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Publisher: Whiting and Birch   (Total: 4 journals)

Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Journal of Social Policy and Social Work in Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (4 followers)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Full-text available via subscription   (12 followers)
Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning    [4 followers]  Follow    
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1759-5150
     Published by Whiting and Birch Homepage  [4 journals]   [SJR: 0.109]   [H-I: 1]
  • Editorial Axiologies, epistemologies and the worlds of practice learning
    • Abstract: Editorial Axiologies, epistemologies and the worlds of practice learning
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Editorial
      Pages 3-4

      DOI 10.1921/6302120205

      Authors
      Jonathan Parker
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 2 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Dec 2013 16:51:01 GMT
       
  • A solution-focused approach to family support
    • Abstract: This article reports on a project to introduce a strengths-based and solution-focused model of practice within a small voluntary family support organisation that works with families affected by drug and alcohol abuse. It outlines a rationale for the project and discusses how the authors drew on learning in relation to change, leadership and project management.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 87-101

      DOI 10.1921/xxx

      Authors
      Sheila Cooper, 18 West Pilton, Park, Edinburgh EH4 4EJ
      Maura Daly, 18 West Pilton, Park, Edinburgh EH4 4EJ
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 2 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Dec 2013 16:51:01 GMT
       
  • The reform of social work practice education and training and supporting
           practice educators
    • Abstract: The BA (Hons) Social Work Programme at University Campus Suffolk (UCS) has just completed a full academic year embedding the new Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF) produced by The College of Social Work (TCSW, 2012) and the Standards of Proficiency for Social Work (SoPS) (Health and Care Professionals Council, HCPC, 2012). UCS fully began this process a year ahead of the mandatory requirement for all Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to introduce these in time for the 2013 -2014 academic year. The new regulatory frameworks were incorporated into the programme to allow an evaluative implementation pilot year and an opportunity for review. This study will set the scene for the important role that practice educators play in social work training and education within the context of recent developments. Despite the disruption created by revision to the teaching and learning on the programme, practice placements and additional training and support required for the social work academics feedback from practice educators and students suggests that the transition was a success. It will also highlight the benefits of the new frameworks in relation to the training and support that was provided, the need for the on-going training and support for practice educators as well as considering lessons to be learned and revisions needed for the next academic year.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 34-52

      DOI 10.1921/5702120201

      Authors
      Jackie Plenty, Social Policy and Social Work Division, University Campus Suffolk, School of Applied Social Science, Waterfront Building, Neptune Quay, Ipswich IP4 1QJ
      David Gower, Social Policy and Social Work Division, University Campus Suffolk, School of Applied Social Science, Waterfront Building, Neptune Quay, Ipswich IP4 1QJ
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 17:35:04 GMT
       
  • (Re)presenting the creative potential of learning plans
    • Abstract: Field education is central to social work education as it is here that students bring alive their classroom-based learning through supervised professional practice. An important part of structuring students’ learning on placement is the development of their learning plan. A learning plan links professional activities to be undertaken with learning outcomes to be achieved along with how these are to be assessed within a specific time frame. Whilst the benefits of a well articulated learning plan (sometimes referred to as a learning contract or learning agreement), for structuring teaching and learning on placement (practicum) are generally acknowledged, there is a paucity of research evidence of such benefits in the literature. This article reports on a small qualitative study undertaken with a cohort of fourth year social work students from a Western Australian university, who had completed their final placement. Utilizing a mixed method of textual analysis of student learning plans and focus interviews we sought to understand how students construct and utilise their learning plan in developing their knowledge, skills and values in and for professional practice. Drawing on the findings we conclude with ways to make learning plans a more effective tool for field education placements.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 34-55

      DOI 10.1921/5902120203

      Authors
      Sabina Leitmann, Social Work and Social Policy, Curtin University
      Marion Palmer, Central Institute of Technology
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 17:35:04 GMT
       
  • Better integration of education and practice?
    • Abstract: This article deals with development work that aimed at promoting a better integration of social work university education and social work practice. The development work incorporated the academic world into the working life of social workers in rural areas. As a result, a permanent university-agency network was established, consisting of a university-coordinated networked infrastructure of 26 significant employer organisations (municipalities and nongovernmental organisations). Seminars, workgroups and a continuing education course for practice educators were modelled and realised as network activities. The network has enhanced collaboration. To support the aims of social work education to promote the use of scientific methods and techniques in practice, a significant structure for better interaction with the practice field has been created. Practitioners do have enthusiasm for development work and it is essential in terms of research-based social work as to how this is resourced, supported and utilised by educational solutions. However, in addition to the university-practice relationship, the relationship between individuals and their employer agencies is also key in terms of escalating learning into the organisational context.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 34-53

      DOI 10.1921/6002120204

      Authors
      Sisko Piippo, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Juha Hämäläinen, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Anssi Savolainen, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Mari Suonio, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Raija Väisänen, Dept of Social Sciences, Sisko Piippo, Faculty of Social Sciences and Business Studies, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 17:35:04 GMT
       
  • Is there a future for the use of non-traditional placement settings for
           final year social work students?
    • Abstract: This paper describes the development of a particular type of nontraditional placement setting for final year social work students: a 100 day, last practice placement based within Police Public Protection Investigation Units (PPIUs) through collaboration between the Police and Manchester Metropolitan University. It will evaluate the degree of progress made since these placements began in 2007 and consider some of the strengths and difficulties encountered in providing consistently good quality practice learning experiences for final year students within PPIU settings. The paper will summarise the learning gained from a recent evaluation of these placements and will describe some of the developments that have resulted from this evaluation.This paper will also consider whether such non-traditional placement settings can continue to provide suitable practice learning opportunities for final year social work students in the light of the newly proposed placement criteria for final placements (TCSW, 2012a) and in the increasingly challenging climate for practice learning reflected in the continuing decreased availability of ‘statutory’ placements.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 34-54

      DOI 10.1921/5802120202

      Authors
      Cathie Jasper, Manchester Metropolitan University
      Liz Munro, Manchester Metropolitan University
      Pauline Black, Manchester Metropolitan University
      Hugh McLaughlin, Manchester Metropolitan University
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 17:35:04 GMT
       
  • Editorial Special issue ‘Creative arts in the professions:
           Contributions to learning in practice’
    • Abstract: Editorial Special issue ‘Creative arts in the professions: Contributions to learning in practice’
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Editorial
      Pages 2-5

      DOI 10.1921/5202120106

      Authors
      Angie Bartoli
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 1 / 2013
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Oct 2013 16:07:56 GMT
       
  • What can social workers learn from African proverbs?
    • Abstract: There continues to be a call on social work education to incorporate diverse teaching and learning resources and strategies to meet the needs of its diverse learners. Proverbs tend to be well known metaphors, which are memorable and are passed on from one generation to the next, and exist in all cultures and in many languages. This paper presents an innovative and creative use of proverbs to facilitate this process, and provides students from different cultures the opportunity to understand and contextualise aspects of social work education and practice. The paper proposes the use of African proverbs to enhance learning for the growing numbers of African students of social work in England.It is hoped that the use of proverbs, which combine cultural heritage and literature as creative arts, will enable students to view the world of social work with an additional lens, making it relevant, interesting and meaningful. The proverbs used in this paper have been translated from various African languages into English.Writing from the perspective of a black female African social work academic, I believe it is important that black people are producers of knowledge and ideas in order to become a part of the writing of their own history.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-32

      DOI 10.1921/4802120105

      Authors
      Prospera Tedam, University of Northampton, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Thu, 19 Sep 2013 14:35:39 GMT
       
  • Social work education in the creative arts space
    • Abstract: This case study explores how the creative arts can be used in the professional development of student social workers. The study is of a voluntary organisation that works with adults experiencing emotional or psychological distress by helping participants to explore the arts as a means of recovery. The organisation incorporates art and design studios, a community gallery and graphic design service with several community projects including a domestic abuse project, prison project and a hospital in-patient service.Since 2004 the organisation has supported over 40 student social workers in practice learning placements. The project manager and off-site practice educator, supported by the HEI, have been instrumental in developing a practice curriculum.The student social workers develop core professional skills by working with individuals, groups, communities and organisations in a setting that challenges negative assumptions about mental health. The creative arts are used as a vehicle for developing skills in relationship based practice. The study will explore how the placements have evolved; what the student social workers actually do; the effectiveness of the practice experience in preparation for the final placement and the development of their professional identity.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-35

      DOI 10.1921/4202120102

      Authors
      Su McCaughan, University of Salford
      Michael Anderson
      Wendy Jones
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:16:55 GMT
       
  • Animating experience
    • Abstract: The imperative for participation in social work education has led to consideration of the ways in which service users’ and carers’ voices can best be heard by students. At Glyndŵr University, this debate has resulted in the development of a service user and carer-led module which will introduce students to a variety of creative approaches as a way of telling narratives of experience. In preparation for the module, a pilot project was run to assess the particular benefits of using animation for this purpose. This reflective case study describes the experiences of a social work student who worked with a carer to make a short animated film. It articulates the ways in which theoretical teaching was brought to life by working intensively. It demonstrates that creative approaches can offer a constructive means of addressing the need to cater for diverse learning styles. In addition, it adds weight to the argument that service users’ and carers’ experiential knowledge should be taken as seriously as other forms of knowledge.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-28

      DOI 10.1921/4302120103

      Authors
      Gareth Morris, Glyndŵr University, Wrexham
      Sylvia Prankard, Glyndŵr University, Wrexham
      Liz Lefroy, Glyndŵr University, Wrexham
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:16:55 GMT
       
  • Healing illusions
    • Abstract: This article focuses on the creative use of a magic trick to help children make sense of the effects of traumatic life events and the process of recovery.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-26

      DOI 10.1921/4402120104

      Authors
      Mark Allenby, University of Northampton, Park Campus, Boughton Green Road, Northampton. NN2 7AL
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:16:55 GMT
       
  • Setting the landscape for a study of academic and creative writing
           techniques as an aid to professional development of healthcare
           professionals
    • Abstract: The purpose of this work is to set the landscape for a study to be carried out in several stages addressing the question: Will creative writing techniques allow healthcare professionals to capture the emotional journeys they experience in a way that makes a significant difference to the effectiveness of such material as teaching and professional development aids?This paper addresses the basis for the study and the assumptions behind it, looking to map out parameters within which later studies can be carried out and a set of learning materials developed. The initial 2-year period has been used to test and enhance a staged workshop teaching model for Health Professional Studies students at levels 4, 5 and 6, using information from studies of creative writing teaching in healthcare plus work on writing techniques.The initial work suggests that creative writing techniques are better understood as a useful developmental tool when taught in the context of academic writing. The response from students has been positive. In this first stage, the work has been a qualitative, testing-the-waters approach from which to build a framework to launch a follow-on quantitative study.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-33

      DOI 10.1921/4102120101

      Authors
      Penny Grubb, Dept of Health Technology and Perioperative Practice, University of Hull
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:16:55 GMT
       
  • The ‘not yet competent’ student
    • Abstract: The Social Work Reform Board emphasises the need for robust assessment processes and qualified practice educators. Following our analysis of ‘failing – or ‘not yet competent’ students’ - we argue that most students ‘failed’ for reasons other than incompetent practice, which we outline.We conclude by arguing for a robust construction of practice education/assessment, which emphasises doing ‘practice’ in the agency; a return to the notion of a portfolio as a vehicle for assessment, as opposed to the portfolio becoming the assessment; and a greater emphasis upon the practice educator to assess ‘practice, as opposed to shifting the assessment decision to portfolio reading or practice assessment panels Our discussion will contribute to preparations for assessing capability within the new social work degree, and poses challenges to Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) and all involved in social work education.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 118-134

      DOI 10.1921/2502110308

      Authors
      Graeme Simpson, University of Wolverhampton
      Ani Murr, University of Wolverhampton
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 11
      Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2013 15:33:53 GMT
       
  • ‘That was awful! I’m not ready yet, am I?’ Is there
           such a thing as a Good Fail?
    • Abstract: Failing students in practice placement is frequently viewed as a negative and emotionally challenging experience for students and practice teachers and, as such, a situation to be avoided. In this article the notion that failing is the ‘right thing to do’ is explored from the perspective of Senior Agency based Practice Educator and a University Course Director for Practice Learning and from their experience of supporting both students and practice educators in the process.Reasons for failure are considered and the concept of ‘reluctance to fail ‘is explored in the context of the expectations of assessment of practice. We argue that there is such a thing as a ‘good fail’ and that Social Work educators need to support the positive challenges of rigorous assessment rather than focus on the uncomfortable ‘feelings’ surrounding the notion of failure.Practice educators have an important gate keeping function which needs recognition in the process of assessing readiness to practise. We suggest that not only do practice educators and tutors need to embrace a fail recommendation as justifiable but also that students themselves are able to recognise a lack of readiness to practise and can acknowledge a sense of’ relief’ in a fail outcome.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 135-148

      DOI 10.1921/2602110309

      Authors
      Stuart Eno, Perth and Kinross Council
      Judy Kerr, University of Stirling
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 11
      Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2013 15:33:53 GMT
       
  • Whose students are they anyway?
    • Abstract: This paper draws on case study research which explored the support needs of those involved in social work practice learning in an English local authority. Data was collected through questionnaires, and semi-structured interviews with 27 practice educators, students and team managers. Although issues relating to failing students were not intended as the primary focus of the research, this theme dominates the findings from practice educators and team managers. Practice educators cited problematic placements as a key factor in their decision not to continue in the role.A significant contributory factor in the negative impact of the failing experience is the participants’ dissatisfaction with the attitude and approach of the students’ universities. Particularly striking is the perception that universities present an obstruction to a fail decision resulting in students being passed who possibly should not do so. This paper considers whether the different institutional perceptions of the social work student and the organisations’ role in relation to them could be at the root of these difficulties in collaboration and fuel the ‘failure to fail’ debate.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 59-78

      DOI 10.1921/2202110305

      Authors
      Joanna Rawles, London South Bank University
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 11
      Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2013 15:33:51 GMT
       
  • Deciding to fail
    • Abstract: Within pre-registration nursing education programmes, clinical competence is verified via continuous assessment in practice. Registered nurses who have undertaken mentor preparation assess competence in practice and have a responsibility to confirm that nursing students are capable of safe and effective practice prior to registration. This requires mentors to identify underperforming students and manage the situation appropriately. Drawing on interview data from 10 mentors who had failed a student in practice this paper will highlight the processes, alongside, the difficulties and dilemmas associated with managing a failed assessment successfully. Three key concepts emerging from the data will provide the framework for this paper, namely: identifying the weak student; creating possibilities for success; deciding to fail.Within the concept of ‘Identifying the weak student’ participants discuss how they recognised the early indicators of possible failure. While, ‘Creating possibilities for success’ reveals the strategies mentors used to attempt to facilitate students’ progress. The final concept ‘Deciding to fail’ exposes the emotional consequences for both the mentor and the student of a failed assessment and the importance of debriefing following the event. The paper concludes by discussing the support needs of mentors as this emerged as crucial in the process of managing a failed assessment.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 36-58

      DOI 10.1921/2102110304

      Authors
      Kathleen Duffy, NMAHP Practice Development Centre, 14 Beckford Street, Hamilton ML3 0TA
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 11
      Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2013 15:33:51 GMT
       
  • Surveillance and silence
    • Abstract: Studies to date have highlighted a number of key factors in the assessment of difficult social work placements including the need for adequate professional formation; communication; the changing social work education framework; and the influence of the wider social work context. Factors less widely examined are the perceptions of some practice educators that the assessment of placement students operates in a wider context of surveillance and scrutiny by a range of stakeholders. We argue that such perceptions of surveillance can cause a discursive anxiety for practice educators and can inhibit key developmental conversations between assessor and student. Drawing on interviews with ten practice educators, we examine the tendency of practice educators reflecting on a failed placement to rehearse or even enact those key developmental conversations post hoc, broaching previously unstated or tacit aspects of the placement experience. We argue for the need to create a safe discursive space for these conversations to take place in situ during the challenging placement and suggest that a diminution in perceptions of surveillance and enhanced outcomes for students and practice educators will result.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 79-97

      DOI 10.1921/2302110306

      Authors
      Jason Schaub, Buckinghamshire New University
      Roger Dalrymple, Oxford Brookes University
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 11
      Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2013 15:33:51 GMT
       
  • ‘They thought I wasn’t good enough for social work
           practice’
    • Abstract: The few studies of why social work students fail their practice learning opportunity (PLOs) have been undertaken through the lens of practice educators, lecturers and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) with no input from students. Using qualitative interviews; this research explores the reasons for failure from the perspective of the students. The findings identified a number of interrelated issues such as previous work experiences, family history and personal circumstances as the rationale for what led those interviewed into social work. Issues such as ill health, personal problems and lack of clarity around assessment criteria as well as perceived lack of support from HEIs were identified as some of the factors that led students to fail their practice learning experiences. Recommendations from those interviewed included the suggestion that HEIs should, at the recruitment stage, provide clear information about the implications of failing practice learning opportunities and clarify what type of support for is available for those who fail. The students interviewed also echo the desire expressed by the HEIs and practice educators for clearer assessment criteria/frameworks and a more supportive process for all parties.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 17-35

      DOI 10.1921/2002110303

      Authors
      Alberto Poletti, University of Bedforshire
      Ann Anka, University of East Anglia
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 11
      Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2013 15:33:51 GMT
       
  • Addressing professional suitability in social work education
    • Abstract: Limited research exists pertaining to field education coordinators’ leadership and educational practice in general, or with respect to the specific topic of gatekeeping in social work education. This article presents the results of a Canadian study that investigates the experience and approach of field education coordinators in addressing student professional suitability concerns. This exploratory study consists of a focus group conducted with field education coordinators from across Canada, and an extensive web-based survey questionnaire administered to all current, and some former social work field education coordinators in Canada. In brief, the results of this study reinforce the perception found in social work literature that gatekeeping predominantly falls to the field component of social work education. Findings of the study provide insight into the location of field education within academia; and highlights the important leadership role undertaken by field education coordinators in supporting students, faculty liaisons, field educators, and university administration in addressing concerns related to student professional suitability. Implications for social work education are discussed.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 98-117

      DOI 10.1921/2402110307

      Authors
      Jeanette S. Robertson, Social and Educational Development, School of Social Work and Human Service, Thompson Rivers University, 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 11
      Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2013 15:33:51 GMT
       
  • We aren’t all winners
    • Abstract: The paper will discuss from a service user/carer perspective the possible implications and ramifications that ‘failing to fail’ students has on service users and carers. We will start by briefly contextualising the issue drawing on the work of Rutkowski (2007), Dudek et al. (2005), Duffy (2003) and Cleland et al. (2008) and other authors who have contributed to the topic. We expand the debate from the service user and carer perspective examining likely causes and determinants and then move on to discussing the possible impact of this practice on those who are cared for.This paper will provide debate and discussion from a unique perspective being written by those who have lived experience of care delivered by students and qualified practitioners from the nursing and social work professions.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 8-16

      DOI 10.1921/1902110302

      Authors
      Lisa Malihi-Shoja, University of Central Lancashire
      David Catherall
      Jane Titherington
      Ernie Mallen
      Graham Hough
      Journal The Journal of Practice Teaching and Learning
      Print ISSN 1759-5150
      Journal Volume Volume 11
      Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 3 / 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2013 15:33:51 GMT
       
 
 
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