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Publisher: Ubiquity Press Limited   (Total: 39 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 39 of 39 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ancient Asia     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archaeology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Architectural Histories     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Belgian J. of Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.167, CiteScore: 0)
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Citizen Science : Theory and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comics Grid : J. of Comics Scholarship     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Data Science J.     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 1)
Future Cities and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Glocality     Open Access  
Glossa : A J. of General Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Insights : the UKSG journal     Open Access   (Followers: 104, SJR: 0.473, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Integrated Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.662, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Review of Social Psychology / Revue Intl.e de Psychologie Sociale     Open Access   (SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Circadian Rhythms     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Computer Applications in Archaeology     Open Access  
J. of Conservation and Museum Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
J. of European Psychology Students     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Interactive Media in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Molecular Signaling     Open Access   (SJR: 0.677, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Open Archaeology Data     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
J. of Open Humanities Data     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Open Psychology Data     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Open Research Software     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Portuguese Linguistics     Open Access  
Laboratory Phonology : J. of the Association for Laboratory Phonology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Le foucaldien     Open Access  
MaHKUscript. J. of Fine Art Research     Open Access  
Open Health Data     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open J. of Bioresources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Quaternary     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Papers from the Institute of Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Physical Activity and Health     Open Access  
Present Pasts     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychologica Belgica     Open Access   (SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Secularism and Nonreligion     Open Access  
Stability : Intl. J. of Security and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Utrecht J. of Intl. and European Law     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Worldwide Waste : J. of Interdisciplinary Studies     Open Access  
Journal Cover
Psychologica Belgica
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.426
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0033-2879 - ISSN (Online) 2054-670X
Published by Ubiquity Press Limited Homepage  [39 journals]
  • Social Support, Adjustment, and Psychological Distress of Help-Seeking
           Expatriates

    • Abstract: The present study aimed to explore the interrelations between support processes, adjustment, and psychological distress within a sample of help-seeking expatriates. Specifically, we examined (1) the association between expatriates’ cross-cultural adjustment (i.e., work, interaction and general adjustment) and levels of psychological distress (i.e., depression, anxiety and stress), (2) the association between expatriates’ perceptions of socioemotional and instrumental support availability and their level of cross-cultural adjustment, and (3) the moderating role of expatriates’ socioemotional and instrumental support needs in the latter association. Findings showed that lower levels of expatriates’ work adjustment were associated with higher levels of psychological distress. Further, perceived availability of socioemotional support was positively linked to expatriates’ interaction and work adjustment. Finally, instrumental support needs moderated the relationship between instrumental support availability and general adjustment such that higher levels of instrumental support availability were associated with better general adjustment, but only for expatriates reporting high needs for instrumental support. Our study represents a novel contribution to the expatriate literature by shedding light on expatriates’ vulnerability for psychological distress and understanding the type of social support that is considered most beneficial for help-seeking expatriates. Suggestions are made for clinical interventions for expatriates in need of support. Published on 2018-10-05 17:29:49
       
  • Understanding Long-term Outcome from the Patients’ Perspective: A Mixed
           Methods Naturalistic Study on Inpatient Psychotherapy

    • Abstract: Objective: The complex phenomenon of psychotherapy outcome requires further conceptual and methodological developments that facilitate clinically meaningful research findings. In this study, we rely on an idiosyncratic and process-oriented understanding of treatment effects in order to investigate long-term outcome. A conceptual model of long-term outcome is presented that comprises both a taxonomy of change and explanatory factors.
      Method: A mixed methods naturalistic study was conducted in an inpatient psychotherapy setting. Long-term quantitative outcome data are complemented with a data-driven thematic analysis of interviews with 22 participants, five to six years after ending inpatient psychotherapy.
      Results: Long-term outcome findings show improved well-being for the majority of former patients and this until five to six years after treatment. From the patients’ perspectives, long-term changes can be situated on different interrelated existential levels: reconnection to others and (the meaning of) life, a revelation, an altered self, life changes, and altered expectations and ideas about recovery and treatment. The complex interplay of the person, the therapy centre, the outside world and the evolution over time helped explain the experienced changes and individual differences.
      Conclusion: The findings support the value of an idiosyncratic and process-oriented understanding of outcome and recovery as well as substantiate the importance of multiple methods and perspectives when studying the effects of psychotherapy. Published on 2018-10-04 12:11:31
       
  • Moral Judgments Depend on Information Presentation: Evidence for Recency
           and Transfer Effects

    • Abstract: Moral judgements are crucial for social life and rely on the analysis of the agent’s intention and the outcome of the agent’s action. The current study examines to the influence of how the information is presented on moral judgement. The first experiment investigated the effects of the order in which intention and outcome information was presented. The results showed that participants relied more on the last presented information, suggesting a recency effect. The second experiment required participants to make two types of judgments (wrongness vs. punishment) and manipulated the order of the requested two types of judgments. Results showed an asymmetrical transfer effect whereby punishment judgements, but not wrongness judgements were affected by the order of presentation. This asymmetrical transfer effect was likely linked to the ambiguity of the punishment judgement. Altogether, the study showed that the order in which information was presented and the order in which one was asked to think about the wrongness of an action or the punishment that the action deserves were two factors that should be irrelevant, but actually influenced moral judgements. The influence of these factors was mostly observed during the most difficult judgements, precisely in situations where human decision is called upon, such as in court trials. Published on 2018-09-27 18:42:38
       
  • Different Clinical Presentations in Eating Disorder Patients with
           Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Based on the Co-Occurrence of Borderline
           Personality Disorder

    • Abstract: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) features are common in patients with eating disorders (ED), yet little is known regarding the clinical presentation of ED patients who present with NSSI with and without BPD. The current study compared self-injurious, female ED inpatients with (n = 98; NSSI+BPD) and without BPD (n = 45; NSSI-only) on different self-reported clinical features. Results suggest that ED patients with NSSI+BPD differ from those with NSSI-only with regard to frequency of suicidal ideation, alcohol, drug or medication abuse, internalizing/externalizing psychopathology, interpersonal problems, and coping strategies, with the NSSI+BPD group demonstrating more impairment in each of these domains. Despite these differences in clinical presentation, however, groups did not differ in NSSI features. In sum, while self-injurious ED patients may present with similar NSSI behavior regardless of BPD diagnosis, those with NSS+BPD represent a group with much higher clinical complexity and greater treatment needs. Published on 2018-09-27 18:28:53
       
  • Executive Function, Chaos and Temperament: Specificities in Preschoolers
           with Externalizing Behaviors

    • Abstract: Various factors may contribute to the emergence of externalizing behavior (EB) problems in the preschool period. At the child level, temperament and executive function (EF) seem to play an important role, as well as environmental variables such as household chaos. In this study, we examined the profiles of 49 EB preschoolers compared to 49 typically developing (TD) preschoolers matched on age and gender. To evaluate the behavioral aspect of EB, we asked teachers and parents to fill out questionnaires, but we also used an observational paradigm. We assessed executive functions using attention, inhibition, flexibility and working memory tests. Finally, we used questionnaires to assess household chaos and child temperament. Results showed that children rated by parents as presenting EB were also assessed so by teachers and exhibited more agitation in our observational paradigm. As expected, EB children also presented weaker performance than the TD children in all EF tasks, except those measuring attention, and showed a larger reaction-time variability. Parents of the EB group reported a more chaotic environment at home. Finally, we found that child temperament (i.e., emotionality) also plays a role in group belonging. This study shows that EB children already exhibit specific characteristics by the time they are of preschool age, not only in the behavioral sphere, but also in the cognitive and environmental areas. However, despite all the differences between the two groups, a discriminant analysis showed that EF capacities have a weak power for EB diagnosis. Published on 2018-08-22 14:07:11
       
  • Paul Eelen: Reflections on Life and Work

    • Abstract: This manuscript is part of a special issue to commemorate professor Paul Eelen, who passed away on August 21, 2016. Paul was a clinically oriented scientist, for whom learning principles (Pavlovian or operant) were more than salivary responses and lever presses. His expertise in learning psychology and his enthusiasm to translate this knowledge to clinical practice inspired many inside and outside academia. Several of his original writings were in the Dutch language. Instead of editing a special issue with contributions of colleagues and friends, we decided to translate a selection of his manuscripts to English to allow wide access to his original insights and opinions. Even though the manuscripts were written more than two decades ago, their content is surprisingly contemporary. This introductory article presents a reflection on Paul’s career and legacy and introduces the selected manuscripts that are part of this special issue. Published on 2018-07-26 15:38:03
       
  • Classical Conditioning: Classical Yet Modern

    • Abstract: This manuscript is part of a special issue to commemorate professor Paul Eelen, who passed away on August 21, 2016. Paul was a clinically oriented scientist, for whom learning principles (Pavlovian or operant) were more than salivary responses and lever presses. His expertise in learning psychology and his enthusiasm to translate this knowledge to clinical practice inspired many inside and outside academia. Several of his original writings were in the Dutch language. Instead of editing a special issue with contributions of colleagues and friends, we decided to translate a selection of his manuscripts to English to allow wide access to his original insights and opinions. Even though the manuscripts were written more than two decades ago, their content is surprisingly contemporary. The present manuscript was originally published as part of a Liber Amicorum for Paul Eelen’s own supervisor, prof. Joseph Nuttin. In this chapter, Paul Eelen presents a modern view on Pavlovian learning. It appeared in 1980, at the heyday of cognitive psychology which initially dismissed conditioning. Paul Eelen’s perseverance in presenting learning principles as key to study human behaviour has proven correct and ahead of time.First published as: Eelen, P. (1980). Klassieke conditionering: Klassiek en toch modern. In Liber Amicorum, Prof. J. R. Nuttin, Gedrag, dynamische relatie en betekeniswereld (pp. 321–343). Leuven: Universitaire Pers Leuven. Published on 2018-07-26 15:30:46
       
  • Behaviour Therapy and Behaviour Modification Background and Development

    • Abstract: This manuscript is part of a special issue to commemorate professor Paul Eelen, who passed away on August 21, 2016. Paul was a clinically oriented scientist, for whom learning principles (Pavlovian or operant) were more than salivary responses and lever presses. His expertise in learning psychology and his enthusiasm to translate this knowledge to clinical practice inspired many inside and outside academia. Several of his original writings were in the Dutch language. Instead of editing a special issue with contributions of colleagues and friends, we decided to translate a selection of his manuscripts to English to allow wide access to his original insights and opinions. Even though the manuscripts were written more than two decades ago, their content is surprisingly contemporary. This manuscript is a transcription of a lecture that was published in 1980. It was Paul Eelen’s first public presentation after a two-year study in the United States, which has inspired much of his later thinking. The text can be viewed as a manifesto for behaviour therapy as it was then advancing in Belgium and the Netherlands.This presentation was given as the introduction to the L.A.P.P. seminar day held October 27, 1980, which was themed: Behaviour modification. The lecture was published as: Eelen, P. (1980). Gedragstherapie en gedragsmodificatie: Achtergronden. Leuvens Bulletin L. A. P. P., 39, 1–19. Published on 2018-07-26 15:13:44
       
  • The Therapist as Conditioned Stimulus

    • Abstract: This manuscript is part of a special issue to commemorate professor Paul Eelen, who passed away on August 21, 2016. Paul was a clinically oriented scientist, for whom learning principles (Pavlovian or operant) were more than salivary responses and lever presses. His expertise in learning psychology and his enthusiasm to translate this knowledge to clinical practice inspired many inside and outside academia. Several of his original writings were in the Dutch language. Instead of editing a special issue with contributions of colleagues and friends, we decided to translate a selection of his manuscripts to English to allow wide access to his original insights and opinions. Even though the manuscripts were written more than two decades ago, their content is surprisingly contemporary. This manuscript was originally published in 1989 as part of an edited book on the therapeutic relation. In this chapter, Paul Eelen takes a critical position against the dominance of the client-centered approach. He presents the therapeutic relation as a behavioural interaction between the patient and his therapist which is subject to laws of learning. This is exemplified by an in-depth analysis of the therapist as a conditioned stimulus.First published as: Eelen, P., Depreeuw, E., & Van den Bergh, O. (1989). De therapeut als geconditioneerde stimulus. In H. Vertommen, G. Cluckers, & G. Lietaer (Eds.), De relatie in therapie (pp. 147–165). Leuven: Universitaire Pers Leuven.1 Published on 2018-07-26 15:08:49
       
  • The Broken Achilles Heel of Behavior Therapy: A Couple of Reflections on
           the Function Analysis

    • Abstract: This manuscript is part of a special issue to commemorate professor Paul Eelen, who passed away on August 21, 2016. Paul was a clinically oriented scientist, for whom learning principles (Pavlovian or operant) were more than salivary responses and lever presses. His expertise in learning psychology and his enthusiasm to translate this knowledge to clinical practice inspired many inside and outside academia. Several of his original writings were in the Dutch language. Instead of editing a special issue with contributions of colleagues and friends, we decided to translate a selection of his manuscripts to English to allow wide access to his original insights and opinions. Even though the manuscripts were written more than two decades ago, their content is surprisingly contemporary. This manuscript was originally published in 1992 and discusses functional analysis as the Achilles heel of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). Functional analysis is that part of CBT where insight in learning principles feeds into clinical case conceptualisation. Even though functional analysis was self-evident for first generation behaviour therapists, its importance has been overlooked since long. It is striking to see how modern CBT-approaches again incorporate functional assessment.First published as: Eelen, P., & Van den Bergh, O. (1992). De gebroken achillespees van de gedragstherapie: enkele bedenkingen bij de functieanalyse. Psychotherapeutisch Paspoort, 2, 25–34.1 Published on 2018-07-26 14:58:00
       
 
 
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