for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Cambridge University Press   (Total: 369 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 369 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Neuropsychiatrica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Numerica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 6.709, CiteScore: 10)
Advances in Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.441, CiteScore: 1)
Aeronautical J., The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.582, CiteScore: 1)
African Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.437, CiteScore: 1)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.756, CiteScore: 2)
Agricultural and Resource Economics Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.414, CiteScore: 1)
AI EDAM     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
AJS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
American Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 255, SJR: 5.587, CiteScore: 4)
Anatolian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.528, CiteScore: 1)
Ancient Mesoamerica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Anglo-Saxon England     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
animal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.842, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.69, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annals of Actuarial Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual of the British School at Athens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Annual Review of Applied Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 3.223, CiteScore: 4)
Antarctic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.643, CiteScore: 1)
Antichthon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Antiquaries J., The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Antiquity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
ANZIAM J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.945, CiteScore: 2)
APSIPA Transactions on Signal and Information Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.404, CiteScore: 2)
Arabic Sciences and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Arbor Clinical Nutrition Updates     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Archaeological Dialogues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.898, CiteScore: 1)
Archaeological Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
arq: Architectural Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.135, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.195, CiteScore: 0)
Astin Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.878, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Organisational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.154, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Special Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Environmental Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Indigenous Education, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Rehabilitation Counseling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Austrian History Yearbook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.161, CiteScore: 0)
Behavioral and Brain Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 1)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.508, CiteScore: 1)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 136, SJR: 0.976, CiteScore: 2)
Bilingualism: Language and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.446, CiteScore: 2)
Biofilms     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bird Conservation Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.581, CiteScore: 1)
BJPsych Advances     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 0)
BJPsych Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain Impairment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.321, CiteScore: 1)
Breast Cancer Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Britannia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
British Actuarial J.     Full-text available via subscription  
British Catholic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 1)
British J. for the History of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
British J. of Anaesthetic and Recovery Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
British J. of Music Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.564, CiteScore: 1)
British J. Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74, SJR: 1.612, CiteScore: 4)
British J. of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 165, SJR: 4.661, CiteScore: 4)
British J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 178, SJR: 2.844, CiteScore: 3)
Bulletin of Entomological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.805, CiteScore: 2)
Bulletin of Symbolic Logic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of the Australian Mathematical Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 0)
Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Business and Human Rights J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Business Ethics Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.098, CiteScore: 2)
Business History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Cambridge Archaeological J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126, SJR: 1.121, CiteScore: 1)
Cambridge Classical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Cambridge J. of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cambridge Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 161, SJR: 0.213, CiteScore: 0)
Cambridge Opera J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Camden Fifth Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Entomologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.482, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.624, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Law & Jurisprudence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 0)
Canadian J. of Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.259, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Neurological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Political Science/Revue canadienne de science politique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Yearbook of Intl. Law / Annuaire canadien de droit international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology in the Young     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.372, CiteScore: 1)
Central European History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
Children Australia     Partially Free   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.255, CiteScore: 0)
China Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 2.289, CiteScore: 3)
Chinese J. of Agricultural Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Church History: Studies in Christianity and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 72, SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Classical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 0)
Classical Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
CNS Spectrums     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.391, CiteScore: 3)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Combinatorics, Probability and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.839, CiteScore: 1)
Communications in Computational Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.048, CiteScore: 2)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 1)
Compositio Mathematica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 3.139, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary European History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Continuity and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.107, CiteScore: 0)
Dance Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 0)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.068, CiteScore: 4)
Dialogue Canadian Philosophical Review/Revue canadienne de philosophie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Diamond Light Source Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription  
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 1)
Early China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Early Music History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
East Asian J. on Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.418, CiteScore: 1)
Ecclesiastical Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Econometric Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.915, CiteScore: 1)
Economics and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.622, CiteScore: 1)
Edinburgh J. of Botany     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Eighteenth-Century Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
English Language and Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
English Profile J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
English Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Enterprise & Society : The Intl. J. of Business History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Environment and Development Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.617, CiteScore: 1)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.028, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Epidemiology & Infection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.128, CiteScore: 2)
Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.494, CiteScore: 2)
Episteme     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.756, CiteScore: 1)
Equine and Comparative Exercise Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ergodic Theory and Dynamical Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 1)
Ethics & Intl. Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.557, CiteScore: 1)
European Constitutional Law Review (EuConst)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.009, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Applied Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.643, CiteScore: 1)
European Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.816, CiteScore: 2)
European Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Experimental Agriculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Expert Reviews in Molecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.647, CiteScore: 4)
Fetal and Maternal Medicine Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Financial History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Foreign Policy Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Forum of Mathematics, Pi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forum of Mathematics, Sigma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Genetics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.483, CiteScore: 1)
Geological Magazine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.966, CiteScore: 2)
Glasgow Mathematical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 0)
Global Constitutionalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Global Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Government and Opposition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.965, CiteScore: 2)
Greece & Rome     Partially Free   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Hague J. on the Rule of Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.271, CiteScore: 1)
Harvard Theological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65, SJR: 0.165, CiteScore: 0)
Health Economics, Policy and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.745, CiteScore: 1)
Hegel Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
High Power Laser Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.901, CiteScore: 3)
Historical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
History in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Horizons     Partially Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.916, CiteScore: 1)
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.97, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. & Comparative Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 200, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Astrobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Cultural Property     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.253, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Law in Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Microwave and Wireless Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Middle East Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.714, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Tropical Insect Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Labor and Working-Class History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 89, SJR: 8.527, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.048, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Review of Social History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.315, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Review of the Red Cross     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. Theory: A J. of Intl. Politics, Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.293, CiteScore: 2)
Iraq     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Irish Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
Irish J. of Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Israel Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.165, CiteScore: 0)
Itinerario     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
J. of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
J. of African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Agricultural and Applied Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
J. of American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.164, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Anglican Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Asian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Biosocial Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.48, CiteScore: 1)
J. of British Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Child Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.035, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Classics Teaching     Open Access  
J. of Dairy Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.573, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Demographic Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Diagnostic Radiography and Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Ecclesiastical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45, SJR: 1.82, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Political Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.526, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial and Quantitative Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 3.636, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Fluid Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 144, SJR: 1.591, CiteScore: 3)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
International Psychogeriatrics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.048
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1041-6102 - ISSN (Online) 1741-203X
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [369 journals]
  • IPG volume 30 issue 6 Cover and Front matter
    • Authors: Myrra Vernooij-Dassen; Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610218001096
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • IPG volume 30 issue 6 Cover and Back matter
    • Authors: Myrra Vernooij-Dassen; Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610218001102
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Social health in dementia care: harnessing an applied research agenda
    • Authors: Myrra Vernooij-Dassen; Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 775 - 778
      Abstract: The notion of social health (Huber et al., 2011) as applied to dementia care research was introduced to redress the balance of empirical studies that tended to focus on biomedical, cognitive, and functional status in dementia (Vernooij-Dassen and Jeon, 2016). The introduction of social health has followed the zeitgeist of campaigners for a better life for those living with dementia, with initiatives to improve the social images of dementia (Alzheimers.org, 2017). Examples from social research in dementia to examine friendships and the social environments of people with dementia exist (Medeiros et al., 2012), but introduction of the paradigm of social health in dementia (Vernooij-Dassen and Jeon, 2016) has harnessed a growing research agenda (de Vugt and Dröes, 2017). This paradigm provides an umbrella concept to study how social aspects influence the dynamic balance between opportunities and limitations in dementia. Social health goes beyond the neuropathology of dementia, to understand how people, their social networks and wider society with its norms, interact with the condition (Vernooij-Dassen and Jeon, 2016). It is not far removed from the ideas of Tom Kitwood, the pioneer of person-centered dementia care, who noted that “personhood is a standing or status that is bestowed upon one human being, by others, in the context of relationship and social being” (Kitwood, 1997). The INTERDEM (Early detection and timely INTERvention in DEMentia, www.interdem.org) psychosocial research agenda aspired to improve knowledge about social inclusion and reciprocal relationships for people with dementia (Moniz-Cook et al., 2011). The concept of social health (Vernooij-Dassen and Jeon, 2016) with its dimensions for dementia research (Dröes et al., 2017) has begun to develop this knowledge-base.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217002769
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • The Unforgettables: a chorus for people with dementia with their family
           members and friends
    • Authors: Mary Sherman Mittelman; Panayiota Maria Papayannopoulou, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 779 - 789
      Abstract: Our experience evaluating a museum program for people with dementia together with their family members demonstrated benefits for all participants. We hypothesized that participation in a chorus would also have positive effects, giving them an opportunity to share a stimulating and social activity that could improve their quality of life. We inaugurated a chorus for people with dementia and their family caregivers in 2011, which rehearses and performs regularly. Each person with dementia must be accompanied by a friend or family member and must commit to attending all rehearsals and the concert that ensues. A pilot study included a structured assessment, take home questionnaires and focus groups. Analyses of pre-post scores were conducted; effect size was quantified using Cohen's d. Results showed that quality of life and communication with the other member of the dyad improved (Effect size: Cohen's d between 0.32 and 0.72) for people with dementia; quality of life, social support, communication and self-esteem improved (d between 0.29 and 0.68) for caregivers. Most participants stated that benefits included belonging to a group, having a normal activity together and learning new skills. Participants attended rehearsals in spite of harsh weather conditions. The chorus has been rehearsing and performing together for more than 6 years and contributing to its costs. Results of this pilot study suggest that people in the early to middle stage of dementia and their family members and friends can enjoy and learn from rehearsing and performing in concerts that also engage the wider community. It is essential to conduct additional larger studies of the benefits of participating in a chorus, which may include improved quality of life and social support for all, and reduced cognitive decline among people with dementia.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217001867
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Through the eyes of others – the social experiences of people with
           dementia: a systematic literature review and synthesis
    • Authors: Kirsty M. Patterson; Chris Clarke, Emma L. Wolverson, Esme D. Moniz-Cook, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 791 - 805
      Abstract: Background:Psychosocial models suggest that the lived experience of dementia is affected by interpersonal factors such as the ways in which others view, talk about, and behave toward the person with dementia. This review aimed to illuminate how informal, everyday interpersonal relationships are experienced by people with dementia within their social contexts.Method:A systematic review of qualitative literature published between 1989 and May 2016 was conducted, utilizing the electronic databases PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and CINAHL-Complete. This was followed by a critical interpretative synthesis to understand how people with dementia perceive the attitudes, views, and reactions of other people toward them, and the subjective impact that these have.Results:Four major themes were derived from the findings of the 23 included studies: being treated as an “other” rather than “one of us”; being treated as “lesser” rather than a full, valued member of society; the impact of others’ responses; and strategies to manage the responses of others. Thus, people with dementia can feel outcast and relegated, or indeed feel included and valued by others. These experiences impact upon emotional and psychological well-being, and are actively interpreted and managed by people with dementia.Conclusion:Experiences such as loss and diminishing identity have previously been understood as a direct result of dementia, with little consideration of interpersonal influences. This review notes that people with dementia actively engage with others, whose responses can foster or undermine social well-being. This dynamic relational aspect may contribute to emerging understandings of social health in dementia.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610216002374
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • ®'+A+systematic+review+of+qualitative+studies&rft.title=International+Psychogeriatrics&rft.issn=1041-6102&rft.date=2018&rft.volume=30&rft.spage=807&rft.epage=831&rft.aulast=Low&rft.aufirst=Lee-Fay&rft.au=Lee-Fay+Low&rft.au=Kate+Swaffer,+Margaret+McGrath,+Henry+Brodaty,+Myrra+Vernooij-Dassen,+Esme+Moniz-Cook,+Yun-Hee+Jeon&rft_id=info:doi/10.1017/S1041610217001545">Do people with early stage dementia experience Prescribed
           Disengagement®' A systematic review of qualitative studies
    • Authors: Lee-Fay Low; Kate Swaffer, Margaret McGrath, Henry Brodaty, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 807 - 831
      Abstract: Background:Prescribed Disengagement® is the description of the post-diagnostic advice given to people after a diagnosis of dementia, which explicitly or implicitly suggests that the person should be slowing down or pulling back from activities. This results in isolation, loss of hope, self-esteem and self-identity, and threatens social health. This study aims to review whether Prescribed Disengagement® can be identified in the literature on subjective experiences of people living with early dementia.Methods:A systematic search was performed. Inclusion criteria were original empirical qualitative studies published in English that addressed the subjective experiences of living with a diagnosis of objectively defined early dementia. Thematic synthesis was undertaken.Results:Thirty-five papers involving 373 participants were included. Following a diagnosis, people with dementia struggled with self-identity, independence, control and status, activities, stigma, and how to view the future. Reactions in these areas ranged from active and positive to negative and passive. Many studies reported participants’ dissatisfaction with the way the diagnosis was communicated. There was insufficient information provided about dementia and limited treatments and support offered. The diagnosis process and post-diagnostic support may have contributed to disempowerment of the person with dementia, made it more difficult to accept the diagnosis, and exacerbated negative views and self-stigma around dementia.Conclusions:These results do not support the idea of Prescribed Disengagement®. However disengagement may have been implied during the diagnosis process and post-diagnostic support. Research is needed on how to improve the communication of dementia diagnosis and support people to live well post-diagnosis.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217001545
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • A pharmacopsychometric overview of major depressive episodes in positive
           psychiatry
    • Authors: P. Bech; Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 833 - 841
      Abstract: Background:The use of the pharmacopsychometric triangle to enhance patient-reported well-being as the ultimate goal of treatment has most intensively been studied in patients with a major depressive episode.Methods:The review is structured on the pharmacopsychometric triangle in which the desired clinical effect of an antidepressive medication is balanced against the undesired side effects induced by this medication in terms of restored well-being. As a biological treatment, the antidepressive medication is compared clinically with both electroconvulsive therapy and psychological treatment.Results:In the process of this review, evidence from a dose–response study in patients suffering from a major depressive episode with an adequate duration and symptom severity has demonstrated that the dose–response relationship emerged when using the patient-reported well-being outcome rather than the symptomatic reduction as outcome.Conclusion:The pharmacopsychometric triangle is in patients with major depressive episodes providing important information within positive psychiatry.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217003015
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • The challenges of shared decision making in dementia care networks
    • Authors: Leontine Groen-van de Ven; Carolien Smits, Marijke Span, Jan Jukema, Krista Coppoolse, Jacomine de Lange, Jan Eefsting, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 843 - 857
      Abstract: Background:Decision making is an important part of managing one's life with dementia. Shared decision making is the preferred way of involving people in decisions. Our study aimed to describe the challenges of shared decision making in dementia care networks.Methods:A multi-perspective qualitative study using face-to-face interviews with 113 respondents in 23 care networks in the Netherlands consisting of 23 people with dementia, 44 of their informal caregivers, and 46 of their professional caregivers. The interview guide addressed the decision topics, who were involved in the decision making and their contributions to the decision making. We used content analysis to delineate categories and themes.Results:The themes and categories that emerged are: (1) adapting to a situation of diminishing independence, which includes the continuous changes in the care network, resulting in shifting decision-making roles and the need for anticipating future decisions; and (2) tensions in network interactions which result from different perspectives and interests and which require reaching agreement about what constitutes a problem by exchanging information in the care network.Conclusion:The challenges in dementia care networks relate to all dimensions of social health. They have implications for a model of shared decision making in dementia care networks. Such a model requires flexibility regarding changing capabilities to preserve the autonomy of the person with dementia. It needs working towards a shared view about what constitutes a problem in the situation. It asks for professionals to advocate for the involvement of people with dementia by helping them participate in ways that strengthen their remaining capacities.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610216001381
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • The clinical course and interrelations of dementia related symptoms
    • Authors: Miriam L. Haaksma; Jeannie-Marie S. Leoutsakos, Jonne A. E. Bremer, Pauline Aalten, Inez H. G. B. Ramakers, Frans R. J. Verhey, Marcel G. M. Olde Rikkert, René J. F. Melis, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 859 - 866
      Abstract: Background:Dementia is a neurodegenerative syndrome that interferes with multiple aspects of life, including cognition, daily functioning, and behavior. Despite the large heterogeneity in symptom development, these three domains are seldom studied simultaneously. This study investigates how trajectories of these domains are interrelated within individuals over time, and how they in turn are related to dementia severity and quality of life (QoL).Methods:We used data from a longitudinal clinical cohort study, including 331 dementia patients. Cognitive status was measured using the Mini-Mental State Examination, daily functioning was measured with the disability assessment for dementia and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) were scored using the neuropsychiatric inventory. We investigated the relationships in the time course of the various dementia domains using random effects multilevel models and parallel-process growth models.Results:Changes in cognition and daily functioning were highly correlated over time (r = 0.85, p < 0.01), as were changes in NPS and functioning (r = −0.60, p < 0.01), while changes in cognition and NPS were not (r = −0.20, p = 0.06). All three domains were strongly associated with dementia severity over time (p < 0.01). Decreased functioning and increased NPS were both associated with decreased QoL (β = 2.97, p < 0.01 and β = −2.41, p < 0.01, respectively), while cognition was not (β = 0.01, p = 0.93).Conclusion:This study demonstrates the heterogeneity of dementia progression between individuals and between different dementia domains within individuals. To improve our understanding of dementia progression, future research should embrace a broader perspective encompassing multiple outcome measures along with the patient's profile, including neurological factors as well as physical, social, and psychiatric health.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217000321
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • The lived neighborhood: understanding how people with dementia engage with
           their local environment
    • Authors: Richard Ward; Andrew Clark, Sarah Campbell, Barbara Graham, Agneta Kullberg, Kainde Manji, Kirstein Rummery, John Keady, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 867 - 880
      Abstract: Background:In this paper, we report progress on “Neighborhoods: our people, our places” an international study about how people living with dementia interact with their neighborhoods. The ideas of social health and citizenship are drawn upon to contextualize the data and make a case for recognizing and understanding the strengths and agency of people with dementia. In particular, we address the lived experience of the environment as a route to better understanding the capabilities, capacities, and competencies of people living with dementia. In doing this, our aim is to demonstrate the contribution of social engagement and environmental support to social health.Methods:The study aims to “map” local spaces and networks across three field sites (Manchester, Central Scotland and Linkoping, Sweden). It employs a mix of qualitative and participatory approaches that include mobile and visual methods intended to create knowledge that will inform the design and piloting of a neighborhood-based intervention.Results:Our research shows that the neighborhood plays an active role in the lives of people with dementia, setting limits, and constraints but also offering significant opportunities, encompassing forms of help and support as yet rarely discussed in the field of dementia studies. The paper presents new and distinctive insights into the relationship between neighborhoods and everyday life for people with dementia that have important implications for the debate on social health and policy concerning dementia friendly communities.Conclusion:We end by reflecting on the messages for policy and practice that are beginning to emerge from this on-going study.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217000631
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • A mismatch between supply and demand of social support in dementia care: a
           qualitative study on the perspectives of spousal caregivers and their
           social network members
    • Authors: Alieske E.H. Dam; Lizzy M.M. Boots, Martin P.J. van Boxtel, Frans R.J. Verhey, Marjolein E. de Vugt, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 881 - 892
      Abstract: Background:Access to social support contributes to feelings of independence and better social health. This qualitative study aims to investigate multi-informant perspectives on informal social support in dementia care networks.Methods:Ten spousal caregivers of people with dementia (PwD) completed an ecogram, a social network card and a semi-structured interview. The ecogram aimed to trigger subjective experiences regarding social support. Subsequently, 17 network members were interviewed. The qualitative analyses identified codes, categories, and themes.Results:Sixth themes emerged: (1) barriers to ask for support; (2) facilitators to ask for support; (3) barriers to offer support; (4) facilitators to offer support; (5) a mismatch between supply and demand of social support; and (6) openness in communication to repair the imbalance.Discussion:Integrating social network perspectives resulted in a novel model identifying a mismatch between the supply and demand of social support, strengthened by a cognitive bias: caregivers reported to think for other social network members and vice versa. Openness in communication in formal and informal care systems might repair this mismatch.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217000898
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Importance of social relationships in the association between sleep
           duration and cognitive function: data from community-dwelling older
           Singaporeans
    • Authors: Grand H.-L. Cheng; Angelique Chan, June C. Lo, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 893 - 901
      Abstract: Background:Aging is accompanied by cognitive decline that is escalated in older adults reporting extreme sleep duration. Social relationships can influence health outcomes and thus may qualify the association between sleep duration and cognitive function. The present study examines the moderating effects of marital status, household size, and social network with friends and relatives on the sleep–cognition association among older adults.Methods:Data (N = 4,169) came from the Social Isolation, Health, and Lifestyles Survey, a nationally representative survey of community-dwelling older Singaporeans (≥ 60 years). Sleep duration and social relationships were self-reported. Cognitive function was assessed with the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire.Results:Regression analysis revealed that the inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration and cognitive function was less profound among older adults who were married (vs. unmarried) and those who had stronger (vs. weaker) social networks. In contrast, it was more prominent among individuals who had more (vs. fewer) household members.Conclusions:Being married and having stronger social networks may buffer against the negative cognitive impact of extreme sleep duration. But larger household size might imply more stress for older persons, and therefore strengthen the sleep duration–cognitive function association. We discuss the potential biological underpinnings and the policy implications of the findings. Although our findings are based on a large sample, replication studies using objective measures of sleep duration and other cognitive measures are needed.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217001041
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Comparison of the lived experiences of family caregivers of patients with
           dementia and of patients with cancer in Indonesia
    • Authors: Martina Sinta Kristanti; Yvonne Engels, Christantie Effendy, Astuti, Adi Utarini, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 903 - 914
      Abstract: Background:Dementia, even more than cancer, demands long-term care. While in Indonesia cancer is accepted as a disease requiring caregiving, dementia is still considered "a normal condition." These differences might affect the experiences of caregivers, especially those relating to social health, the subject of our study. We aim to describe and compare the lived experiences of family caregivers of patients with cancer (PWC) with those of patients with dementia (PWD) in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, and to explore the role of their social health in these experiences.Method:A qualitative design was applied. In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with PWC and PWD caregivers in two outpatient clinics of a tertiary hospital. The constant comparative method was applied to analyze the data that were interpreted using the concept of social health to explore the experiences of the caregivers. We used Atlas.ti software.Results:Three themes were identified: problems with caregiving, dealing with problems, and beliefs in caregiving. We found more similarities than differences in the experiences of caregivers in both groups. Half of the categories were related to social health: challenges, consequences, hiding, social support, and the caregiver's approach. The organization of dementia care is characterized by simplicity and direct ties between medical specialists, PWD, and caregivers, whereas cancer care encounters coordination problems.Conclusions:Family caregivers of both groups mostly had similar experiences of the caregiving process. Gaining a better understanding of the specific experiences of caregivers, and their social health, opens new avenues for interventions to improve their quality of life.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217001508
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Improving the social health of community-dwelling older people living with
           dementia through a reablement program
    • Authors: Yun-Hee Jeon; Lindy Clemson, Sharon L. Naismith, Loren Mowszowski, Niki McDonagh, Margaret Mackenzie, Caitlin Dawes, Luisa Krein, Sarah L. Szanton, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 915 - 920
      Abstract: Psychological, neurological, and social impairments caused by dementia may limit the person's everyday living and experiences, but their capacity to enjoy a meaningful life is still retained. Increasingly, evidence has been shown the importance of reablement approaches to care in maximizing the older person's independence, health, and well-being through increased engagement in their daily, physical, social, and community activities. However, there is a major knowledge gap in providing reablement for people living with dementia. We describe one case of a client with moderate dementia and her daughter carer who participated as a dyad in a person centered, interdisciplinary, and reablement program called I-HARP (Interdisciplinary home-based reablement program). I-HARP is designed to improve functional capacity of those community dwelling, older people living with dementia, and other health conditions. In this paper, we discussed key contributions that such a reablement approach to care can make to optimizing the social health of people living with dementia.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217001533
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Effects of active psychosocial stimulation on social interactions of
           people with dementia living in a nursing home: a comparative study
    • Authors: Jean-Bernard Mabire; Marie-Claire Gay, Pierre Vrignaud, Catherine Garitte, Yun-Hee Jeon, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 921 - 922
      Abstract: Dementia can interfere with the maintenance of social interactions. The ability to participate in social interactions is one of the elements that enables good social health (Hubert et al., 2011), and having dementia does not automatically eliminates the person's opportunity to have good social health (Vernooij-Dassen and Jeon, 2016). We highlighted in a previous study that people with dementia who did not know each other interacted spontaneously when they were in a stimulating social interaction setting (Mabire et al., 2016). However, a lack of activity and social interaction in nursing homes is still a widespread issue (Harper Ice, 2002). Stimulation of social interactions is rarely used as an intervention and social interactions are seldomly used as social health related outcomes.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610217002046
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
  • Effects of active psychosocial stimulation on social interactions of
           people with dementia living in a nursing home: a comparative study –
           ERRATUM
    • Authors: Jean-Bernard Mabire; Marie-Claire Gay, Pierre Vrignaud, Catherine Garitte, Yun-Hee Jeon, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, Esme Moniz-Cook, Yun-Hee Jeon
      Pages: 923 - 923
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1041610218001011
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 6 (2018)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.224.83.221
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-