American Journal of Public Health Research
   [12 followers]  Follow    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
     ISSN (Print) 2327-669X - ISSN (Online) 2327-6703
     Published by Science and Education Publishing Homepage  [19 journals]
  • User-Fees in Health Services: Assessing how it Impacts on Access,
           Utilization and Quality of Care in a Tertiary Health Facility in Delta
           State, Nigeria

    • Authors: Ejughemre Ufuoma John; Ivrogbo Stanley
      Pages: 119 - 124
      Abstract: Objective: To assess how user-fees policy impacts on clienteles’ access to care, willingness to utilize health services and their satisfaction with the quality of healthcare, having to pay at the point of service in a tertiary health facility. Method: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. The instrument was a pre-tested, semi-structured self administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics as well as chi-square test and regression analysis were done to show statistically significant associations. Results: The findings reveal different modes money was made available for payment for health services. On the whole, about 98% of payment were through ‘formal’ out-of pocket spending (user-fees) with most respondents having to source for funds from own money. It was shown that user-fees increases ‘rational’ demand for services and at the same time decreasing the willingness to seek such level of care. However, it is associated with better quality service delivery. Conclusion: The findings from this study has brought to the fore that user-fee policy is an effective mechanism for achieving desired health outcomes in tertiary care. However, there remain the problems of inequities in tertiary healthcare coverage. The evidence so far suggests that user fees alone will not accomplish the sustainability objectives in health financing in the country. This suggests that charges levied for tertiary health services should therefore be linked to the broader package of financing through health insurance coverage.
      PubDate: 2014-06-15
      Issue No: Vol. 2, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Providers’ Knowledge of the Guidelines for Intermittent Preventive
           Treatment for Malaria in Pregnancy: Evidence from Bungoma East District,
           Kenya

    • Authors: Angela Chepkemoi Ng’etich-Mutulei; Tom Odhiambo
      Pages: 125 - 135
      Abstract: Introduction: Intermittent Preventive Treatment for malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine is a key intervention for malaria prevention. Providers’ knowledge of IPTp guidelines is crucial for effective services and achievement of the Roll Back Malaria target. This study assessed providers’ knowledge of the IPTp guidelines, with a view to contributing towards policy deliberations aimed at improving providers’ knowledge and service quality. Methods: We sourced primary data from 34 providers working in public health facilities, including the district and sub-district hospitals, health centres, and dispensaries. The test items included definition of IPTp; timing of the first IPTp dose; whether women on cotrimoxazole should be given IPTp; as well as whether IPTp can be given with folic acid, among others. Quantitative analysis techniques included frequency distributions and cross-tabulations with Chi Square statistic. Findings: Only one-third (29.4%) of the participants provided correct responses to all the ten test items; hence, were considered to be ‘knowledgeable’ about the guidelines. About 56% of the providers had accessed some training on IPTp, while a significant variation in IPTp knowledge emerged between trained and untrained providers. The study also found significant variation in providers’ knowledge of most guidelines across the cadres as well as across health facility tiers. Interpretation: The failure of about 71% of the providers to state correct responses to all the test items suggests that providers’ knowledge of the guidelines remains low. Trained providers were likely to be more knowledgeable than their untrained counterparts were; clinical officers were likely to be more knowledgeable than community health workers were, while providers at the district hospital were likely to be more knowledgeable than providers at the dispensaries were. The study recommends the need to scale-up in-service training; package and disseminate the guidelines in portable materials; and prioritize training opportunities for lower cadres and providers in lower tier facilities.
      PubDate: 2014-06-18
      Issue No: Vol. 2, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Health Inequity at The Local Level: Theoretical Aspects and The Experience
           of Stavropol

    • Authors: Karen Amlaev
      Pages: 136 - 146
      Abstract: 1. The article describes the state of the problem of inequality in health in the world. The main causes of increasing inequality in health. The authors refer to them economic differentiation of society, the transition from health to the health of clinical medicine, unequal access to health services. Analyzed the influence of socio-economic determinants that shape inequality in health. As the most important factors are considered poverty, ecological trouble, lack of education. Shown that lifestyle residents largely confined to socio economic factors that do not depend directly on the person. 2. This article discusses the concept of adherence and compliance of patients. We describe the pharmacological, clinical, and physical methods for assessing adherence. Factors affecting patient compliance, which include sex and age; characterological features of the patient, low education, level of will power, lack of education and intelligence, characteristics of the disease, the correct choice of the drug: it is fast enough and good efficacy and good tolerability; treatment regimen, the presence of drugs prescribed by your doctor pharmacies. 3. The article describes the situation with health literacy. The article describes the state of the problem of inequality in health in the world. The main causes of increasing inequality in health. The authors refer to them economic differentiation of society, the transition from health to the health of clinical medicine, unequal access to health services. Analyzed the influence of socio-economic determinants that shape inequality in health. As the most important factors are considered poverty, ecological trouble, lack of education. Shown that lifestyle residents largely confined to socio economic factors that do not depend directly on the person. The facts of correlation of health literacy to self-assessment of their own health, with personal income, economic growth, empowerment of women, life expectancy were presented. A review of effective European strategies for improving health literacy was done.
      PubDate: 2014-06-22
      Issue No: Vol. 2, No. 4 (2014)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014