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Publisher: Whiting and Birch   (Total: 4 journals)

Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.11, h-index: 3)
J. of Practice Teaching and Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 1)
J. of Social Policy and Social Work in Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.128, h-index: 5)
Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
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     ISSN (Print) 1759-5150
     Published by Whiting and Birch Homepage  [4 journals]   [SJR: 0.109]   [H-I: 1]
  • Participants’ self-identified learning outcomes in an online
           preceptor education program for health professionals and students
    • Abstract: This case study analysis reports the reflective learning of students and preceptors involved in field experience who accessed an online, free, self-directed educational program (www.preceptor.ca). Six learning outcomes were identified which include: becoming self-aware, fostering communication, valuing relationships, developing new insights, applying new learning to practice, optimizing practice education and experiencing affirmation. Users of the online program tell a story of transformation and that preparation of both student and preceptor for field experience is enhanced. The Preceptor Education program provides an important e-learning option for academic programs and field educators/preceptors in the organisations who collaborate in the preparation of students as future professionals.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 79-97

      DOI 10.1921/9302130101

      Authors
      Ann Bossers, School of Occupational Therapy, Western University, London, Ontario
      Shanon Phelan, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta
      Elizabeth Anne Kinsella, School of Occupational Therapy, Western University, London, Ontario
      Karen Jenkins, School of Nursing, Fanshawe College, London, Ontario
      Karen Ferguson, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University
      Taslim Moosa, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western University
      Susan Schurr, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western University
      Sandra Hobson, School of Occupational Therapy, Western University, London, Ontario
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 15:58:55 GMT
       
  • The practice educator as museum guide, art therapist or exhibition curator
    • Abstract: : The use of arts-based approaches in professional education in health and social care has gathered momentum in the last decade and their effectiveness has been well documented. There are helpful models in the education literature that begin to explain how these creative methods work in learning and practice, and that assert the significance of an emotional or affective level of learning. However, the process remains elusive, almost a ‘given’. A more cross-disciplinary analysis of affective learning is needed to guide arts-based methods and more robust evaluation of their use in health and social care education and practice. This paper identifies different roles that can be taken by the practice educator with a review of those theoretical models of affective learning that underpin them to help understand how and why arts-based approaches are effective.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 79-92

      DOI 10.1921/8302120306

      Authors
      Wendy Couchman, London South Bank University
      Trish Hafford-Letchfield, Middlesex University
      Kate Leonard, Graduate Diploma in Children and Families Social Work, London South Bank University
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 3 / 2014
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Jun 2014 13:00:46 GMT
       
  • Editorial Ritual, dialectic, and learning in, from, about, for and to
           practice
    • Abstract: Editorial Ritual, dialectic, and learning in, from, about, for and to practice
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Editorial
      Pages 3-5

      DOI 10.1921/8402120307

      Authors
      Jonathan Parker, Penang, Malaysia
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 3 / 2014
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Jun 2014 13:00:44 GMT
       
  • Finding the perfect match
    • Abstract: Prior to the commencement of a practice placement, a social work student will usually be invited to meet formally with their practice educator, and sometimes other members of the team, in their work setting to discuss a range of issues about the forthcoming placement. In the absence of significant research about these pre-placement meetings, this small-scale study examined the understandings and experiences of social work students and practice educators regarding the role played by this meeting. Qualitative methods were employed to answer a range of questions related to how the pre-placement meeting was used to aid decision-making about the viability of the placement, participants’ perceptions of the meeting, and concerns about the process that needed to be addressed. Findings indicate that there are a variety of ways in which the meeting is configured and organised, understood and used. The implications for the organisation of social work practice placements are discussed.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 44-61

      DOI 10.1921/8202120305

      Authors
      Diane Simpson
      Ian Mathews
      Karin Crawford, School of Health and Social Care, University of Lincoln, Bridge House, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, LN6 7TS. England
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 3 / 2014
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jun 2014 19:00:25 GMT
       
  • Lessons learned from a dementia training programme for health
           professionals
    • Abstract: This paper presents findings from a dementia awareness training programme delivered to a multidisciplinary group of health professionals in the East Midlands, UK in 2012. The training aimed to develop dementia champions and improve care practices. The focus was on the socio-psychological model of dementia. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with stakeholders (n=5) and training providers (n=2). Post-training questionnaires were completed by those attending the training (n=74). Thematic analysis was undertaken on interview data and open-ended questionnaire data, descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken on quantitative data. Emerging themes focused on the continued need for person-centred care in dementia training and inclusion of the voice of the person with dementia in training material. Attendance of multidisciplinary health professionals at training sessions generated greater understanding of dementia care across professional areas. Issues of health professionals’ workloads and release of staff time were identified as key determinants of staff capacity to attend training. Gaps in training provision were identified.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 48-66

      DOI 10.1921/8002120304

      Authors
      Alison Ward
      Mary Dobson
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Tue, 27 May 2014 19:17:27 GMT
       
  • Group programs in corrections. Best practice meets real world
    • Abstract: The past decade has seen a very significant cultural shift in how group programs are delivered in prisons and in probation and parole settings in New South Wales, Australia. The agency responsible for custodial and community corrections services, Corrective Services New South Wales (CSNSW) is making its way from a culture of considerable autonomy, where staff largely wrote and ran group programs in the way that seemed best to them, to an organisation where systems exist for accreditation, training, supervision and systematic data collection. The transformation to model agency is not complete, but considerable progress has been made and this is borne out by the preparation and publication of a number of significant papers describing the outcomes of program interventions. This paper appraises the progress so far in the introduction of evidence-based group work and offers some reflections on the challenges faced in moving a large organisation concerned with security and offender supervision towards best practice in group rehabilitative programs.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 48-64

      DOI 10.1921/7902120302

      Authors
      Kevin O'Sullivan, School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Australia
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Fri, 23 May 2014 17:25:25 GMT
       
  • Can practice educators be a ‘bridge’ between the academy and
           the practicum'
    • Abstract: Debates exist about the separation of the academy and the practicum. The purpose of this study is to explore how its findings may contribute to this discussion. The unique pedagogies of the university and practice are explored and consideration is given to whether practice educators hold an intermediary role. A qualitative study of an undergraduate programme in England using thematic analysis was undertaken once ethical approval was given. Individual interviews and focus groups were used. A total of 48 participants were interviewed at two different points in time (2008 and 2011-2012). Although this is a limited small scale study not susceptible to generalisation it may be able to provide an analytic generalisation, which may be replicable with further studies. The findings indicated practice educators struggled to act as a bridge because the academy and the practicum have conflicting and competing signature pedagogies. The contribution of this study is to the contemporary discussion on the SWRB changes and models such as Frontline.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 48-64

      DOI 10.1921/7802120301

      Authors
      Martyn Higgins, London South Bank University
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Fri, 16 May 2014 12:40:59 GMT
       
  • Mechanisms that support the assessment of interpersonal skills
    • Abstract: In many health professions, experienced practitioners assess students’ or inexperienced practitioners’ clinical skills but do not formally or explicitly rate their interpersonal skills, even though it is often suggested that failing or struggling students have poor interpersonal skills. The Interpersonal Skills Profile (ISP) has been widely used in UK health care programmes. The tool allows assessors to select five statements from a list, which they feel reflect the student’s achievement. These are usually graded from fail to excellent. Using a Realistic Evaluation approach this study examined how the ISP was used to assess interpersonal skills in a university pre-registration nursing programme. The use of the ISP was investigated through interviews with clinical nursing mentors, practice education facilitators and education champions as well as a documentary analysis of student assessment booklets. The findings led to the development of three middle range theories which may be useful in other contexts. These focus on: 1) overt assessment of interpersonal skills, 2) providing support to mentors and 3) feedback and ‘feeding-forward’ to students.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 34-52

      DOI 10.1921/7701240205

      Authors
      Kate Meier, Learning Development Centre, City University
      Pam Parker, Learning Development Centre, City University
      Della Freeth, Institute of Health Sciences Education, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Fri, 16 May 2014 12:40:59 GMT
       
  • Editorial Axiologies, epistemologies and the worlds of practice learning
    • Abstract: Editorial Axiologies, epistemologies and the worlds of practice learning
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Editorial
      Pages 3-4

      DOI 10.1921/6302120205

      Authors
      Jonathan Parker
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 2 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Dec 2013 16:51:01 GMT
       
  • The reform of social work practice education and training and supporting
           practice educators
    • Abstract: The BA (Hons) Social Work Programme at University Campus Suffolk (UCS) has just completed a full academic year embedding the new Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF) produced by The College of Social Work (TCSW, 2012) and the Standards of Proficiency for Social Work (SoPS) (Health and Care Professionals Council, HCPC, 2012). UCS fully began this process a year ahead of the mandatory requirement for all Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to introduce these in time for the 2013 -2014 academic year. The new regulatory frameworks were incorporated into the programme to allow an evaluative implementation pilot year and an opportunity for review. This study will set the scene for the important role that practice educators play in social work training and education within the context of recent developments. Despite the disruption created by revision to the teaching and learning on the programme, practice placements and additional training and support required for the social work academics feedback from practice educators and students suggests that the transition was a success. It will also highlight the benefits of the new frameworks in relation to the training and support that was provided, the need for the on-going training and support for practice educators as well as considering lessons to be learned and revisions needed for the next academic year.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 34-52

      DOI 10.1921/5702120201

      Authors
      Jackie Plenty, Social Policy and Social Work Division, University Campus Suffolk, School of Applied Social Science, Waterfront Building, Neptune Quay, Ipswich IP4 1QJ
      David Gower, Social Policy and Social Work Division, University Campus Suffolk, School of Applied Social Science, Waterfront Building, Neptune Quay, Ipswich IP4 1QJ
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 17:35:04 GMT
       
  • (Re)presenting the creative potential of learning plans
    • Abstract: Field education is central to social work education as it is here that students bring alive their classroom-based learning through supervised professional practice. An important part of structuring students’ learning on placement is the development of their learning plan. A learning plan links professional activities to be undertaken with learning outcomes to be achieved along with how these are to be assessed within a specific time frame. Whilst the benefits of a well articulated learning plan (sometimes referred to as a learning contract or learning agreement), for structuring teaching and learning on placement (practicum) are generally acknowledged, there is a paucity of research evidence of such benefits in the literature. This article reports on a small qualitative study undertaken with a cohort of fourth year social work students from a Western Australian university, who had completed their final placement. Utilizing a mixed method of textual analysis of student learning plans and focus interviews we sought to understand how students construct and utilise their learning plan in developing their knowledge, skills and values in and for professional practice. Drawing on the findings we conclude with ways to make learning plans a more effective tool for field education placements.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 34-55

      DOI 10.1921/5902120203

      Authors
      Sabina Leitmann, Social Work and Social Policy, Curtin University
      Marion Palmer, Central Institute of Technology
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 17:35:04 GMT
       
  • Better integration of education and practice?
    • Abstract: This article deals with development work that aimed at promoting a better integration of social work university education and social work practice. The development work incorporated the academic world into the working life of social workers in rural areas. As a result, a permanent university-agency network was established, consisting of a university-coordinated networked infrastructure of 26 significant employer organisations (municipalities and nongovernmental organisations). Seminars, workgroups and a continuing education course for practice educators were modelled and realised as network activities. The network has enhanced collaboration. To support the aims of social work education to promote the use of scientific methods and techniques in practice, a significant structure for better interaction with the practice field has been created. Practitioners do have enthusiasm for development work and it is essential in terms of research-based social work as to how this is resourced, supported and utilised by educational solutions. However, in addition to the university-practice relationship, the relationship between individuals and their employer agencies is also key in terms of escalating learning into the organisational context.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 34-53

      DOI 10.1921/6002120204

      Authors
      Sisko Piippo, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Juha Hämäläinen, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Anssi Savolainen, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Mari Suonio, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Raija Väisänen, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 17:35:04 GMT
       
  • Is there a future for the use of non-traditional placement settings for
           final year social work students?
    • Abstract: This paper describes the development of a particular type of nontraditional placement setting for final year social work students: a 100 day, last practice placement based within Police Public Protection Investigation Units (PPIUs) through collaboration between the Police and Manchester Metropolitan University. It will evaluate the degree of progress made since these placements began in 2007 and consider some of the strengths and difficulties encountered in providing consistently good quality practice learning experiences for final year students within PPIU settings. The paper will summarise the learning gained from a recent evaluation of these placements and will describe some of the developments that have resulted from this evaluation.This paper will also consider whether such non-traditional placement settings can continue to provide suitable practice learning opportunities for final year social work students in the light of the newly proposed placement criteria for final placements (TCSW, 2012a) and in the increasingly challenging climate for practice learning reflected in the continuing decreased availability of ‘statutory’ placements.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 34-54

      DOI 10.1921/5802120202

      Authors
      Cathie Jasper, Manchester Metropolitan University
      Liz Munro, Manchester Metropolitan University
      Pauline Black, Manchester Metropolitan University
      Hugh McLaughlin, Manchester Metropolitan University
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 17:35:04 GMT
       
  • Editorial Special issue ‘Creative arts in the professions:
           Contributions to learning in practice’
    • Abstract: Editorial Special issue ‘Creative arts in the professions: Contributions to learning in practice’
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Editorial
      Pages 2-5

      DOI 10.1921/5202120106

      Authors
      Angie Bartoli
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 1 / 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Oct 2013 16:07:56 GMT
       
  • What can social workers learn from African proverbs?
    • Abstract: There continues to be a call on social work education to incorporate diverse teaching and learning resources and strategies to meet the needs of its diverse learners. Proverbs tend to be well known metaphors, which are memorable and are passed on from one generation to the next, and exist in all cultures and in many languages. This paper presents an innovative and creative use of proverbs to facilitate this process, and provides students from different cultures the opportunity to understand and contextualise aspects of social work education and practice. The paper proposes the use of African proverbs to enhance learning for the growing numbers of African students of social work in England.It is hoped that the use of proverbs, which combine cultural heritage and literature as creative arts, will enable students to view the world of social work with an additional lens, making it relevant, interesting and meaningful. The proverbs used in this paper have been translated from various African languages into English.Writing from the perspective of a black female African social work academic, I believe it is important that black people are producers of knowledge and ideas in order to become a part of the writing of their own history.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-32

      DOI 10.1921/4802120105

      Authors
      Prospera Tedam, University of Northampton, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Thu, 19 Sep 2013 14:35:39 GMT
       
  • Social work education in the creative arts space
    • Abstract: This case study explores how the creative arts can be used in the professional development of student social workers. The study is of a voluntary organisation that works with adults experiencing emotional or psychological distress by helping participants to explore the arts as a means of recovery. The organisation incorporates art and design studios, a community gallery and graphic design service with several community projects including a domestic abuse project, prison project and a hospital in-patient service.Since 2004 the organisation has supported over 40 student social workers in practice learning placements. The project manager and off-site practice educator, supported by the HEI, have been instrumental in developing a practice curriculum.The student social workers develop core professional skills by working with individuals, groups, communities and organisations in a setting that challenges negative assumptions about mental health. The creative arts are used as a vehicle for developing skills in relationship based practice. The study will explore how the placements have evolved; what the student social workers actually do; the effectiveness of the practice experience in preparation for the final placement and the development of their professional identity.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-35

      DOI 10.1921/4202120102

      Authors
      Su McCaughan, University of Salford
      Michael Anderson
      Wendy Jones
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:16:55 GMT
       
  • Animating experience
    • Abstract: The imperative for participation in social work education has led to consideration of the ways in which service users’ and carers’ voices can best be heard by students. At Glyndŵr University, this debate has resulted in the development of a service user and carer-led module which will introduce students to a variety of creative approaches as a way of telling narratives of experience. In preparation for the module, a pilot project was run to assess the particular benefits of using animation for this purpose. This reflective case study describes the experiences of a social work student who worked with a carer to make a short animated film. It articulates the ways in which theoretical teaching was brought to life by working intensively. It demonstrates that creative approaches can offer a constructive means of addressing the need to cater for diverse learning styles. In addition, it adds weight to the argument that service users’ and carers’ experiential knowledge should be taken as seriously as other forms of knowledge.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-28

      DOI 10.1921/4302120103

      Authors
      Gareth Morris, Glyndŵr University, Wrexham
      Sylvia Prankard, Glyndŵr University, Wrexham
      Liz Lefroy, Glyndŵr University, Wrexham
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:16:55 GMT
       
  • Healing illusions
    • Abstract: This article focuses on the creative use of a magic trick to help children make sense of the effects of traumatic life events and the process of recovery.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-26

      DOI 10.1921/4402120104

      Authors
      Mark Allenby, University of Northampton, Park Campus, Boughton Green Road, Northampton. NN2 7AL
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:16:55 GMT
       
  • Setting the landscape for a study of academic and creative writing
           techniques as an aid to professional development of healthcare
           professionals
    • Abstract: The purpose of this work is to set the landscape for a study to be carried out in several stages addressing the question: Will creative writing techniques allow healthcare professionals to capture the emotional journeys they experience in a way that makes a significant difference to the effectiveness of such material as teaching and professional development aids?This paper addresses the basis for the study and the assumptions behind it, looking to map out parameters within which later studies can be carried out and a set of learning materials developed. The initial 2-year period has been used to test and enhance a staged workshop teaching model for Health Professional Studies students at levels 4, 5 and 6, using information from studies of creative writing teaching in healthcare plus work on writing techniques.The initial work suggests that creative writing techniques are better understood as a useful developmental tool when taught in the context of academic writing. The response from students has been positive. In this first stage, the work has been a qualitative, testing-the-waters approach from which to build a framework to launch a follow-on quantitative study.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-33

      DOI 10.1921/4102120101

      Authors
      Penny Grubb, Dept of Health Technology and Perioperative Practice, University of Hull
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:16:55 GMT
       
  • ‘That was awful! I’m not ready yet, am I?’ Is there
           such a thing as a Good Fail?
    • Abstract: Failing students in practice placement is frequently viewed as a negative and emotionally challenging experience for students and practice teachers and, as such, a situation to be avoided. In this article the notion that failing is the ‘right thing to do’ is explored from the perspective of Senior Agency based Practice Educator and a University Course Director for Practice Learning and from their experience of supporting both students and practice educators in the process.Reasons for failure are considered and the concept of ‘reluctance to fail ‘is explored in the context of the expectations of assessment of practice. We argue that there is such a thing as a ‘good fail’ and that Social Work educators need to support the positive challenges of rigorous assessment rather than focus on the uncomfortable ‘feelings’ surrounding the notion of failure.Practice educators have an important gate keeping function which needs recognition in the process of assessing readiness to practise. We suggest that not only do practice educators and tutors need to embrace a fail recommendation as justifiable but also that students themselves are able to recognise a lack of readiness to practise and can acknowledge a sense of’ relief’ in a fail outcome.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 135-148

      DOI 10.1921/2602110309

      Authors
      Stuart Eno, Perth and Kinross Council
      Judy Kerr, University of Stirling
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 11
      Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2013 15:33:53 GMT
       
 
 
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