useful when developing the teaching guides for subjects with communication skills, as well as when defining communication competencies in the different Nursing Schools.
       
  • COMPARISON OF PEER ASSESSMENT AND FACULTY ASSESSMENT IN AN
           INTERPROFESSIONAL SIMULATION-BASED TEAM TRAINING PROGRAM.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Reime Marit Hegg, Kvam Fred Ivan, Johnsgaard Tone, Aarflot MortenAbstractChallenges related to limited clinical sites and shortage of clinical instructors may reduce the quality of clinical experiences, leading to increased demand for the establishment of simulation-based training programs in the curricula of educational institutions. However, simulation-based training programs in health education place heavy demands on faculty resources. It is interesting, therefore, to investigate peers contributions in formal assessment, and how this compares to faculty assessment. This paper report the results from the comparison of direct observation by peer observers who had received short rater training, and post-hoc video-based assessment by trained facilitators. An observation form with six learning outcomes was used to rate team performance. Altogether 262 postgraduate nursing students, bachelor nursing students and medical students participated, organized into 44 interprofessional teams. A total of 84 peers and two facilitators rated team performance. The sum score of all six learning outcomes showed that facilitators were more lenient than peer observers (p=.014). The inter-rater reliability varied considerably when comparing scores from peer observers from the three different professions with those of the facilitators. The results indicate that peer assessment may support, but not replace, faculty assessment.
       
  • Investigation the correlation between psychological empowerment and
           assertiveness in nursing and midwifery students in Iran
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Seyyed Mohsen Azizi, Elahe Heidarzadi, Ali Soroush, Maryam Janatolmakan, Alireza KhatonyAbstractBackgroundAssertiveness is a key skill for nurses and midwives, and should be considered in the students’ education. In this regard, variables such as psychological empowerment, which may have a significant correlation with assertiveness, should be identified and studied.ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between psychological empowerment and assertiveness in nursing and midwifery students.DesignAcross-sectional and correlational study.Settings/Participants: This study was carried out on 200 Iranian nursing and midwifery students.MethodsThe students were randomly selected for the study. The study tools were The Rathus' Assertiveness Schedule and Spreitzer's Psychological Empowerment Scale. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics.FindingsThere was a positive and significant correlation between psychological empowerment and assertiveness. The components of meaning and self-determination had a positive and significant correlation with the assertiveness.ConclusionsSince psychological empowerment and assertiveness in decision-making and interaction with colleagues and patients are considered as essential skills for nurses and midwives, we recommend that, required measures should be taken to promote these skills in nursing and midwifery students.
       
  • Perception of Compassion and Professional Values in Nursing Students: A
           cross-sectional multivariate analysis from Turkey
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Selma Turan Kavradım, Mehtap Akgün, Zeynep Özer, İlkay BozAbstractProfessional values have been acknowledged as the foundation of nursing care, and compassion is recognized as one of these professional values. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between compassion and professional values and the factors that affect the perceptions of nursing students. A cross-sectional research design was used. There were two sample groups: 141 first-year and 185 third-year nursing students (N=326). The data were collected using a Personal Information Form, a Compassion Scale and the Nursing Professional Values Scale-Revised. Study data were evaluated with univariate and multivariate regression analyses. No statistically significant difference was found between the students’ compassion levels. At the same time, the mean professional values score of the third-year students was determined to be statistically significantly higher. Furthermore, it was determined that the compassion levels of female students were greater than those of male students, and the perception of professional values of those whose fathers’ education levels were high was greater. This study concluded that professional values increased as education levels increased but the level of compassion did not change. It is suggested that nursing education be shaped in order to include factors affecting the perception of professional values and compassion levels.
       
  • Evaluation of nursing students’ perceptions of their cultural care
           competency: A mixed method study in Taiwan
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 November 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Hwey-Fang Liang, Kuang-Ming Wu, Chang-Chiao Hung, Ying-Hsiang Wang, Yong-Chuan ChenAbstractGrowing cultural diversity among immigrants has challenged health care practice in Taiwan. This study used mixed methods to evaluate how the implementation of a course on cultural competence embedded in a nursing course affected nursing students' perceptions of their cultural care competency. An evaluation survey with a quantitative questionnaire comprising pre- and post-test measures of self-perceived cultural care competency was implemented for 48 participants at the commencement and completion of the course. A focus group interview (n = 10) was conducted and a thematic approach applied to analyze qualitative data. The results found a significant improvement in self-perceived cultural care competency (t = 7.15, p 
       
  • Factors influencing professional values among Indonesian undergraduate
           nursing students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Nelwati, Khatijah Lim Abdullah, Mei Chan ChongAbstractBackgroundUndergraduate nursing students are required to acquire professional values during professional nurse education to provide safe and high quality patient care. However, there was no documentation in professional values among Indonesian undergraduate nursing students and the factors influencing its development.PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine professional values among Indonesian undergraduate nursing students and examine the relationship between students’ demographic factors and professional values.DesignA cross-sectional study using convenience sampling was applied to recruit 391 Indonesian undergraduate nursing students. The 26 items of Nurses Professional Values Scale Revision (NPVS-R) with five dimensions was employed to collect data. Descriptive and inferential statistics, independent samples t-test were applied to analyse and interpret data.ResultsThe result showed that the total score of nurse professional values was high (95.80 ± 12.93). The most important professional value dimension was caring, while activism was the least important values. The NPVS-R total score had a significant association with length of professional clinical practice of the students (p 
       
  • Weight management across pregnancy and postpartum care: The need for
           interprofessional education and collaboration
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Ruth Walker, Ellinor K. Olander, Briony Hill, Suzanne Willey, Helen SkouterisAbstractThe journey from pregnancy to caring for a new infant is a significant experience for many women and crucial period for obesity prevention. During this time, a large portion of care is allocated to midwives and maternal and child health nurses (MCHN). These professions have the potential to play a crucial role in supporting women with weight management across pregnancy and postpartum; however, both midwives and MCHNs report barriers to doing this. Upskilling achieved through midwifery and MCHN education that equips midwives and MCHNs with the skills and knowledge to provide evidence-based advice for weight management could assist in addressing some of these barriers. Interprofessional collaboration should be fostered so healthy lifestyle messages and support are reinforced consistently by midwives and MCHNs throughout pregnancy and postpartum.
       
  • Reframing evidence-based practice curricula to facilitate engagement in
           nursing students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): R.T. Disler, H. White, Armari E, Morris N, Jackson DAbstractEvidence-based practice underscores a modern approach to nursing to ensure delivery of safe, up-to-date and person-centred care in the evolving clinical environment. While most entry-to-practice nursing courses incorporate elements of evidence-based research curricula, nursing students commonly struggle to see the relevance of research in their training. This study sought to understand nursing students' satisfaction and perspectives on research after an undergraduate research subject was redesigned to make overt the connection between research and professional nursing practice. Satisfaction significantly improved on routinely collected satisfaction surveys over a one-year period (mean increase 0.57, 95% CI 0.40–0.77, P 
       
  • Clinical nurses's critical thinking level according to sociodemographic
           and professional variables (Phase II): A correlational study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Esperanza Zuriguel-Pérez, Anna Falcó-Pegueroles, Sandra Agustino-Rodríguez, Maria del Carmen Gómez-Martín, Juan Roldán-Merino, Maria Teresa Lluch-CanutAbstractCritical thinking ability is one of the basic competencies of clinical nurse and is widely accepted as being associated with the provision of quality care, however, the few evidence-based data related to the relationship between level of critical thinking ability and nurses’ sociodemographic and professional characteristics.The aim of this study was to identify the level of critical thinking among nurses in clinical practice according to sociodemographic and professional variables.Descriptive cross-sectional and correlational study was carried out in a sample of 339 nurses from medical, surgical and critical care units at a tertiary care hospital. This study is related to a previous publication that presents psychometric analysis. Data were compiled using the Nursing Critical Thinking in Clinical Practice Questionnaire and ad hoc form for the recording of sociodemographic and professional characteristics. The statistical analysis of the data was performed using frequency, Mann-Whitney U Test, Kruskal-Wallis Test, and Pearson's correlation coefficients.Nurses reported moderate levels of critical thinking. Older nurses, with 11–15 years of experience in the actual unit, with continuous shift work, a permanent contract and master's degree indicated a higher level of critical thinking.Critical thinking skills are related to certain socio-demographic and professional variables, particularly age, years of experience, shift work, type of contract and educational level.
       
  • Self-directed learning and professional values of nursing students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Sunhee Lee, Donghee Kim, Sun-Mi ChaeAbstractThis study examined the associations between self-directed learning and professional nursing values in nursing students. A cross-sectional descriptive design was employed with a sample of 800 nursing students. Path analysis was used to evaluate relationships among self-directed learning, professional nursing values, and general participant characteristics. Self-directed learning had significantly positive effects on professional nursing values. Male nursing students were more likely to have higher levels of self-directed learning. Our findings suggest that self-directed learning can be an effective pedagogical method to instill and reinforce professional nursing values in nursing students. In addition, nursing educators should consider gender differences in the learning styles of nursing students.
       
  • Effects of Simulation-Based Learning on Nursing Student Competences and
           Clinical Performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Bih-O. Lee, Hwey-Fang Liang, Tsui-Ping Chu, Chang-Chiao HungAbstractThe aims of this study were to explore the effects of simulation-based learning (SBL) on nursing student competences and performance in the clinical setting.A comparison group design was used with data obtained from self-administered questionnaires at the onset and end of the semester. Students' practicum grades were also collected to examine their clinical performance. Four simulated scenarios were added to the course and a Chinese version of the Simulation-Based Learning Evaluation Scale (SBLES) was distributed to the participants. The student practicum evaluation form was used to collect the participants' practicum grades. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, paired t-test, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA).Positive, significant differences were found in five competences in the test group. In the comparison group, results in the professional knowledge and nursing process subscale showed significant differences, and no significant difference was found in the patient safety, communication, and attitude of reflection subscales. The students in the test group perceived greater competences than those in the comparison group. Finally, no significant findings were found in clinical performance between two groups.The findings showed that SBL is seen as an attractive teaching strategy for students’ learning as part of their curriculum and that the effects of SBL on clinical practice need further examination.
       
  • A 3-step teaching approach for a blended learning of ‘understanding and
           avoiding unintentional plagiarism’
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Ng Yuet-Ming, Yip Chi-WingAbstractPlagiarism refers to the behaviour of taking other people's work or idea as one's work or idea. Lack of understanding of plagiarism can lead to unintentional plagiarism. Unintentional plagiarism occurs not only in nursing students' writing but also in other healthcare learners. However, teaching approaches for understanding and avoiding unintentional plagiarism in healthcare education are limited. This is particularly helpful for using blending learning to address the issue of unintentional plagiarism. This editorial will describe the impact of unintentional plagiarism and propose a teaching approach called ‘Understanding and Avoiding Unintentional Plagiarism’ using blended learning to help avoid unintentional plagiarism. This teaching approach aims to assist healthcare teachers to deliver academic writing development programmes in three important steps: 1) Plan appropriate tasks, 2) Prepare essential resources, and 3) Perform effective delivery.
       
  • THE EXPERIENCES OF AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS NURSING STUDENTS: A
           PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Jennifer Kelly, Kim Henschke
       
  • Midwives transition to practice: Expectations and experiences
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Marnie Griffiths, Jennifer Fenwick, Amanda G. Carter, Mary Sidebotham, Jenny Gamble
       
  • Current situation and challenges concerning nursing education in Pakistan
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Ahtisham Younas, Sobia Parveen Rasheed, Jacoline SommerAbstractDespite the advancements in the nursing education and nursing education-based research worldwide, nursing remains an undervalued profession in Pakistan and the nursing education system is steadily evolving. The purpose of this discussion is two-fold: (i) to describe the nursing education system in Pakistan and (ii) to analyze the status, trends, and challenges in nursing education and nursing education-based research in comparison with the international nursing education standards.
       
  • Simulation in midwifery education: A descriptive explorative study
           exploring students’ knowledge, confidence and skills in the care of the
           preterm neonate
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Cathy Stoodley, Lois McKellar, Mary Steen, Julie FleetAbstractUndergraduate midwifery programs across Australia have embedded simulation into their curriculum although there is limited but emerging evidence to support the use of simulation as an effective teaching strategy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact that a simulated learning activity (insertion and management of a neonatal nasogastric tube), had on midwifery students' knowledge, confidence and skills post-simulation, and on completion of a clinical placement. A descriptive explorative study was undertaken in two phases. Phase 1: Midwifery students (n = 60) completed a purpose-designed questionnaire to assess their knowledge, confidence and skills, pre and post simulation. Phase 2: Students (n = 46) repeated the questionnaire to reassess their knowledge, confidence and skills after the completion of a neonatal nursery placement. The findings demonstrate that simulation is an effective learning strategy in an undergraduate midwifery program. Students' knowledge, confidence and skills increased significantly post-simulation activity (p0.001). A further increase in these areas was noted post-placement. Key aspects that contributed to student learning included; the demonstrators’ level of knowledge, expertise and currency of practice, as well as the role the student assumes in the simulation activity.
       
  • Digital explanations and nursing students’ perception of learning
           science
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Shahla Meedya, Tracey Moroney, Wendy Nielsen, Ida Najafi BokatAbstractA thorough understanding of human physiology and anatomy are pivotal in the preparation of competent nursing students for clinical practice. However, anatomy and physiology are among the most conceptually perplexing subjects that nursing students will encounter throughout the duration of their course. Research in other science-based contexts has demonstrated a positive relationship between student-generated digital media and learning scientific concepts. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore nursing students' experience in learning science concepts through a formative assessment task which was based on making a ‘digital explanation’. Our work was guided by semiotic theory and the study design was a mixed method study where 428 first-year nursing students across five campuses volunteered to complete self-reported surveys during the first and last week of the academic session. Students who consented for an interview were invited to attend one of five focus groups. More than half of the participating cohort had prior experience with science (66%), but only 24% had previous experience with making digital media. After completion of the assessment task, two-thirds of the students strongly agreed or agreed that they learned more about science and fewer students agreed that searching for scientific knowledge could be boring. The qualitative findings confirmed the presence of learning about science and four themes were identified: ‘learning about science’, ‘linking knowledge to practice’, ‘using technology’, and ‘making it real’. A key point was that the students began to see connections between science knowledge and nursing practice. But many students were challenged by the technology and the fact that the task was ungraded. Although the digital explanation was an overall positive experience for the nursing students, there is a need for a flexible and graded assessment task to achieve its potential benefits as a teaching and learning task in nursing. We conclude that additional intervention studies are warranted.
       
  • The influence of hospital location and ‘level of care’ on continuing
           professional development
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Karen-leigh Edward, Lyn Walpole, Gavin Lambert, Ms Sarah Phillips, Jeffrey Gow, Jane Morrow, Dr Minh Huynh, Prof Janet HillerAbstractHealthcare workers core skills are reinforced and knowledge of latest developments ensured by undertaking systematic continuing professional development. The current study explored the impact of health facility location and level of care provided on the continuing professional development offered to maternity services healthcare workers in Victoria, Australia. An online survey of middle to senior management staff of 71 public and private health services as well as 7 professional bodies was conducted, yielding 114 participants. Analysis was by location (metropolitan or regional/rural) and level of care provided. The findings revealed Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency registration is the predominant requirement to provide continuing professional development to staff. Dedicated education departments or educators are significantly underrepresented in Level 1&2 facilities, while Level 5&6 facilities are more likely to provide breastfeeding continuing professional development. Metropolitan locations provided more wide-ranging programmes compared with rural/regional locations. Key enablers are the capacity to share resources, have access to external courses and simulation equipment/centres, and the provision of relevant and timely continuing professional development programmes, indicating that ‘Educational hubs’ with credentialed staff working from better resourced regional facilities could deliver a complete array of CPD programmes to lower level facilities.
       
  • Exploration of self-regulatory behaviours of undergraduate nursing
           students learning to teach: A social cognitive perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Dr Susan Irvine, Brett Williams, Mehmet Özmen, Lisa McKennaAbstractSelf-regulated learning is a model of learning situated in social cognitive theory that views learners as active participants in their learning. Similarly, peer-learning is a pedagogical approach that assigns greater autonomy to the student and known to enhance student learning. The objective of this study was to determine the self-regulated learning strategies used by final year undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a teaching unit that included a component of peer-teaching.A mixed methods study was conducted across four campuses of one university. Three hundred and five undergraduate nursing students completed The Motivational Strategy for Learning Questionnaire and fourteen students consented to interviews.Key findings included the high level of reported motivational and learning strategies used by students in their approach to learning, and in their roles as near-peer teachers. Learning strategies were associated with higher-order learning and near-peer teaching enhanced shared regulation using dyadic teaching.This study has shown how participating in a formal teaching unit prior to graduating may positively influence self-regulatory behaviours and increase student confidence and is therefore uniquely situated to promoting students’ anticipatory control over similar opportunities in the clinical setting once they graduate.
       
  • “UNSAFE STUDENT NURSE BEHAVIOURS: THE PERSPECTIVES OF EXPERT
           CLINICAL NURSE EDUCATORS”.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 September 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Karlstrom Monique, Andersen Elizabeth, Olsen Lise, Moralejo LisaAbstractClinical evaluation of undergraduate nursing students is one of the most challenging aspects of baccalaureate nursing education, especially for novice clinical instructors. Early identification of unsafe student behaviours is necessary to ensure students obtain adequate support and guidance. The degree to which clinical instructors are certain about what is safe and unsafe varies, and greatly influences their decisions about evaluative processes and which patients to assign to students. The purpose of this study was to gain consensus from a panel of sixteen nurse educator experts on particular student nurse behaviours that represent unsafe clinical practices and provide a hierarchy of unsafe behaviours from their perspectives. Using the Delphi technique, a series of four online surveys were administered to the panel: exploratory (open-ended questions), evaluative (responses to Likert statements with level of agreement), reconsidering (revising or confirming), and ranking. Thirty-eight unsafe student behaviours with respect to patients and seventeen unsafe behaviours with respect to others reached 80% or more consensus as being very unsafe. Two themes emerged from a cognitive perspective: the value of honesty and the expectation of knowledge. Two themes emerged from a behaviorist perspective: the value of control and the expectation of scrupulousness and precision.
       
  • Accessing the curriculum; university based learning experiences of
           visually impaired physiotherapy students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 August 2019Source: Nurse Education in PracticeAuthor(s): Helen Frank, Mike McLinden, Graeme DouglasAbstractThe aim of this study was to explore the learning experiences of visually impaired physiotherapy students in the UK, specifically focusing on barriers and enablers faced within university and classroom based education.A qualitative multiple case study design was used due to the unique and small group of participants under exploration. Course Leaders of all universities in the UK that offered Physiotherapy education at undergraduate or pre-registration level were approached as gatekeepers to access participants. Four visually impaired physiotherapy students consented to take part in the study, each from a different institution.Semi-structured interviews were used at a time and setting chosen by each participant. Data were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and analysed thematically using NVivo 10. Both barriers and enablers were identified, with sub-themes within the data; the barriers were: environmental factors, unsupportive behaviours and time and effort. The enablers were: supportive relationships, student attributes, and strategies and adaptations.All participants experienced barriers to learning within their university setting, despite having disclosed a disability and having access to and provision of reasonable adjustments. However, despite facing barriers, there were many positive experiences that enabled learning, particularly when staff and students worked together in an open, supportive, and proactive environment.
       
 
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