Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3147 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3147 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.655, CiteScore: 2)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.015, CiteScore: 2)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 106, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 2)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.771, CiteScore: 3)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 445, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 7)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 325, SJR: 3.263, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.793, CiteScore: 6)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.374, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.344, CiteScore: 1)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.671, CiteScore: 5)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 4)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.29, CiteScore: 3)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.755, CiteScore: 2)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.611, CiteScore: 8)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189, SJR: 4.09, CiteScore: 13)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.167, CiteScore: 4)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.384, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.126, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.992, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.089, CiteScore: 5)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.572, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.61, CiteScore: 7)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 3.043, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.453, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.992, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.713, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.316, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.562, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.977, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.524, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 5.39, CiteScore: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.354, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 12.74, CiteScore: 13)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 6)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.938, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.682, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.88, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 3.027, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.158, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.875, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.579, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.536, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 431, SJR: 0.569, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.208, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.262, CiteScore: 5)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.551, CiteScore: 3)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.117, CiteScore: 3)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 393, SJR: 0.796, CiteScore: 3)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.42, CiteScore: 2)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.671, CiteScore: 9)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 489, SJR: 1.238, CiteScore: 3)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 5)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 4)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.747, CiteScore: 4)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, CiteScore: 3)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.153, CiteScore: 3)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 3)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.142, CiteScore: 4)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.148, CiteScore: 2)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 3.521, CiteScore: 6)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 4.66, CiteScore: 10)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.796, CiteScore: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.108, CiteScore: 3)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 3.267, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 1.93, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.524, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 7.45, CiteScore: 8)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.062, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.973, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.967, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 265, SJR: 2.7, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 3.184, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.289, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.139, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.164, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 1)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.144, CiteScore: 3)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 1)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.277, CiteScore: 0)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription  
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 4.849, CiteScore: 10)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 5)
Analytica Chimica Acta : X     Open Access  
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 215, SJR: 0.633, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.411, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236, SJR: 1.58, CiteScore: 3)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.704, CiteScore: 2)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Neurochemistry International
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.283
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0197-0186 - ISSN (Online) 1872-9754
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3147 journals]
  • Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist ameliorates the pain hypersensitivity,
           spinal inflammation and oxidative stress induced by systemic
           lipopolysaccharide in neonatal rats
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Cheng-Ta Hsieh, Yih-Jing Lee, Jonathan W. Lee, Silu Lu, Michelle A. Tucci, Xiaoli Dai, Norma Beatriz Ojeda, Hyun Joon Lee, Lir-Wan Fan, Lu-Tai TienAbstractPerinatal inflammation-induced reduction in pain threshold may alter pain sensitivity to hyperalgesia or allodynia which may persist into adulthood. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory protective effect of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), an anti-inflammatory cytokine, on systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced spinal cord inflammation and oxidative stress, thermal hyperalgesia, and mechanical allodynia in neonatal rats. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of LPS (2 mg/kg) or sterile saline was performed in postnatal day 5 (P5) rat pups, and IL-1ra (100 mg/kg) or saline was administered (i.p.) 5 min after LPS injection. Pain reflex behavior, spinal cord inflammation and oxidative stress were examined 24 h after LPS administration. Systemic LPS exposure led to a reduction of tactile threshold in the von Frey filament tests (mechanical allodynia) and pain response latency in the tail-flick test (thermal hyperalgesia) of P6 neonatal rats. Spinal cord inflammation was indicated by the increased numbers of activated glial cells including microglia (Iba1+) and astrocytes (GFAP+), and elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) 24 h after LPS treatment. LPS treatment induced spinal oxidative stress as evidenced by the increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content in the spinal cord. LPS exposure also led to a significant increase in oligodendrocyte lineage population (Olig2+) and mature oligodendrocyte cells (APC+) in the neonatal rat spinal cord. IL-1ra treatment significantly reduced LPS-induced effects including hyperalgesia, allodynia, the increased number of activated microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, and elevated levels of IL-1β, COX-2, PGE2, and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) in the neonatal rat spinal cord. These data suggest that IL-1ra provides a protective effect against the development of pain hypersensitivity, spinal cord inflammation and oxidative stress in the neonatal rats following LPS exposure, which may be associated with the blockade of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β.
       
  • Treadmill exercise restores memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity
           impairments in ovalbumin-sensitized juvenile rats: Involvement of
           brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Amin Mokhtari-Zaer, Saeideh Saadat, Narges Marefati, Mahmoud Hosseini, Mohammad Hossein BoskabadyAbstractStudies demonstrate that asthma, especially during childhood, affects the functions of the brain including learning and memory. Exercise is well known for its neuroprotective functions and for its beneficial effects on asthma. We aimed to assess the effects of exercise on cognitive function, synaptic plasticity, and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized juvenile rats. Rats were sensitized by intraperitoneal administration and inhaled OVA. Animals were subjected to treadmill running exercise during the OVA-challenged period. T-helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine [interleukin (IL)-4], Th1 cytokine (INF-γ) levels, and INF-γ/IL-4 (Th1/Th2) ratio in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and tracheal response to methacholine and OVA were measured. Further, memory behaviors and BDNF levels were measured in the hippocampus as well as long-term potentiation (LTP) was assessed by recording field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the hippocampus. The levels of IL-4 and TGF-β were decreased but INF-γ level and INF-γ/IL-4 ratio increased in the BALF due to exercise in the OVA-sensitized animals. In addition, exercise improved OVA-sensitization induced cognitive impairments, increased BDNF levels, and enhanced hippocampal LTP in OVA-sensitized rats. Exercise is not only effective in the alleviation of airway inflammation by restoring Th1/Th2 cytokines balance, but also is a candidate for improvement of memory and synaptic plasticity deficits partially through increasing the levels of hippocampal BDNF in OVA-sensitized rats.
       
  • Remote ischemic conditioning reduced cerebral ischemic injury by
           modulating inflammatory responses and ERK activity in type 2 diabetic mice
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Cuiying Liu, Jian Yang, Chencheng Zhang, Xiaokun Geng, Heng ZhaoAbstractRemote ischemic preconditioning (RIPreC) and postconditioning (RIPostC) have been demonstrated to attenuate brain injury after ischemic stroke in healthy animals. This study investigated whether RIPreC and RIPostC exerted neuroprotection against cerebral ischemic injury in type 2 diabetic mice. RIPreC (24 h before ischemia) and RIPostC (immediately after reperfusion) were performed in an ischemia/reperfusion induced stroke model with type 2 diabetes. Ischemic outcomes, flow cytometry, multiplex cytokine assay, and western blotting were analyzed after 45 min of ischemia followed by 48 h of reperfusion. Our data indicated that RIPreC and RIPostC attenuated cerebral injuries and neurological deficits. RIPreC significantly reduced CD4 T cell and CD8 T cell infiltration and increased B cell infiltration into the ischemic brain. It also upregulated CD4 and CD8 T cell levels in the peripheral blood. However, RIPostC significantly decreased CD8 T cells infiltration and increased B cell infiltration into the ischemic brain. RIPreC inhibited IL-6 level in both the brain and blood, while RIPostC treatment attenuated IL-6 level upregulation in the peripheral blood. In addition, both RIPreC and RIPostC significantly increased p-ERK expression in the ipsilateral hemisphere in diabetic mice. This study indicated that RIPreC and RIPostC neuroprotection is present in type 2 diabetic mice via the modulation of brain ERK activity and inflammatory responses in both the peripheral blood and ischemic brain. However, the benefit was lower in RIPostC.
       
  • Fluoxetine improves behavioural deficits induced by chronic alcohol
           treatment by alleviating RNA editing of 5-HT2C receptors
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Zexiong Li, Yan Lu, Shanshan Liang, Shuai Li, Beina Chen, Manman Zhang, Maosheng Xia, Dawei Guan, Alexei Verkhratsky, Baoman LiThe alcoholism and major depressive disorder are common comorbidity, with alcohol-induced depressive symptoms being eased by selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), although the mechanisms underlying pathology and therapy are poorly understood. Chronic alcohol consumption affects the activity of serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT2CR) by regulating adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) in neurons. Astrogliopathic changes contribute to alcohol addiction, while decreased release of ATP from astrocytes can trigger depressive-like behaviours in mice. In this study, we discovered that chronic alcohol treatment increased editing of RNA of 5-HT2CR via up-regulating the expression of ADAR2, consequently reducing the release of ATP from astrocytes induced by 5-HT2CR agonist, MK212. Moreover, SSRI antidepressant fluoxetine decreased the expression of ADAR2 through the transactivation of EGFR/PI3K/AKT/cFos signalling pathway. The increased release of astroglial ATP by MK212 which was suppressed by chronic alcohol consumption, and reduction in ADAR2 activity eliminated the RNA editing of 5-HT2CR increased by alcohol in vitro and recovered the release of ATP from astrocytes induced by MK212. Meanwhile, fluoxetine improved the behavioural and motor symptoms induced by alcohol addiction and decreased the alcohol intake. Our study suggests that the astrocytic 5-HT2CR contribute to alcohol addiction; fluoxetine thus can be used to alleviate depression, treat alcohol addiction and improve motor coordination.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • The effects of manganese overexposure on brain health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Mahfuzur R. Miah, Omamuyovwi M. Ijomone, Comfort O.A. Okoh, Olayemi K. Ijomone, Grace T. Akingbade, Tao Ke, Bárbara Krum, Airton da Cunha Martins, Ayodele Akinyemi, Nicole Aranoff, Felix Alexandre Antunes Soares, Aaron B. Bowman, Michael AschnerAbstractManganese (Mn) is the twelfth most abundant element on the earth and an essential metal to human health. Mn is present at low concentrations in a variety of dietary sources, which provides adequate Mn content to sustain support various physiological processes in the human body. However, with the rise of Mn utility in a variety of industries, there is an increased risk of overexposure to this transition metal, which can have neurotoxic consequences. This risk includes occupational exposure of Mn to workers as well as overall increased Mn pollution affecting the general public. Here, we review exposure due to air pollution and inhalation in industrial settings; we also delve into the toxic effects of manganese on the brain such as oxidative stress, inflammatory response and transporter dysregulation. Additionally, we summarize current understandings underlying the mechanisms of Mn toxicity.
       
  • Preclinical testing of the ketogenic diet in fragile X mice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Pamela R. Westmark, Alejandra Gutierrez, Aaron K. Gholston, Taralyn M. Wilmer, Cara J. WestmarkThe ketogenic diet is highly effective at attenuating seizures in refractory epilepsy and accumulating evidence in the literature suggests that it may be beneficial in autism. To our knowledge, no one has studied the ketogenic diet in any fragile X syndrome (FXS) model. FXS is the leading known genetic cause of autism. Herein, we tested the effects of chronic ketogenic diet treatment on seizures, body weight, ketone and glucose levels, diurnal activity levels, learning and memory, and anxiety behaviors in Fmr1KO and littermate control mice as a function of age. The ketogenic diet selectively attenuates seizures in male but not female Fmr1KO mice and differentially affects weight gain and diurnal activity levels dependent on Fmr1 genotype, sex and age.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Estrogen protects neuroblastoma cell from amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42)-induced
           apoptosis via TXNIP/TRX axis and AMPK signaling
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Qiong Pan, Ke Guo, Min Xue, Qiuyun TuAbstractAlzheimer's disease (AD), a massive challenge to global health, is featured with the extracellular plaques made up of amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42) and the intracellular neurofibrillary pathology composed of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Women seem to have a higher vulnerability to AD. In the present study, we identified Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) as a specifically highly-expressed gene in the hippocampus in female AD patients by bioinformatics analysis. Consistently, in the hippocampus in female AD mice, apoptosis and TXNIP expression were enhanced while TRX expression was suppressed. In Aβ42-stimulated SH-SY5Y cells, the administration of estradiol significantly rescued Aβ42-suppressed cell viability and protein level of TRX while inhibited Aβ42-induced increases in ROS production, cell apoptosis, ΔΨm, and the protein levels of PERK, IREα, and TXNIP, further confirming the potential role of estrogen in AD progression and the involvement of TXNIP/TRX axis. Furthermore, the protective effects of estradiol against Aβ42-induced in vitro neurotoxicity on SH-SY5Y cells could be significantly reversed by AMPK inhibitor, Compound C, indicating that estradiol could improve Aβ42-induced AD via TXNIP/TRX and AMPK signaling. In summary, we demonstrated the cellular function of estradiol on Aβ42-induced in vitro neurotoxicity on SH-SY5Y cells and a novel mechanism of TXNIP/TRX axis involved in estradiol function via AMPK signaling.
       
  • Chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in rats causes different
           activation modes of microglia between the anterior and posterior horns of
           the spinal cord
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Tasuku Nishihara, Junya Tanaka, Keisuke Sekiya, Yuki Nishikawa, Naoki Abe, Taisuke Hamada, Sakiko Kitamura, Keizo Ikemune, Shinichiro Ochi, Mohammed E. Choudhury, Hajime Yano, Toshihiro YorozuyaAbstractChronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve is frequently considered as a cause of chronic neuropathic pain. Marked activation of microglia in the posterior horn (PH) has been well established with regard to this pain. However, microglial activation in the anterior horn (AH) is also strongly induced in this process. Therefore, in this study, we compared the differential activation modes of microglia in the AH and PH of the lumbar cord 7 days after chronic constriction injury of the left sciatic nerve in Wistar rats. Microglia in both the ipsilateral AH and PH demonstrated increased immunoreactivity of the microglial markers Iba1 and CD11b. Moreover, abundant CD68+ phagosomes were observed in the cytoplasm. Microglia in the AH displayed elongated somata with tightly surrounding motoneurons, whereas cells in the PH displayed a rather ameboid morphology and were attached to myelin sheaths rather than to neurons. Microglia in the AH strongly expressed NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. Despite the tight attachment to neurons in the AH, a reduction in synaptic proteins was not evident, suggesting engagement of the activated microglia in synaptic stripping. Myelin basic protein immunoreactivity was observed in the phagosomes of activated microglia in the PH, suggesting the phagocytic removal of myelin. CCI caused both motor deficit and hyperalgesia that were evaluated by applying BBB locomotor rating scale and von Frey test, respectively. Motor defict was the most evident at postoperative day1, and that became less significant thereafter. By contrast, hyperalgesia was not severe at day 1 but it became worse at least by day 7. Collectively, the activation modes of microglia were different between the AH and PH, which may be associated with the difference in the course of motor and sensory symptoms.
       
  • Involvement of TRPV1 and the efficacy of α-spinasterol on experimental
           fibromyalgia symptoms in mice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Susana Paula Moreira Fischer, Indiara Brusco, Evelyne da Silva Brum, Maria Fernanda Pessano Fialho, Camila Camponogara, Rahisa Scussel, Ricardo Andrez Machado-de-Ávila, Gabriela Trevisan, Sara Marchesan OliveiraFibromyalgia is characterised mainly by symptoms of chronic widespread pain and comorbidities like depression. Although these symptoms cause a notable impact on the patient's quality of life, the underlying aetiology and pathophysiology of this disease remain incompletely elucidated. The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a polymodal receptor that is involved in the development of nociceptive and depressive behaviours, while α-spinasterol, a multitarget TRPV1 antagonist and cyclooxygenase inhibitor, presents antinociceptive and antidepressant effects. The present study investigated the involvement of the TRPV1 channel and the possible effects of α-spinasterol on nociceptive and depressive-like behaviours in an experimental fibromyalgia model. The fibromyalgia model was induced with a subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of reserpine (1 mg/kg) once daily for 3 consecutive days in male Swiss mice. Reserpine administration depleted monoamines and caused mechanical allodynia. This dysfunction was inhibited by SB-366791 (1 mg/kg, oral route [p.o.]), a selective TRPV1 antagonist, with a maximum inhibition (Imax) of 73.4 ± 15.5%, or by the single or 3-day-repeated administration of α-spinasterol (0.3 mg/kg, p.o.), with an Imax of 72.8 ± 17.8% and 78.9 ± 32.9%, respectively. SB-366791 also inhibited the increase of the reserpine-induced immobility time, with an Imax of 100%, while α-spinasterol inhibited this parameter with an Imax of 98.2 ± 21.5% and 100%, by single or repeated administration, respectively. The reserpine-induced mechanical allodynia and the thermal hyperalgesia were abolished by TRPV1-positive fibers desensitisation induced by previous resiniferatoxin (RTX) administration. In summary, the TRPV1 channel is involved in the development and maintenance of nociception and depressive-like behaviours in a fibromyalgia model, while the α-spinasterol has therapeutic potential to treat the pain and depression symptoms in fibromyalgia patients.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Polydatin protects SH-SY5Y in models of Parkinson's disease by promoting
           Atg5-mediated but parkin-independent autophagy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Hua Bai, Yaqi Ding, Xin Li, Deqin Kong, Chenqi Xin, Xue-Kang Yang, Cheng-wu Zhang, Ziqiang Rong, Chuanhao Yao, Shenci Lu, Lei Ji, Lin Li, Wei HuangParkinson's disease (PD), the second most common chronic neurodegenerative disorder, broadly remains incurable. Both genetic susceptibility and exposure to deleterious environmental stimuli contribute to dopaminergic neuron degeneration in the substantia nigra. Hence, reagents that can ameliorate the phenotypes rendered by genetic or environmental factors should be considered in PD therapy. In this study, we found that polydatin (Pol), a natural compound extracted from grapes and red wines, significantly attenuated rotenone- (Rot) or Parkin deficiency-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in SH-SY5Y, a human dopaminergic neuronal cell line. We showed that Pol significantly attenuated the Rot-induced decrease in cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and Sirt 1 expression and increase in cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DJ1 expression. Rot resulted in a decrease in mTOR/Ulk-involved autophagy and an increase in PGC1β/mfn2-involved mitochondrial fusion, which was inhibited by Pol. We further demonstrated that the protective effects of Pol are partially blocked when autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) is genetically inactivated, suggesting that Pol-mediated neuroprotection requires Atg5. Moreover, Pol rescued Parkin knockdown-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy impairment, and mitochondrial fusion enhancement. Interestingly, Pol treatment could also rescue the mitochondrial morphological abnormality and motorial dysfunction of a Drosophila PD model induced by Parkin deficiency. Thus, Pol could represent a useful therapeutic strategy as a disease-modifier in PD by decreasing oxidative stress and regulating autophagic processes and mitochondrial fusion.Graphical abstractSchematic diagram underlying the protective effects of polydatin against Parkinson's disease models induced by Rot or Parkin knockdown through recovering redox balance, rescuing autophagy and inhibiting mitochondrial fusion.Image 1
       
  • Intranasal wnt-3a alleviates neuronal apoptosis in early brain injury post
           subarachnoid hemorrhage via the regulation of wnt target PPAN mediated by
           the moonlighting role of aldolase C
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Wu Ruan, Junwen Hu, Hang Zhou, Yin Li, Chaoran Xu, Yujie Luo, Ting Chen, Bangliang Xu, Feng Yan, Gao ChenAbstractNeuronal apoptosis is one of the main pathophysiological events in the early brain injury (EBI) post subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Wnt-3a, one of the endogenous wnt ligands crucial in neurogenesis, has been proven to be efficacious in neuroprotection in traumatic brain injury and ischemic stroke. The glycolytic enzyme aldolase C and ribosome biogenesis protein PPAN were revealed to be linked to wnt signaling pathway. The aim of the study was to explore the antiapoptotic effects of intranasal wnt-3a through Frizzled-1 (Frz-1)/aldolase C/PPAN pathway in SAH. Approaches for assessment included SAH grade, Garcia test, brain water content evaluation, rotarod test, Morris water maze test, Western blot, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that wnt-3a improved the neurological scores, brain water content and long-term neurobehavioral functions after SAH. Wnt-3a increased the level of Frz-1, aldolase C, β-catenin, PPAN and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; and decreased the level of axin and cleaved caspase-3 (CC-3). The anti-apoptotic effect of wnt-3a was further evidenced by TUNEL staining and subcellular structure imaging. Frz-1 siRNA and aldolase C siRNA offset the effects of wnt-3a; and restoration of aldolase C by aldolase C CRISPR in Frz-1 siRNA preconditioned SAH rats salvaged the level of Frz-1, aldolase C, PPAN and reduced axin and CC-3. In summary, intranasal administration of wnt-3a alleviates neuronal apoptosis through Frz-1/aldolase C/PPAN pathway in the EBI of SAH rats. The feasible intranasal route and the long-lasting neuroprotective property of wnt-3a is of great clinical relevance.
       
  • Glutamate treatment mimics LTP- and LTD-like biochemical activity in
           viable synaptosome preparation
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Kusumika Gharami, Subhas C. BiswasAbstractLong-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are considered to be the cellular mechanisms behind the increase or decrease of synaptic strength respectively. Electrophysiologically induced LTP/LTD is associated with the activation of glutamate receptors in the synaptic terminals resulting in the initiation of biochemical processes in the postsynaptic terminals and thus propagation of synaptic activity. Isolated nerve endings i.e. synaptosome preparation was used to study here, the biochemical phenotypes of LTP and LTD, and glutamate treatment in varying concentration for different time was used to induce those biochemical phenomena. Treatment with 200 μM glutamate showed increased GluA1 phosphorylation at serine 831 and activation of CaMKIIα by phosphorylation at threonine 286 like LTP, whereas 100 μM glutamate treatment showed decrease in GluA1 phosphorylation level at both pGluA1(S831) and pGluA1(S845), and activation of GSK3β by de-phosphorylating pGSK3β at serine 9 like LTD. The 200 μM glutamate treatment was associated with an increase in the local translation of Arc, BDNF, CaMKIIα and Homer1, whereas 100 μM glutamate treatments resulted in decrease in the level of the said synaptic proteins and the effect was blocked by the proteasomal inhibitor, Lactasystin. Both, the local translation and local degradation was sensitive to the Ca2+ chellator, Bapta-AM, indicating that both the phenomena were dependent on the rise in intra-synaptosomal Ca2+, like LTP and LTD. Overall the results of the present study suggest that synaptosomal preparations can be a viable alternative to study mechanisms underlying the biochemical activities of LTP/LTD in short term.
       
  • NADPH oxidase1 inhibition leads to regression of central sensitization
           during formalin induced acute nociception via attenuation of ERK1/2-NFκB
           signaling and glial activation
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Sanjay Kumar, Manjula VinayakRole of NADPH oxidase1 in the development of inflammatory pain has been demonstrated by gene knockout studies. Nevertheless, pharmacological inhibition of NOX1 is a requisite approach for therapeutic utility. Recently, we have reported the anti-nociceptive effect of newly identified NOX1 specific inhibitor ML171 (2-acetylphenothiazine). Inhibition of NOX1 resulted in attenuation of nociceptive sensitization during acute inflammatory pain via inhibition of ROS generation and its downstream ERK1/2 activation. However, glial activation accompanying inflammation is closely related to the initiation and maintenance of pain. Peripheral nociceptive inputs activate the primary afferents via release of various chemical mediators which are potentially capable of mediating signals from neuron to glia in DRG and subsequently in spinal cord dorsal horn. The subsequent interactions between neuron and glia contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Thus, the present study was focused to investigate the effect of ML171 on ERK1/2 signaling, glial activation, and crosstalk between neuron and glia in a mouse model of formalin induced acute nociception. Thus, the present study was focused to investigate the effect of ML171 on ERK1/2 signaling, glial activation, and crosstalk between neuron and glia in DRG and dorsal horn of the spinal cord of lumbar region (L3-L5) in a mouse model of formalin induced acute nociception.Intraperitoneal administration of ML171 decreased nociceptive behavioral responses, i.e. the flinch and lick counts, in formalin induced nociceptive mice. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis demonstrated decreased levels of nociceptive mediators like p-ERK1/2, p-NFκB p65, Iba1 and GFAP in DRG as well as in spinal cord dorsal horn; supporting anti-nociceptive potential of ML171. Further, co-localization studies showed the neuron-glia crosstalk in tissue dependent manner. ERK1/2 was found to be activated in glia and NFκB in neurons in DRG; whereas in case of spinal cord ERK1/2 was activated in neurons and NFκB in astrocytes. Decrease in nociceptive behavioral response and activation of nociceptive mediators after intraperitoneal administration of ML171 strongly advocate anti-nociceptive potential of ML171.This is the first report demonstrating modulation of ERK1/2-NFκB signaling pathway, glial activation and regulation of neuron-glia crosstalk by NADPH oxidase1 inhibition towards its anti-nociceptive action.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Indole-3-guanylhydrazone hydrochloride mitigates long-term cognitive
           impairment in a neonatal sepsis model with involvement of MAPK and NFκB
           pathways
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Luana Heimfarth, Alexandra Maria Santos Carvalho, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira Quintans, Erik Willyame Menezes Pereira, Natália Teles Lima, Mikaella Tuanny Bezerra Carvalho, Rosana de Souza Siqueira Barreto, José Cláudio Fonseca Moreira, Edeildo F. da Silva-Júnior, Martine Schmitt, Jean-Jacques Bourguignon, Thiago M. de Aquino, João X. de Araújo-Júnior, Lucindo J. Quintans-JúniorBackgroundNeonatal sepsis is defined as a systemic inflammatory response caused by a suspected or proven infection, occurring in the first month of life, and remains one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in newborn and preterm infants. Frequently, survivors of neonatal sepsis have serious long-term cognitive impairment and adverse neurologic outcomes. There is currently no specific drug treatment for sepsis. Indole-3-guanylhydrazone hydrochloride (LQM01) is an aminoguanidine derivative that has been described as an anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive and antioxidant with potential applicability in inflammatory diseases.MethodsWe used a LPS-challenged neonatal sepsis rodent model to investigate the effect of LQM01 on cognitive impairment and anxiety-like behavior in sepsis mice survivors, and examined the possible molecular mechanisms involved.ResultsIt was found that LQM01 exposure during the neonatal period reduces anxiety-like behavior and cognitive impairment caused by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in adult life. Additionally, treatment with LQM01 decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and reduced NFκB, COX-2, MAPK and microglia activation in hippocampus of neonatal mice. Furthermore, LQM01 was also able to prevent oxidative damage in hippocampus of neonatal mice and preserve brain barrier integrity.ConclusionsLQM01 attenuated inflammatory reactions in an LPS-challenged neonatal sepsis mice model through the MAPK and NFκB signaling pathways and microglia activation suppression. All these findings are associated with mitigated cognitive impairment in 70 days-old LQM01 treated-mice.General significanceWe revealed the effect of LQM01 as an anti-septic agent, and the role of crucial molecular pathways in mitigating the potential damage caused by neonatal sepsis.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals Akt isoform-specific regulation of
           cytoskeleton proteins in human temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal
           sclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Rajesh Ramanna Valmiki, Subhashini Venkatesalu, Ari George Chacko, Krishna Prabhu, Maya Mary Thomas, Vivek Mathew, Sangeetha Yoganathan, Karthik Muthusamy, Geeta Chacko, Harshad Arvind Vanjare, Srinivasa Babu KrothapalliAbstractAkt is one of the most important downstream effectors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mTOR pathway. Hyperactivation and expression of this pathway are seen in a variety of neurological disorders including human temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS). Nevertheless, the expression and activation profiles of the Akt isoforms, Akt1, Akt2, and Akt3 and their functional roles in human TLE-HS have not been studied. We examined the protein expression and activation (phosphorylation) patterns of Akt and its isoforms in human hippocampal tissue from TLE and non-TLE patients. A phosphoproteomic approach followed by interactome analysis of each Akt isoform was used to understand protein-protein interactions and their role in TLE-HS pathology. Our results demonstrated activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway as well as activation of Akt downstream substrates like GSK3β, mTOR, and S6 in TLE-HS samples. Akt1 isoform levels were significantly increased in the TLE-HS samples as compared to the non-TLE samples. Most importantly, different isoforms were activated in different TLE-HS samples, Akt2 was activated in three samples, Akt2 and Akt1 were simultaneously activated in one sample and Akt3 was activated in two samples. Our phosphoproteomic screen across six TLE-HS samples identified 183 proteins phosphorylated by Akt isoforms, 29 of these proteins belong to cytoskeletal modification. Also, we were able to identify proteins of several other classes involved in glycolysis, neuronal development, protein folding and excitatory amino acid transport functions as Akt substrates. Taken together, our data offer clues to understand the role of Akt and its isoforms in underlying the pathology of TLE-HS and further, modulation of Akt/mTOR pathway using Akt isoforms specific inhibitors may offer a new therapeutic window for treatment of human TLE-HS.
       
  • mTORC1 is involved in DGKβ-induced neurite outgrowth and spinogenesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Hiroko Nakai, Ryosuke Tsumagari, Kenta Maruo, Akio Nakashima, Ushio Kikkawa, Shuji Ueda, Minoru Yamanoue, Naoaki Saito, Nobuyuki Takei, Yasuhito ShiraiAbstractDiacylglycerol kinase β (DGKβ) is an enzyme converting DG to phosphatidic acid (PA) and is specifically expressed in neurons, especially those in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum. We previously reported that DGKβ induces neurite outgrowth and spinogenesis, contributing to higher brain function including emotion and memory, and plasma membrane localization of DGKβ via the C1 domain and a cluster of basic amino acids at the C-terminus is necessary for its function. To clarify the mechanisms involved in neuronal development by DGKβ, we investigated whether DGKβ activity induces neurite outgrowth using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. DGKβ induced neurite outgrowth by activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) through a kinase-dependent pathway. In addition, in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons, inhibition of mTORC1 abolished DGKβ induced-neurite outgrowth, branching and spinogenesis. These results indicated that DGKβ induces neurite outgrowth and spinogenesis by activating mTORC1 in a kinase-dependent pathway.
       
  • Hydrogen peroxide triggers an increase in cell surface expression of
           system xc − in cultured human glioma cells
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Leah A. Chase, Mary VerHeulen Kleyn, NaTasha Schiller, Abby Goltz King, Guillermo Flores, Sasha Balcazar Engelsman, Christina Bowles, Sara Lang Smith, Anne E. Robinson, Jeffrey RothsteinAbstractSystem xc− exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate across the plasma membrane of many cell types. One of the physiological roles of System xc− is to provide cystine for synthesis of the antioxidant glutathione. Here we report that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) triggers the translocation of System xc− to the plasma membrane within 10 min of the initial exposure. Specifically, we observed a three-fold increase in 35S-l-cystine uptake following a 10 min exposure to 0.3 mM H2O2. This effect was dose-dependent with an EC50 for H2O2 of 65 μM. We then used cell surface biotinylation analysis to test the hypothesis that the increase in activity is due to an increased number of transporters on the plasma membrane. We demonstrated that the amount of transporter protein, xCT, localized to the plasma membrane doubles within 10 min of H2O2 exposure as a result of an increase in its delivery rate and a reduction in its internalization rate. In addition, we demonstrated that H2O2 triggered a rapid decrease in total cellular glutathione which recovered within 2 h of the oxidative insult. The kinetics of glutathione recovery matched the time course for the recovery of xCT cell surface expression and System xc− activity following removal of the oxidative insult. Collectively, these results suggest that oxidants acutely modulate the activity of System xc− by increasing its cell surface expression, and that this process may serve as an important mechanism to increase de novo glutathione synthesis during periods of oxidative stress.
       
  • MiR-340-5p alleviates oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation-induced
           neuronal injury via PI3K/Akt activation by targeting PDCD4
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Yake Zheng, Peng Zhao, Yajun Lian, Shuang Li, Yuan Chen, Lihao LiAbstractMicroRNA-340-5p (miR-340-5p), a suppressor of certain target genes in brain, reportedly is decreased in peripheral circulation of acute stroke patients. However, little is known regarding its role in regulating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study explores the effect of miR-340-5p on ischemia/reperfusion insults by exposing rat hippocampal neurons to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGDR) in vitro. We found miR-340-5p to be poorly expressed in these neurons after OGDR stimulation. OGDR stimulation decreased cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and cell apoptosis, all of which were significantly inhibited by miR-340-5p overexpression and enhanced by miR-340-5p inhibition. Using bioinformatics analysis, we identified mRNA encoding the pro-apoptotic factor, programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) as a putative target of miR-340-5p. A dual-luciferase reporter assay suggested that miR-340-5p targeted the 3′-UTR of PDCD4. PDCD4 was upregulated in cells exposed to OGDR, and miR-340-5p negatively modulated expression of PDCD4. PDCD4 overexpression partly reversed the neuroprotective effect of miR-340-5p during OGDR-induced injury. MiR-340-5p overexpression significantly promoted the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (P 
       
  • Upregulation of spinal glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide
           receptor induces membrane translocation of PKCγ and synaptic target of
           AMPA receptor GluR1 subunits in dorsal horns in a rat model of incisional
           pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: Neurochemistry International, Volume 134Author(s): Ruijuan Guo, Yuqing Sun, Huili Li, Danxu Ma, Yun WangAbstractIt is unclear whether glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor (GIPR) signaling plays an important role in spinal nociception. We hypothesized that the spinal GIPR is implicated in central sensitization of postoperative pain. Our data showed that the cumulative pain scores peaked at 3 h, kept at a high level at 1 d after incision, gradually decreased afterwards and returned to the baseline values at 5 d after incision. Correspondingly, the expression of GIPR in spinal cord dorsal horn peaked at 1 d after incision, and returned to the baseline value at 5 d after incision. The double-labeling immunofluorescence demonstrated that spinal GIPR was expressed in dorsal horn neurons, but not in astrocyte or microglial cells. At 1 d after incision, the effects of intrathecal saline, GIPR antagonist (Pro3)GIP on pain behaviors were investigated. Our data showed that at 30 min and 60 min following intrathecal treatments of 300 ng (Pro3)GIP, the cumulative pain scores were decreased and paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimuli were increased when compared to those immediately before intrathecal treatments. Accordingly, at 30 min after intrathecal injections, the membrane translocation levels of PKCγ and the GluR1 expression in postsynaptic membrane in ipsilateral dorsal horns to the incision were significantly upregulated in rats with intrathecal saline injections, as compared to normal control group. At 30 min after intrathecal treatment, (Pro3)GIP inhibited the membrane translocation levels of PKCγ and the GluR1 expression in postsynaptic membrane in ipsilateral dorsal horns. Our study indicates that upregulation of spinal GIPR may contribute to pain hypersensitivity through inducing membrane translocation level of PKCγ and synaptic target of AMPA receptor GluR1 subunits in ipsilateral dorsal horns of rats with plantar incision.
       
  • Metabolomic analysis of serum using proton NMR in 6-OHDA experimental PD
           model and patients with PD
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Sadhana Kumari, S. Senthil Kumaran, Vinay Goyal, Samrat Bose, Suman Jain, S.N. Dwivedi, Achal Kumar Srivastava, N.R. JagannathanGraphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Iron overload induced by IRP2 gene knockout aggravates symptoms of
           Parkinson's disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 January 2020Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Yun-Zhe Ci, Haiyan Li, Lin-Hao You, Yu Jin, Rui Zhou, Guofen Gao, Pui Man Hoi, Chunyan Wang, Yan-Zhong Chang, Peng YuAbstractParkinson's disease (PD) is accompanied by iron overload in the brain. However, whether iron accumulation is the cause or effect of PD is still unknown. Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) plays a critical role in keeping iron homeostasis, and our previous data showed that the deletion of the IRP2 gene caused iron deposits in organs of mice. Therefore, we further investigated the role of iron overload induced by IRP2 gene deletion in the development of the MPTP-induced PD mouse model in vivo, and the underlying regulatory mechanisms in primary cultures of astrocytes in vitro. Data from neurobehavioral, immunohistochemistry, TUNEL and Elisa studies showed that MPTP treatment enhanced the symptoms of PD in vivo, increased cell apoptosis and decreased dopamine levels in IRP2−/− mice. In addition, the expression of L-ferritin and iron contents increased significantly in the substantia nigra (SN) of IRP2−/− mice. Moreover, MPTP treatment significantly increased the expression of DMT1 (-IRE) and decreased the expression of TfR1 in IRP2−/− mice. Further investigations with primary cultures of astrocytes from IRP2−/− mice showed that MPP+ increased the expression of L-ferritin and DMT1 (-IRE), and decreased the expression of TfR1. Our results demonstrated that IRP2 gene deletion induced iron accumulation in the SN, which exacerbated the neuronal apoptosis and Parkinsonism symptoms. At the same time, IRP2 gene deletion increased the iron contents in astrocytes around neurons, which further decreased their protection for neurons and increased the cell apoptosis, ultimately forming a vicious cycle that leads to the onset and progression of PD.
       
  • Short review: Air pollution, noise and lack of greenness as risk factors
           for Alzheimer's disease- epidemiologic and experimental evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Anna OudinAbstractThe number of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is likely to triple in a few decades as the world's population ages. Given the high personal and societal burden of this disease, it is imperative to identify its risk factors. The etiology of AD is still not fully understood, but environmental factors have emerged as plausible important risk factors on the population-level. In this short review, the author summarizes literature on air pollution, noise and (lack of) greenness as risk factors for AD. In conclusion, a link between air pollution and AD is supported by experimental studies as well as epidemiological studies, although a multi-exposure approach is lacking in most epidemiological studies. Although evidence is much more limited regarding noise and (lack of) greenness as risk factors for AD, future epidemiological studies should have a multi-exposure approach in order to separate potential effects of air pollution, noise and lack of greenness. Given the heavy toll of AD on individuals and society, as well as the ubiquitous nature of environmental factors, a link between environmental stressors and AD deserves special attention.
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.172.195.82
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-