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Publisher: Cambridge University Press   (Total: 374 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 374 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Neuropsychiatrica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Numerica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 6.709, CiteScore: 10)
Advances in Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.441, CiteScore: 1)
Aeronautical J., The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.582, CiteScore: 1)
African Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.437, CiteScore: 1)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.756, CiteScore: 2)
Agricultural and Resource Economics Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.414, CiteScore: 1)
AI EDAM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
AJS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
American Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 291, SJR: 5.587, CiteScore: 4)
Anatolian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.528, CiteScore: 1)
Ancient Mesoamerica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Anglo-Saxon England     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
animal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.842, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Health Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.69, CiteScore: 2)
Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annals of Actuarial Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual of the British School at Athens     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Annual Review of Applied Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 3.223, CiteScore: 4)
Antarctic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.643, CiteScore: 1)
Antichthon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Antiquaries J., The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Antiquity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
ANZIAM J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.945, CiteScore: 2)
APSIPA Transactions on Signal and Information Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.404, CiteScore: 2)
Arabic Sciences and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Arbor Clinical Nutrition Updates     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Archaeological Dialogues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.898, CiteScore: 1)
Archaeological Reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
arq: Architectural Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.135, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.195, CiteScore: 0)
Astin Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.878, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Organisational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.154, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Special Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Environmental Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Indigenous Education, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Rehabilitation Counseling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Austrian History Yearbook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.161, CiteScore: 0)
Behavioral and Brain Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 1)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.508, CiteScore: 1)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 161, SJR: 0.976, CiteScore: 2)
Bilingualism: Language and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 1.446, CiteScore: 2)
Biofilms     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bird Conservation Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.581, CiteScore: 1)
BJPsych Advances     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 0)
BJPsych Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BJPsych Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain Impairment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.321, CiteScore: 1)
Breast Cancer Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Britannia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
British Actuarial J.     Full-text available via subscription  
British Catholic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 1)
British J. for the History of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
British J. of Anaesthetic and Recovery Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
British J. of Music Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.564, CiteScore: 1)
British J. Of Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82, SJR: 1.612, CiteScore: 4)
British J. of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 191, SJR: 4.661, CiteScore: 4)
British J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203, SJR: 2.844, CiteScore: 3)
Bulletin of Entomological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.805, CiteScore: 2)
Bulletin of Symbolic Logic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of the Australian Mathematical Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 0)
Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Business and Human Rights J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Business Ethics Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.098, CiteScore: 2)
Business History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Cambridge Archaeological J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 136, SJR: 1.121, CiteScore: 1)
Cambridge Classical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Cambridge J. of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cambridge Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189, SJR: 0.213, CiteScore: 0)
Cambridge Opera J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Camden Fifth Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Entomologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.482, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.624, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Law & Jurisprudence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 0)
Canadian J. of Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.259, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Neurological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Political Science/Revue canadienne de science politique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Yearbook of Intl. Law / Annuaire canadien de droit international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology in the Young     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.372, CiteScore: 1)
Central European History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
Children Australia     Partially Free   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.255, CiteScore: 0)
China Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 2.289, CiteScore: 3)
Chinese J. of Agricultural Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Church History: Studies in Christianity and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69, SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Classical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 0)
Classical Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
CNS Spectrums     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.391, CiteScore: 3)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Combinatorics, Probability and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.839, CiteScore: 1)
Communications in Computational Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.048, CiteScore: 2)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 1)
Compositio Mathematica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 3.139, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary European History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Continuity and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.107, CiteScore: 0)
Dance Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 0)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.068, CiteScore: 4)
Dialogue Canadian Philosophical Review/Revue canadienne de philosophie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Diamond Light Source Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 1)
Early China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Early Music History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
East Asian J. on Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.418, CiteScore: 1)
Ecclesiastical Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Econometric Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.915, CiteScore: 1)
Economics and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.622, CiteScore: 1)
Edinburgh J. of Botany     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Eighteenth-Century Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
English Language and Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
English Profile J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
English Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Enterprise & Society : The Intl. J. of Business History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Environment and Development Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.617, CiteScore: 1)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 1.028, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Epidemiology & Infection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.128, CiteScore: 2)
Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.494, CiteScore: 2)
Episteme     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.756, CiteScore: 1)
Equine and Comparative Exercise Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ergodic Theory and Dynamical Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.193, CiteScore: 1)
Ethics & Intl. Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.557, CiteScore: 1)
European Constitutional Law Review (EuConst)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.009, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Applied Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.643, CiteScore: 1)
European Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.816, CiteScore: 2)
European Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Experimental Agriculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Expert Reviews in Molecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.647, CiteScore: 4)
Fetal and Maternal Medicine Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Financial History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Foreign Policy Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Forum of Mathematics, Pi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forum of Mathematics, Sigma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Genetics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.483, CiteScore: 1)
Geological Magazine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.966, CiteScore: 2)
Glasgow Mathematical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 0)
Global Constitutionalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Global Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Global Sustainability     Open Access  
Government and Opposition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.965, CiteScore: 2)
Greece & Rome     Partially Free   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Hague J. on the Rule of Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.271, CiteScore: 1)
Harvard Theological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68, SJR: 0.165, CiteScore: 0)
Health Economics, Policy and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.745, CiteScore: 1)
Hegel Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Power Laser Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.901, CiteScore: 3)
Historical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
History in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Horizons     Partially Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.916, CiteScore: 1)
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.97, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. & Comparative Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 222, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Astrobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Cultural Property     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.253, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Law in Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Legal Information     Open Access   (Followers: 310)
Intl. J. of Microwave and Wireless Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Middle East Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.714, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Tropical Insect Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Labor and Working-Class History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. Organization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 99, SJR: 8.527, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.048, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Review of Social History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.315, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Review of the Red Cross     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. Theory: A J. of Intl. Politics, Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.293, CiteScore: 2)
Iraq     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Irish Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
Irish J. of Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Israel Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.165, CiteScore: 0)
Itinerario     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
J. of African History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
J. of African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Agricultural and Applied Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
J. of American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.164, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Anglican Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Asian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Biosocial Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.48, CiteScore: 1)
J. of British Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Child Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.035, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Classics Teaching     Open Access  
J. of Dairy Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.573, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Demographic Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Diagnostic Radiography and Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of East Asian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.59, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Ecclesiastical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)

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Journal Cover
Development and Psychopathology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.068
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0954-5794 - ISSN (Online) 1469-2198
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [374 journals]
  • DPP volume 31 issue 1 Cover and Front matter
    • Authors: Lenneke R. A. Alink; Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579419000105
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • DPP volume 31 issue 1 Cover and Back matter
    • Authors: Lenneke R. A. Alink; Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579419000117
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • The effect of maltreatment experiences on maltreating and dysfunctional
           parenting: A search for mechanisms
    • Authors: Lenneke R. A. Alink; Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 1 - 7
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001517
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Maternal history of childhood maltreatment and later parenting behavior: A
           meta-analysis
    • Authors: Laura-Émilie Savage; George M. Tarabulsy, Jessica Pearson, Delphine Collin-Vézina, Lisa-Marie Gagné, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 9 - 21
      Abstract: Exposure to maltreatment during childhood (CM) can have deleterious effects throughout the life span of an individual. A parent's history of child maltreatment can also impact his or her own parenting behavior. Theoretically, parents who experienced maltreatment as children may have fewer resources to cope with the challenges of childrearing and may adopt more problematic parenting behaviors. However, empirical studies examining the association between CM and later parenting behavior have yielded mixed results. The aim of this study is to conduct a meta-analysis of studies that have examined the association between exposure to CM and the subsequent parenting outcomes of mothers of 0- to 6-year-old children. A secondary aim is to examine the potential impact of both conceptual and methodological moderators. A total of 32 studies (27 samples, 41 effect sizes, 17,932 participants) were retained for analysis. Results revealed that there is a small but statistically significant association between maternal exposure to CM and parenting behavior (r = –.13, p < .05). Moderator analyses revealed that effect sizes were larger when parenting measures involved relationship-based or negative, potentially abusive behaviors, when samples had a greater number of boys compared to girls, and when studies were older versus more recent. Results are discussed as they relate to the intergenerational transmission of maltreatment and abuse.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001542
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Testing the cycle of maltreatment hypothesis: Meta-analytic evidence of
           the intergenerational transmission of child maltreatment
    • Authors: Sheri Madigan; Chantal Cyr, Rachel Eirich, R. M. Pasco Fearon, Anh Ly, Christina Rash, Julia C. Poole, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 23 - 51
      Abstract: It has long been claimed that “maltreatment begets maltreatment,” that is, a parent's history of maltreatment increases the risk that his or her child will also suffer maltreatment. However, significant methodological concerns have been raised regarding evidence supporting this assertion, with some arguing that the association weakens in samples with higher methodological rigor. In the current study, the intergenerational transmission of maltreatment hypothesis is examined in 142 studies (149 samples; 227,918 dyads) that underwent a methodological quality review, as well as data extraction on a number of potential moderator variables. Results reveal a modest association of intergenerational maltreatment (k = 80; d = 0.45, 95% confidence interval; CI [0.37, 0.54]). Support for the intergenerational transmission of specific maltreatment types was also observed (neglect: k = 13, d = 0.24, 95% CI [0.11, 0.37]; physical abuse: k = 61, d = 0.41, 95% CI [0.33, 0.49]; emotional abuse: k = 18, d = 0.57, 95% CI [0.43, 0.71]; sexual abuse: k = 18, d = 0.39, 95% CI [0.24, 0.55]). Methodological quality only emerged as a significant moderator of the intergenerational transmission of physical abuse, with a weakening of effect sizes as methodological rigor increased. Evidence from this meta-analysis confirms the cycle of maltreatment hypothesis, although effect sizes were modest. Future research should focus on deepening understanding of mechanisms of transmission, as well as identifying protective factors that can effectively break the cycle of maltreatment.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001700
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • The reproduction of child maltreatment: An examination of adolescent
           problem behavior, substance use, and precocious transitions in the link
           between victimization and perpetration
    • Authors: Megan Bears Augustyn; Terence P. Thornberry, Kimberly L. Henry, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 53 - 71
      Abstract: Growing evidence suggests that maltreatment is reproduced across generations as victims of maltreatment are at an increased risk for maltreatment perpetration. Unfortunately, little information about mediating pathways exists to provide an explanation for why maltreatment begets maltreatment. We use the number of types of maltreatment experienced to predict later maltreatment perpetration and then examine two developmental pathways that may serve as bridges between maltreatment victimization and perpetration: adolescent problem behaviors and precocious transitions to adulthood. With prospective, longitudinal data from the Rochester Youth Development Study, we assess the relevance of these pathways for the number of maltreatment experiences as well as the number of maltreatment victimization experiences by developmental period (i.e., childhood and adolescence). Our results demonstrate a significant relationship between maltreatment victimization and maltreatment perpetration. Adolescent delinquency and two precocious transitions, dropping out of school and independent living, as well as the accumulation of precocious transitions and problem behaviors, serve as mediators of this intergenerational relationship. Furthermore, the relationship between the number of types of maltreatment and subsequent perpetration is primarily driven by experiences of maltreatment during adolescence. We discuss the implications of these results and set an agenda for the development of programs and policies to interrupt the cycle of maltreatment.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001633
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Intergenerational associations in physical maltreatment: Examination of
           mediation by delinquency and substance use, and moderated mediation by
           anger
    • Authors: Deborah M. Capaldi; Stacey S. Tiberio, Katherine C. Pears, David C. R. Kerr, Lee D. Owen, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 73 - 82
      Abstract: Findings as to whether individuals’ experiences of physical maltreatment from their parents in childhood predict their own perpetration of physical maltreatment toward their children in adulthood are mixed. Whether the maltreatment experienced is severe versus moderate or mild may relate to the strength of intergenerational associations. Furthermore, understanding of the roles of possible mediators (intervening mechanisms linking these behaviors) and moderators of the intervening mechanisms (factors associated with stronger or weaker mediated associations) is still relatively limited. These issues were examined in the present study. Mediating mechanisms based on a social learning model included antisocial behavior as assessed by criminal behaviors and substance use (alcohol and drug use), and the extent to which parental angry temperament moderated any indirect effects of antisocial behavior was also examined. To address these issues, data were used from Generations 2 and 3 of a prospective three-generational study, which is an extension of the Oregon Youth Study. Findings indicated modest intergenerational associations for severe physical maltreatment. There was a significant association of maltreatment history, particularly severe maltreatment with mothers’ and fathers’ delinquency. However, neither delinquency nor substance use showed significant mediational effects, and parental anger as a moderator of mediation did not reach significance.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001529
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Intimate partner violence as a mechanism underlying the intergenerational
           transmission of maltreatment among economically disadvantaged mothers and
           their adolescent daughters
    • Authors: Tangeria R. Adams; Elizabeth D. Handley, Jody Todd Manly, Dante Cicchetti, Sheree L. Toth, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 83 - 93
      Abstract: Child maltreatment represents a pervasive societal problem. Exposure to maltreatment is predictive of maladjustment across development with enduring negative effects found in adulthood. Compelling evidence suggests that some parents with a history of child abuse and neglect are at elevated risk for the maltreatment of their own children. However, a dearth of research currently exists on mediated mechanisms that may underlie this continuity. Ecological and transactional theories of child maltreatment propose that child maltreatment is multiply determined by various risk factors that exist across different ecological systems. Intimate partner violence (IPV) often co-occurs with child maltreatment and may represent a pathway through which risk for child abuse and neglect is transmitted across generations within a family. Informed by theories on the intergenerational transmission of child maltreatment and utilizing a community-based, cross-sectional sample of 245 racially and ethnically diverse, low-income mothers and daughters, the objective of this study was to investigate IPV as a propagating process through which risk of child abuse and neglect is conferred from parent to child. We found evidence suggesting that mothers’ history of maltreatment is associated with both their IPV involvement and their adolescent daughters’ maltreatment victimization (with exposure to IPV as a maltreatment subtype excluded for clarity). Maternal IPV also partially accounted for the continuity of maltreatment victimization from mother to adolescent. A secondary analysis that included the adolescent's own engagement in dating violence provided compelling but preliminary evidence of the emergence of a similar pattern of relational violence, whereby adolescent girls with maltreatment histories were likewise involved in abusive intimate relationships. Future directions and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001505
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Romantic functioning mediates prospective associations between childhood
           abuse and neglect and parenting outcomes in adulthood
    • Authors: Madelyn H. Labella; K. Lee Raby, Jodi Martin, Glenn I. Roisman, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 95 - 111
      Abstract: Research suggests intergenerational links between childhood abuse and neglect and subsequent parenting quality, but little is known about the potential mechanisms underlying intergenerational continuities in parenting. Adult romantic functioning may be one plausible mechanism, given its documented associations with both adverse caregiving in childhood and parenting quality in adulthood. The present study used data from the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaptation to (a) investigate prospective associations between childhood experiences of abuse and neglect and multiple parenting outcomes in adulthood, and (b) evaluate the degree to which adult romantic functioning mediates those associations. Information regarding childhood abuse and neglect was gathered prospectively from birth through age 17.5 years. Multimethod assessments of romantic functioning were collected repeatedly through early adulthood (ages 20 to 32 years), and parenting quality was assessed as participants assumed a parenting role (ages 21 to 38 years). As expected, childhood abuse and neglect experiences predicted less supportive parenting (observed and interview rated) and higher likelihood of self-reported Child Protective Services involvement. The association with interview-rated supportive parenting was partially mediated by lower romantic competence, whereas the association with Child Protective Services involvement was partially mediated by more relational violence in adult romantic relationships. Implications of these novel prospective findings for research and clinical intervention are discussed.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S095457941800158X
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Attachment state of mind and childhood experiences of maltreatment as
           predictors of sensitive care from infancy through middle childhood:
           Results from a longitudinal study of parents involved with Child
           Protective Services
    • Authors: Lindsay Zajac; K. Lee Raby, Mary Dozier, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 113 - 125
      Abstract: The current longitudinal study examined whether attachment states of mind and childhood maltreatment predict sensitive caregiving during infancy, early childhood, and middle childhood among a sample of 178 parents who were involved with Child Protective Services. Nearly all the parents had themselves experienced childhood maltreatment based on their reports on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire—Short Form (Bernstein et al., 2003) when their children were infants. Adult Attachment Interviews (George, Kaplan, & Main, 1985) were administered to parents when their children were infants (M = 10.92 months, SD = 8.66). Parental sensitivity was rated based on observations of parent–child interactions at three time points: infancy, early childhood, and middle childhood. During infancy, dismissing states of mind of parents predicted marginally lower sensitivity scores than autonomous states of mind. In early and middle childhood, dismissing states of mind of parents predicted significantly lower sensitivity ratings than autonomous states of mind. Unresolved states of mind of parents predicted significantly lower sensitivity scores than autonomous states of mind only during early childhood. Childhood maltreatment was not significantly associated with parents’ sensitivity ratings at all three time points. Findings suggest that among parents with Child Protective Services involvement, most of whom had themselves experienced maltreatment, parents’ unresolved states of mind predict insensitive caregiving in early childhood, and parents’ dismissing states of mind predict insensitive caregiving from infancy through middle childhood.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001554
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • The impact of childhood trauma and psychophysiological reactivity on
           at-risk women's adjustment to parenthood
    • Authors: Mirjam Oosterman; Carlo Schuengel, Mirte L. Forrer, Marleen H. M. De Moor, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 127 - 141
      Abstract: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have an impact on women's adaptation to parenthood, but mechanisms are poorly understood. Autonomic nervous system reactivity was tested as a potential mediating mechanism in a sample of 193 at-risk primiparous women. ACEs were measured retrospectively during pregnancy. A baby cry-response task was administered during pregnancy while indicators of sympathetic reactivity (pre-ejection period; PEP) and parasympathetic reactivity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia; RSA) were recorded. Parenting self-efficacy, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were measured during pregnancy and 1 year after giving birth. Harsh discipline was measured 2 years after giving birth. Structural equation modeling was employed to test whether baseline PEP and RSA and reactivity mediated links between ACEs and postnatal outcomes, adjusted for prenatal variables. High ACEs predicted less RSA reactivity (p = .02), which subsequently predicted increases in depressive symptoms (p = .03). The indirect effect was not significant (p = .06). There was no indirect link between high ACEs and harsh parenting through PEP nor RSA (n = 98). The parasympathetic nervous system may be involved in negative affective responses in the transition to parenthood among women exposed to childhood trauma.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001591
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Maternal depression in the intergenerational transmission of childhood
           maltreatment and its sequelae: Testing postpartum effects in a
           longitudinal birth cohort
    • Authors: Karmel W. Choi; Renate Houts, Louise Arseneault, Carmine Pariante, Kathleen J. Sikkema, Terrie E. Moffitt, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 143 - 156
      Abstract: Mothers who have experienced childhood maltreatment are more likely to have children also exposed to maltreatment, a phenomenon known as intergenerational transmission. Factors in the perinatal period may contribute uniquely to this transmission, but timing effects have not been ascertained. Using structural equation modeling with 1,016 mothers and their 2,032 children in the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, we tested the mediating role of postpartum depression between maternal childhood maltreatment and a cascade of negative child outcomes, specifically child exposure to maltreatment, internalizing symptoms, and externalizing symptoms: (a) adjusting for later maternal depression, (b) comparing across sex differences, and (c) examining the relative role of maltreatment subtypes. Mothers who had been maltreated as children, especially those who had experienced emotional or sexual abuse, were at increased risk for postpartum depression. In turn, postpartum depression predicted children’s exposure to maltreatment, followed by emotional and behavioral problems. Indirect effects from maternal childhood maltreatment to child outcomes were robust across child sex and supported significant mediation through postpartum depression; however, this appeared to be carried by mothers’ depression beyond the postpartum period. Identifying and treating postpartum depression, and preventing its recurrence, may help interrupt the intergenerational transmission of maltreatment and its sequelae.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418000032
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • The genetic and environmental etiology of child maltreatment in a
           parent-based extended family design
    • Authors: Katharina Pittner; Marinus H. van Ijzendoorn, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Renate S. M. Buisman, Laura H. C. G. C. Compier-de Block, Lisa J. M. van den Berg, Bernet M. Elzinga, Jolanda Lindenberg, Marieke S. Tollenaar, Vincent P. Diego, Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 157 - 172
      Abstract: Child maltreatment has been associated with various cumulative risk factors. However, little is known about the extent to which genetic and environmental factors contribute to individual differences between parents in perpetrating child maltreatment. To estimate the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to perpetrating maltreatment we used a parent-based extended family design. Child-reported perpetrated maltreatment was available for 556 parents (283 women) from 63 families. To explore reporter effects (i.e., child perspective on maltreatment), child reports were compared to multi-informant reports. Based on polygenic model analyses, most of the variance related to the perpetration of physical abuse and emotional neglect was explained by common environmental factors (physical abuse: c2 = 59%, SE = 12%, p = .006; emotional neglect: c2 = 47%, SE = 8%, p < .001) whereas genetic factors did not significantly contribute to the model. For perpetrated emotional abuse, in contrast, genetic factors did significantly contribute to perpetrated emotional abuse (h2 = 33%, SE = 8%, p < .001), whereas common environment factors did not. Multi-informant reports led to similar estimates of genetic and common environmental effects on all measures except for emotional abuse, where a multi-informant approach yielded higher estimates of the common environmental effects. Overall, estimates of unique environment, including measurement error, were lower using multi-informant reports. In conclusion, our findings suggest that genetic pathways play a significant role in perpetrating emotional abuse, while physical abuse and emotional neglect are transmitted primarily through common environmental factors. These findings imply that interventions may need to target different mechanisms dependings on maltreatment type.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001608
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Protective factors that buffer against the intergenerational transmission
           of trauma from mothers to young children: A replication study of angels in
           the nursery
    • Authors: Angela J. Narayan; Chandra Ghosh Ippen, William W. Harris, Alicia F. Lieberman, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 173 - 187
      Abstract: This replication study examined protective effects of positive childhood memories with caregivers (“angels in the nursery”) against lifespan and intergenerational transmission of trauma. More positive, elaborated angel memories were hypothesized to buffer associations between mothers’ childhood maltreatment and their adulthood posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms, comorbid psychopathology, and children's trauma exposure. Participants were 185 mothers (M age = 30.67 years, SD = 6.44, range = 17–46 years, 54.6% Latina, 17.8% White, 10.3% African American, 17.3% other; 24% Spanish speaking) and children (M age = 42.51 months; SD = 15.95, range = 3–72 months; 51.4% male). Mothers completed the Angels in the Nursery Interview (Van Horn, Lieberman, & Harris, 2008), and assessments of childhood maltreatment, adulthood psychopathology, children's trauma exposure, and demographics. Angel memories significantly moderated associations between maltreatment and PTSD (but not depression) symptoms, comorbid psychopathology, and children's trauma exposure. For mothers with less positive, elaborated angel memories, higher levels of maltreatment predicted higher levels of psychopathology and children's trauma exposure. For mothers with more positive, elaborated memories, however, predictive associations were not significant, reflecting protective effects. Furthermore, protective effects against children's trauma exposure were significant only for female children, suggesting that angel memories may specifically buffer against intergenerational trauma from mothers to daughters.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001530
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Intergenerational continuity/discontinuity of child maltreatment among
           low-income mother–child dyads: The roles of childhood maltreatment
           characteristics, maternal psychological functioning, and family ecology
    • Authors: Diane St-Laurent; Karine Dubois-Comtois, Tristan Milot, Michael Cantinotti, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 189 - 202
      Abstract: Despite evidence of some intergenerational continuity of maltreatment, a notable proportion of parents maltreated in childhood do not perpetuate the cycle of maltreatment. The aim of this study was to identify factors that would distinguish mother–child dyads where intergenerational continuity was present from dyads characterized by intergenerational discontinuity. The sample included 193 children and their mothers, drawn from two populations: 74 maltreated children recruited through Child Protection Services and 119 nonmaltreated children recruited among low-income families. Factors investigated included maternal childhood maltreatment, psychological functioning, and family ecology. Compared to maltreated mothers who broke the cycle of maltreatment, those who perpetuated the cycle were more likely to have experienced childhood physical neglect and multitype maltreatment, and to experience sociodemographic risk, intimate partner violence, and lack of family support. Compared to nonmaltreated mothers who maintained a nonmaltreating child-rearing environment: (a) maltreated mothers who broke the cycle were more likely to experience residential instability and lack of family support, and (b) nonmaltreated mothers whose child was maltreated were more likely to experience sociodemographic risk and lack of family support. Maternal psychological functioning did not discriminate maltreatment groups. Lending empirical support to a diathesis-stress model of poor parenting, these findings suggest that family-ecology related stress, but not maternal psychological difficulties, may create additional burden that will precipitate the risk of maltreatment intergenerational continuity.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S095457941800161X
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Randomized control trial report on the effectiveness of Group
           Attachment-Based Intervention (GABI©): Improvements in the parent–child
           relationship not seen in the control group
    • Authors: Howard Steele; Anne Murphy, Karen Bonuck, Paul Meissner, Miriam Steele, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 203 - 217
      Abstract: This paper reports on a randomized control trial involving children less than 3 years old and their mothers who were regarded at risk of maltreating their children by referral agencies. Mothers’ risk status derived from a heavy trauma burden (average exposure over the first 18 years of their lives to 10 possible adverse childhood experiences [ACEs] was >5), mental health challenges (15%–28% had experienced a prior psychiatric hospitalization), and prior removal of a child to foster care (20%). Mothers were randomly assigned to either a widely used parenting class known as Systematic Training for Effective Parenting (STEP) or the Group Attachment-Based Intervention (GABI), a multifamily 26-week treatment. The resulting mother–child pairs available for consideration in this baseline versus end-of-treatment report were 35 families in the STEP arm and 43 families in the GABI arm. The focus of this paper is the outcome measure of observed parent–child relationship assessed with the Coding of Interactive Behavior (Feldman, 1998) collected at baseline and end of treatment. In comparison to STEP, results indicated that GABI was linked to significant improvements in maternal supportive presence and dyadic reciprocity, and significant declines in maternal hostility and dyadic constriction (proxies for risk of child maltreatment). These medium-to large-sized effects remained significant even after controlling for mothers’ prior ACEs in analysis of covariance procedures. In addition, two small interaction effects of ACEs by treatment type were found, underlining the need for, and value of, treatments that are sensitive to parents’ traumatic histories.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001621
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Children of parents with a history of depression: The impact of a
           preventive intervention on youth social problems through reductions in
           internalizing problems
    • Authors: Nicole Lafko Breslend; Justin Parent, Rex Forehand, Virginia Peisch, Bruce E. Compas, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 219 - 231
      Abstract: The current investigation examined if changes in youth internalizing problems as a result of a family group cognitive behavioral (FGCB) preventive intervention for families with a parent with a history of depression had a cascade effect on youth social problems over 24 months and the bidirectional nature of these effects. One hundred eighty families with a parent with a history of major depressive disorder (M age = 41.96; 88.9% mothers) and a youth age 9 to 15 years (49.4% females; M age = 11.46) participated. Findings from a panel model indicated that, compared to a minimum intervention condition, the FGCB intervention significantly reduced youth internalizing problems at 12 months that in turn were associated with lower levels of social problems at 18 months. Similarly, the FGCB intervention reduced internalizing problems at 18 months, which were associated with fewer social problems at 24 months. Changes in social problems were not related to reductions in subsequent internalizing problems. The findings suggest that reductions in youth internalizing problems can lead to lower levels of social problems. Youth social problems are difficult to change; therefore, targeting internalizing problems may be an effective way to reduce the social problems of children of parents with a history of depression.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001821
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Intergenerational transmission of violence: The mediating role of
           adolescent psychopathology symptoms
    • Authors: Sabina Low; Stacey S. Tiberio, Joann Wu Shortt, Carrie Mulford, J. Mark Eddy, Deborah M. Capaldi, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 233 - 245
      Abstract: Evidence on the intergenerational continuity of intimate partner violence (IPV) suggests small to moderate associations between childhood exposure and young adult IPV involvement, suggesting an indirect effects model. Yet, few prospective studies have formally tested meditational mechanisms. The current study tested a prospective (over 9 years) moderated-mediational model in which adolescent psychopathology symptoms (i.e., internalizing, externalizing, and combined) mediated the association between exposure to IPV in middle childhood and young adult IPV perpetration. In a more novel contribution, we controlled for proximal young adult partner and relationship characteristics. The sample consisted of n = 205 participants, who were, on average, assessed for exposure to parent IPV at age 12.30 years, adolescent psychopathology symptoms at age 15.77 years, and young adult IPV at 21.30 years of age. Data suggest a small, significant direct path from IPV exposure to young adult perpetration, mediated only through adolescent externalizing. Gender moderation analyses reveal differences in sensitivity to exposure across developmental periods; for males, effects of exposure were intensified during the transition to adolescence, whereas for females, effects were amplified during the transition to adulthood. In both cases, the mediational role of psychopathology symptoms was no longer significant once partner antisocial behavior was modeled. Findings have important implications for both theory and timing of risk conveyance.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001833
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Nurturant-involved parenting and adolescent substance use: Examining an
           internalizing pathway through adolescent social anxiety symptoms and
           substance refusal efficacy
    • Authors: Bridget B. Weymouth; Gregory M. Fosco, Mark E. Feinberg, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 247 - 260
      Abstract: Research has clearly established the important role of parents in preventing substance use among early adolescents. Much of this work has focused on deviance (e.g., antisocial behavior, delinquency, and oppositional behavior) as a central pathway linking parenting behaviors and early adolescent substance use. This study proposed an alternative pathway; using a four-wave longitudinal design, we examined whether nurturant-involved parenting (Fall sixth grade) was inversely associated with adolescent drunkenness, marijuana use, and cigarette use (eighth grade) through social anxiety symptoms (Spring sixth grade) and subsequent decreases in substance refusal efficacy (seventh grade). Nurturant-involved parenting is characterized by warmth, supportiveness, low hostility, and low rejection. Analyses were conducted with a sample of 687 two-parent families. Results indicated that adolescents who were in families where fathers exhibited lower levels of nurturant-involved parenting experienced subsequent increases in social anxiety symptoms and decreased efficacy to refuse substances, which in turn was related to more frequent drunkenness, cigarette use, and marijuana use. Indirect effects are discussed. Findings were not substantiated for mothers’ parenting. Adolescent gender did not moderate associations. The results highlight an additional pathway through which parenting influences youth substance use and links social anxiety symptoms to reduced substance refusal efficacy.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001766
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Refining the assessment of disrupted maternal communication: Using item
           response models to identify central indicators of disrupted behavior
    • Authors: John D. Haltigan; Sheri Madigan, Elisa Bronfman, Heidi N. Bailey, Catherine Borland-Kerr, Roger Mills-Koonce, Karlen Lyons-Ruth, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 261 - 277
      Abstract: The Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE; Bronfman, Madigan, & Lyons-Ruth, 2009–2014; Bronfman, Parsons, & Lyons-Ruth, 1992–2004) is a widely used and well-validated measure for assessing disrupted forms of caregiver responsiveness within parent–child interactions. However, it requires evaluating approximately 150 behavioral items from videotape and extensive training to code, thus making its use impractical in most clinical contexts. Accordingly, the primary aim of the current study was to identify a reduced set of behavioral indicators most central to the AMBIANCE coding system using latent-trait item response theory (IRT) models. Observed mother–infant interaction data previously coded with the AMBIANCE was pooled from laboratories in both North America and Europe (N = 343). Using 2-parameter logistic IRT models, a reduced set of 45 AMBIANCE items was identified. Preliminary convergent and discriminant validity was evaluated in relation to classifications of maternal disrupted communication assigned using the full set of AMBIANCE indicators, to infant attachment disorganization, and to maternal sensitivity. The results supported the construct validity of the refined item set, opening the way for development of a brief screening measure for disrupted maternal communication. IRT models in clinical scale refinement and their potential for bridging clinical and research objectives in developmental psychopathology are discussed.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001778
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Sequences of maladaptation: Preadolescent self-regulation, adolescent
           negative social interactions, and young adult psychopathology
    • Authors: Odilia M. Laceulle; René Veenstra, Wilma A. M. Vollebergh, Johan Ormel, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 279 - 292
      Abstract: This study aims to test whether adolescent negative social interactions mediate the relation between early adolescent self-regulatory capacities and young adult psychopathology, using a fully prospective mediation model. Data were derived from the Tracking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey, a large population cohort of Dutch adolescents (n = 962). At age 11, three indicators of self-regulation were assessed: low frustration, high effortful control, and high response inhibition. Negative social interactions between ages 11 and 22 were captured twice using the Event History Calendar. Psychopathology (i.e., internalizing and externalizing problems) was assessed at ages 11 and 22. Findings indicate that adolescents’ frustration and effortful control but not response inhibition assessed at age 11 are related to both internalizing and externalizing problems at age 22, after controlling for psychopathology at age 11, sex, and socioeconomic status. These associations were partly (about 22%) mediated by the negative social interactions adolescents experienced. Effect sizes were all modest. This study shows that self-regulation is related to subsequent psychopathology in part through its effect on negative social interactions, providing evidence for sequences of self-regulatory capacities, life experiences, and developmental outcomes.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001808
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Gene × Environment contributions to autonomic stress reactivity in
           youth
    • Authors: Andrea G. Allegrini; Brittany E. Evans, Susanne de Rooij, Kirstin Greaves-Lord, Anja C. Huizink, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 293 - 307
      Abstract: Dysregulated physiological stress reactivity has been suggested to impact the development of children and adolescents with important health consequences throughout the life span. Both environmental adversity and genetic predispositions can lead to physiological imbalances in stress systems, which in turn lead to developmental differences. We investigated genetic and environmental contributions to autonomic nervous system reactivity to a psychosocial stressor. Furthermore, we tested whether these effects were consistent with the differential susceptibility framework. Composite measures of adverse life events combined with socioeconomic status were constructed. Effects of these adversity scores in interaction with a polygenic score summarizing six genetic variants, which were hypothesized to work as susceptibility factors, were tested on autonomic nervous system measures as indexed by heart rate and heart rate variability. Results showed that carriers of more genetic variants and exposed to high adversity manifested enhanced heart rate variability reactivity to a psychosocial stressor compared to carriers of fewer genetic variants. Conversely, the stress procedure elicited a more moderate response in these individuals compared to carriers of fewer variants when adversity was low.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S095457941700181X
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • How children's anxiety symptoms impact the functioning of the
           hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis over time: A cross-lagged panel
           approach using hierarchical linear modeling
    • Authors: Denise Ma; Lisa A. Serbin, Dale M. Stack, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 309 - 323
      Abstract: Anxiety symptoms in childhood and adolescence can have a long-term negative impact on mental and physical health. Although studies have shown dysregulation of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis is associated with anxiety disorders, it is unclear how and in what direction children's experiences of anxiety symptoms, which include physiological and cognitive–emotional dimensions, impact the functioning of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis over time. We hypothesized that higher physiological symptoms would be contemporaneously associated with hypercortisolism, whereas cognitive–emotional symptoms would be more chronic, reflecting traitlike stability, and would predict hypocortisolism over time. One hundred twenty children from the Concordia Longitudinal Risk Research Project were followed in successive data collection waves approximately 3 years apart from childhood through midadolescence. Between ages 10–12 and 13–15, children completed self-report questionnaires of anxiety symptoms and provided salivary cortisol samples at 2-hr intervals over 2 consecutive days. The results from hierarchical linear modeling showed that higher physiological symptoms were concurrently associated with hypercortisolism, involving cortisol levels that remained elevated over the day. In contrast, longitudinal results over the 3 years between data collection waves showed that chronic worry and social concerns predicted hypocortisolism, showing a low and blunted diurnal cortisol profile. These results have implications for broadening our understanding of the links between anxiety, the stress response system, and health across the course of development.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001870
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Child neglect and its relation to emotional and behavioral problems: A
           cross-sectional study of primary school-aged children in Tanzania
    • Authors: Tobias Hecker; Victoria S. Boettcher, Markus A. Landolt, Katharin Hermenau, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 325 - 339
      Abstract: Child maltreatment is known to engender negative emotional and behavioral consequences. Although neglect is the most frequent form of maltreatment, it has thus far only received little attention, especially when looking at low-resource countries. The current study investigated possible associations between neglect and internalizing and externalizing problems. As neglect and abuse often co-occur, the latter was controlled for. In total, 409 Tanzanian primary school students (52% boys, M = 10.5 years, range = 6–15) participated in the cross-sectional study. Structured clinical interviews were conducted assessing maltreatment, internalizing problems, and externalizing problems. Overall, 31% (n = 128) of the children reported at least one type of physical neglect and 31% (n = 127) of emotional neglect. Using structural equation modeling, we found a significant association between neglect and internalizing (β = 0.59, p < .01) and externalizing problems (β = 0.35, p < .05). However, these associations could only be detected in younger children (ages 6–9), whereas in older children (ages 10–15), mental health problems were significantly related to violence and abuse. Our findings suggest that the current age may influence the association between maltreatment type and the development of internalizing and/or externalizing problems.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001882
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Parsing profiles of temperamental reactivity and differential routes to
           delay of gratification: A person-based approach
    • Authors: Jennifer H. Suor; Melissa L. Sturge-Apple, Hannah R. Jones-Gordils, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 341 - 360
      Abstract: Informed by a developmental psychopathology perspective, the present study applied a person-based approach to examine whether associations between early sociocontextual experiences (e.g., socioeconomic factors and maternal discipline practices) and preschool-age children's delay of gratification vary across profiles of children's temperamental reactivity. In addition, the study examined the direct and mediating role of children's set shifting in associations with delay of gratification within each profile. The sample consisted of 160 socioeconomically and ethnically diverse mothers and their 5-year-old children drawn from a longitudinal study of mother–child relationships. Latent profile analyses identified three profiles of temperamental reactivity distinguished by sensitivity to reward and punishment and negative affectivity. Multigroup analysis revealed maternal sensitive discipline (observed during a parent–child compliance task) at age 3.5 predicted longer delay of gratification at age 5 in the punishment reactivity/negative affectivity group. Maternal inductive reasoning discipline at age 3.5 predicted longer delay in the low temperamental reactivity group. For children with the reward reactivity/negative affectivity profile, higher family income at age 3.5 predicted longer delay of gratification at age 5, which was mediated by children's set shifting. Findings underscore the utility of person-based approaches for delineating differential developmental routes toward children's delay of gratification.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001894
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • MAOA)+and+childhood+maltreatment+as+a+predictor+of+personality+pathology+in+females:+Emotional+reactivity+as+a+potential+mediating+mechanism&rft.title=Development+and+Psychopathology&rft.issn=0954-5794&rft.date=2019&rft.volume=31&rft.spage=361&rft.epage=377&rft.aulast=Byrd&rft.aufirst=Amy&rft.au=Amy+L.+Byrd&rft.au=Stephen+B.+Manuck,+Samuel+W.+Hawes,+Tayler+J.+Vebares,+Vishwajit+Nimgaonkar,+Kodavali+V.+Chowdari,+Alison+E.+Hipwell,+Kate+Keenan,+Stephanie+D.+Stepp,+Lenneke+R.+A.+Alink,+Chantal+Cyr,+Sheri+Madigan&rft_id=info:doi/10.1017/S0954579417001900">The interaction between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and childhood
           maltreatment as a predictor of personality pathology in females: Emotional
           reactivity as a potential mediating mechanism
    • Authors: Amy L. Byrd; Stephen B. Manuck, Samuel W. Hawes, Tayler J. Vebares, Vishwajit Nimgaonkar, Kodavali V. Chowdari, Alison E. Hipwell, Kate Keenan, Stephanie D. Stepp, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 361 - 377
      Abstract: Research consistently demonstrates that common polymorphic variation in monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) moderates the influence of childhood maltreatment on later antisocial behavior, with growing evidence that the “risk” allele (high vs. low activity) differs for females. However, little is known about how this Gene × Environment interaction functions to increase risk, or if this risk pathway is specific to antisocial behavior. Using a prospectively assessed, longitudinal sample of females (n = 2,004), we examined whether changes in emotional reactivity (ER) during adolescence mediated associations between this Gene × Environment and antisocial personality disorder in early adulthood. In addition, we assessed whether this putative risk pathway also conferred risk for borderline personality disorder, a related disorder characterized by high ER. While direct associations between early maltreatment and later personality pathology did not vary by genotype, there was a significant difference in the indirect path via ER during adolescence. Consistent with hypotheses, females with high-activity MAOA genotype who experienced early maltreatment had greater increases in ER during adolescence, and higher levels of ER predicted both antisocial personality disorder and borderline personality disorder symptom severity. Taken together, findings suggest that the interaction between MAOA and early maltreatment places women at risk for a broader range of personality pathology via effects on ER.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001900
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Core beliefs in healthy youth and youth at ultra high-risk for psychosis:
           Dimensionality and links to depression, anxiety, and attenuated psychotic
           symptoms
    • Authors: Henry R. Cowan; Dan P. McAdams, Vijay A. Mittal, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 379 - 392
      Abstract: Cognitive theory posits that core beliefs play an active role in developing and maintaining symptoms of depression, anxiety, and psychosis. This study sought to comprehensively examine core beliefs, their dimensionality, and their relationships to depression, anxiety, and attenuated psychotic symptoms in two groups of community youth: a group at ultrahigh risk for psychosis (UHR; n = 73, M age = 18.7) and a matched healthy comparison group (HC; n = 73, M age = 18.1). UHR youth reported significantly more negative beliefs about self and others, and significantly less positive beliefs about self and others. HC youth rarely endorsed negative self-beliefs. Exploratory factor analyses found that HC negative self-beliefs did not cohere as a single factor. We hypothesized specific links between core beliefs and symptoms based on cognitive models of each disorder, and tested these links through regression analyses. The results in the HC group were consistent with the proposed models of depression and anxiety. The results in the UHR group were consistent with proposed models of depression and negative psychotic symptoms, somewhat consistent with a proposed model of positive psychotic symptoms, and not at all consistent with a proposed model of anxiety. These findings add to a growing developmental literature on core beliefs and psychopathology, with important clinical implications.
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579417001912
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • MAOA)+and+childhood+maltreatment+as+a+predictor+of+personality+pathology+in+females:+Emotional+reactivity+as+a+potential+mediating+mechanism+–+ERRATUM&rft.title=Development+and+Psychopathology&rft.issn=0954-5794&rft.date=2019&rft.volume=31&rft.spage=393&rft.epage=393&rft.aulast=Byrd&rft.aufirst=Amy&rft.au=Amy+L.+Byrd&rft.au=Stephen+B.+Manuck,+Samuel+W.+Hawes,+Tayler+J.+Vebares,+Vishwajit+Nimgaonkar,+Kodavali+V.+Chowdari,+Alison+E.+Hipwell,+Kate+Keenan,+Stephanie+D.+Stepp,+Lenneke+R.+A.+Alink,+Chantal+Cyr,+Sheri+Madigan&rft_id=info:doi/10.1017/S0954579418000238">The interaction between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and childhood
           maltreatment as a predictor of personality pathology in females: Emotional
           reactivity as a potential mediating mechanism – ERRATUM
    • Authors: Amy L. Byrd; Stephen B. Manuck, Samuel W. Hawes, Tayler J. Vebares, Vishwajit Nimgaonkar, Kodavali V. Chowdari, Alison E. Hipwell, Kate Keenan, Stephanie D. Stepp, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 393 - 393
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418000238
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Prenatal stress and the developing brain: Risks for neurodevelopmental
           disorders — ERRATUM
    • Authors: Bea R. H. Van den Bergh; Robert Dahnke, Maarten Mennes, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 395 - 395
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001402
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Testosterone–cortisol dissociation in children exposed to prenatal
           maternal stress, and relationship with aggression: Project Ice Storm —
           ADDENDUM
    • Authors: Tuong-Vi Nguyen; Sherri L. Jones, Guillaume Elgbeili, Patricia Monnier, Chunbo Yu, David P. Laplante, Suzanne King, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Chantal Cyr, Sheri Madigan
      Pages: 397 - 397
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0954579418001414
      Issue No: Vol. 31, No. 1 (2019)
       
 
 
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