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Publisher: Indian Council of Agricultural Research   (Total: 6 journals)

Fishery Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Horticulture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Indian J. of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.276, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.23, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 4)
Indian Phytopathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal Cover   Indian Phytopathology
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0367-973X - ISSN (Online) 2248-9800
   Published by Indian Council of Agricultural Research Homepage  [6 journals]
  • Screening of potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivars against common scab
           (Streptomyces scabies)

    • Authors: RAMAKANT GHARATE; NARENDRA SINGH* S.M. CHAUDHARI
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) germplasm against yellow vein
           mosaic disease

    • Authors: RAKESH KUMAR MEENA*; AMBRESH K. VERMA, MANISH KUMAR, TANUSHREE CHATTERJEE SANKET THAKUR
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Occurrence of crown gall caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens on rose

    • Authors: A.K. GUPTA*; ADITI SHARMA, DINESH SINGH, SUNITA CHANDEL, R.C. SHARMA, RISHI MAHAJAN ANUPAMA GUPTA
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of wheat (Triticum aestivum) germplasm for identification of
           resistant source to Puccinia recondita, incitant of brown rust of wheat

    • Authors: NISAR A. DAR*; S.K. SINGH, RAYEES A. AHANGER, V.K. RAZDAN, HILAL A. BHAT RANBIR SINGH
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Diversity for resistance to stem and leaf rusts in durum wheat (Triticum
           turgidum)

    • Authors: A.N. MISHRA*; V.G. DUBEY, K. KAUSHAL S.V. SAI PRASAD
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of resistance in barley genotypes to stripe rust pathogen
           (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei)

    • Authors: R. SELVAKUMAR*; R.P.S. VERMA, M.S. SAHARAN, S.C. BHARDWAJ, P.S. SHEKHAWAT, MADHU MEETA JINDAL, DHANBIR SINGH, RAKESH DEVLASH, S.S. KARWASRA, , S.K. JAIN INDU SHARMA
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of sources of resistance to leaf blight (Bipolaris sorokiniana
           and Alternaria triticina) in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and Triticale

    • Authors: D.P. SINGH*; INDU SHARMA, ISHWAR SINGH, MADHU MEETA JINDAL, SATVINDER K. MANN, A.K. CHOWDHURY, SUNITA MAHAPATRA, K.P. SINGH, JATINDER KUMAR, DEEPSHIKHA, , KANAK SRIVASTAVA, S.S. VAISH, R. CHAND, D.S. DODAN, S.P. SINGH, J. VERMA, S. YASMIN DAS, S.S. KARWASRA, A.C. PRADHAN, S.K. MUKHOPADHYAY, S. DUTTA, , I.K. KALAPPANAVAR, I.S. SOLANKI, ATUL KUMAR, C.S. AZAD H.C. LAL
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Genetic diversity for leaf rust resistance in durum wheat (Triticum durum
           Desf.)

    • Authors: A.N. MISHRA*; K. KAUSHAL, V.G. DUBEY S.V. SAI PRASAD
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Screening of host-plant resistance in chickpea against wilt caused by
           Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceri

    • Authors: S.K. SINGH*; B.S. JAMWAL, BIKRAM SINGH V.B. SINGH
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Management of common scab (Streptomyces sp.) of potato (Solanum tuberosum)
           through biofumigation

    • Authors: NARENDRA SINGH*; M.N. MAHESHWARI, R.N. PATEL S.M. CHAUDHARI
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) genotypes for yield and yellow
           vein mosaic disease

    • Authors: AMIT KUMAR; R.B. VERMA, S.S. SOLANKEY* ANUPAM ADARSH
      Abstract: Okra yellow vein mosaic virus (OYVMV) a member of genus Begomovirus (family: Geminiviridae) the causal agent of yellow vein mosaic disease of okra is caused by a complex consisting of monopartite DNA molecule and beta satellite (DNA component). Infection of 100% plants in a field is very usual and yield losses ranges from 50 to 94%, depending on stage of crop growth at which infection occurs and its vector whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Gen.) population. Thus, 30 diverse okra genotypes including 4 national control (VRO 6, Pusa Sawani, Arka Anamika, and Arka Abhay) were grown in RCBD during rainy season, 2013-14, for 13 diverse traits. The magnitude of PCV was higher than that of GCV for all the traits. High value of PCV with corresponding high value of GCV were observed for number of branches, number of fruit-plant, fruit yield per plant, per cent disease incidence (PDI) and coefficient of infection (CI). This indicated that selection of genotypes on the basis of these characters is desirable. The genotypes, viz. IIHR 129, IIHR 123, IIHR 112, IC 14845B and IC 14600, IIHR 120, IIHR 53, IIHR 113, were found promising genotypes for most of the yield-contributing traits; whereas among control varieties, VRO 6 and Arka Anamika, performed better. These genotypes could be used for further hybrid breeding programme, due to their high yield and lower OYVMV incidence.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Identification and genetic relationships of phytoplasma strains infecting
           coconut, arecanut and oil palm in South India

    • Authors: KOCHUBABU SUMI*; MADHUPRIYA, RAMASWAMY MANIMEKALAI, GOVIND PRATAP RAO KROTHAPALLI RAJA SURYA SAMBASIVA RAO
      Abstract: The survey was spear rot disease (SRD) of oil palm, yellow leaf disease (YLD) of arecanut and root (wilt) disease (RWD) of coconut in Kerala and Karnataka. These are important phytoplasma diseases in South India. The 16Sr RNA gene sequence comparison, phylogenetic analysis and in silico RFLP analysis of  SRD, YLD and RWD phytoplasma isolates revealed the association of 16SrXI-B sub-group phytoplasma in Kerala and 16SrXIV-A sub-group in Karnataka in oil palm, arecanut and coconut and possible cross transmission among all the three palm species in Kerala and Karnataka. However, detection of 16SrXIV group phytoplasma with RWD in a severely affected area of Kerala indicated possible involvement of two groups (16SrXI-B and 16SrXIV-A) of phytoplasmas also in RWD in Kerala. Possible involvement of more than one group/sub-group of phytoplasmas with these three palm diseases in different locations was indicated, which warrants further investigations on epidemiology and genetic variation in phytoplasmas at different locations to adopt appropriate management strategy to keep the diseases under control.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of molecular markers in diversity analysis among isolates of
           Lasiodiplodia theobromae Pat. (Griffon & Maubl) inciting root and
           collar rot of biofuel plant (Jatropha curcas)

    • Authors: HEMANT N. PRAJAPATI*; RAVINDRANATH K. PATIL
      Abstract: Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) plantation is highly threatened by root rot and collar rot caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae Pat. (Griffon & Maubl). Nine isolates of Lasiodiplodia theobromae collected from jatropha from various regions in Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh were characterized based on their molecular profiles of the isolates. Clustering pattern of dendrogram generated by using the pooled molecular data of 14 RAPD loci formed two clusters. The highest similarity index value of 0.50 was found between Lt-5 isolate and Lt-6 isolate. The average similarity coefficient among isolates was 0.403. The data obtained from Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with 14 arbitrary primers produced 279 loci and 861 amplicons. Out of the 279 loci produced, 266 were polymorphic and hence the total polymorphism was found to be 95.60%. Average number of amplicons per primer was found to be 19.9 and average number of polymorphic loci obtained per primer (Assay Efficiency Index) was found to be 19. Out of 14 primer, 5 successfully produced 100% polymorphism, successfully.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of pre-symptom activity of fungicides against Marssonina
           coronaria causing premature leaf fall in apple

    • Authors: ANIL KUMAR*; J.N. SHARMA
      Abstract: Fifteen fungicides were evaluated for their pre-symptom activities against Marssonina coronaria under polyhouse during causing premature leaf fall in apple 2009 and 2010. Mancozeb, captan, copper oxychloride, metiram, benomyl, carbendazim, thiophanate methyl, Shield, Kresoxim methyl, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, hexaconazole, difenoconazole and tebuconazole were tested at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% concentration, whereas Dodine at 0.05, 0.075 and 0.1%. Pot plants of apple cv Starking Delicious were inoculated with standardized conidial suspension (5 × 104 conidia ml-1) of M. coronaria and plants were treated 9 days after inoculation. Timing of application was based on incubation period (12 days) of M. coronaria on the test cultivar. Strobilurins (kresoxim methyl, pyraclostrobin and azoxystrobin) had strongest pre-symptom activity against the disease in polyhouse exhibited 70.99-91.08% control during both the years. These fungicides also had highest inhibitory effect on conidial production (4.25 × 104 conidia ml-1 - 5.54 × 104 conidia ml-1) and reduced lesion size (3-6 mm) produced on the treated leaves compared to other treatments. Captan was least effective against Marssonina blotch of apple among all the treatments exhibited 41.16-49.58% disease control during both the years. Kresoxim methyl exhibited highest disease control (80.82-91.08%) among all the fungicides. It could be used for effective management of Marssonina blotch in apple.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Integrated management of collar rot (Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc.) on brinjal
           (Solanum melongena)

    • Authors: A.P. SURYAWANSHI*; A.S. BORGAONKAR, D.P. KULDHAR UTPAL DEY
      Abstract: The studies were carried out on collar rot caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. on brinjal (Solanum melongena L) during kharif 2012 at Vasantrao Naik Marathwada Krishi Vidyapeeth, Parbhani. The in-vitro evaluation revealed that highest average mycelial inhibition with fungicides, Vitavax (100.00%), Tebuconazole (99.25%) and Penconazole (99.03%). Of the bioagents and bioinoculants/PGPR evaluated, significantly highest mycelial growth inhibition was recorded with B. megaterium (87.85%), aqueous extracts of all botanicals tested (@ 10 and 20%) exhibited antifungal potential significantly highest average mycelial growth inhibition was recorded with A. indica (71.17%) Significantly highest seed germination (80.00%) was recorded with the treatment Vitavax (ST @ 1.5g/kg) + Thiram (ST @ 1.5g/kg) + P. fluorescens (ST @ 10g/kg) + NSC (SA @ 50g/kg soil). Significantly highest reduction in pre-emergence (69.96%), post-emergence (55.43%) and average (62.37%) mortality were recorded with treatment of Vitavax + Thiram + P. fluorescens + NSC. Thus, it is concluded that brinjal collar rot can be managed effectively by seed treatment with fungicides (Vitavax, Thiram), bioagent (P. fluorescens) and soil amendment with neem seed cake.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Managing Macrophomina phaseolina causing charcoal rot of sunflower
           (Helianthus annus) by soil amendment

    • Authors: A.P. SURYAWANSHI*; V.P. MULE, K.T. APET, UTPAL DEY D.P. KULDHAR
      Abstract: The pot culture (screen house) studies were undertaken to manage charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina) disease applying organic and inorganic amendments on sunflower (Helianthus annus L.). Of the 11 amendments tested, neem seed cake soil application (preventive and curative) @ 50g/kg potting mixture was found most effective with significantly highest seed germination (85.00 and 71.67%); least pre-emergence (15.00 and 28.33%), post-emergence (22.66 and 34.92%) and average (18.83 and 31.63%) mortality. There was significantly highest reduction in pre-emergence (78.57 and 59.52%), post-emergence (70.03 and 55.62%) and average (74.30 and 57.57%) mortality, respectively in preventive and curative methods. All the test amendments improved growth parameters, viz. root length, shoot length and vigour index in sunflower cv. KBSH-44. However, highest root length (14.10 and 13.60 cm), shoot length (26.53 and 24.73 cm) and vigour index (3453.55 and 2747.11) were recorded with neem seed cake, respectively in preventive and curative methods, followed by the amendments, viz. cotton seed cake, groundnut cake and sunflower cake.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Field management of anthracnose of chilli (Capsicum annuum) caused by
           Colletotrichum capsici

    • Authors: H.N. KAMBLE; D.N. DHUTRAJ UTPAL DEY*
      Abstract: A field experiment was conducted to evaluate fungicides, bioagents and botanicals in-vivo during rabi, 2011-12 and kharif, 2012-13 to manage anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum capsici on chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) during 2011-12 and 2012-13 at Parbhani. All the treatments could effectively reduce the incidence, intensity and coefficient of disease index (CODEX) of anthracnose. Among fungicides, Propiconazole (@ 0.1%) recorded least mean disease incidence, intensity and CODEX and increased dry pod yield over the control. The second best fungicide was Hexaconazole (@ 0.1%), followed by Carbendazim 12% + Mancozeb 63% WP (@ 0.1%), Captan (@ 0.25%) and copper oxychloride (@ 0.25%). The Trichoderma viride as a bioagent, and Allium sativum as a botanical could also effectively manage anthracnose. Further, economics [cost: benefit ratio] of all the treatments revealed highest monetary gain in Hexaconazole (1:48.43), followed by Propiconazole (1:25.68) and copper oxychloride (1:20.00). All the treatments significantly increased dry pod yield, with maximum gross and additional income over the control.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Identification of resistant genes and association of Colletotrichum
           acutatum complex with fruit rot in Capsicum (Capsicum annuum) in North
           Western Himalayas

    • Authors: ABHISHEK KATOCH*; PREM NATH SHARMA
      Abstract: The studies were undertaken to identify resistant genes and complex association of Colletrotrichum acutatum with fruit rot in Capsicum (Capsicum annuum L.) in North-western Himalayas. The Colletotrichum sp. showing incidence up to 50.0% and severity index of 30.50% in chili fields was identified as C. acutatum based on morphological characteristics and use of species-specific markers. The pathogen was further subcategorized as C. simmondsii within the phylogeny of C. acutatum complex using two DNA barcode markers, internal transcribe spacer region (ITS) and β-tubulin (tub2) gene sequence data. Five Capsicum accessions namely, EC631750, EC631751, California Wonder, PBC 80 and PBC 81, were identified as potential resistance donors while screening 195 germplasm lines against this species.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Variability in Phytophthora nicotianae var. nicotianae causing leaf blight
           and fruit rot of capsicum in North-west Himalayas

    • Authors: JAYA CHAUDHARY*; D.K. BANYAL P.N. SHARMA
      Abstract: This study reports the information on cultural, pathogenic & molecular diversity in Phytophthora nicotianae var. nicotianae associated with leaf blight and fruit rot of capsicum in Himachal Pradesh, a North-Western Himalayan state of India. 25 isolates of P. nicotianae var. nicotianae collected from diverse capsicum growing areas of Himachal Pradesh were categorized into 7 morpho-cultural groups based on colony characteristics like type of growth, colony colour, shape, colony margins and zonation. Pathogenic variability determined on an indigenous differential set comprising of 10 capsicum genotypes, grouped the test isolates into 10 pathogroups without any congruence with the morpho-cultural groups. Genetic diversity analysis using Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) primers and UPGMA cluster analysis distinguished the 25 isolates into two major clusters (Cluster I & Cluster II) with a similarity coefficient 88 %. Cluster I comprised of 19 isolates and cluster II contained 6 isolates. Further, Cluster I and Cluster II were distinctly subdivided into 6 and 2 subgroups, respectively. Pathogenic and ISSR data clustered majority of isolates according to their geographical locations. In the present investigation high variability was observed among P. nicotianae var. nicotianae populations in North-West Himalayas.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Prediction equations on severity of early blight of tomato (Solanum
           lycopersicum) under different non-conventional chemical treatments and
           their comparison between logistic and gompertz model

    • Authors: POLY SAHA*; SRIKANTA DAS
      Abstract: The field experiment was conducted to find out the effect of different weather factors on development of early blight on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) caused by Alternaria solani (Ell. and Mart.) under six non-conventional chemical treatments during 2008-09 and 2009-10. Two transformation models, viz. logit and gompertz through which the disease progress curve moves over time were also compared. Different prediction equations were developed for each chemical treatment separately through step down multiple regression analysis. Different meteorological factors had different effect on disease severity. Among six non-conventional chemicals tested, Salicylic acid was superior in controlling the disease severity with AUDPC: 93.70 and 92.98 during both the years, respectively. Linearization of area under disease progress curve (AUDPC) following both models (logit and gompit) showed that gompit fit better than logit for prediction of early blight disease severity as confirmed by the low standard error estimate value of gompertz. The co-efficient of determination value (R2) showed that variation in disease severity can be explained up to 80% (maximum) in logistic as well as 92% (maximum) in Gompertz with combined effect of weather variables included in the present study. Among seven meteorological factors considered, only average temperature (Tmean), RHmean and total rainfall (Rt) were found to act positively and significantly, whereas bright sunshine hours (BSH) had negatively significant effect on increase the disease severity on tomato. These situations were observed in both the transformation models but varied within treatments and year.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of pea (Pisum sativum) germplasm for inheritance of resistance
           to powdery mildew (Erysiphe pisi)

    • Authors: D.K. BANYAL*; JAYA CHAUDHARY AMAR SINGH
      Abstract: The germplasm lines of pea (Pisum sativum L.) were screened under natural and artificial epiphytotic conditions under field and greenhouse, respectively. Out of 317 lines 6 pea genotypes (DPP 362, JP-501-A/2, DPP-1542EP, PMR-21, KMNR-894 and JI-1766) showed highly resistant reaction against powdery mildew Erysiphe pisi DC ex. Saint-Amans while 59 were moderately resistant. In order to study the genetics of resistance in pea, 6 lines (JI-1559, JI-2480, IPF-P-2-5, DPP-13, DPP-25G, DPP-1542 EP) showing resistance to different pathotypes of Erysiphe pisi were crossed in diallel mating design along with susceptible cultivar ‘Lincoln’. Segregation pattern of F2population of six crosses under field and in vitro conditions revealed a ratio of 1 resistant to 3 susceptible (1:3) in different crosses, thereby indicating the presence of single recessive gene in donor parents, indicating that resistance in genotypes JI-1559, JI-2480, IPF- P- 2-5, DPP-13, DPP-25G and DPP-1542 EP is governed by single recessive gene.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of biocontrol agents and mycorrhizae against Gloeocercospora
           sorghi causing zonate leaf spot of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) with respect
           to disease reduction and growth parameters

    • Authors: GAURAV VERMA* YOGENDRA SINGH
      Abstract: The experiment was conducted to develop effective biocontrol system for management of zonate leaf spot on sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] caused by Gloeocercospora sorghi at G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, during 2013. Five isolates of Trichoderma harzianum Th, two isolates of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf and a Glomus intraradices isolate were evaluated for growth promotion, disease reduction, chlorophyll content and green fodder yield in sorghum against G. sorghi under field conditions. Biocontrol agent (Th-32) was found best in increasing root length (26.89cm) and stem diameter (1.35cm) in PC-4, while it was 27.12cm (root length) and 1.41cm (stem diameter) in PC-5. However, significant increase in shoot length (172.12cm and 185.89cm) in recorded with Pf-31 in PC-4 and PC-5, respectively at 45 days after sowing (DAS). Among all isolates, Th-32 resulted in maximum reduction of disease severity in both PC-4 (28.74%) and PC-5(33.81%). Maximum chlorophyll content was observed in Th-32 treated PC-4 plants (2.356 mg/g fr.wt.) while in PC-5, it was maximum in Th-31 treated plants (2.976 mg/g fr.wt.). Green fodder yield was observed to be maximum in Th-32 treated plots of both PC-4 (27.15kg/plot) and PC-5(38.19kg/plot) cultivars. Thus, present study demonstrates the possible role of Th-31, Th-32 and Pf-31isolates in growth promotion, disease reduction, chlorophyll content and green fodder yield of sorghum.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of fungicides and biocontrol agents for suppression of banded
           leaf and sheath blight of maize (Zea mays)

    • Authors: L.S. RAJPUT*; S.I. HARLAPUR
      Abstract: The field experiment was conducted during kharif season of 2012 to assess the possibility of managing leaf and sheath blight of maize (Zea mays L.) by different combinations of seed dressing fungicides and biocontrol agents along with foliar spray. Seed treatment with Pseudomonas fluorescens (10 g/kg) of seed combined with two sprays of Propiconazole (0.1%) 30 and 40 days after sowing gave maximum grain yield (80.42 q/ha), stover yield (10.75 t/ha) and 100-seed weight (39.51 g) with minimum percentage disease intensity (20.40% on 1-5 scale), followed by seed treatment with Pseudomonas fluorescens (10 g/kg) of combined with two sprays of Hexaconazole (0.1%) and seed treatment with Carbendazim (2.5 g/kg) combined with two sprays of Propiconazole @ 0.1% for effective control of BSLB. Seed treatment with Pseudomonas fluorescens (10 g/l) combined with two sprays of Propiconazole (0.1%) 30 and 40 days after sowing resulted in increase in grain yield and stover yield by 40.72 and 44.68% respectively with highest disease control efficacy (68.90%). Uses of biocontrol agents with fungicides show good result, so far best strategy for BSLB management.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Pathotype surveillance and pre-emptive breeding against black and brown
           rusts of wheat in Nilgiri hills

    • Authors: J. KUMAR*; M. SIVASAMY, P. JAYAPRAKASH, V.K. VIKAS, P. NALLATHAMBI, UMA MAHESHWARI, R. NISHA JOHN PETER
      Abstract: Surveillance in Nilgiri hills was conducted from September 2010 to November 2012. There were dominance of pathotypes (pts) 77-5 (121R63-1), 77-7 (121R127) and 77-8 (253R31) of brown rust and 40A (62G29) and 40-1(62G29-1) of black rust in Nilgiri hills. Majority of resistant genes in cultivars released for peninsular and central zones are susceptible to pts occurring in Nilgiri hills except Lr 24 for brown rust and Sr31 for black rust. Black rust resistant gene, Sr31, confers immunity in India. It is susceptible to race Ug99, hence protection due to this gene is at risk due to identification of matching virulences in other countries. Cultivars in peninsular and central India need to be fortified with additional resistant genes for achieving longer protection against wheat rusts. Several useful resistant genetic stocks pyramided with number of rust resistant genes have been developed at IARI Regional Station, Wellington and can be utilised in breeding durable resistant wheat varieties. All these stocks have been listed and can be procured on demand.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Evaluation of wheat (Triticum aestivum) germplasm and varieties against
           stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) pathotype Ug99 and its
           variants

    • Authors: A.K. SHARMA*; M.S. SAHARAN, S.C. BHARDWAJ, M. PRASHAR, R. CHATRATH, V. TIWARI, MANGAL SINGH INDU SHARMA
      Abstract: The study was undertaken to identify resistance to Ug99 in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germplasm popular varieties in East Africa (Kenya and Ethiopia) during 2005-2011. During 2005, out of 22 lines, three genetic stocks, FLW 2 (PBW 343 + Sr24), FLW 6 (HP 1633 + Sr24) and FLW 8 (HI 1077 + Sr25) were found resistant along with HW 1085. Subsequently, 102, 318, 420, 241 and 189 lines consisting of elite advanced lines, along with released varieties were evaluated during 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011, respectively, in Kenya and Ethiopia against stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) pathotype Ug99 and its variants. Wheat lines, viz. A-9-30-1, AKDW 4021, DDK 1037, DDK 1038, DDW 14, DL 153-2, GW 1250, HD 2781, HD 3014, HD 4720, HDR 77, HI 8381, HI 8498, HUW 234, HW 5211, K 9107, MACS 1967, MACS 2846, MACS 2988, MACS 2998, MACS 3742, MACS 5009, MPO 1215, NI 5439, NIDW 295, PBW 315, PBW 612, PDW 274, PDW 316, PDW 317, WH 147, Sr22, Sr32, Sr35, Sr39, Sr42 and triticale varieties TL 2942, TL 2963 and TL 2966, showed resistance to Ug99 and its variants (Ug99TTKS and TTKSK) on evaluation in Kenya and Ethiopia during 2006-2011. During 2010, slow ruster lines for Ug99 resistance were identified based on AUDPC values. These lines may be utilized for improving Ug99 resistance in popular Indian wheat cultivars.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
  • Virulence diversity in Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici causing yellow
           rust on wheat (Triticum aestivum) in India

    • Authors: M. PRASHAR; S.C. BHARDWAJ*, S.K. JAIN O.P. GANGWAR
      Abstract: Yellow (or stripe) rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) is an important foliar disease on wheat in the North-western Plains Zone (NWPZ), Northern hills zone, and Southern hills zone of India. The pathogen population was analyzed for phenotypic dynamics, diversity and virulence evolution on temporal and spatial bases. A total of eight pathotypes were identified from 2579, yellow rust samples analyzed during 2005-2011 from nine states of India. The Pst population reveals high virulence with low diversity. The population was dominated primarily by three pathotypes, 78S84 and 46S119 in Northern India and 38S102 (I) in the Nilgiri Hills. Based on avirulence/virulence structure, our population of yellow rust is different to that of Western Asia and South Africa and appears to have evolved locally. Relative Shannon’s index (HSR) exhibits insignificant differences in diversity (richness) and evenness of the pathotypes over the years. The frequency of 78S84 remained all time high on yearly basis except crop season 2004-05. In Nilgiri Hills (Tamil Nadu), pathotype, 38S102, revealed consistently decreased frequency over the year and was not detected in 2009-10 crop season. Pathotype, 78S84, was predominant in Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab and Western Uttar Pradesh, whereas, 46S119 in Haryana, Uttarakhand, Rajasthan and Delhi. New virulent types have mainly evolved by mutation for virulence to host resistance, and subsequent dominance of pathotypes has been influenced by parasitic fitness and opportunity to be selected through large-scale cultivated varieties with matching resistant genes. Pathotype analyses revealed that wheat yellow rust population of India is avirulent to Yr5, Yr10, Yr11, Yr12, Yr13, Yr14, Yr15, Yr24, Yr26, YrSp and YrSk. Phenotypic spatial and temporal dynamics and diversity in pathogen population, virulence evolution is of prime focus.
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 2
       
 
 
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