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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover
Australian Bulletin of Labour
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0311-6336
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Multiple disadvantage, service delivery and client
           outcomes in a strengths-based employment program
    • Abstract: Isherwood, L; Moskos, M; King, D; Walker, R; Brown, L
      Jobseekers facing social and economic disadvantage experience multiple personal and systemic barriers in obtaining employment. It is important to understand how such disadvantage impacts on service delivery of employment programs and outcomes achieved. This article draws on an evaluation of an employment program for long-term jobless families, the Building Family Opportunities program, which was implemented using strengths-based, intensive case management principles. Quantitative and qualitative administrative data on 393 jobseekers, collected over the first three years of program operation, were analysed to examine the association between disadvantage, service provision and jobseeker outcomes. Level of disadvantage was negatively associated with education and employment outcomes. The multiple disadvantages experienced by many jobseekers led to the program placing greater emphasis on client engagement, collaboration with other agencies, and the addressing of barriers to employment and education. These findings inform future policy and programs which aim to increase workforce participation of jobseekers experiencing multiple disadvantages.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 May 2018 21:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Examining the gendered impact of economic
           restructuring on regional labour markets
    • Abstract: Bamberry, Larissa
      This paper explores the gendered impact of structural change in regional labour markets, and the implications for gender equality. While buffering, segmentation and substitution labour market hypotheses have been used in national and supra-national analyses of labour market inequality, their application has not been tested at the regional level. Examining three regions within Australia (the Latrobe and Geelong regions of Victoria and North Western region of Tasmania) that have experienced distinctive patterns of economic restructuring since 1996 the paper finds that while women's education and training has improved, the concentration of women in part-time work and female-dominated industries has resulted in limited change to their relative contribution to household income. The research suggests that the application of labour market hypotheses to regional labour markets provides an improved understanding of the impact of economic restructuring on gender equality.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 May 2018 21:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Decentralised bargaining in Denmark and Australia:
           Voluntarism versus legal regulation
    • Abstract: Andersen, Soren Kaj; Kaine, Sarah; Lansbury, Russell D
      This article compares the decentralisation of Danish and Australian systems of industrial relations in recent decades. Despite significant differences in historical starting points and trajectories, which reflect different political economies, both have made the transition from a largely centralised to a more decentralised system. However, there are important differences in the means by which these developments occurred and the extent of change in the basic character of industrial relations in each country. The Australian system has placed greater emphasis than the Danish on a legalistic approach to labour-market regulation and enforceability of employment contracts. The Danish system has retained much of its voluntaristic social-partnership approach, subject to a complicated interplay between collective agreements and legislation, as well as European Union (EU) regulations. The article examines the degree to which the changes in each country are examples of 'path dependency', insofar as they are the products of historical legacies.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 May 2018 21:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - Recycling older steelworkers: Post-redundancy
           job-mobility experiences of workers from BlueScope steel port Kembla
    • Abstract: O’Brien, Martin; Burrows, Scott
      Mass worker redundancies are a common feature associated with structural change in developed economies, particularly in the steel-manufacturing industry. Past research has highlighted the poor re-employment outcomes for older workers, with many exiting the labour force permanently and becoming dependent on social-security income. The research presented in this article uses a longitudinal and mixed-methods approach to understand the job-mobility experiences of redundant steel workers. These workers were displaced from BlueScope Steel's Port Kembla plant after the shutdown in 2011 of one of their remaining two blast furnaces. We document relatively optimistic outcomes, when compared to past research, by focusing on the post-redundancy outcomes for older workers. We highlight the roles of the mining boom and the job-search strategies and attitudes of displaced workers.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 May 2018 21:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 43 Issue 1 - From the editors
    • Abstract: Hancock, Keith; Karmel, Tom
      PubDate: Wed, 30 May 2018 21:29:53 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Non-resident workers: A comparison of family support
           services for resource, health, and defence communities
    • Abstract: Langdon, Rebecca; Rowland, Bevan; Biggs, Herbert
      Non-resident workforces experience high labour turnover, which has an impact on organisational operations and affects worker satisfaction and, in turn, partners' ability to cope with work-related absences. Research suggests that partner satisfaction may be increased by providing a range of support services, which include professional, practical, and social support. A search was conducted to identify support available for resources and health-industry non-resident workers. These were compared to the supports available to families of deployed defence personnel. They were used to compare and contrast the spread available for each industry. The resources industry primarily provided social support, and lacked professional and practical supports. Health-professional support services were largely directed towards extended locum support, rather than to Fly-In Fly-Out workers. Improving sources of support which parallel support provided to the Australian Defence Force is suggested as a way to increase partner satisfaction. The implications are to understand the level of uptake, perceived importance, and utilisation of such support services.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Training and turnover: The mediating role of
           commitment
    • Abstract: Ismail, Hussein Nabil
      Studies exploring the linkages between training and turnover have produced inconsistent results. That inconsistency suggests a path for further study into the variables that might be confounding this relationship. The main purpose of this research was to test the mediating effect of organisational commitment in the relationship between training and turnover intentions. A sample of 124 participants took part in this study. Training was initially found to have a significant inverse relationship with turnover intentions. However, when organisational commitment was entered into the model as a mediating variable, the effect of training on employee turnover intentions became insignificant, suggesting full mediation. The impact of training on turnover intentions is not straightforward, but works first through the effect of training on attitudes, that is on commitment. The results demonstrate the importance of increasing the commitment of employees to the organisation through training, which can help companies to reduce turnover intentions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Deepening industry engagement with international
           students through work-integrated learning
    • Abstract: Jackson, Denise
      This study canvasses employer, academic, and student perspectives on the barriers experienced by international students in gaining exposure to the Western Australian workplace through Work-integrated Learning (WIL). It explores international-student participation in work placements - one example of WIL offerings - as part of their university studies. WIL is highly regarded by international students who seek to gain local experience to improve their employment prospects; it is a key consideration for study destination. WIL also holds significant benefits for industry. These potential benefits include gaining cultural insight, linguistic expertise and, potentially, deepening existing collaborative global partnerships through the placement of participating international students. Findings indicate that a relatively low proportion of international students participate in WIL compared with domestic students. Implications of employer reluctance to engage with international students extend beyond individual employability and may affect international education's status as one of Australia's largest export industries. Stakeholder strategies to alleviate barriers to international students participating in WIL are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - To the lighthouse towards a global minimum wage:
           Building on the international poverty line
    • Abstract: Bolwell, Dain
      This article outlines how a global minimum wage might be introduced having regard to the political, institutional, and technical barriers in its way. It reviews the issues surrounding minimum wages in the context of globalisation, and assesses the evolution of labour standards in developing countries with a view to their application to a new minimum wages regime. The proposed global minimum wage rests on four pillars: (i) the World Bank's international poverty line recalculated as a universal wage floor; (ii) an electronic lighthouse that provides the global minimum wage translated for each developing country, and for the informal sector; (iii) involvement of the widest range of stakeholders; and (iv) commercialisation of its monitoring and remediation. The International Labour Organisation - World Bank 'Better Work' program is discussed as an example of how its governance might proceed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 42 Issue 1 - Phd-educated employees and the development of generic
           skills
    • Abstract: Jackson, Denise; Michelson, Grant
      While considerable research on skills and training exists, less is known about employee perceptions of their skill development. This issue is particularly salient among the most highly educated members of the labour market, given the duration of their training. This study draws on survey data of almost four thousand PhD graduates in Australia. We explore perceived skill development and the importance of these skills among PhD graduates, and the factors that influence these perceptions. The findings reveal a number of factors that explain skill development and skill importance including age, gender, and career destination (for example higher education or industry). Perceived skill importance also depends on discipline area, organisation size, occupation, and sector. We conclude that the most highly educated members of the labour market do not always consider that they obtain the requisite skills during their PhD training; greater attention is needed to ensure that skills are better matched to career decisions and to the demands of high-level professions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - Are all workers influenced to stay by similar factors,
           or should different retention strategies be implemented': Comparing
           younger and older aged-care workers in Australia
    • Abstract: Radford, Katrina; Chapman, Geoffrey
      The global financial crisis led many older workers to delay retirement or to re-enter the workforce (O'Loughlin, Humpel and Kendig 2010). This has resulted in an increase in age diversity within organisations. This age diversity leads to improved creativity (Crampton and Hodge 2007) and improved productivity (Ilmakunnas and Ilmakunnas 2011). However, for human resource management professionals, age diversity can be challenging. Research comparing younger and older workers' intentions to stay is limited; this study continues that inquiry. To investigate intentions, a cross-sectional questionnaire was distributed to 2118 employees in the aged-care sector; 359 useable questionnaires were analysed. Results revealed similarities and differences between younger and older workers' intentions to stay. Variables such as perceived organisational support (POS), perceived supervisor support (PSS), and job embeddedness are analysed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - Instructions for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - Can collective enterprise bargaining affect the
           psychological contract': An analysis of the 2011 Australian public
           service negotiations
    • Abstract: Williamson, Sue; O'Donnell, Michael; Shingles, Joshua
      This article explores how the process of collective workplace bargaining has an impact on employees' psychological contracts in the Australian Public Service. Based on two case studies from the 2011 bargaining round, the researchers identify the bargaining parties' expectations, perceptions of whether or not the negotiations were based on trust and fairness, and whether employees considered that their employer had reneged on the deal. It is found that the bargaining process can reinforce employees' collective and individual sense of a breach of their psychological contract based on their perceptions that the employer is not delivering their side of deal, but expects ever-increasing employee contributions in a tighter fiscal environment. The article concludes that an emphasis on communication, procedural fairness, and maintaining employee trust can, nevertheless, repair and even sustain the relational elements of psychological contracts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - Apprenticeship training and productivity growth: A
           case study of the Australian construction industry
    • Abstract: Chancellor, Will; Abbott, Malcolm
      This article explores the effect of apprenticeship training on productivity in the Australian construction industry. Using state-level data, the correlation between the level of training and productivity is analysed. The results are then used to build on anecdotal evidence to suggest a firm, pre-existing, positive relationship between training and productivity. In addition, the level of apprenticeship training in Australia is related to the composition and general characteristics of the Australian construction industry.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 41 Issue 1 - Carving out employment futures for aboriginal
           ex-prisoners in the resource sector
    • Abstract: Giles, Margaret; Larsen, Ann-Claire; Whale, Jacqui
      The resource sector in northern Western Australia draws its workforce from local purpose-built towns (drive-in/drive-out (DIDO) workers) and metropolitan areas (fly-in/fly-out (FIFO) workers). However, each of these arrangements has a downside. Mining towns are costly to build and maintain. Staff turnover is high. FIFO lifestyles adopted by city-based tradesmen seeking high incomes can lead to social dysfunction. Hence, the question: is there a viable alternative in these regional and remote areas for local communities to provide workers and ancillary support for the resource sector' For example most of the inland mines in Western Australia are located near or within Aboriginal communities. Returning to these communities are ex-prisoners who have had the opportunity to gain trade skills while in metropolitan prisons. This article considers whether Aboriginal ex-prisoners might be gainfully employed in the resource sector in the Pilbara and Kimberley regions of Western Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - The impact of employment specialisation on regional
           labour market outcomes in Australia
    • Abstract: Hicks, John; Basu, PK; Sherley, Christopher
      This article examines the industry composition of employment across Statistical Divisions in Australia utilising census data from 2001 and 2006. We find some evidence to support the hypothesis that peripheral regions tend to have a higher level of employment specialisation than metropolitan centres, but there is little indication that employment specialisation, in general, grew over the period. From a policy perspective, we provide support for the findings of previous Australian researchers that higher levels of employment specialisation are associated with better labour market outcomes in a region, and that when policymakers assess different regional-development policies, they should give some consideration as to whether or not the implementation of their preferred policy will have an impact upon employment specialisation in the particular region.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Insights into the working experience of casual
           academics and their immediate supervisors
    • Abstract: Davis, D; Perrott, B; Perry, LJ
      The increasing use of casual university academics has been an issue of concern to researchers and commentators for some time. Research to date has tended to focus on the plight of casuals who aspire to permanent positions, and emphasising issues such as career dissatisfaction, exploitation, and marginalisation. Little evidence has been gathered that quantifies the views of casuals more broadly. Less still has been gathered on the perceptions of the immediate supervisors of casuals. This article seeks to compare the perceptions of a cohort of casuals and their immediate supervisors. Both quantitative and qualitative data are gathered via a survey of academic staff employed in the business faculty of a large metropolitan university. The survey results indicate, among other things, a high level of mutual satisfaction between casuals and their immediate supervisors. Casuals also expressed a high level of general satisfaction with their work as casual staff. These and other findings are discussed in some detail.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Contributory misconduct reductions in unfair dismissal
           remedies
    • Abstract: Southey, Kim
      When an attempt to conciliate an unfair-dismissal claim fails, arbitration may be called upon to determine whether the dismissal was fair or unfair. In the event that the dismissal is deemed unfair, Australia's federal industrial tribunal can reduce the amount of compensation ordered for the worker if their conduct contributed to the dismissal. This article offers original insights about the application of contributory-misconduct provisions to unfair-dismissal remedies by Australia's federal industrial tribunal. A content analysis was performed on arbitration decisions concerning misconduct-related dismissals made between July 2000 and June 2010 that awarded a remedy to the worker. It was found that reductions to remedies were more highly associated with situations where employees engaged in production deviance, had longer service histories, and apologised for their behaviour. Within the 33 decisions that recorded a reduction to the remedy, three typical remedy discounts were identified: reduced back pay, no back pay, or part reductions to compensation. It is concluded that in broad terms, the reductions may provide some sense of restorative justice to the organisation in finalising an unfair-dismissal dispute. However, these reductions may have less meaning to individual victims where the worker's misconduct involved acts of inter-personal deviance.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Long service leave, the labour market, and portability
           of entitlements
    • Abstract: Thornthwaite, Louise; Markey, Ray
      In this article we examine the case for the portability of long service leave (LSL) entitlements. Proliferating flexibility in employment arrangements increasingly leaves workers without coverage of employment provisions based on tenure with a single employer. An historical analysis of developments in LSL in Australia, including implementation of portable schemes in particular industries, and an analysis of labour-market trends are undertaken. We argue that the restriction of LSL to long-term employment with a single employer is anachronistic in the modern labour market. Nevertheless, LSL remains an important entitlement in the context of the contemporary labour market - perhaps more so than previously - even if the arguments in support of LSL have generally shifted in emphasis as a result of changes in the labour market. We conclude that a general entitlement to portable leave would deal with current inequities with respect to access to LSL. It would particularly assist in reconciling employers' demands for flexibility with employees' demands for protection.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Guest editors' introduction to the special issue on
           FIFO work
    • Abstract: Rainnie, Al; Michelson, Grant; Goods, Caleb; Burgess, John
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - FIFO and global production networks: Exploring the
           issues
    • Abstract: Rainnie, Al; Fitzgerald, Scott; Ellem, Bradon; Goods, Caleb
      In this introductory article, we provide a context for subsequent articles in this special edition. We do not intend to provide a comprehensive overview of the costs and benefits of FIFO. This ground is covered in other articles here (see also Morris 2012). We argue that FIFO represents the third wave in a series of spatial fixes, whereby resource companies mining in far north Western Australia sought to manage relationships between themselves, their workforces, and the communities in which these workers live. We are responding to the demands of Coe (2013) and Kelly (2013) who wish to see Global Production Network analysis move beyond a narrow workplace focus to incorporate issues such as environmental landscapes, households and livelihoods, and social and spatial unevenness of development. In so doing, we develop the form of analysis of GPNs, labour, and uneven development outlined in Rainnie et al. (2011; 2013).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Workers' perceptions of FIFO work in North Queensland,
           Australia
    • Abstract: Blackman, Anna; Welters, Riccardo; Murphy, Laurie; Eagle, Lynne; Pearce, Meryl; Pryce, Josephine; Lynch, Paul; Low, David
      The impact of the fly-in fly-out (FIFO) lifestyle on the psychosocial and emotional well-being of the workers and their families has been a topic of discussion in local media, forums, and research, with mixed findings. In addition, there are reports that the communities that carry the increased presence of non-resident workers suffer erosion of social, human, economic, institutional,and environmental capital. This study outlines the positive effects of a FIFO lifestyle and discusses the results from a survey conducted by the authors on North Queensland FIFO workers. In particular, the demography of the FIFO workforce in North Queensland, workers' perceptions of FIFO work, and their perceptions of the impacts on social interaction for FIFO workers. The article closes with a brief outline of future research areas.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Do holistic human resource management practices make a
           difference to fly-in fly-out workers' job quality' An exploratory
           investigation
    • Abstract: Connell, Julia; Burgess, John
      In common with ongoing research into human resource management (HRM), there are attributes of jobs that are associated with job quality, which are considered important in attracting and retaining employees. To date, however, analysis has omitted the fly-in fly-out (FIFO) workforce. It is important to consider whether it is possible to develop a strategic HRM approach for FIFO workers where commuting arrangements deviate from the norm. This article fills a gap in the literature by using a four-dimensional job-quality(JQ) framework to analyse factors associated with job quality and HRM. There search was undertaken at two FIFO-dependent workplaces in Western Australia. The findings show that one workplace was using bundles of HR practices that spanned all four JQ dimensions; the other concentrated mainly on two dimensions, a consequence which is the potential to lead to suboptimal outcomes for the organisation and their FIFO employees.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - The flip side of fly-in fly-out: The use of 457 visas
           by smaller firms in the Western Australian resources sector
    • Abstract: Barrett, Rowena; Bahn, Susanne; Susomrith, Pattanee; Prasad, Krishna
      The focus in this article is how the extensive use of fly-in fly-out (FIFO) working arrangements in the Western Australian resources sector has an impact directly and indirectly on smaller firms and their ability to recruit workers in remote locations. We argue that the growth of FIFO working arrangements has disadvantaged smaller resource-sector firms by increasing their employment costs and decreasing their ability to attract skilled workers. As a result, smaller resource-sector firms are recruiting skilled workers on 457 visas to secure their business stability and growth, despite the complexity, costs, and risks involved.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Determinants of employee-turnover intentions in
           atypical employment: The FIFO mining industry in Western Australia
    • Abstract: Brown, Alan; Susomrith, Pattanee; Sitlington, Helen; Scott, Glenda
      In the Western Australian mining sector, a significant portion of the workforce (at least 50 per cent) is employed in fly-in fly-out (FIFO) arrangements. This involves flying to isolated mining sites and working consecutive days usually for 11 or 12 hour shifts and returning home after a period of time (days or weeks). Such employment presents unique stresses on employees and at the same time offers significant opportunities such as high pay levels. During a decade of substantial growth in the industry, high levels of employee turnover have been experienced. This article examines the individual and organisational factors which contribute to this turnover. A questionnaire was used to measure employee views about their job and company, along with their intentions to stay or quit their job. This was administered in an iron-ore company with FIFO work arrangements. Findings show both organisational factors (rosters, supervisors, managers, and company culture) and personal factors (career goals and family circumstances) can influence turnover intentions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - The FIFO experience: A Gladstone case study
    • Abstract: Cameron, Roslyn; Lewis, Jan; Pfeiffer, Linda
      The aim of this article is to explore the historic and contemporary use of non-residentworkers (NRWs) in the Gladstone region, how this has contributed to the region's development, and the economic and social impacts of the use of Fly-in Fly-out (FIFO) employment practices. Gladstone, in Central Queensland, is at the front and centre of Australia's evolving economic growth with some $45 billion of investment being delivered in the region. Recently, the construction of three coal seam gas and liquefied natural gas (CSG and LNG) projects on Curtis Island in Gladstone harbour has placed enormous pressure on the region in terms of unprecedented labour and housing demands. It has seen the extensive use of FIFO and Drive-in Drive-out (DIDO) workers. An exploratory qualitative approach framed by key concepts in the literature on resource dependence and socio-economic well-being and, in particular, the fly-over effects of utilising large-scale FIFO labour practices is used in this study. A case study research design has been utilised involving archival and documentary analysis, and a series of qualitative semi-structured interviews with community stakeholders. Recent research into the socio-economic impacts on regional resource-dependent regions across Australia points to a shift away from the 'resource curse' hypothesis (Lawrie et al. 2011, Tonts et al. 2012). We argue that the Gladstone story is unique and is differentiated from the atypical story of the company-built inland mining town, due to a number of contextual variables. Key issues from multiple perspectives are identified and recommendations for future research are made.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Mining through the talent pool of potential fly-in
           fly-out (FIFO) workers
    • Abstract: Pryce, Josephine; Welters, Riccardo; Lynch, Paul; Blackman, Anna; Murphy, Laurie; Eagle, Lynne; Case, Peter; Low, David
      This article reports on findings from an exploratory study which examined the qualifications, skills, and experience of local job seekers in Tropical North Queensland to ascertain their potential as FIFO workers. An online survey was conducted, eliciting 213 responses from potential FIFO workers, identifying their interest in, capacity, and capability to undertake FIFO work. The majority of respondents indicated that not only were they interested in FIFO work, but that they constituted an untapped talent pool of potential FIFO workers with substantial experience and (or) limited qualifications. The results indicated that this supply of potential FIFO labour, with some up skilling, could go a long way in contributing to the growing demand for skilled labour in the resource sector. The interest of these potential workers has implications for the mining industry, government departments, employment agencies, communities, and labour markets.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Adjustment, well-being and help-seeking: Among
           Australian FIFO Mining employees
    • Abstract: Vojnovic, Philippa; Michelson, Grant; Jackson, Denise; Bahn, Susanne
      The theme of fly-in fly-out (FIFO) employment arrangements has attracted considerable policy and media interest, yet there is limited knowledge about the impact of such employment on workers and how they might manage the various strains associated with FIFO work. To advance this line of research, this article examines the antecedent factors of and relationships between adjustment, well-being, and help-seeking among FIFO employees. Our primary contribution is to develop a model and a series of propositions which will assist researchers, the industry, and policy-makers to understand the complex circumstances and impacts of FIFO employment better.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Instructions for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Australian wage policy: Infancy and adolescence [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: McCusker, Peter
      Review(s) of: Australian wage policy: Infancy and adolescence, by Hancock, K 2013, University of Adelaide Press.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Surely there are too many graduates now'
    • Abstract: Karmel, Tom
      This article updates earlier work which asked the question whether Australia was producing too many graduates, noting that the increase in the proportion of the workforce with degrees had been quite dramatic. That work dated from the mid 1990s, and the quick answer was that the lack of change in relative earnings implied very extensive changes in the structure of labour demand. However, the expansion of the proportion of the workforce with qualifications has continued at a remarkable rate and therefore it is timely to ask the question again. By examining the relationship between changes in the proportions of the workforce with different levels of education and changes in relative wages, the article estimates shifts in the demand for labour across the various levels of education.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Workers on 457 visas: Evidence from the Western
           Australian resources sector
    • Abstract: Bahn, Susanne
      This article shows that in 2011-2012 the Australian resources sector was challenged by sharp demands for experienced skilled workers. These shortages reflected the limited pool of specialised Australian skilled labour willing to relocate to Western Australia, the falling numbers of workers taking up apprenticeships and traineeships, and the lack of experience of new graduates. Under these conditions, resources firms actively sourced overseas skilled labour on temporary 457 visas. In 2013, the landscape is changing in that some resource projects have tapered off, Australian workers have relocated to Western Australia in larger numbers, and access to skilled labour via the 457 visa has decreased. It appears that resource firms are using the 457 visa as a temporary response to deal with genuine skill shortages. However, the research here suggests that Australian workers may be subjected to coercive comparisons with overseas labour willing to work harder and longer in poorer conditions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - A just transition to a green economy: Evaluating the
           response of Australian unions
    • Abstract: Goods, Caleb
      Many policymakers, unions, and businesses have embraced the idea of green jobs and a green economy. This enthusiasm for environmentally sound job creation received a significant shot in the arm at the end of 2008, in the context of the global financial crisis, as an important element in the solution to the world's economic and ecological concerns. The connection between work and combating environmental problems is however an area of significant contestation. This has resulted in highly varied understandings of what constitutes a green job and a just transition to a green economy. This article scrutinises the response of the Australian Council of Trade Unions - as the peak union body in Australia - and three specific unions to the challenge of transiting from the world of work towards an ecologically sustainable footing.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Adding migrants to the mix: The demography of the
           labour force participation rate, 2000 to 2010
    • Abstract: Cully, Mark
      Between 2000 and 2010, the labour force participation rate in Australia increased by more than 2 percentage points to reach a record high by the end of the decade. This article decomposes the change in the participation rate to examine the respective contributions of age, gender, and birthplace. There are three strong findings. First, among the Australian-born, increases in the propensity to participate in the labour force - among women and older persons - fully offsets the downward pull of ageing. Second, among the overseas-born, there is both a reverse-ageing effect - reflecting the large influx of young migrants over the past decade - and the same higher propensity to participate among women and older persons. The end result is that migrants added 1.9 percentage points to the aggregate participation rate over the past decade. Third, controlling for age and gender, participation rates for the overseas-born remain lower than they are for the Australian-born people. There has been some convergence over the decade for men, but not for women.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Subscription form
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Instructions for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - The impact of training practices on individual,
           organisation, and industry skill development
    • Abstract: Kennett, Geraldine
      This article discusses the way in which employers provide training and how it has an impact on individual, organisational, and industry skill development. It uses findings from a research study of the relationship between training and development and employee turnover. The study uncovered three training and development models that had likely consequences for employee turnover. These models were labelled Individual Development, Team Development, and Organisational Development. Individual Development contributed to higher employee turnover when it was adopted in a work environment which lacked employment-growth opportunities, and where employees perceived more external job alternatives. Team Development was likely to contribute to lower employee turnover if adopted in conjunction with other high-performance work practices, or if there was evidence of job embeddedness in the organisation. Finally, the Organisational Development model appeared to contribute to higher employee turnover when the training activities contributed to a lack of role clarity, and to poorer employee commitment to the organisation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Onshore skilled migrant engineers: Skills wastage and
           atrophy
    • Abstract: Cameron, Roslyn; Joyce, Deborah; Wallace, Michelle; Kell, Peter
      This article reports the survey findings from a research project exploring the use of skilled migration as a strategy for assisting in overcoming the pressing risks facing the Australian rail industry in workforce development. These risks are associated with an ageing workforce and skill shortages in engineering and technical areas. The data presented originate from a survey of skilled migrants in an employment program for skilled migrants in the Sydney metropolitan area and skilled migrant engineers in Victoria. The findings point to the potential, and yet untapped source of highly qualified professionals who could be targeted for recruitment by the rail industry. Of greater significance are the broader implications of the research in terms of engineering skills wastage and atrophy in a time when Australia cannot produce enough engineering professionals domestically to meet the demand. This is all set against a backdrop of global engineering shortages and fierce domestic competition for engineering skills made even more prominent with the second wave of the resources boom.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Akubras to hard hats: Easing skill shortages through
           labour harmonisation strategies
    • Abstract: Storer, Christine; Connell, Julia
      This article examines skill and labour shortages within rural agricultural industries in Western Australia. It draws on primary and secondary data, including 600 survey respondents in the sector. It is determined that there may be a shortage of farm workers during the busy seasons, while they are unemployed during the low seasons. Consequently, it is proposed that a human capability framework is utilised to encourage farm owners and (or) workers to consider the potential for labour-harmonisation (LH) strategies which would allow workers to transit between working on the land during the busy seasons and in mining during the low seasons. The outcomes of the study are considered in relation to indicators of precarious work illustrating that LH could enable an easing of labour shortages for both the farming and mining sectors, while providing benefits for the respective workers, employers, and the region in general.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Indigenous workforce participation at a mining
           operation in Northern Australia
    • Abstract: Pearson, Cecil AL; Daff, Sandra
      The potential of the Australian minerals industry to generate considerable national revenue can be jeopardised in periods of economic growth by fostering a shortage of relevant educated and skilled personnel. Legal reforms of the 1990s, public pressure, and benefits by employing local Aboriginal people has driven the installation of work-integrated learning programs designed to reduce the skill shortage by increasing the employment rate of Indigenous people in the mining industry. This article reports five years of primary data to detail nationally accredited attainments and relevant job outcomes of an Indigenous education-vocation program that has delivered sustainable jobs in a substantive remote mining operation in northern Australia. Identified barriers for applicants and vocational career choices that are framed by values and priorities held by regional Indigenous people are discussed to focus on a conclusion challenging the mining industry and the government to disclose how Indigenous training schemes are ameliorating the skills gap in the Australian mining industry.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Sourcing specialised skilled labour in the global
           arena: A change in the way we view work in Australia'
    • Abstract: Bahn, Susanne; Cameron, Roslyn
      This article presents a newly developed research agenda to explore the increased needs of resource-rich regions in terms of sourcing industry-specific skilled labour. The article begins with a conceptual framework that maps the human resource management issues that are being magnified by the resources boom in Australia. The paper focuses on one of the five key thematic areas encompassed within the framework - labour global mobility. The difficulty in sourcing specialised skilled labour at this time indicates a major paradigm shift that is challenging long-held beliefs and constructs related to the nature of work in Australia with specialised skilled migrant workers actively sourced to fill positions in resources firms. After reviewing the international literature, we explore labour-sourcing practices as a response to dealing with skill shortages in the labour demand and supply of Australia's resource-rich regions. This is followed by a discussion on how these practices have progressed in regional Queensland and Western Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Rediscovering Braverman': Political economy,
           skill, and skill shortages
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Scott; Rainnie, Al; Burgess, John
      The debate over skill and skill shortages is full of complexity and contradiction. For example, just what is meant by skill and skill shortages is, at the very least, open to debate (Shah and Burke 2005). Furthermore, at the same time as Grugulis and Lloyd (2010, p. 92) point to a shift away from attempts to locate skill within a broader analysis of capitalist development and towards a narrower explanation of particular trends and concepts, theories are emerging about the changing nature of the economy - the knowledge economy, for example - which have major implications for the nature of skill and skill formation. Skill shortages are used to justify importing skilled labour from outside the state and country, echoing more generally a disproportionate focus on supply side issues in the debate (Hall 2011), at the same time as skill itself, once seen as a driver of prosperity, is placed alongside productivity as the driver of prosperity (Keep and Mayhew 2010). Internationally, this is reflected in policy documents which are 'couched in terms that ring with evangelical zeal' about the competitive and social importance of the supply of skills (Hayward and James 2004, p. 1). This Special Edition looks at the matter of skills in Australia, with a special focus on rural and remote regions which - with the emergence of a two-speed or patchwork economy - have become conspicuous as centres of production. The empirical and institutional focus of these articles provides important insights into how issues of skill formation, retention, and shortages are playing out in different sectors (public and private) and in different locations.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 4 - Australian bulletin of labour
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 4 - Labour and industry
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 4 - Negative events, positive outcomes: Improving labour
           force outcomes via tertiary study for individuals with disability and
           chronic Illness
    • Abstract: Werth, Shalene
      The economic appraisal often displayed by organisations in the assessment of their staff, at times crosses ethical and legal boundaries and evaluates personal characteristics of workers which are not relevant to their work such as a disability. Workers report problems in the workplace which have led them to decide to complete a tertiary degree in order to improve their skills and increase their labour market power. They hope this might result in labour market outcomes such as improved job satisfaction, job security, job quality, career opportunities and increased access to flexibility to allow for their circumstances of disability. The decision process undertaken by workers with disability can be a fraught one and might require considerable motivation and commitment to follow through to the end. The students in this project are committed participants who followed this course of action to achieve improved labour market outcomes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 4 - Gender and employment-structure patterns in
           Australia's retail workforce: An intra-industry analysis
    • Abstract: Chang, Joshua; Travaglione, Antonio
      Challenging conditions in Australian retail pose a threat to its retail workforce and are expected to change the retail employment landscape. This prompts a need to develop a contemporary knowledge of the retail workforce, which has a higher incidence of insecure employment than the general workforce. This study investigates gender and employment-structure patterns between different sectors within the retail industry by analysing the variables of employment status and gender between 40 Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANSIC) retail categories (for example groceries, clothing, automobiles, hardware, restaurants), using data from the 'Australia at Work' survey. The results show that while overall women dominate employment in the retail sector, retail employment among women tends to be part-time and lower-skilled, while men tend to be in more physical, skilled, prestigious, and full-time positions. Societal gender expectations such as the breadwinner role for men and child caring for women are also identified.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 4 - Multiple job holders in Australia: Motives and
           personal impact
    • Abstract: Bamberry, Larissa
      Multiple job holding, also called moonlighting or secondary job holding, is an important topic for research and policy, both in Australia and in several other industrialised societies. Official labour force statistics in Australia suggest that the number of multiple job holders is significant, amounting to around 6 percent of all employed persons in 2007. But beyond basic data which map the extent of the phenomenon and provide a broad profile of multiple job holders surprisingly little is known about the topic. Commentators remain divided on basic issues of interpretation and assessment. Is multiple job holding a plight or a pleasure' Is it a malign or benign feature of contemporary labour markets' This article uses qualitative data from interviews with a small sample of multiple job holders in Australia in order to explore motives and personal impact. It reveals the complex mix of pressures and enticements that can influence an employee's decision to work in two or more paid jobs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 4 - Does industrial relations policy affect
           productivity'
    • Abstract: Peetz, David
      This article considers the link between productivity, fairness, and industrial relations (IR) policy at workplace, national, and international levels using data from micro- and macro-level empirical studies as well as data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), the OECD, and other sources. There is some evidence that policies that enhance fairness enhance economic performance. But the effects are conditional; they are neither consistent nor universal. Government policies to encourage or discourage unions, to restrict the extent or scope of collective bargaining or related action, or to encourage or discourage non-unionism or individual contracting, will not do a great deal in net terms to improve economic performance. However, in any specific workplace, industrial relations and the decisions management makes can have a notable effect on productivity. While welfare and industrial relations systems do not make a large inherent difference to economic efficiency, they make a very large difference to social outcomes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Australian Bulletin of Labour - Subscription form
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Gender pay equity in Australia: Where are we now and
           where are we heading'
    • Abstract: Todd, Patricia; Preston, Alison
      In this article we consider the current trends in gender pay equity in Australia, identifying the lack of improvement, and indeed the recent deterioration, in the national gender wage ratio. We analyse the gender wage gap by industry, State, and labour force status and consider developments in the regulatory sphere and social context which have the potential to have an impact on gender pay equity. We conclude with a discussion of the future prospects for the gender wage gap.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Private retirement savings in Australia: Current
           policy initiatives and gender equity implications
    • Abstract: Jefferson, Therese
      This article assesses the implications for gender equity of three recent policy initiatives on superannuation in Australia: (i) government co-contributions for low-income earners; (ii) an increase in compulsory superannuation contributions from 9 to 12 per cent; and (iii) the pending introduction of 'MySuper' accounts, specifically designed for those who do not take an active interest in their superannuation accumulation. Implications for gendered patterns of superannuation coverage and superannuation accumulations are considered. The conclusion is that while the first measure may have some beneficial outcomes in terms of gendered patterns of accumulation, none of the three measures appears to deal with issues associated with gendered patterns of access to occupational superannuation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Working time and managing care under labor: Whose
           flexibility'
    • Abstract: Heron, Alexandra; Charlesworth, Sara
      Since the Labor Government's election in 2007, debate around working-time flexibility has continued unabated. Employers argue that increasing employer orientated flexibility through changes to minimum working-time standards and individual flexibility agreements is the path to enhanced productivity and a more effective economy. Unions and others have focused on the need for greater employee-orientated flexibility to facilitate combining work and care. However, on neither side of the debate has much attention been paid to basic principles that might inform working-time regulation in ways that would enable individual workers to manage their work and care responsibilities better and deliver a more sustainable and gender-equitable economy. The article outlines recent contestation around flexibility and argues that without ensuring adequate minimum working-time standards for all workers, the gendered divide around work and care will continue to be reinforced.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Maternal employment and childcare in Australia:
           Achievements and barriers to satisfying employment
    • Abstract: Boyd, Wendy
      The Australian Government has begun effecting significant changes that focus on the provision of high-quality, accessible early-childhood education and care (ECEC). This approach is twofold: it recognises the continual increase of maternal employment and its value to the productivity of Australia, and the importance of the early years of life. This article examines the significant changes made to ECEC policy and highlights some key areas of concern for parents, and mothers in particular, as they make plans for entering (or re-entering) the workforce. These areas of concern are likely to have an impact upon children, families, and the productivity agenda.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Paid parental leave: First birthday policy review
    • Abstract: Baird, Marian; Whitehouse, Gillian
      Australia's Paid Parental Leave scheme commenced payments on 1 January 2011. In this article we provide an overview of the scheme in its first year of operation, drawing attention in particular to one major extension of the scheme (to fathers and partners) and one ongoing limitation. We argue that while not perfect in design, the introduction of a government-funded paid parental leave scheme has shifted the policy context and policy debates in Australia: where there was no scheme prior to 2011, there is now a functioning scheme; where there was opposition to government-funded paid parental leave just a short while ago, there is now support for it from all major political parties.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Introduction: Work and family policy in Australia:
           Current policy and outstanding issues
    • Abstract: Charlesworth, Sara; Elder, Alison; Hill, Elizabeth; Pocock, Barbara
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Australian bulletin of labour : Subscription form
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Labour and industry
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Nils publications
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - An examination of award wages among Australian
           apprentices and trainees
    • Abstract: Oliver, Damian
      Low rates of award pay for apprentices have been seen as discouraging young people from starting an apprenticeship as well as contributing to low completion rates. This criticism, however, assumes that few apprentices receive above-award payments. Analysis of data from the 2009 Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Survey of Education and Training finds that over-award payments for apprentices are common, especially in the electro-technology, automotive, and engineering trades. Most trainees also receive over-award payments, particularly existing workers, older trainees, and male trainees. In most cases, the relevant award wage for apprentices and trainees is below the national minimum wage. More importantly, the method for determining the apprentice award wage in most cases does not take into account age or level of schooling, even though apprentices are increasingly older and are more likely to have completed Year 12. This has led to a decline in the apprentice award wage, relative to the applicable award wage in alternative employment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Beyond our control: Labour adjustment in response to
           the global recession by multinational auto companies in Australia
    • Abstract: Auer, Peter; Clibborn, Stephen; Lansbury, Russell D
      In response to the global recession, many multinational companies (MNCs) in the auto industry adjusted labour levels in their plants around the world. This paper examines the responses of Ford, GM, and Bosch in relation to plants in their home countries and in their subsidiary companies in Australia. The case studies revealed the emergence of 'hybrid' forms of employment relations practices among these MNCs, which were the product of convergence around commercial imperatives, as well as divergence due to the roles played by governments and trade unions in the respective countries.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Does immigration policy affect the
           education-occupation mismatch' Evidence from Australia
    • Abstract: Tani, Massimiliano
      This article analyses the impact of a change in Australia's immigration policy, introduced on 1 July 1999, on migrants' probability of being over or undereducated or correctly matched. The policy change consists of stricter entry requirements about age, language ability, education, and work experience. The results indicate that those who entered under more stringent conditions the second cohort have a lower probability to be overeducated and a correspondingly higher probability of being better matched than those in the first cohort. The policy change appears to have reduced the incidence of overeducation among women, enhanced the relevance of being educated in Australia to being correctly matched, and has attracted a higher proportion of immigrants who were already underutilised (or overachieving) in their home countries. Overall, the policy appears to have brought immigrants that reduced the education mismatch in Australia's labour market.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Keynes versus the classics in the 1970s
    • Abstract: Isaac, Joe
      The wage inflation and unemployment in Australia during the 1970s have been analysed by many writers. With the benefit of hindsight, this paper examines the facts and assumptions of earlier writings in connection with various questions whether centralisation of wage determination was a factor in the wage inflation, the circumstances leading to the wage indexation system, why the system failed, and whether reduced trade union density and enterprise bargaining after the 1990s were responsible for more moderate wage increases and reduced industrial strife. The paper notes the neglect in earlier discussion of the importance of trade protection and globalisation in the operation of the labour market.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Australian bulletin of labour
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Labour and Industry
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - NILS publications
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Women's participation in mining: What can we learn
           from EOWA reports'
    • Abstract: Lord, Linley; Jefferson, Therese; Eastham, Judy
      Various stakeholders associated with the mining sector have voiced concerns over current or projected skill and labour shortages that might affect output and productivity within their industry. In this context, policies that facilitate the recruitment and retention of women have been discussed as presenting an opportunity through which to address labour shortages and, in doing so, to enhance equity by improving women's employment in Australia's most highly paid industry. In this paper, we use information contained in company reports to the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency (EOWA) to assess recent reported actions by the mining industry to enhance the recruitment and retention of women employees. We find considerable shortcomings in available data, coupled with little evidence of coordinated or concerted industry activity to deal with issues that might assist with promoting women's participation in the industry.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Adding insult to injury: How work-life pressures
           affect the participation of low-paid workers in vocational education and
           training
    • Abstract: Pocock, Barbara; Skinner, Natalie
      This paper applies a work-life lens to examine the barriers and challenges confronting low-paid workers in their participation in vocational education and training. It utilises data from a large national survey of Australian workers, as well as qualitative material arising from interviews and focus groups amongst workers, students, and industry representatives in the retail, food processing, and aged-care industries. The findings illustrate how money and time pressures constrain the participation of low-paid workers in vocational education, and how these particularly affect low-paid women. Implications for policy are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - What are the characteristics of the employers of the
           low paid in Australia'
    • Abstract: McGuinness, Seamus; Webster, Elizabeth; Mavromaras, Kostas
      Service-sector employers from Communications; Accommodation, cafes and restaurants; Personal and other services; Retail trade; and Manufacturing have the highest densities of low-wage employees in Australia. In addition, the majority of all employers of the low paid were service-industry employers. A multivariate analysis found that employers of the low paid were more likely to be small firms employing a disproportionate share of casual labour. Employers of the low paid were more likely to be located in industries where labour costs form a relatively smaller proportion of turnover (possibly because of high material costs) and where there were higher rates of businesses recording a loss of profit. In addition, substantial regional differences remain in the presence of industry controls, indicating that state-level differences in the incidence of low-paying employers cannot be fully accounted for by the other factors.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Dark corners in a bright economy: The lack of jobs for
           unskilled men
    • Abstract: Gregory, Robert G
      This paper discusses the large reductions in full-time employment among unskilled Australian males that began in the 1970s and continued over the next three to four decades. Over this period, each recession led to large falls in the male full-time employment-population ratio, and during each economic recovery the employment ratio failed to move back to its previous levels. Unemployment fell during each output recovery, not in response to employment gains, but in response to large-scale withdrawals from the labour market into the welfare system. The loss of unskilled jobs for men has been associated with falling marriage rates and increasing use of the welfare system by single women. The paper concludes by briefly assessing some of the impacts of the new resource boom on these long-run labour market and welfare trends, and discusses the potential for different labour-market outcomes emerging across mineral and non-mineral Australian states.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Editor's introduction
    • Abstract: Hancock, Keith; Healy, Joshua
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Methodology and research on the human resource
           practices of multinational enterprises in Australia
    • Abstract: McDonnell, Anthony; Russell, Helen; Sablok, Gitika; Stanton, Pauline; Burgess, John; Bartram, Timothy
      Despite Australia being a major source of foreign direct investment and an important location for multinational enterprises (MNEs), there is a lack of information about the operations of MNEs in Australia, particularly with respect to their human resource management (HRM) practices. This paper examines the existing datasets and research on the HRM practices of MNEs in Australia. One of the main weaknesses with existing quantitative research on the HRM practices of MNEs is the absence of a systematic or representative data set of MNEs. To address this issue, we describe the process that we followed in order to develop a new data set that will assist researchers interested in understanding and explaining the HRM practices of the Australian operations of MNEs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - The difficulty of quantitative cross-country
           comparisons of wage-fixing systems
    • Abstract: Isaac, Joe
      The implications for public policy of cross-country comparisons of wage-fixing institutions and economic performance have been a continuing source of academic interest. Because of the complex and unstable combination of factors involved in centralised wage-fixing systems, however, distilling quantitatively based conclusions from pooled international data is exceedingly difficult. Australian experience for the period 1970-96 provides a useful case study.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Upskilling and polarisation in the Australian labour
           market: A simple analysis
    • Abstract: Esposto, Alexis
      National and international studies have shown consistent upskilling trends in the labour market. While this claim is true at aggregate levels, when employment growth and total hours worked are disaggregated into permanent and casual full-time and part-time employment for men and women, upskilling trends are inconsistent. The analysis shows that permanent male and female full-time employment exhibited clear signs of upskilling both in terms of employment growth and hours worked but this was not the case in casual full-time work for men and women. Part-time casual and permanent work showed clear signs of polarisation and downskilling for men and women. These polarisation trends suggest that workers who do not possess high-level skills will face increasing levels of difficulty and uncertainty in the labour market, with an adverse impact on both household and individual inequality.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Oh won't you stay just a little bit longer: Changing
           employers' views of older workers
    • Abstract: Mountford, Helene
      The effects of the 2009 economic downturn in Australia, followed by a comparatively rapid recovery, have seen a surprising growth in the number of older workers in employment. If this increase in older workers is the harbinger of permanent change in the labour market, it can only come about if employers modify their traditionally negative attitude towards mature employees. In the first comprehensive overview of the literature and case studies, this paper explores employers' attitudes towards older workers and finds that most of the stereotypical myths are readily overcome in the current labour market. If a labour shortage drives employers to offer more flexible working conditions as first seen in the Global Financial Crisis, they will be taken up by the largest working cohort - the baby boomers - and the problem could be largely averted.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Quality and quantity in work-home conflict: The nature
           and direction of effects of work on employees' personal relationships and
           partners
    • Abstract: Peetz, David; Muurlink, Olav; Townsend, Keith; Allan, Cameron; Fox, Andrea
      Modern working patterns can directly and adversely affect family lives and personal relationships. Using quasi-longitudinal survey data from Queensland, this study confirms qualitative evidence that long hours of work, weekend work, irregular starting times, and high-pressure, long-hours cultures contribute to deteriorating home relationships and to dissatisfaction among partners. This study uniquely contrasts the quality impacts of work with the consequences of work quantity, indicating that the former is much more influential in modulating work-life conflict and satisfaction variables. Claims that long and increased working hours reflect the use of work as a refuge from home are shown to be unfounded.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Australian Labour Market Flows over the Business Cycle
    • Abstract: Chindamo, Phillip
      This paper analyses the behaviour of Australian labour market transition rates. Since the early 1980s, the job-finding rate has been significantly more volatile than the job-loss rate and it is strongly pro-cyclical. The economic downturns of the early 1980s and early 1990s were associated with up to a 10 percentage points decline in the average job-finding rate. In comparison, the recent economic downturn was associated with a less significant decline in the job-finding rate. During these periods, the job-loss rate has shown less significant volatility. The findings of this paper suggest that the job search activities of workers are potentially more relevant in explaining the volatility of labour market variables such as the unemployment rate, and whether emerging skill shortages can be addressed. Policies that assist job search and the skills development of workers are important, as is the intensity of workers' search activity.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - The 'Rise and Rise' of New Professional Groups: Mental
           Health Professions under Medicare
    • Abstract: Doessel, Darrel P; Williams, Ruth FG
      From November 2006, three paramedical professions that provide mental health services - eligible or approved psychologists, social workers and occupational therapists - came within the scope of Medicare. The purpose of this article is to place that historic decision in context, first by examining several key secular trends in psychiatry as a profession, and then by presenting some data on the professional groups newly subsidised under Medicare. The trends in psychiatry give the context of that decision and point to the structural forces that are likely to be associated with the provision of mental health services in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Did 'Work First' Work': The Role of Employment
           Assistance Programs in Reducing Long-term Unemployment in Australia
           (1990-2008)
    • Abstract: Davidson, Peter
      Over the last two decades Australia's progress in reducing its long-term reliance on unemployment payments was disappointing; this was despite an improving labour market, tighter work requirements and reformed employment assistance. After the introduction of the Job Network in 1998, the focus of employment assistance for long-term unemployed people shifted from a human capital approach towards a 'work first' approach. We review evidence from microeconomic evaluations of employment programs. Generally, job search assistance - central to work first - is relatively effective. Gaps in the research may be a reason for the apparent discrepancy between these findings and Australia's slow progress overall in reducing long-term reliance on unemployment payments. Short-term average measures mask the distribution of program outcomes and results over the longer term. As unemployment fell, a growing proportion of unemployment payment recipients were disadvantaged in the labour market, and the work first approach may be ineffective for this group. The paper concludes with a brief assessment of the Job Services Australia program.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - 'It's a Lot of Hard Work': The Experiences of
           Student-workers in University Term-time Employment
    • Abstract: Munro, Lyle
      In a recent article in this journal, Robbins (2010) pointed out the importance of understanding the 'hard labour' of university students who have part-time jobs during term time. He did this, however, without invoking the testimony of the student-workers themselves in their dual role as university students and part-time workers. He focused instead on data mainly from quantitative surveys, including his own, of student-workers at a regional university. While Robbins provides an informative and up-to-date account of what he rightly calls 'a challenging time to be a university student', his article does not offer any real insight into the way these challenges are experienced by the young workers whose voices are absent in his paper. This article seeks, in part, to fill this gap by featuring the testimonies of a sample of student-workers at a regional campus in Australia. The stories reveal a range of strategies which students use to resolve the dilemmas posed by the work-study couplet.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Wage Inequality: A Comparative Perspective
    • Abstract: Lemieux, Thomas
      Wage inequality has been increasing in most industrialised countries over the last three decades. There are, nonetheless, major differences across countries in terms of the timing and magnitude of the growth in inequality. A large number of explanations have been suggested for these observed changes, including technological progress and the computer revolution, labour market institutions and social norms, and changes in the relative supply of highly educated workers. This paper assesses the validity of these explanations in the light of large differences in inequality growth across countries, and the stunning growth in the concentration of income at the top end of the distribution.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - The Fair Work Australia Minimum Wage Decision Viewed
           From Afar
    • Abstract: Sloane, PJ
      This paper attempts to put the minimum wage increase into an international context and in particular to focus on the special provisions relating to disabled workers. It is suggested that consideration be given to the inter-relationship between the special provisions and other policies directed at the disabled.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - The Annual Wage Review 2009-10 of the Minimum Wage
           Panel of Fair Work Australia
    • Abstract: Brown, William
      The key aspects and features of the Annual Wage Review 2009-2010 of the Minimum Wage Panel (MWP) of Fair Work Australia (FWA) are discussed. The basis of the recommendations of minimum wages must be seen by employers and the wider public to combine an understanding of the practicalities of diverse sectors, the best available statistical data and rigorous independent research.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - An American Perspective on the 2010 Increase in the
           Australian Minimum Wage
    • Abstract: Burkhauser, Richard V
      The views and opinions of several American economists and analysts on the 2010 increase in minimum wages in Australia are discussed. The need for the Minimum Wage Panel (MWP) of Fair Work Australia (FWA) to invest more time and resources into estimating the consequences of its mandate on the employment and economic well being of the working poor is highlighted.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Australia's Other Two-speed Economy: Gender,
           Employment and Earnings in the Slow Lane
    • Abstract: Jefferson, Therese; Preston, Alison
      Talk of a 'two-speed economy' was prevalent in Australia in the first half of 2010. The Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry argued against a significant increase in the minimum wage on the basis that most minimum wage earners were employed in the 'slower' sectors of the Australian economy, where employers could not afford increased employment costs. This article considers the recent Fair Work Australia wage decision in the context of the argument that Australia has a two-speed economy. Using earnings and employment data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, we find that it is possible to identify significantly different patterns to the earnings outcomes experienced within specific sections of the Australian economy. There are some clear 'tracks', particularly between men and women in the private sector. The data suggest that the recent minimum wage decision will play an important role in countering labour market inequities, particularly those that are evident in Australia's gender pay gap. Further work remains to be done, however, and the forthcoming equal remuneration case will provide a further opportunity for Fair Work Australia to contribute to gender pay equity in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - An Unfair Safety Net'
    • Abstract: Wooden, Mark
      The issue of whether an increase by Fair Work Australia (FWA) of he minimum wage by $26 per week as a safety net of fair minimum wages is justified or not is discussed. Minimum award wage structures appear to be more about maintaining and preserving wage relativities that are based on the notion that a fair wage structure is one where wages reflect the value of jobs and where value is determined by members of the FWA.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Minimum Wage Setting under Fair Work Australia: Back
           to the Future'
    • Abstract: Harper, Ian; McKibbin, Rebecca
      Fair Work Australia (FWA) recently handed down its first minimum wage decision - a $26 per week increase. Although the decision emanated from new legislation, which explicitly references fairness and living standards of the low paid, both the decision and the process by which it was reached closely resemble those of its predecessor, the Australian Fair Pay Commission (AFPC). It is possible that this resemblance will diminish over time as interpretation of the legislation evolves. But the fundamental need to balance employment and income effects of minimum wage adjustments may lead FWA to deliver similar decisions to the AFPC's notwithstanding the different emphasis in its legislation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Fair Work Australia's First Minimum Wage Decision:
           Context, Impact and Future
    • Abstract: Healy, Josh
      The Fair Work Australia's first minimum wage decision by the Minimum Wage Panel (MWP) and the context in which it was made as well as its impact on living standards and business costs are discussed. The need for an empirical strategy to produce more compelling evidence about the employment effects of Australian minimum wage increases is highlighted.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - The Authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Editors' Introduction
    • Abstract: Hancock, Keith; Healy, Josh
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Flexicurity: What Is It' Can It Work
           Downunder'
    • Abstract: Belchamber, Grant
      From the late seventies, neo-liberal economic prescriptions for labour market reform held sway across the English-speaking advanced economies. The neo-liberal view was that employment security came at the expense of labour market flexibility, and retarded economic dynamism. Today, the Great Recession has blown asunder the claim that deregulated labour markets generate more jobs. It is clear that flexible wages and scant unemployment benefits do not automatically clear the labour market. The Nordic and western European nations never fully embraced labour market fundamentalism. Their distinctive alternative policy - 'flexicurity' - targets both flexibility and security, combining decent work in lightly regulated labour markets with active labour market programs and generous unemployment benefits. By adopting a social insurance model, Australia can raise significantly the income support available to unemployed workers and underpin national economic dynamism with robust flexicurity architecture. An increase in the Superannuation Guarantee provides a tractable, efficient and effective way to do this.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - The Change in Labour Skills in Australia over the
           Business Cycle
    • Abstract: Kelly, Ross; Lewis, Philip
      This paper presents an analysis of skill change for each of several skill dimensions for Australia for the period 1991 to 2006. This period is of particular interest since it covers three phases of the business cycle - recession, full employment and excess demand. The pronounced shedding of low skill workers and increased demand for skilled workers observed in many countries over the last two decades has been attributed to a number of different causes. In this paper the attributes of different occupations are used to obtain measures of distinct skill dimensions - motor, cognitive and interactive, plus education. The results indicate that there were very significant changes in skills mix during the three phases of the business cycle. The mean level declined for motor skills but rose for the other dimensions, particularly interactive. The results have important implications for policy, particularly in relation to employment, unemployment and training.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Got a Lot O'Livin' to Do: Opportunities for Older
           Workers in the Global Financial Crisis
    • Abstract: Mountford, Helene
      The 2009 downturn in the Australian economy brought on by the global financial crisis (GFC) caused many businesses to review staff levels in an effort to reduce costs. But unlike previous recessions, large scale restructuring and retrenchments were less common in favour of retaining skilled staff on reduced working conditions, such as fewer hours. Many employers suffered from skills shortages only a year before. At the same time research began to show that many baby boomers wanted to continue working beyond the early retirement age preferred by previous cohorts, and could fill the skilled worker gap. But older employees, having other demands on their time, want more job flexibility and less responsibility or work pressure. Since the GFC more older workers need to stay at work to improve their retirement funds. The changed working conditions brought on by the GFC will, coincidentally, attract older workers probably more than other cohorts, giving both older workers and employers greater flexibility, while retaining valuable workplace experience.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Note to Authors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Central Policies, Local Discretion: A Review of
           Employee Access to Work-life Balance Arrangements in a Public Sector
           Agency
    • Abstract: Colley, Linda
      Work-life balance is one of the leading contemporary issues in the Australian employment environment, driven by both employee demands and employer desire to attract employees in a tight labour market. This article is about the important issue of employee experiences of work-life balance, and uses a public sector case study to consider progress and identify issues yet to be resolved. The research considers the extent of the work-life balance policy framework in the case study agency, employees' awareness of their work-life balance options, and employee perceptions about access to flexible working arrangements. The research finds that the agency has a solid policy framework and reasonably high levels of awareness. But it identifies a gap between employees' awareness and their perceptions of access, and uncovers many local-level barriers to access to flexible working arrangements. The article concludes that, to ensure employees have access to work-life balance, the agency should shift its focus to implementation of the policy framework through activities such as education and culture change activities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Working Time Arrangements and Recreation: Making Time
           for Weekends When Working Long Hours
    • Abstract: Brown, Kerry; Bradley, Lisa; Lingard, Helen; Townsend, Keith; Ling, Sharine
      Work time spread across the entire week, rather than the conventional five day working week, has meant that workers are now less able to utilise longer stretches of recreation time especially in gaining access to a full two-day break over a weekend. This paper explores the issues contributing to workers' acquisition of longer recreation time. It seeks to determine the effects of this acquisition on the quality of working and non-working time for the employee through a study of work-life balance in the construction industry. It finds that weekends are more important to achieving work-life balance than shorter days over a six-day week when working long hours. Further, 'personal time' is a key element in achieving satisfactory work-life balance for employees, and this type of 'time' is often forgone in trying to integrate the necessary and desired non-work activities in the shorter time available to workers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Working Time Flexibilities: A Paradox in Call
           Centres'
    • Abstract: Hannif, Zeenobiyah; McDonnell, Anthony; Connell, Julia; Burgess, John
      Call centres are a source of job growth in many parts of the world. Jobs in call centres are a manifestation of the opportunities offered by ICT, together with the internal restructuring of organisations, to reduce costs and to achieve efficiencies. Extensive research has been conducted on the labour process in call centres, with findings suggesting that the work is demanding and high-pressured, entailing continuous operations with shift work being the norm, repetition and extensive monitoring and control. Moreover, call centres often have many female operatives, linked to non-standard work arrangements and the provision of emotional skills. Two features of call centres that are generally understated in the literature are their flat organisational structures and the use of team structures as a form of work organisation. There are often formal and informal mechanisms that could support flexible working arrangements, especially in the context of work-life balance issues. In this article we examine the impact of call centre work on worklife balance. Given the evidence of a high pressure work environment, we explore the types of working time arrangements in call centres, how working hours are determined, and the impact of these hours on work-life balance. Findings derived from a survey of 500 call centre operatives across 10 call centre workplaces and focus group interviews suggest that, despite the intensive and regulated work regimes that there is flexibility available in terms of adjusting working time arrangements to support non work responsibilities. A reconciliation of these developments is considered.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - The Work-life Provisions of the Fair Work Act: A
           Compromise of Stakeholder Preference
    • Abstract: Waterhouse, Jennifer; Colley, Linda
      This paper adopts a stakeholder analysis approach to policy formulation to consider the Rudd Government's success in achieving its work-life balance goals through the Fair Work Act (FWA), the extent to which it consulted stakeholders and the stakeholders to whom it listened. We explore the stated interests of key stakeholders in the process. We review the legislation, the parliamentary debates, and submissions to the Senate Inquiry into the Fair Work Bill 2008. We also consider the related and simultaneous Productivity Commission enquiry into paid parental leave up until the May 2009 federal budget. The paper concludes that the FWA develops a prescriptive response to work-life balance in establishing National Employment Standards for substantive issues including parental leave, maximum hours of work, paid personal carers' leave, compassionate leave, community service leave and the right to request flexible working arrangements. The Act is less prescriptive, however, in relation to process provisions, in particular the powers of the newly established 'Fair Work Australia' to hear and intercede in disputes regarding work-life balance provisions. There is a lack of clarity about individual flexibility agreements and the assessment of the 'Better Off Overall Test' (BOOT). The weak process provisions represent an uneasy and perhaps unworkable compromise between the competing demands of stakeholders.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Work, Life, Flexibility and Workplace Culture in
           Australia: Results of the 2008 Australian Work and Life Index (AWALI)
           Survey
    • Abstract: Skinner, Natalie; Pocock, Barbara
      This article summarises the main results of the 2008 Australian Work and Life Index (AWALI) survey of Australian workers. The survey reveals significant issues for Australian workers that arise from the intersection of work with the rest of their lives. Hours of work, work overload and the nature of direct supervision and workplace culture emerge as important in explaining differences in work-life interaction. When hours are the same, those with caring responsibilities (especially mothers, and particularly single mothers) have worse work-life outcomes than others. The article briefly considers the implications of findings for labour market policy and workplace initiatives.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Balancing Work, Family and Life: Introduction to the
           Special Edition
    • Abstract: Burgess, John; Waterhouse, Jennifer
      The papers in this special edition of Australian Bulletin of Labour are about the issue of balancing paid work with other aspects of life. Work-life had its genesis in the concept of work-family balance in the 1980s, when the apparent tension between work and family life began to be recognised. Woolcott (1990) showed that concerns about issues outside of work, particularly family responsibilities, had the potential to affect both the wellbeing and productivity of workers. Failing to address problems of imbalance between work and other life aspects has also been identified as resulting in detrimental social and economic consequences (OECD, 2008). As a result of these consequences, initiatives that assist workers to balance their work and family lives have gained increasing support from policy makers, employee and employer groups.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - The National Institute of Labour Studies
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:29 GMT
       
 
 
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