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Publisher: Indian Council of Agricultural Research   (Total: 6 journals)

Fishery Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Horticulture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Indian J. of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.271, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.246, h-index: 3)
Indian Phytopathology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Phytopathology
   [4 followers]  Follow    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
     ISSN (Print) 0367-973X - ISSN (Online) 2248-9800
     Published by Indian Council of Agricultural Research Homepage  [6 journals]
  • Brown spot of rice: an overview

    • Authors: S. SUNDER; RAM SINGH* RASHMI AGARWAL
      Abstract: Brown spot of rice caused by Drechslera oryzae (Syn=Biplolaris oryzae) is of worldwide occurrence and known to cause substantial quantitative and qualitative losses in grain yield. The disease is of particular significance under low input management, water stress and direct seeding conditions. The disease is of historical importance in the country. The pathogen has wide host range and exhibits pathogenic and molecular variability. With availability of full genome sequence of its teleomorph, cochliobolus miyabeanus and other Cochliobolus species, comparative genome analysis can led to better understanding of host pathogen interaction and disease management. In this article all these an aspects are discussed.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Molecular validation for blast and sheath blight resistance in improved
           rice genotypes and landraces

    • Authors: A.K. DUBEY; R.T.P. PANDIAN, H. RAJASEKARA, A. KHANNA, R.K. ELLUR, P. SHARMA, A. KUMAR, A.K. SINGH, S. GOPALAKRISHNAN, R. RATHOUR U.D. SINGH*
      Abstract: Globally, two major fungal diseases viz., blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae and Sheath blight incited by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn of rice occurs in most of the rice-ecosystem resulting in significant yield losses. Host plant resistance is the most eco-friendly management option for combating biotic stresses. In the present study, a set of one hundred rice genotypes were evaluated for blast as well as sheath blight resistance. Twenty seven genotypes were identified to be resistant against M. oryzae isolate (Mo-ni-0066). These genotypes were subjected to molecular validation using the markers linked to major R-genes, viz., Piz5, Pi9, Pita, Pi54, Pi1 and Pib. Individually none of the entries could be observed to possess all these R-genes. However, some of the resistant genotypes were found to possess one or more R-genes. But, evaluation of these genotypes with highly virulent M. oryzae Karnataka isolate (Mo-si-mnd) revealed that only two genotypes viz., Bhusan San and P1490-03 were resistant to blast. Interestingly, molecular validation of these two genotypes did not show any of the above resistance genes, indicating the possible role of some other R-gene/s. The same set of one hundred rice genotypes were screened for sheath blight resistance, none of the rice genotypes were resistant. However, four genotypes were observed to possess high degree of tolerance to sheath blight and were assessed for the major sheath blight quantitative trait loci qSBR11-1.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Morphological and molecular characterization of Ustilaginoidea virens
           isolates causing false smut of rice in India

    • Authors: MATHEW S. BAITE*; R.K. SHARMA, T. PRAMEELA DEVI, PRATIBHA SHARMA DEEBA KAMIL
      Abstract: Different isolates of Ustilaginoidea virens showed variation in the size, colour and shape of the conidia, length of spines and width of the hyphae. The conidia were globose, irregularly round to elliptical and warty on the surface with diameters ranging from 4.20 to 6.54 µm. The scanning electron microscopy revealed that the conidial wall was echinulated and ornamented with prominent spines. The spines were pointed at the apex or irregularly curved and ranged from 359.9–994.5 nm long. Based on colony characters isolates of U. virens were grouped into three groups.  The maximum colony diameter was observed in isolate UV3 (40 mm) while minimum was in UV7 (25 mm). The width of the hyphae in different isolates varied from 1.26-2.81 µm. The maximum width of the hypha was 2.81 µm in UV4 isolate and minimum in UV3 (1.26 µm). The genetic diversity of the eight isolates of U. virens, by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker using nine primers, revealed a considerable level of genetic variation. The dendrogram analysis showed two main clusters; cluster I comprised of five isolates (UV1, UV5, UV8, UV6 and UV7), while Cluster II consisted of three isolates (UV2, UV3 and UV4).
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Integrated management of post flowering stalk rot of maize caused by
           Fusarium verticillioides

    • Authors: M.K. KHOKHAR*; S.S. SHARMA RENU GUPTA
      Abstract: Five fungicides, five botanicals and three bio-control agents were evaluated against Fusarium verticillioides, first in vitro and then in field to develop effective management strategies for post flowering stalk rot (PFSR). Systemic fungicides bavistin and tebuconazole (100% and 97.77 %) were found most effective in inhibiting the complete mycelial growth of F. verticillioides in vitro. Maximum inhibition of mycelium growth was observed with Trichoderma viride (46.77%) and 0.2% neem seed extract (76.4%). Under field conditions, combination of bavistin + T. viride as seed treatment with susceptible cultivar Surya revealed maximum increase in seed germination (89.4%), population density of T. viride (23.5 x 104/g soil), reduction in disease severity (83.8% efficacy of disease control) and mortality at 70 DAS (3.9), average disease rating (1.0) and population density of F. verticillioides (3.3 x 104/g soil). In moderate resistant variety, the trend of efficacy of these treatments was similar The seed treatment with moderately resistant variety (Pratap Makka 3) + bavistin + T. viride showed superior results on plant vigour and yield component of maize. Thus with the help of these strategies we can reduce the losses caused in maize due to PFSR and can grow the maize successfully.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Protein and isozyme patterns of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri isolates
           causing chickpea wilt

    • Authors: N.B. PAWAR*; S.S. MANE
      Abstract: Variations among different isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri collected from various locations of Maharashtra were studied in respect of protein and isozyme analysis. Protein content in different isolates was ranged from 0.454 to 1.092 mg/100 mg mycelium and maximum protein content was observed in F23 isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and peroxidase activities ranged between 28.70 to 74.52 U min-1 mg-1 protein. The maximum polyphenol oxidase activity (1.86 U min-1 mg-1 protein) was observed in weakly pathogenic F5 isolate of Akola district. Moreover, a maximum esterase activity was observed in weakly pathogenic isolate F54 of Satara district (16.23 µm min -1 mg-1 protein. Electrophoretic studies by using SDS-PAGE revealed that, ten soluble proteins bands between molecular weights 44.67 to 112.2 KDa were detected in the isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceri, with high molecular weight protein bands specially expressed in highly virulent culture of Akola district (F1). Presence or absence of specific protein and isozyme bands measures variability and relatedness. No consistent appearance of esterase and polyphenol oxidase isozyme bands was visualized in the different pathogenic groups, which indicates variability among the isolates. Peroxidase as molecular marker also differentiates variability but existence was in traces i.e maximum one band in most of the isolates and the strongly pathogenic isolate F20 from Jalna district does not exhibited any peroxidase band.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Comparative efficacy of biodegradable plastic and low density polyethylene
           mulch on viability of soilborne plant pathogen of strawberry

    • Authors: HARENDER RAJ
      Abstract: Soil-borne diseases like crown rot (Rhizoctonia solani), southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii) and wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae) are among the important diseases of strawberry. Comparative efficacy of polyethylene and biodegradable mulch was observed in solarization for 40 days in May-June on these pathogens. Biodegradable plastic mulch (BPM) was found slightly less effective with average maximum temperature of 36.9 and 39.1oC in comparison to 38.3 and 40.1oC in low density polyethylene mulch (LDPM) in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Soil solarization with BPM resulted in 96.6, 97.2 and 98.0% reduction in the viability of propagules/sclerotia of F. oxysporum f. sp. fragariae, S. rolfsii and R. solani in comparison to 100% reduction in viability with LDPM at 5 cm soil depth. These pathogens did not survive beyond 40oC in thermal sensitivity test in the water bath.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Arbuscular ycorrhizal fungal association in some commonly occurring
           economically important plants of Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India

    • Authors: BIDISHA SHARMA; D.K. JHA*
      Abstract: The present research work involves the study of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal diversity in the rhizosphere of some economically important plants existing in grassland and woodland ecosystems of Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India. The rhizosphere soil of twelve economically important plant species belonging to twelve families were sampled of which ten species showed mycorrhizal association while the remaining two species, Lagerstroemium reginae Roxb. and Streblus asper Lour., showed either negligible or complete absence of AM fungal colonization. Forty four AM fungal species belonging to ten genera viz. Acaulospora, Ambispora, Claroideoglomus, Funneliformis, Glomus, Gigaspora, Paraglomus, Rhizophagus, Redeckera and Scutellospora were isolated from the rhizosphere soil of selected plants. Glomus established as the most dominant genus in the study sites, followed by Acaulospora and Gigaspora. The root colonization and subsequent sporulation of AM fungi were influenced by a wide range of environmental factors. AM spore population varied significantly both due to study sites as well as seasons. The increased spore population in the rhizosphere in the summer season as compared to either winter or autumn season established summer season as the most favorable season. Results of the present work indicated that Kaziranga National Park have a promising AM fungi diversity which needs to be explored for filing up the gap in  the current knowledge of AM fungi diversity in the north-eastern zone of India.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Defense gene induction in Camelina sativa upon Alternaria brassicae
           challenge

    • Authors: NAYANAKANTHA; N.M. CHAMIL, SANDHYA RAWAT, SAJAD ALI ANITA GROVER*
      Abstract: Rapeseed and mustard are one of the most important oilseed crops of India and the production and productivity of this crop has been greatly hampered by the disease “Alternaria blight” caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Alternaria brassicae. A study on defense gene induction was undertaken to explore the signalling mechanisms that underline the defense responses of resistant Camelina sativa to alternaria leaf spot disease. The Expression of four selected defense-related genes viz., PR-1, PR-3, PDF1.2 and GST was examined after inoculation of the seedlings of C. sativa with A. brassicae at different time intervals. Transcripts of some or all four defense-related genes accumulated at a greater level upon challenge inoculation with A. brassicae locally as well as systemically. These defense-related genes might play an important role in rendering C. sativa resistant to infection by A. brassicae. Methyl jasmonate or salicylic acid also induced some or all of the above mentioned pathogen responsive defense-related genes to varied levels. Pathogenesis-related (PR) genes such as defensin (PDF1.2), which is often used as a marker gene for jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathway, and PR1, used as a marker gene for salicylic acid (SA) signalling pathway were also induced in response to SA or JA treatment or vice versa, deviating from the  signalling pathway in Arabidopsis. These results suggest the involvement of both JA and SA signalling pathways and their cross-talk in C. sativa conferring its resistance to A. brassicae.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Pathogenic and genetic variability in Alternaria brassicae infecting
           rapeseed-mustard and evaluation of resistance sources

    • Authors: ARUN KUMAR; ABHISHEK KATOCH, PREM NATH SHARMA, VEDNA KUMARI ASHOK KUMAR*
      Abstract: Rapeseed-mustard is an important oilseed crop grown worldwide with Alternaria blight being one of the most devastating fungal diseases hampering production. Seven pathotypes (Abr1 to Abr7) of Alternaria brassicae were associated with disease losses in Himachal Pradesh while characterizing 32 isolates on differential set comprised of six Brassica species. Pathotype Abr4 being the most predominant and had compatible interaction with all six differential hosts.DNA fingerprinting using ISSR primers revealed wide genetic diversity among 32 isolates of A. brassicae grouped into five major clusters independent of pathotypes. Out of forty genotypes of rapeseed-mustard screened, no single genotypes resistant to all the pathotypes of pathogen was found.  Genotype GS-05-1 of Brassica napus was found to be resistant against two pathotypes viz., Abr1 and Abr5 whereas, three genotypes viz., RH-8544, Pusa Swarnim and HC-9605 showed moderately resistant reaction to at least three pathotypes.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Diversity analysis of Erysiphe pisi populations causing pea powdery mildew
           in Himachal Pradesh

    • Authors: D.K. BANYAL*; AMAR SINGH, SACHIN UPMANYU, JAYA CHAUDHARY P.N. SHARMA
      Abstract: Powdery mildew of pea caused by Erysiphe pisi DC ex. Saint-Amans is of common recurrence and destructive disease in wet and dry temperate regions of Himachal Pradesh where pea is an important off-season crop. Knowledge of virulence pattern of the pathogen is of paramount importance to explore host resistance and there is no well documented proof of pathogenic variation in powdery mildew pathogen except few reports, probably due to lack of availability of defined differential set. In the present study, a differential set of nine pea genotypes was developed from a panel of 317 pea lines comprising of exotic and indigenous collections with differential resistance to powdery mildew isolates. Virulence analysis of 36 isolates representing diverse pea growing areas of Himachal Pradesh determined on a differential set of pea genotypes viz., JI-2302 (er1), EC-334160, NIC-11181, EC-292164, EC-329561, JI-1559 (er1), JI-2480 (er2), PB29B and Lincoln (check) showed the presence of 19 pathotypes of E. pisi in the target area of study. Three pathotypes PMP 12, 14 and 18 were found highly virulent infecting five differentials whereas PMP 7 was least virulent showing resistant reaction on all the differentials.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Integrated disease management module for management of downy mildew of
           cucumber in Jammu division of Jammu and Kashmir

    • Authors: SACHIN GUPTA*; RAGHU NATH UPADHYAY, SATESH KUMAR V.K. RAZDAN
      Abstract: In the present study, status of downy mildew of cucumber was ascertained in Jammu division of Jammu & Kashmir (India) and the disease incidence and severity was recorded up to 70.29 per cent and 56.01 per cent respectively at 80 days after transplanting. Among the twenty two cucumber germplasm evaluated for resistance to downy mildew, eleven were observed to be moderately susceptible and another eleven susceptible. However, none fall in the category of resistant, moderately resistant or highly susceptible. Among the fungicides tested with varying number of sprays, metalaxyl + mancozeb (five sprays) was most effective and reduced the disease intensity up to 94.23 per cent over control. Plant extract of Allium sativum was most effective with disease reduction of 49.88 per cent. An extra dose of potash reduced the disease by 30.93 per cent. An integration of these measures can be utilized for developing an integrated disease management module for management of downy mildew of cucumber.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Efficacy of fungicides alone and in combination with insecticides on
           foliar diseases of onion (Allium cepa) in rabi season

    • Authors: R.C. GUPTA*; R.P. GUPTA
      Abstract: The field trial was conducted on onion variety Agrifound Light Red to test the combined efficacy of fungicides and insecticides on foliar diseases of onion during Rabi, 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13 at Research Farm, Chitegaonphata, National Horticultural Research and Development Foundation (NHRDF), Nashik. The fungicides namely mancozeb @ 0.25%, propiconazole @ 0.1%, copper oxychloride @ 0.25%, tricyclazole @ 0.1% and hexaconazole @ 0.1% were tested alone and in combination with insecticides namely methomyl @ 0.8g/L, carbosulfan @ 2ml/L and profenofos @ 1ml/L in the present study. The pooled data of three years revealed that, maximum percent disease control of stemphylium blight (59.81%) as well as highest gross yield (326.60q/ha) and marketable yield (317.44q/ha) of onion was recorded with combined spray of mancozeb @ 0.25%+methomyl @ 0.8g/L at 30 DAT, propiconazole @ 0.1%+carbosulfan @ 2ml/L at 45 DAT and copper oxychloride @ 0.25% + profenofos @ 1ml/L at 60 day after transplanting (DAT). The maximum increase in marketable yield (31.64%) of onion bulbs was also recorded in the same treatment over untreated check. The highest incidence (36.67%) of stemphylium blight and lowest gross (248.10q/ha) as well as marketable yield (239.89q/ha) of onion were recorded in untreated check. Purple blotch and colletotrichum blight did not appear during the entire cropping season in onion crop. The study revealed that combined sprays of fungicides and insecticides effectively manage the stemphylium blight disease as well as increased yield of onion bulbs during Rabi season under Nashik area of Maharashtra.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Antifungal activity of essential oils and plant extracts against Corticium
           salmonicolor, the incitant of pink canker in apple

    • Authors: DURGA PRASHAD*; VED RAM, I.M. SHARMA SUSHMA SHARMA
      Abstract: Apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) is one of the most important fruit crop grown in the temperate region of the world. Pink canker caused by Corticium salmonicolor Berk & Br. has been predominant and destructive disease causing up to 80-90 per cent losses in Kullu and Rajgarh areas of Himachal Pradesh, India. Looking into high disease severity, it was proposed to evaluate the efficacy of different botanicals and essential oils against Corticium salmonicolor. Out of thirteen plant oil tested under in vitro conditions, three namely Olea cuspidata, Cymbopogon citratus and Brassica juncea var. cunefolia oil at 100, 250, 500 and 750 ppm provided complete (100%) growth inhibition of Corticium salmonicolor, followed by Eugenia caryophyllata (94.14%), Azadirachta indica (85.81 %) and Ocimum sanctum (84.11%), respectively. Among twenty botanicals tested, aqueous extracts of Adhatoda vasica and a combinations of cow urine + darek seed + bana leaves + walnut leaves + Artimisia sp.(1:1:1:1:1), cow urine + darek seed + bana + walnut leaves + Artimisia sp + kadu (1:1:1:1:1:1) at 10, 20, 50 and 100 per cent provided complete growth inhibition of Corticium salmonicolor under in vitro conditions followed by combination of cow urine + darek + bana + walnut leaves (94.47%), and cow urine + darek + eucalyptus + bougainvellia (95.37%). Oils of Brassica juncea var. cunefolia provided maximum wound recovery (81.27%) when applied as paint against C. salmonicolor under field conditions for two consecutive years (2011& 2012) followed by Olea europea (75.83 %) with more than 10 mm callus formation respectively. Combination of Cow urine + Melia azedarach + Vitex negundo + Artimisia roxburghiana + Juglans regia + Roylea elegans (1:1:1:1:1:1) resulted maximum wound recovery (58.54 %) followed by combination of Cow urine + Melia azedarach + Vitex negundo + Artimisia roxburghiana + Juglans regia (1:1:1:1:1) (55.44%) with a callus formation of 5-10 mm respectively. Hence application of essential oils and botanicals may be an important substitute for eco-friendly management of pink canker of apple.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Role of weather on Alternaria leaf spot development in crucifers

    • Authors: R. SELVAMANI*; R.T.P. PANDIAN PRATIBHA SHARMA
      Abstract: Black leaf spot caused by Alternaria brassicae (Berk.) Sacc. is an important disease of crucifers. Progression of Alternaria leaf spot was found to be influenced by environmental factors prevalent under field conditions. There was periodical increase in lesion number and per cent disease index (PDI). However, PDI increase varied with crops and crop varieties. PDI progression was higher in mustard varieties followed by cauliflower and cabbage. Highest AUDPC value was recorded on Pusa Bold variety of mustard and the lowest was recorded on CJ-182 variety of cabbage. On the contrary, maximum and minimum temperature was positively correlated with disease development, but average temperature showed high degree of correlation than the minimum (1.5-15.3oC) and maximum temperature (10-28oC). The laboratory study indicated that optimum conditions for spore germination were 20-24oC with more than 90 per cent relative humidity.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • RAPD based DNA fingerprinting of toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains of
           Aspergillus flavus isolated from different habitats

    • Authors: AJOY KUMAR CHOUDHARY*; PRIYANKA KUMARI RASHMI AGGARWAL
      Abstract: Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus are extremely toxic substances to man and animals. These fungi are ubiquitous which grow on a wide variety of substrates. Isolations made from different habitats have shown that not all the strains of A. flavus are toxigenic. DNA polymorphism of 16 toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains of A. flavus isolated from different habitats (air, soil, maize) studied through RAPD technique, the data were further used to create a similarity matrix for construction of dendrograms by means of UPGMA method. These results support the need of using molecular marker as an auxillary tool in differentiating different strains of A. flavus.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • The potential of leaf extract of Barleria lupulina for detoxification of
           aflatoxins

    • Authors: K. KANNAN; R. VELAZHAHAN*
      Abstract: The fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus which often contaminate foods and feeds produce aflatoxin, a secondary metabolite and the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known. Aflatoxins are highly stable molecules which are extremely difficult to remove or destroy once formed in a commodity. In the present study we explored the potential of some indigenous medicinal plants in the detoxification of aflatoxins in vitro. Of the various plant extracts tested, methanolic extract (10 %) obtained from leaves of Barleria lupulina Lindl. (Acanthaceae) showed the maximum degradation of aflatoxin B1. The methanol extract of B. lupulina also showed significant levels of detoxification of other aflatoxins tested viz., AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2. Maximum detoxification occurred at pH 10, whereas the percentage detoxification decreased at pH 7 and pH 3. Time course study of aflatoxin detoxification by B. lupulina extract showed that degradation of aflatoxin occurred within 10 min and the percentage of degradation gradually increased with increase in incubation time.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia’ related strains
           affecting two important medicinal plants (Cymbopogan citratus and
           Tylophora asthmatica) in India

    • Authors: MADHUPRIYA; RENU MAURYA G.P. RAO*
      Abstract: White leaf symptoms in Cymbopogan citratus (lemongrass) (CCWL) and little leaf & yellowing symptoms in Tylophora asthmatica (Antamuula) (TYLL &LY) were recorded in the month of August 2013 at herbal garden of Amity University campus, Manesar, Haryana, India. Total genomic DNA was isolated from symptomatic and non-symptomatic leaf samples of both the plant species and nested PCR was performed using universal primers specific to the phytoplasma 16S rRNA gene: P1/P7 and R16F2/R2n. Expected amplicons size of ~1.8kb and ~1.2kb were observed from both the symptomatic plant samples in PCR and nested PCR assays, respectively, but not with the non-symptomatic test plant samples. The 1.8 kb amplified PCR products were directly sequenced. BLASTn analysis of the partial 16S rRNA gene sequence of the CCWL and TYLL&LY isolates revealed 99 per cent sequence identity with phytoplasma isolates associated with sesame phyllody, tomato big bud, Echinacea and Scaevola witches’ broom, all members of the peanut witches’ broom phytoplasma (16SrII) group. Phylogenetic analysis of the CCWL and TYLL&LY phytoplasma’s 16S rDNA sequence also revealed their closest phylogenetic relationship with members of the 16SrII group (‘Ca. P. aurantifolia’). This confirms the association of 16Sr II group phytoplasma with CCWL and TYLL&LY diseases in the present study. Virtual and in silico RFLP analysis of 1.25 kb product 16S rRNA gene allowed identification of the phytoplasma into ribosomal subgroup 16Sr II-D in T. asthatica. However the RFLP profiles in C. citratus indicated different RFLP profiles with BfaI and Mse I compared to all identified 16S II subgroups. Hence it may be a new subgroup under 16Sr II group which needs further investigation. This is the first report of association of ‘Ca. P. aurantifolia’ affecting C. citratus and T. asthmatica from the world.
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Management of spot blotch of wheat caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana in
           

    • Authors: D.P. SINGH*; ATUL SINGH, I.S. SOLANKI, S.P. SINGH, J. VERMA, SUNITA MAHAPATRA, S.S. VAISH, S.K. MUKHOPADHYAY S. DUTTA
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Degeneration of potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivars in North Gujarat

    • Authors: NARENDRA SINGH*; M.N. MAHESHWARI S.M. CHAUDHARI
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Resistance potential of newly released urdbean genotypes against Mungbean
           yellow mosaic India virus

    • Authors: ASHUTOSH KUMAR; A.K. PARIHAR*, G.P. DIXIT SANJEEV GUPTA
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • Occurrence of anthracnose on coloured capsicum under protected conditions

    • Authors: MEENU GUPTA*; S.K. GUPTA
      PubDate: 2014-08-08
      Issue No: Vol. 67 (2014)
       
  • NEWS

    • Authors: Editor IPS
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3
       
  • Annoucement

    • Authors: Editor IPS
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3
       
 
 
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