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Publisher: Indian Council of Agricultural Research   (Total: 6 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 6 of 6 Journals sorted alphabetically
Fishery Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Horticulture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Indian J. of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 18)
Indian J. of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Fisheries     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.154, h-index: 5)
Indian Phytopathology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal Cover Indian Phytopathology
  [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0367-973X - ISSN (Online) 2248-9800
   Published by Indian Council of Agricultural Research Homepage  [6 journals]
  • Studies on fungal endophytes in India: A brief review

    • Authors: SANJAY K. SINGH
      Pages: 323 - 327
      Abstract: Plant biodiversity serve as a reservoir of plethora of fungi including endophytes, epiphytes, and pathogens. Asymptomatic presence of endophytic fungi inside different plant tissues play vital roles in mediating many ecological processes, and considered as untapped resource of metabolic products of economic importance. Besides, endophytes ability to synthesize plant metabolites has gained much attention in recent years, which has led to change whole approach of selecting and screening host plants. Strategy to explore endophytes inside different tissues of plant is scaling new heights. Tropical regions are considered as reservoir of living species and large number of biologically active metabolites is produced in this ecosystem. Certainly, India is one among these regions endowed with vast plant diversity. It is assumed that a high degree of endophytic fungal diversity may be present in these ecosystems requiring special attention for study in detail and their documentation. Purpose of this brief review is to consolidate highly scattered information on fungal endophytes (except mycorhizas) and their distribution/geographic locations in India. Although, serious attempts are made, there could be lapses due to unavailability of resource information, as the task of searching reports/informations on diversity, biology and biotechnological aspects of endophytes and their association with plant-hosts published from India, is huge.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • A comparative prelude on wheat rusts in India

    • Authors: J. KUMAR
      Pages: 328 - 339
      Abstract: Rusts are the most serious diseases of wheat crop in India. The causal agents of rusts are highly specialized plant pathogens with narrow host ranges. These are fungal organisms which belong to genus Puccinia, family Pucciniaceae, order Uredinales and class Basidiomycetes. Of the rust diseases of wheat, the most common these days is called leaf or brown rust and is caused by P. triticina Eriks. develops rapidly at temperatures between 10° and 30°C. Stem rust, caused by P. graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici Eriks. & E. Henn., is also known as black rust is favoured by humid conditions and warmer temperatures of 15° to 35°C. Stripe or yellow rust, caused by P. striiformis West. f. sp. tritici Eriks. & E. Henn., is principally a disease of wheat grown in cooler climates (2° to 15°C), which are generally associated with higher elevations or cooler years.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Sheath blight of rice: current status and perspectives

    • Authors: RAM SINGH*; S. SUNDER P. KUMAR
      Pages: 340 - 351
      Abstract: Sheath blight of rice caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn [teleomorph: Thanatephorus  cucumeris (Frank) Donk] is of worldwide occurrence and is known to cause substantial yield losses. It is a major production constraint in high yielding varieties under intensive rice production systems. The pathogen has a very wide host range and exhibits considerable pathogenic and molecular variability. Due to non-availability of resistant cultivars, the management of sheath blight primarily relies on chemical control. However, the disease can be managed effectively through integration of effective cultural practices, botanical pesticides, bio-control agents and fungitoxicants. In this article, the information available on various aspects of this disease has been presented and discussed alongwith future strategies for disease management.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Intraspecific variation in Tilletia indica, a pathogen causing Karnal bunt
           of Wheat

    • Authors: MALKHAN SINGH GURJAR*; ABHIMANYU JOGAWAT DEEPIKA KULSHRESHTHA, SAPNA SHARMA ROBIN GOGOI RASHMI AGGARWAL
      Pages: 352 - 356
      Abstract: in the present climatic change conditions. A total of twenty one Karnal bunt (KB) diseased samples were collected from North western plain zone of wheat in India during 2013 to 2015. The KB coefficient of infection was varied minimum of 1.25 percent and highest of 14.25 per cent in Bundi, Rajasthan and Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh respectively. The partial Gapdh gene was amplified and gave unique 694 bp fragments in all isolates of T. indica and then sequenced. All KB isolates clustered in two major clades of phylogeny tree. Seventeen isolates viz. KB1, KB7, KB11, KB15, KB12, KB16, KB19, KB3, KB2, KB10, KB9, KB17, KB20, KB18, KB2, KB6, KB13 clustered in clade I and four isolates viz. KB5, KB4, KB8, KB14 clustered in clade II with outlier of Tilletia horrida and Ustilago maydis. Among isolates, five isolates KB1 (Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh), KB12 (Bulandshar, Uttar Pradesh), KB7 (Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh), KB11 (Bulandshar, Uttar Pradesh) and KB15 (Kota, Rajasthan) matched 100 per cent in subgroup I of clade I and two isolates KB18, KB21 were also similar in subgroup II of clade I. Majority of T. indica isolates did not cluster to region wise and showed nucleotide variation which ranged from one to two. This study indicated that T. indica isolates showed the high genetic variation at DNA level in single KB seed containing mass of teliospores and can be helpful to understand the pathogen behaviour.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Impact of different fungicides and bioagents, and fungicidal spray timing
           on wheat stripe rust development and grain yield

    • Authors: VAIBHAV K. SINGH*; R.C. MATHURIA, ROBIN GOGOI RASHMI AGGARWAL
      Pages: 357 - 362
      Abstract: Stripe rust of wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici is a major constraint for wheat production worldwide. Present investigation was carried out for two consecutive rabi seasons during 2014-15 and 2015-16 to evaluate some fungicides and bioagents for their effectiveness against yellow rust development on wheat and also to find out the appropriate time of fungicidal spray so as to avoid the yield losses caused by the disease. Two years data revealed that minimum mean disease severity of 1.22 per cent was recorded with a strobilurin fungicide azoxystrobin 25SC (Amistar @ 0.1%). This treatment gave a mean disease control of 98.67 per cent, thus increasing the grain yield and thousand grain weight by 77.33 and 44.14 per cent, respectively. It was followed 92.89 per cent disease control achieved in difenoconazole 25EC (Score @ 0.1%) which gave an increase of 66.15 and 37.09 per cent in grain yield and thousand grain weight, respectively. Bioagents Pseudomonas fluorescence (Pf3 @ 5 gm/L water with 2 x 109 cfu/ml) and Bacillus subtilis (Bs1 @ 5 gm/L water 2 x 109 cfu/ml) were moderately effective in controlling stripe rust by 41.83 and 39.92 per cent, respectively. Penconazole 100EC (Topas @ 0.1%) and mancozeb 75WP (Dithane M45 @ 0.2%) were found least effective in controlling the stripe rust. Further to achieve maximum protection against stripe rust and increase the grain yield, fungicide need to be sprayed either at flag leaf emergence or at 20 per cent leaves having stripe rust infection.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Assessment and impact of spot blotch resistance on grain discolouration in
           wheat

    • Authors: D.P. SINGH*; S.K. SINGH ISHWAR SINGH
      Pages: 363 - 367
      Abstract: Ninety four numbers of released varieties and genotypes of wheat and Triticale were evaluated against spot blotch caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana to assess the their levels of resistance under artificially inoculated conditions as well as to see the impact of resistance on grain colour. The seeds were analyzed for the presence of discolouration and black point after harvest. Based on spot blotch score, the genotypes were categorized in to resistant (R), moderately resistant (MR), moderately susceptible (MS) and susceptible (S) categories. The per cent black point and discoloured seeds were counted in one hundred seed sample per genotype. A total numbers of 43, 16, 18 and 17 genotypes were in the category of R, MR, MS and S, respectively against spot blotch. The most promising released varieties and genotypes showing high per cent of healthy looking seeds (99.5% or more) were, HS 375, K 65, Milan/Sha-7, NI 5439, VL 616, VL 804, VL 907, and genotype UP 2691 in T. aestivum (bread wheat), HI 8627 in durum wheat variety, and Triticale variety, TL 2942 and were in first significant group. Amongst different varieties and genotypes having significantly high total diseased seeds, were 7.0, 18.8, 27.8 and 58.8%, in case of R, MR, MS and S categories, respectively (Fig. 1). In statistical terms, the range of entries showing significantly high per cent discoloured, black point and total infected seeds were, 0.0-14.4, 2.3-18.8 and 7.0-18.8% respectively in R-MR types of varieties and genotypes, which was much lower than MS-S types showing 16.7.1-52.9, 16.7-47.1 and 27.8-58.8%, respectively.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Evaluation of molecular diversity in stripe rust samples using EST-derived
           SSR markers

    • Authors: MANNY SALUJA; SATINDER KAUR*, PRITI SHARMA, N.S. BAINS PARVEEN CHHUNEJA
      Pages: 368 - 372
      Abstract: Evaluation of genetic diversity in a pathogen population and differentiation of pathogenic races is fundamental for mitigation strategies devised to ensure food security. In the present study, molecular diversity was analysed among 10 Puccinia striiformis Westend f. sp. tritici (Pst) samples. Seven of these samples were collected from open fields of different regions of Punjab and Himachal Pradesh states of India while three were known prevalent Pst races. The samples were evaluated using EST-derived SSR markers. Cluster analysis based on UPGMA algorithm and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) classified these 10 samples into three separate groups which indicated genetic diversity among the samples collected from same as well as different geographical regions.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Biochemical basis of bacterial leaf streak resistance in maize

    • Authors: MANMOHAN DHKAL; MANDEEP SINGH HUNJAN*, HARLEEN KAUR RAJWINDER KAUR
      Pages: 373 - 380
      Abstract: Bacterial leaf streak is an emerging disease of maize (Zea mays L.), an important cereal crop grown in north India. The present research investigates the potential role of four antioxidant enzymes in imparting resistance against Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae in six inbreds/hybrids of maize viz. G-5414, PMH-1, CM-139, LM-13, CM-600 and CML-25. Antioxidant enzyme activity was estimated spectrophotometrically from the leaf samples collected at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 hours after inoculation. Results indicated a spike in expression of various antioxidant enzymes following pathogen challenge with maximum spike recorded after 48 or 72 hrs post inoculation in different maize lines. Maize inbred line CML-25 showed maximum enzyme activity, whereas G-5414 showed the least. Significantly high values of Pearson’s correlation coefficient were obtained between antioxidant enzyme activity and lesion length development suggesting possible involvement of these enzymes in imparting disease resistance against bacterial leaf streak in maize.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Evaluation of pigeonpea genotypes against Fusarium wilt under artificial
           inoculation conditions

    • Authors: S.G. ASHITHA*; H.K. RAMAPPA R. GOWRI
      Pages: 381 - 385
      Abstract: The experiment was conducted at Zonal Agricultural Research Station (ZARS), Gandhi Krishi Vignana Kendra (GKVK), Bengaluru during 2014-15. Thirty two pigeonpea genotypes were screened for resistance against Fusarium wilt in the sick plots and the same set of genotypes were subjected to rigorous screening under greenhouse conditions by using root dip inoculation technique. Among 32 genotypes, 21 genotypes were showed resistant reaction, 4 were moderately resistant three were moderately susceptible and 6 were susceptible under sick plot conditions at 180 days after sowing. Similarly, only 15 genotypes were showed resistant, 9 were moderately resistant, one was moderately susceptible and 7 were showed susceptible reaction under green house conditions at 60 days after root dipping. Root dip inoculation technique confirmed the wilt response in pigeonpea genotypes within short duration of two months. Therefore the identified technique can be used for large scale screening of pigeonpea genotypes against Fusarium wilt.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Genetic diversity of Colletotricum truncatum infecting urdbean (Vigna
           mungo) in Himachal Pradesh

    • Authors: ASHWANI KUMAR BASANDRAI*; VARUN SHARMA, ABHISHEK KATOCH, DAISY BASANDRAI PREM NATH SHARMA
      Pages: 386 - 390
      Abstract: Urdbean is an important pulse crop of India and an assured kharif pulse crop of Himachal Pradesh. The crop is vulnerable to many diseases, out of which anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum truncatum takes a heavy toll of the crop. The disease may be effectively managed by the cultivation of resistant varieties and development of such varieties depends on availability of effective resistant sources and variability aspect of the pathogen. Hence, in the present studies 31 isolates of C. truncatum were characterized into six pathogenic races based on reaction on indigenous differential set. Pathogenic race Ct I accommodated 11 isolates and was virulent on four differential genotypes whereas, race Ct III was least virulent. Genotyping of the different isolates using inter simple sequence repeat marker (ISSR) grouped 31 isolates into six major clusters at 70 per cent similarity coefficient using NTSYS software/version 2.0. Though there was sampling biasness with more isolate representation from major urdbean cultivating area Sirmour, but four isolates (Ct 27, Ct 28, Ct 30 and Ct 31) were found early divergent in genetic analysis. Thus, indicting restricted gene flow in these geographic pockets. Moreover, prevalence of all major pathogenic forms of C. truncatum except race Ct III from Sirmour district suggests that this area could be harnessed as hotspot for screening resistant genotypes in vivo.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Phytophthora infestans
           population of Himachal Pradesh

    • Authors: SANJEEV SHARMA*; B.P. SINGH, SUMIT SHARMA V.U. PATIL
      Pages: 391 - 395
      Abstract: Late blight (Phytophthora infestans) is the most devastating disease of potato throughout the world. Monitoring the population structure of P. infestans is essential to devise suitable management strategies. A total of 57 isolates of P. infestans collected from Himachal Pradesh (temperate high hills and low hills) over a period of three years (2008-2010) were characterized using biological and molecular markers. All the isolates were of A2 mating type possessing 9-11 virulence genes and most of them (89.5%) displayed intermediate resistance to metalaxyl. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotyping was done using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Results of mitochondrial DNA profiling revealed that all the isolates yielded Ia mtDNA haplotypes which could be a new population. SSR fingerprinting grouped the isolates into seven clusters and microsatellite allele sizes observed in the present study varied from those reported in the literature.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Integrated management of carnation wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.
           sp. dianthi using soil solarization and soil amendments

    • Authors: HARENDER RAJ; PRANEET CHAUHAN*and SHALINI CHANDEL
      Pages: 396 - 399
      Abstract: Wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi is the most prevalent and damaging soil-borne disease of carnation in all parts of the world. In Himachal Pradesh, incidence upto 79 per cent has been recorded in different parts. As use of chemical fungicides adversely affect the beneficial soil microorganisms and environment, studies were conducted during 2011-12 and 2012-2013 to integrate the treatment of soil solarization with soil amendments of neem cake, neem granules and biofumigant (cabbage leaves) for the management of carnation wilt. Combination of treatment of soil solarisation with transparent polyethylene mulch for 40 days with soil amendment of neem cake followed by cabbage leaves was found at par with combination of soil solarization followed by three drenching with combi-fungicide comprising of carbendazim 25% + iprodione 25% which resulted in reducing the wilt incidence by 89.0 to 100 per cent in comparison to unsolarized and unamended control. Combination of soil solarization with soil amendment with neem oil cakes/granules or T. viride formulation was more effective than soil drenching with chemical fungicides in improving the plant growth and quality of the flowers. Among all the treatments, integration of soil solarization with soil application of Trichoderma viride followed by amendment of neem cake was found most effective in improving the shoot length by 79.8 to 84.6 per cent with 48 to 55 times increase in number of A grade flowers in comparison to unsolarized and unamended control.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • First record of Acrophialophora levis causing wilt of Plumeria in Gurgaon

    • Authors: NARENDRA KUMAR*; DEEPIKA KULSHRESHTHA, SAPNA SHARMA, RASHMI AGGARWAL S.M. PAUL KHURANA
      Pages: 400 - 406
      Abstract: During survey in Gurgaon and its suburbs, white flowered Plumeria acutifolia Poir plants, belonging to apocynaceae family, have been wilting. Frequent surveys showed 10-15% wilting in Gurgaon and wilting incidence was found alarming in IMT Manesar. It caused complete wilting and death of trees one after another in a row. The wilted plants of P. acutifolia were observed in all age groups which showed yellowing of leaves starting from margins, then complete yellowing of old and even young leaves and finally death of the plant in 3-4 years. The samples of wilted and healthy plants (root containing soil, collar regions, shoot) were collected for study of rhizosphere, rhizoplane microflora. Both sterilized and unsterilized pieces of the samples were observed for the growth of bacteria and fungi. In all age group Acrophialophora levis was found present in both sterilized and unsterilized pieces. A. levis was present in rhizosphere, rhizoplane and collar region in all collected wilted plants but it was completely absent in healthy plants. The results of sequence datasets for both ITS1 and 4 (~550 bp) showed a 99% sequence identity to the fungus A. levis. During pathogenicity tests under pot conditions A. levis showed 90% wilting while control set showed no wilting. On basis of wide occurrence and pathogenicity tests A. levis was regarded as causal organism responsible for wilting of frangipani plants at Gurgaon. This is the first record of A. levis causing wilt in this plant.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Termitomyces R. Heim from Rupandehi, Nepal

    • Authors: H.P. ARYAL*; U. BUDHATHOKI
      Pages: 407 - 410
      Abstract: This mycological investigation carried out at protected forest during rainy season 2010-2012. Samples were collected between 225 and 265 msl in 633 hectors area. This paper highlights on morphological description of two species of Termitomyces from the study area among the collected macrofungi with their distribution in Nepal. These represented the species of Basidiomycetes belongs to order Agaricales and family Lyophyllaceae. The specimens were deposited in Natural History Museum, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Genetic basis of slow rusting leaf rust resistance in bread wheat land
           race ‘Agra local’

    • Authors: T.L. PRAKASHA*; A. VERMA, K. SOLANKI, J.B. SINGH, S.V. SAI PRASAD, A.N. MISHRA SURESH CHAND
      Pages: 411 - 412
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Identification of resistance sources against powdery mildew (Blumeria
           graminis) of wheat

    • Authors: D.P. SINGH*; A.K. SHARMA, INDU SHARMA, DHANBIR SINGH, S.K. RANA, K.P. SINGH, JATINDER KUMAR, KANAK SRIVASTAVA, DEEPSHIKHA, S.C. BHARDWAJ, M. PRASHAR, , O.P. GANGWAR, S.K. JAIN, S.K. PANT, R.N. BRAHMA, J. KUMAR, KRISHAN P. SINGH, R. DEVLASH, AMBIKA PRASAD D.S. DODAN
      Pages: 413 - 415
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Yield loss assessment due to linseed rust in relation to meteorological
           parameters

    • Authors: ASHOK KUMAR*
      Pages: 416 - 418
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Spraying schedule of garlic bulb extract, mancozeb and salicyclic acid
           against Alternaria blight of mustard

    • Authors: SUNITA MAHAPATRA*and SRIKANTA DAS
      Pages: 419 - 421
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Shelf life of bacterial and fungal biocontrol agents in different
           formulations

    • Authors: J. MAREESWARAN*; B. RADHAKRISHNAN
      Pages: 422 - 423
      PubDate: 2016-12-24
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2016)
       
 
 
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