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Publisher: STM Journals   (Total: 36 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Current Trends in Information Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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J. of Advancements in Library Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
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J. of AYUSH :- Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
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OmniScience : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Recent Trends In Civil Engineering & Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Research & Reviews : A J. of Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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Research & Reviews : A J. of Life Sciences     Open Access  
Research & Reviews : J. of Agricultural Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Research & Reviews : J. of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research & Reviews : J. of Crop Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Research & Reviews : J. of Dairy Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research & Reviews : J. of Ecology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Research & Reviews : J. of Embedded System & Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Research & Reviews : J. of Food Science and Technology     Open Access  
Research & Reviews : J. of Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research & Reviews : J. of Space Science & Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Research & Reviews : J. of Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Research & Reviews : J. of Veterinary Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trends in Electrical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Trends in Mechanical Engineering & Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal Cover
Research & Reviews : Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Online) 2278-2206
Published by STM Journals Homepage  [36 journals]
  • Alcohol Production from Pre-treated Maize and Paddy Lignocellulose Biomass
           in a Fabricated Unit
    • Authors: Sunita Singh, Panna Lal Singh, K.C. Pandey Pandey
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: An alcohol production unit was fabricated to handle 5 kg biomass per batch of paddy straw or maize stalk hydrolysis and fermentation. Various lignocellulose treatments were repeated from a previously reported study on paddy straw to compare it to that of maize stalk as a substrate biomass in a fabricated unit [1]. The pre-treatments to these lignocellulosic biomasses from maize stalk (MS) and paddy straw (MS) were compared after their size reduction and stepwise treatment(s) with strong alkali solution. The energy consumed on size reduction of maize stalk (MS) was 35% less compared to that consumed on paddy straw (PS). On further pre-treatment to de-lignify the biomass, after its size reduction, thermochemical treatment with alkali NaOH solution 0.5 N (in the ratio of 1:8, in NaOH solution for 1 h at 121°C) increased cellulose content availability for the process in MS and PS. These pre-treatments increased cellulose content availability from 29.4 to 73.3% and from 30.3 to 59.8% in MS and PS respectively. Cellulase enzyme was used as part of the process to breakdown the celluloses for making sugars available for alcohol production by fermentation. The total reducing sugars (monomers) obtained after cellulase treatment in MS and PS were 68.8 and 54.1% (w/w) respectively. Using a fabricated laboratory-scale (5 l) unit for fermentation, about 80% of the alcohol was produced from pre-treated MS within 40–42 h and in 48–50 h in case of pre-treated PS fermentation. The alcohol yield (in absolute terms) was 150–158 g/kg from the pre-treated maize stalk and 86–95 g/kg from the pre-treated paddy straw.Keywords: Alcohol production, maize stalk, paddy straw, cellulase enzyme, hydrolysis, fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiaeCite this ArticleSunita Singh, Panna Lal Singh, Pandey KC. Alcohol Production from Pre-treated Maize and Paddy Lignocellulose Biomass in a Fabricated Unit. Research & Reviews: Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2): 1–10p.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Experimental Study to Improve the Quality of Dehydrated Button Mushrooms
           (Agaricus bisporus)
    • Authors: Vipin Saini, Saleem Siddiqui
      Pages: 11 - 19
      Abstract: Mushrooms are popular for their delicacy and flavour rather than food value. However, it is well established fact that they are excellent sources of minerals and vitamins such as B-complex and vitamin C. In addition, mushrooms contain 1.1–8.2% lipids, 4.0–8.1% carbohydrates and 3–32% fibers on dry weight basis. It contains about 90% moisture. The present investigation was undertaken to study the effect of 10 min dipping or vacuum infusion pretreatments either in water or 0.05% KMS or 0.1% citric acid or 100 ppm ascorbic acid or 125 ppm EDTA or 0.4% CaCl2 solutions on dehydration of button mushroom. The dried mushrooms were packed in in polythene bags and kept at room temperature (25±5°C). The rehydration proportion, non-enzymatic browning and microbial load increased while, no significant change in the organoleptic quality was observed during storage.  The dried button mushrooms showed no significant change in quality during storage period of two months at room temperature. The dipping of fresh button mushrooms for 10 min in 100 ppm ascorbic acid solution followed by drying in tray at 60ºC was the most effective pretreatment in producing quality dehydrated mushrooms.Keywords: Button mushrooms, dehydration, dip treatment, storageCite this ArticleVipin Saini, Saleem Siddiqui. Experimental Study to Improve the Quality of Dehydrated Button Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus). Research & Reviews: Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2): 11–19p.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Salicylic Acid and Packaging Method Effects on Storability of Pear Fruits
    • Authors: Ikbal M. Al-Barzinji, Nameer N. Fadhil, Nameer N. Fadhil, Tahir A. Ahmed
      Pages: 20 - 31
      Abstract: A factorial experiment with randomized complete block design carried out in Koya city and Erbil governorate during 2015 and 2016 seasons on (Pyrus communis L. cv. Spadona) to investigate tree spraying with (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5%) salicylic acid (SA) and dipping fruits after harvesting in 0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/l SA, followed by packaging in perforated or imperforated polyethylene bags and stored at 1±1°C and 85–90% relative humidity for 60 days. Results indicated that spraying SA and packaging in imperforated bags improved fruits storability through a reduction in weight loss, reserve firmness, reduce total acidity, total soluble solids and peroxidase activity, and a significant increment in total phenolic contents compared to control treatment. Non-significant differences were appeared between treatments of dipping in SA and control treatment for fruit weight loss, firmness and total acidity for the two seasons, whereas dipping fruits in 1000 mg/l SA resulted in a significant increase in total sugars and total phenolic content compared to control treatment. This study concludes that SA treatments either spraying trees or dipping fruits and store in imperforate bags improved the storability of pear fruits under cold storage conditions.Keywords: Cold storage of pear, salicylic acid, the peroxidase enzyme, total phenolic contentCite this ArticleIkbal M. Al-Barzinji, Nameer N. Fadhil, Tahir A. Ahmed. Salicylic Acid and Packaging Method Effects on Storability of Pear Fruits. Research & Reviews: Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2): 20–31p.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Transgenic Expression of Stress Tolerance Gene in Sugarcane (Saccharum
           officinarum L.)
    • Authors: Md Munan Shaik, Mst Monira Khaton, Md Amzad Hossain, Md Rezuanul Islam
      Pages: 32 - 39
      Abstract: AbstractAgrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 mediated transformation of sugarcane variety 31 with two plasmids of pB1121 constructs, one containing PsCBL gene and the other containing PsCIPK gene was studied for stress tolerance capability induction. Calli of the variety Isd 31 were infected with both plasmid containing strains using three different infection times of 60, 90 and 120 min in acetosyringone infection medium. In GUS (β-glucuronidase) assay, randomly selected calli from 120 min infection time for PsCBL gene showed 100% of callus GUS positive, and for PsCIPK gene, it was 98%. The expression of these two genes was confirmed by the expression of GUS reporter gene present in the construct. Transformed calli from Isd 31 showed lower levels of regeneration response. Regenerated plantlets derived from transformed calli of sugarcane varieties Isd 31 were used as plant material for DNA isolation. The GUS gene transformed in the plant genome was detected by amplifying through two sets of primer: Primer set 1 amplifies 600 bp DNA segment from GUS gene and Primer set 2 amplifies 960 bp DNA segment from GUS gene. The transformed plantlets produced bands of the expected size 600 bp (primer set 1) and 960 bp (primer set 2) for the GUS fragment at the same position. No band was produced in DNA isolated from the non-transformed sugarcane control plants. The stably attached transgenic plants showed stress tolerance behaviors.Keywords: Agrobacterium, sugarcane, callus, GUS assay, PCRCite this ArticleMd Munan Shaik, Mst Monira Khaton, Md Amzad Hossain et al. Transgenic Expression of Stress Tolerance Gene in Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.). Research & Reviews: Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2): 32–39p.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Review on Assessment of Use and Efficiency of Mating Design in Plant
           Breeding
    • Authors: Clement Urinzwenimana, Felix Muhizi
      Pages: 40 - 57
      Abstract: AbstractPlant breeder works with many different characters, some of which will be controlled by genes whose individual effects can be easily detected. Selection with these characters can give spectacular results others however, form a bulk of the characters plant breeders work with and are governed by genes whose individual effects are so small that they are not amenable to conventional analysis of segregation ratios. The success of any breeding programme largely depends on the selection of suitable parental lines. The starting point of mating designs is a random mating population in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with material deemed appropriate by a breeder for a particular purpose. Mating designs in breeding has two-fold primary objectives. Firstly, to generate information for the breeder to understand the genetic control of the trait and secondly, to generate a base population to initiate an effective breeding programme. Consequently, in order to estimate genetic variances plant breeders, choose from among several standard mating designs to use. A mating can be as simple as a cross between two parents to a more complex one like diallel mating. Mating configuration alludes to the methodology of creating the progenies. The decision of a mating plan for evaluating hereditary fluctuations ought to be managed by the objective(s) of the research, time, space, cost and other organic impediments. This review of paper describes a number of mating designs and assesses the efficiency of their use. These include biparental progenies (BIP), polycross, North Carolina I (NCI) (Nested design), North Carolina II (NCII), North Carolina III (NCIII) and Diallels (I-IV) and line by tester.Keywords: Mating design, plant breeding, parents, progeniesCite this ArticleUrinzwenimana C, Muhizi F. Review on Assessment of Use and Efficiency of Mating Design in Plant Breeding. Research & Reviews: Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2): 40–57p.

      PubDate: 2018-04-25
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 2 (2018)
       
 
 
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