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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
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Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
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Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
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Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
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Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
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Journal Cover
Australasian Historical Archaeology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.212
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1322-9214
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 34 Australasian society for historical archaeology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Information for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Australasian society for historical archaeology: Monograph
           series [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: The shore whalers Western Australia: Historical archaeology of a maritime frontier,by Martin Gibbs, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press, 2010; Archaeology of the Chinese Fishing Industry in Colonial Victoria, by Alister M Bowen, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2013; An Archaeology of Institutional Confinement: The Hyde Park Baracks, 1846-1886, by Peter Davies, Penny Crook and Tim Murray, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2013; Good taste, fashion, luxury: A genteel Melbourne family and their rubbish, by Sarah Hayes, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2014.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Thesis abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Calling the shots: Aboriginal photographs [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Brown, Steve
      Review(s) of: Calling the shots: Aboriginal photographs, by Jane Lydon (Editor), Aboriginal Studies Press, Sydney 2014. 292 pages, paperback; ISBN: 9781922059598. AUD 39.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The Australian archaeologist's book of quotations [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Pitt, Nicholas
      Review(s) of: The Australian archaeologist's book of quotations, by Mike Smith and Billy Griffiths (eds), Monash University Publishing, Clayton, Vic., 2015, 166 pages; paperback, ISBN 9781922235749. AUD 24.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Ned Kelly under the microscope: Solving the forensic mystery of
           Ned Kelly's remains [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Carter, Gemma
      Review(s) of: Ned Kelly under the microscope: Solving the forensic mystery of Ned Kelly's remains, by Craig Cormick (Editor), CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, 2014, 263 + xxvii pages, paperback, c + bw illus., ISBN 9781486301768, AUD 39.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Coerced labour in Western Australia during the nineteenth
           century
    • Abstract: Winter, Sean
      Coerced forms of labour in Colonial Western Australia have been of particular interest to archaeologists. This paper synthesises research into nineteenth-century systems that coerced the labour of indentured workers, convicts and Aboriginal people in Western Australia. It becomes clear that economic and geographic expansion in Western Australia during the nineteenth century was heavily dependent on the exploitation of coerced labour, until the advent of the gold rushes at the end of the century. This exploitation was legitimised by a range of government processes and allowed elites to reaffirm their dominant position in the face of worker social mobility in the early days of the Swan River colony.,

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Holy waters: The development of criteria for the identification
           of the monkish wells of New Norcia in colonial Western Australia
    • Abstract: Bertinshaw, Ross
      The Benedictine monks based at New Norcia were a pastoral giant in colonial Western Australia. To support their flocks of sheep they constructed a water supply system based on the use of over 200 wells. This article summarises the results of an investigation of these wells using archaeological and archival methods, and in particular looks to develop a set of criteria that allows the monks' wells to be differentiated from others found in the area. For a well to be 'monkish' it should meet the criteria of land owned by the Benedictines, constructed to a standard design including a large diameter and stone lining, of good quality and sited to provide water and have grass nearby sufficient to feed a flock of 1000 sheep.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The geraldine mine: The 1850s lead mining frontier in Midwest
           Western Australia
    • Abstract: Gibbs, Martin
      The Geraldine lead mine was established in 1849 as Western Australia's first attempt to create a remote industrial frontier and engage in the global economy. Historical and archaeological evidence shows that the mining operation attempted to employ innovative technologies, used experienced miners as well as convict and Aboriginal labour, and in its later phases provided a well-developed mine settlement. Despite good quality ore its operation suffered through isolation, logistical difficulties with ore transport and an unstable workforce, while several hasty decisions including positioning the main shaft within a dry riverbed also impeded its success.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Global and local contexts: Nineteenth to early twentieth-century
           gold mining settlements in the Upper Murchison, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Fleming, Kelly
      The gold rush/mining era of the nineteenth and early twentieth century had global repercussions. Using data collected from three archaeological sites in the Upper Murchison region of Western Australia dating to this period, the global through to local context of these sites is explored. The results of the first comprehensive archaeological study of gold mining settlement sites in Western Australia suggest that participants adapted to accommodate fundamental shifts in politics, ideology, and social relations during this period, most of which were unique to the local context. In addition, although a global perspective is important given the widespread nature of the gold rushes and aspects of the experience being 'shared', framing questions in terms of local patterns and influence may render overarching global interpretations less tenable.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Urban planning as colonial marketing strategy for the Swan river
           settlement, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Barteaux, Jillian
      The creation of culturally meaningful landscapes through the naming, mapping and planning of places functioned to assert colonial ownership over the vast, seemingly unclaimed spaces of Western Australia. It also formed the backdrop upon which towns like Fremantle could be established, creating a sense of familiarity and belonging in an otherwise hostile environment. By exporting a vision of an established and recognisably civilised British landscape to prospective settlers and investors, the sense of spatial insecurity associated with such an isolated, unknown place was countered. To this end, the colonial government fabricated the image of an attractive, ideal urban center at Fremantle, well before there were people or funds to support such developments. By treating the town and graphic representations of the landscape as artefacts, the ways the colonial government endeavored to use town planning as a marketing strategy to attract settlers and investors to the Swan River Settlement, is illuminated.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The badimia people at Ninghan pastoral station: Changes to
           cultural landscapes and lifeways 1870s-1920s
    • Abstract: Wells, Stephen
      Pastoralism developed at Ninghan Pastoral Station in Western Australia's Mid-West from the 1870s to the 1920s. Changes to the lifeways of Ninghan's original inhabitants, the Badimia people, are described for this period. The applicability of developmental periods, phases and models of pastoralism is examined for Ninghan. 'Chaos - invasion and colonisation' (Smith 2001:23) is evident at Ninghan, confirming in part the applicability of her model. Additional steps referred to as 'exploration' and 'shepherding' are identified to more accurately describe what took place at Ninghan. The 'killing times' (Harrison 2002a; Paterson 2008; Smith 2001) and violence towards Indigenous people is not evident at Ninghan. Citing Lemkin's (1944) definition of genocide as a framework to investigate pastoralism, this paper reveals that what happened at Ninghan, whilst not genocide, reflects elements of Curthoys' (2014:231) 'genocidal character'.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 The settlement at Barmup: Britain's first farm in Western
           Australia
    • Abstract: Winter, Sean; Forsey, Callum; Dotte-Sarout, Emilie; Paterson, Alistair
      The National Trust of Australia (W.A.) property 'Old Farm Strawberry Hill' in Albany, Western Australia is one of the state's most significant heritage locations. It is a registered Aboriginal site where British colonists established the first farm in the fledgling colony, and where Governor Stirling was housed briefly. Long running archaeological investigations from University of Western Australia researchers at the site since the late 1990s have revealed the shift from a solely Noongar mineng landscape around the site of Barmup to the arrival of the colony's first farm, the history of the early byildings associated with Governor Stirling and other early colonists, and material evidence for the various phases of life at the site. Four different phases of investigation, each with different aims, have rewritten the history of the site, and provided the National Trust with a range of positive heritage outcomes, allowing new interpretations of the site. In particular the hidden histories of the undocumented residents of the site have been shown, and the general failure of the upper class Spencer family to establish a British style country estate in Western Australia has been demonstrated through the analysis of archaeological material.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Through the eyes of Henry Gray: Report on preliminary
           archaeological excavations at Gray's Store, Greenough, Western Australia
    • Abstract: Hetherington, Melissa
      This paper discusses the historical background, goals and preliminary outcomes of archaeological excavations in the yard surrounding 'Gray's Store', which is located on the Greenough Flats in the Midwest region of Western Australia, approximately 400 km north of Perth and 25 km south of Geraldton. Excavations at Gray's Store contribute to current understanding about lifeways on the Greenough Flats during the latter half of the nineteenth century. In 2015, three trenches were excavated in strategic areas to examine patterns of activity and rubbish disposal in the yard surrounding Gray's Store. This report discusses preliminary observations and results from those excavations.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Building colonial histories: The archaeology of the Menzies
           centre site, Hobart
    • Abstract: Crook, Penny; Mackay, Richard; Kostoglou, Parry
      In 2007 the excavation of a city block occupied by the Menzies Centre Research Institute on the northern fringe of Hobart CBD revealed the substantial remains of early-nineteenth-century architecture. The site was occupied by Hobart's elite for a mix of residential and commercial use from the mid-1820s to the early twentieth century. It was excavated, conserved and interpreted by team of consultant archaeologists and other specialists working closely with the site owner and the local consent authority. In this paper, we introduce the history and archaeology of the site, focusing on one of the six historic allotments: 53 Campbell Street. We then discuss the conservation and interpretation of all surviving remains below the ground floor of a multi-storey medical research and teaching facility. We reflect on the process of building colonial histories in the regulatory framework of urban planning and embedding them in the landscapes of urban renewal.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Colonial experiences of death, burial and memorialisation in
           West Terrace Cemetery, Adelaide: Applying a phenomenological approach to
           cultural landscapes in historical archaeology
    • Abstract: Muller, Stephen
      The study of cemeteries, with their accumulated material culture, is a popular topic in historical archaeology, eliciting a number of methodological approaches. This paper describes the application of a phenomenological approach, best known previously in archaeology for its use in prehistoric landscape studies, to a historical public cemetery. The plan and layout of the colonial section (1837-1900) of Adelaide's West Terrace Cemetery is analysed within the context of nineteenth-century visitation patterns, prevailing attitudes to death and burial in Britain and their influence on South Australian colonial society, to consider what factors influenced the layout, selection, placement, accumulation and display of material culture within the cemetery. The study concludes that beyond the immediate practicality of the deceased's disposal, the colonial cemetery landscape developed during a time of more regulated cemetery visitation, was intended as a place of movement and experience demonstrating private and public expressions of religious and social beliefs to the observer. Its conscious construction was designed to project a sensory experience of prevailing attitudes to death, burial and society in the nineteenth century. The visitor immersed within this landscape, was engaged in a reflexive sensory dialogue through the mediums of space and material culture. This experiential communication could invoke the power of memory to conjure the deceased's persona, invite contemplation of personal loss, prevailing community attitudes and religious beliefs, and reaffirm and perpetuate social worldviews.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Making productive space from sawmill waste: Timber production
           and reclamation at Kohukohu, Northland, New Zealand (1879-1912)
    • Abstract: Boswijk, Gretel; Munro, Duncan
      This paper explores local-scale landscape change as a consequence of waste disposal practices employed by the New Zealand (NZ) timber industry during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and considers whether there was concern about effects of these practices on receiving environments. The research focuses on Kohukohu, Northland, where a steam-powered sawmill operated between 1879 and 1912. Sawn waste was used to reclaim six acres (2.43 ha) of land at Kohukohu, which converted waste material into something useful (lining and fill) and improved the working conditions of the mill by creating flat land. Local concern about disposal of sawn waste by reclamation appears limited until the early 1900s, when anxiety about the negative effect of sawdust on the harbour increased. Such local scale modifications occurred elsewhere in the kauri district and are a (sometimes forgotten) legacy of industrialised timber production in NZ.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Index of volumes 1-32 (1983-2014)
    • Abstract: Davies, Peter
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Vale James Semple Kerr (1932-2014)
    • Abstract: Mackay, Richard
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Thesis abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Archaeological theory in a nutshell [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Dunk, Melissa
      Review(s) of: Archaeological theory in a nutshell, by Adrian Praetzellis, Left Coast Press, California, 2015, 224 pages, paperback, ISBN 9781629581590, USD $29.95.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Please god send me a wreck: Responses to shipwreck in a 19th
           century Australian community [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Mirams, Rebecca
      Review(s) of: Please god send me a wreck: Responses to shipwreck in a 19th century Australian community, by Brad Duncan and Martin Gibbs, Springer, New York, 2015, 243 pages, hardcover, ISBN 1869-6783. US$129.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 White granite in Brisbane
    • Abstract: Prangnell, Jonathan; Terry, Linda
      During analysis of artefacts excavated at the 1 William Street development site in Brisbane City two sherds of white granite were identified. These sherds represent the first white granite ever identified on a Queensland historical archaeological site. The two sherds have different patterns and both patterns differ from any previously reported in Australia and do not occur in the 23 white granite patterns illustrated in the Diagnostic Artifacts in Maryland website. The sherds come from 10-inch plates that were manufactured by Pinder, Bourne and Co between 1862 and 1882 and are from the site of a cottage that existed between 1855 and 1919 that was occupied by a number of families.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 The Fremantle Prison project
    • Abstract: Winter, Sean; Whitley, Tom
      In 2013, the University of Western Australia and the World Heritage Site Fremantle Prison signed a Memorandum of Understanding to allow archaeological investigation of the Prison over a five year period, under the title "The Fremantle Prison Project". This paper reports briefly on the first two years of that project. The project, designed to link with the UWA archaeology curriculum, and to meet heritage needs of the Prison, has produced a range of successful outcomes, including three research theses and two field schools. Initial research outcomes include a better understanding of refuse disposal practices within the Prison and the way it functioned as an industrial site in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Stone walls near Jindabyne NSW: European fences, not Aboriginal
           stone arrangements
    • Abstract: Pickard, John
      Two sets of stone walls located at Mill Creek and Ironpot Creek near Jindabyne NSW and a pair of parallel lines of stones near Ironpot Creek are believed by some to have been built by Aborigines for spiritual or astronomical purposes. However the structure of both sets of walls is typical of European dry stone walls elsewhere in Australia, and similar to other examples on a nearby property 35 km away. Furthermore, both sets of walls were charted and valued by surveyors as fence improvements on survey plans in the 1880s and 1890s. This paper compares these structures to other examples of European walls and Aboriginal stone arrangements, concluding that they are dry stone walls built in the late nineteenth century as boundary fences on steep rocky slopes. Either Aborigines, or Chinese miners returning from the Kiandra gold rush may have been employed to build them. Explanations invoking Aboriginal spiritual or astronomical uses are improbable and unnecessary. The double row of stones near Ironpot Creek is most likely to be a lockspit marking a reserved road between cadastral portions.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 'A subtle and evasive thing': Mercury refining in northern New
           South Wales in the early twentieth century
    • Abstract: Stubbs, Brett J; Gardiner, Jane
      Increasing importation of mercury for use in gold refining operations prompted the New South Wales government in 1900 to offer a reward for its production from ore raised within the colony. One early attempt to claim the reward was made at Pulganbar, in the Clarence River district. The ruins of this rare mineral processing activity are extant. The mode of operation of the original plant, which functioned for about four years from 1913, is interpreted mainly from historical records, supported by the study of its physical remains. It included a reverberatory furnace for roasting the mercury ore, a series of water-cooled chambers in which the gaseous mercury was condensed, a long flue and a chimney stack. Although the mainly brick ruins are afforded some level of protection by their inclusion on the heritage schedule of the relevant Local Environmental Plan, they are threatened by wandering livestock and uncontrolled growth of vegetation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 An archaeology of improvisation: Convict artefacts from Hyde
           Park Barracks, Sydney, 1819-1848
    • Abstract: Starr, Fiona
      Excavations during the early 1980s at Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney recovered over 120,000 artefacts. Approximately 90 per cent related to the post-1848 uses of the site as Sydney's female Immigration Depot, the Hyde Park Asylum for aged and destitute women, and courts and government offices. This paper presents an analysis of the small proportion relating to the convicts employed as government workers between 1819 and 1848, the first and most significant occupation of the site. The author considers the spatial distribution of identifiable convict artefacts and argues that previously unrecognised areas of in situ convict deposits survived the 1848 installation of new ceilings, which removed most of the convict period deposits. By linking the archaeological evidence with historical sources, the convict artefacts reveal new perspectives on how convicts at the Barracks resisted government regulations. Improvisation allowed them to adapt and respond to their human needs, minimise the impact of the penal system, and make-do in their situation of confinement and segregation from society.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Australasian society for historical archaeology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Information for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Australasian society for historical archaeology: Monograph
           series [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: The shore whalers of Western Australia: Historical archaeology of a maritime frontier: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 2, by Martin Gibbs, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press, 2010, Member's price AUD$35 + p and h; Archaeology of the Chinese fishing industry in colonial Victoria: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 3, by Alister M Bowen, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2013, Member's price: AUD$35 + p and h; An archaeology of institutional confinement: The Hyde Park Barracks, 1846-1886: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 4, by Peter Davies, Penny Crook and Tim Murray, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2013, Member's price: AUD$40 + p and h; Good taste, fashion, luxury: A genteel Melbourne family and their rubbish: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 5, by Sarah Hayes, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2014, Member's price: AUD$40 + p and h.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 33 Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 General Information about Australasian society for historical
           archaeology
    • Abstract:
      The Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology was founded in 1970 to promote the study of historical archaeology in Australia.Two decades later with the formal incorporation of New Zealand into the Society the name was changed to Australasian.The Society encourages archaeological research on historical sites, buildings, artefacts, and relics by appropriate means including historical research, survey, recording, excavation and analysis and the publication of results of such research.The Society supports the conservation of sites and relics that are part of the Australian and New Zealand heritage.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Information for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Thesis abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 The archaeology of market capitalism: A Western Australian
           perspective [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bowen, Alister
      Review(s) of: The archaeology of market capitalism: A Western Australian perspective, by Gaye Nayton, Contributions to Global Historical Archaeology, Springer, New York, 2011, 278 pages; hardback. ISBN 9781441983176, EUR 129.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 An archaeology of institutional confinement: The Hyde Park
           Barracks, 1848-1886 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Piddock, Susan
      Review(s) of: An archaeology of institutional confinement: The Hyde Park Barracks, 1848-1886, by Peter Davies, Penny Crook and Tim Murray, Studies in Australasian Historical Archaeology 4. Sydney University Press, Sydney, 2013, 118 pages; paperback. ISBN 9781920899790. AUD$40.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 An archaeology of the margins: Colonialism, amazighity, and
           heritage management in the Canary Islands [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Flexner, James L
      Review(s) of: An archaeology of the margins: Colonialism, amazighity, and heritage management in the Canary Islands, by A. Jose Farrujia de la Rosa, New York, 2014, x + 119 pages; e-Book; ISBN 9781461493969, EUR 41.64; softcover; ISBN 9781461493952. 49.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Historical archaeologies of cognition: Explorations into faith,
           hope and charity [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Davies, Peter
      Review(s) of: Historical archaeologies of cognition: Explorations into faith, hope and charity, by James Symonds, Anna Badcock and Jeff Oliver (editors), Equinox Publishing, Sheffield, 2013, x, 198 pages; hardback, bw illus., ISBN 9781845533434. GBP 60 pounds.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Vasilikos Valley project 12: The field survey of the Vasilikos
           Valley, volume III - human settlement in theVasilikos Valley [Book Review]
           
    • Abstract: Sneddon, Andrew
      Review(s) of: Vasilikos Valley project 12: The field survey of the Vasilikos Valley, volume III - human settlement in the Vasilikos Valley, by Ian A. Todd (with a contribution by Jonathan Mitchell), Studies in Mediterranean Archaeology, Astroms Forlag, Uppsala 2013; 252 pages, hardback, ISBN 9789170812514.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology: Monograph
           series [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: The shore whalers of western Australia: Historical archaeology of a maritime frontier: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 2, by Martin Gibbs, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press, 2010; Archaeology of the Chinese fishing industry in colonial Victoria: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 3, by Alister M Bowen, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2013; An archaeology of institutional confinement: The hyde park barracks, 1846-1886: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 4, by Peter Davies, Penny Crook and Tim Murray, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2013; Good taste, fashion, luxury: A genteel Melbourne family and their rubbish: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 5, by Sarah Hayes, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2014.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Streets and stamper batteries - an 'industrial' landscape of
           gold mining townships in nineteenth-century Queensland
    • Abstract: Mate, Geraldine
      Gold exploration and mining in late nineteenth-century Queensland led to the development of many small, ephemeral mining townships. These townships had distinctive social landscapes, informed by the cultural values of nineteenth-century regional communities with a recursive relationship between the social and industrial landscape (both physical and cultural). The townscape itself was an active component in the construction and perpetuation of social identity within the mining towns and constructions were further informed by the overpowering influence of the mining landscape. The mining town of Mount Shamrock is used as an example of the application of such a landscape perspective enabling a complex and fine-grained picture of the construction of social identity in the historical landscapes of mining towns to emerge.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 A doomed business: The material culture of Ann Jones and the
           Glenrowan Inn
    • Abstract: Hayes, Sarah
      At the start of June 1880, Ann Jones was running a successful inn at Glenrowan, but by the end of the month her home and business lay in ruins. The Kelly Gang had holed up in her bar in their attempt to fend off the Victoria Police, and ultimately Ann's property was burnt to the ground. While Ann is in many ways a footnote to the Kelly story, the siege has left an important record of the ordinary life of an uneducated Irish woman in nineteenth-century rural Victoria. She has received much more attention than others like her, both in the historical records and in having her home excavated by archaeologists. As such, the artefacts recovered from the site along with the historical record provide a rare opportunity to examine how material culture was used to establish a respectable business and personal position in colonial society.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 A nineteenth-century hay rope from Hobart, Tasmania
    • Abstract: Ranson, Don
      Rope made of hay rarely survives to be described in the archaeological literature. However, an example preserved under the floorboards of a nineteenth-century Hobart house is reported here.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 Artefacts, history and assemblage formation at Te Hoe whaling
           station, New Zealand
    • Abstract: Smith, Ian; Woods, Naomi
      Manufacturing date ranges for ceramic vessels, glass bottles, clay pipes and selected metal artefacts at Te Hoe whaling station, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand are compared with each other and with two historically identified phases of occupation at the site (c.1842-1857, 1864-1896). This supports the frequently observed pattern of ceramic vessels having a longer use-life than either glass bottles or clay pipes. It also shows a markedly longer time-lag for ceramics from the second phase of occupation, which is interpreted here as indicating that the remnant whaling community had limited engagement with mainstream New Zealand society throughout the later nineteenth century.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 'They camped here always': 'Archaeologies of attachment' in a
           seascape context at Wardang Island (Waraldi/Wara-dharldhi) and Point
           Pearce Peninsula (Burgiyana), South Australia
    • Abstract: Fowler, Madeline; Roberts, Amy; McKinnon, Jennifer; O'Loughlin, Clem; Graham, Fred
      This research employs the concept of 'archaeologies of attachment', with its emphasis on material culture and intangible heritage, and applies it to an Indigenous Australian seascape - an approach rarely or thoroughly combined in maritime studies. The seascape investigated is the Wardang Island (Waraldi/Waradharldhi)/ Point Pearce Peninsula (Burgiyana) area in South Australia. This region (and the wider Yorke Peninsula area) is the traditional country of the Narungga people. Collaborative fieldwork with Narungga people has revealed the importance of combining archaeological surveys with place-based oral history interviews to understand the extent of Narungga attachment to this seascape. In particular, place-based interviews conducted with Narungga elders contributed vital 'lived experiences' to the understanding of the archaeological record, providing a meaningful and textured account of the past.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 The archaeological interpretation of the New Zealand stamp mill
    • Abstract: Petchey, Peter
      The stamp mill (or stamper battery) is the most commonly surviving item of machinery on the New Zealand goldfields, and machines can be found in all of the old major hard rock mining areas from Coromandel to Fiordland. Each machine was the product of a series of human decisions in response to the requirements and constraints of each mine site. Mine owners, managers, engineers and workers all had an input into creating the machines that now constitute the archaeological record. This paper presents a standardised terminology for describing stamp mills, based on contemporary engineering sources, and then uses the United Goldfields Battery as a case study to show how an archaeological examination of stamp mill engineering can also shed light on the roles that people played in their creation and operation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 At the margins: Archaeological evidence for Macassan activities
           in the South Wellesley Islands, Gulf of Carpentaria
    • Abstract: Oertle, Annette; Leavesley, Matthew; Ulm, Sean; Mate, Geraldine; Rosendahl, Daniel
      Archaeological, anthropological, historical, linguistic and genetic studies of Macassans and their activities in northern Australia have focused on the extensive industrial trepang processing site complexes of the Cobourg Peninsula and northeast Arnhem Land. Less attention has been given to sites at the geographical peripheries of Macassan industrial activities. Archaeological studies show that the eastern extremity of Macassan activities extended to the Sir Edward Pellew Group. However, ethnographic and historical accounts show that Macassan presence extended to the South Wellesley Islands, over 200 km further east, in the south east Gulf of Carpentaria. Recent archaeological fieldwork reveals new evidence for Macassan activities at the eastern margin. This paper reports preliminary data from five Macassan sites in the South Wellesley Islands.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 The lost mausoleum of Matthew Goggs
    • Abstract: Prangnell, Jonathan; Howe, Irene
      In 2010 a search by members of the Centenary Suburbs Historical Society identified possible structural debris within the grounds of Wacol Prison, close to Wolston House, in the western Brisbane suburb of Wacol. The authors undertook archaeological and historical investigations to identify the remains. The footings of a stone building and adjacent walls were unearthed. This building was identified as a mausoleum constructed by Matthew Buscall Goggs, the second owner of Wolston House, in 1871, that was subsequently demolished by the Prisons Department in the 1960s.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 32 St Lawrence archaeological project: Background, progress and
           future directions
    • Abstract: Buckler, Aleisha
      St Lawrence is a small Australian town, established as a port on the coast of Central Queensland in the early 1860s. The now sparsely populated settlement has a rich archaeological record through which to disentangle and understand life in colonial Queensland. This paper presents a brief background report on part of ongoing historical archaeological research at St Lawrence, which investigates the movement of people, information and material culture into, and out of, the settlement prior to the arrival of the railway in the early 1920s.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Australasian society for historical archaeology
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Information for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology: Monograph
           series [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: Port essington: The historical archaeology of a north Australian nineteenth-century military outpost: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 1, by Jim Allen, Published by Sydney University Press, 2007; The shore whalers of Western Australia: Historical archaeology of a maritime frontier: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 2, by Martin Gibbs, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press, 2010; Archaeology of the Chinese fishing industry in Colonial Victoria: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 3, by Alister M Bowen, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2013; An Archaeology of institutional confinement: The Hyde park barracks, 1846-1886: Studies in Australasian historical archaeology 4, by Peter Davies, Penny Crook and Tim Murray, Published by Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology and Sydney University Press 2013.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Thesis abstracts
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Progress at Ageston Plantation: survey
    • Abstract: Youngberry, April; Rains, Kevin
      This paper presents a brief report on the preliminary archaeological investigations at Ageston Plantation, Alberton, one of the earliest and most important of the sugar plantations in southeast Queensland. There have been no published archaeological studies of any of the early plantation sites in the southeast Queensland region, where the State's sugar industry was pioneered, and little understanding of what physical evidence survives across the region. The Ageston mill site, which is the focus of this paper, has revealed information pertaining to the organisation, layout, function, evolution and social life of the plantation landscape, as well as information on South Sea Islander experiences and contributions to colonial development. Future archaeological potential, as well as human and natural threats to the evidence, are also considered.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 The history, archaeology and material culture of 105 Radar
           Station, Cox Peninsula, Northern Territory
    • Abstract: Owen, Tim; James, Shelley
      The 105 Range and Direction Finding (RDF) Radar Station, Cox Peninsula, Northern Territory, was established as the second radar site in Darwin during the Second World War. The site was established as a consequence of a dire and urgent need to identify Japanese aircraft squadrons that were conducting bombing raids on Darwin and surrounds, which had commenced in February 1942. 105 RDF used a Modified Air Warning Device (MAWD) that allowed detection of planes up to 150 miles away. This paper tells the story of the camp where the 119 men who operated 105 RDF lived for nineteen months in a remote and isolated corner of the Northern Territory, at the front line of Australian defence. The harsh bush conditions were adapted with the erection of a number of buildings, including a mess, kitchen (with a fridge for cold beer) and a recreation hut. The remnant archaeological pattern at 105 RDF provides evidence for the habitation of this area and the intention of Australian Defence to protect the location of 105 RDF, to ensure it remained unknown to the Japanese.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Bottle glass: Examination of a breakage pattern and two types of
           modification
    • Abstract: Bowen, Alister
      Bottle glass is one of the most common artefact types recovered from historical archaeological sites in Australia. With careful identification and analysis, post-depositional, cultural and behavioural information can be gleaned from the interpretation of glass bottle assemblages. This paper identifies a particular pattern in glass breakage and provides an interpretation for two types of bottle glass modifications. The information provided will assist archaeologists in their understanding of glass bottle artefacts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Tram or dam': A comparison of kauri logging transportation
           methods in the Kauaeranga valley, New Zealand, 1871-1928
    • Abstract: Wilton, David; Soltani, Laya Zarif
      Logging of kauri timber from the northern regions of New Zealand (NZ) in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries played a major part in the development of the colony and, later, fledgling nation. Kauri timber also provided a very early source of export income. Mature kauri trees were of massive size and their growing locations in remote, rugged, bush-covered terrain meant that innovative transportation methods had to be adopted to harvest them. One such method was a system of driving dams, constructed within a river catchment, and tripped in a synchronized fashion when full (of logs and water). This study utilized GIS technology to develop a volumetric model of the driving dam system in the Kauaeranga Valley, which provides insights into how the system worked (particularly, its efficiency) and facilitated a comparison with other early systems of transporting logs (particularly tramways).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 The archaeology of institutions: Exploring the Abbotsford
           convent site through legislation
    • Abstract: Kay, Edwina
      Institutions of confinement have played a significant role in Australian society. This paper explores the value of using legislation to understand a site of institutional confinement in Melbourne. The former Convent of the Good Shepherd in Abbotsford was a large institutional complex, made up of several distinct institutions operating simultaneously at the site. With a Magdalen Asylum, reformatory, industrial school for girls, and a day school, the convent was home to thousands of women and children between 1863 and 1975. The buildings of the convent are treated here as material culture, and are examined in relation to child welfare and education legislation in nineteenth-century Victoria. This approach has the potential to provide important insights into the changing role of institutions of confinement in society.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Artefacts and neighbourhood transformations: A material culture
           study of nineteenth-century North Dunedin
    • Abstract: Woods, Naomi
      North Dunedin experienced major social transformations during the second half of the nineteenth century, particularly in relation to ideas and stereotypes regarding the residents and as part of the development of a shared identity. Artefacts from one primary study site (234-242 George Street) were analysed directly and another eight via the excavators' reports and artefact catalogues with the intention of identifying these transformations in the material culture record. The results, along with supporting evidence drawn from the historical record, were used to understand how these changes influenced the neighbourhood and the people living in it at this time.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Historical archaeological research in Western Australia: A
           critical review and suggestions for future research
    • Abstract: Winter, Sean
      Historical archaeological investigation in Western Australia has mirrored investigations common to much of historical archaeology in Australia, such as shipwrecks, European colonisation, cross-cultural contact, convictism and industry. While a number of large scale studies have made inroads into our understanding of colonial life, much of the focus of Western Australian historical archaeology has concentrated on investigating specific historic places in isolation rather than the larger systems which supported them. Western Australian historical archaeology has favoured remote rural and coastal sites in the north of the state, largely ignoring the large urban centres of the south-west. Areas of future research for the discipline include the archaeology of urban centres, colonial expansion in the south-west, understanding the impact of the convict system in 1850, then the gold rushes in the 1880s, and finally, social and industrial issues related to industries such as mining and timber-getting.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Modelling construction camps on the Otago central railway
    • Abstract: Mitchell, Peter
      The development of strategic infrastructure such as road and railway networks in New Zealand during the latter part of the nineteenth century relied on a combination of government workers from the Public Works Department and private contractors. As these projects were often undertaken in remote areas the workforce would be housed in temporary camps, which could be occupied for a matter of months to some years. The following study puts forward a model to explain the location of railway construction camps on the Otago Central Railway in the South Island of New Zealand, which was constructed between 1880 and 1917. The model is tested against evidence drawn from archaeological field survey and historical research, which shows that there are distinctions between the locations of the Public Works Department camps and those of the private contractors.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Dog-legs and cockatoos: Clarifying two confused and confusing
           early Australian fencing terms
    • Abstract: Pickard, John
      Dog-leg and cockatoo fences were widely used by selectors and squatters in colonial Australia in the early years of developing their selections and runs. However as the terms, which have their origins in colonial Australia, were applied to a range of structures, interpreting contemporary descriptions may be difficult. This paper explores the meanings of the terms and their origins. Dog-legs are paired poles laid diagonally across a fence of any form, but usually some form of log or brush fence, with a log supported in the crutch to increase the height or stability of the fence. They have also been recorded with dry stone walls. In general the term 'dog-leg fence' should not be interpreted as a zig-zag fence, although dog-legs may be used with these structures. Cockatoo or cocky's fence was a derisive term applied to any of a wide range of rough fences, again usually log or brush, and including dog-leg fences, erected by small-scale selectors known as cockatoo or cocky farmers. Historical archaeologists should be careful assigning a specific structure to a contemporary use of this term.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 The Garfield water wheel: Hydraulic power on the Victorian
           goldfields
    • Abstract: Davies, Peter; Lawrence, Susan
      Water wheels were widely used on the Victorian goldfields during the nineteenth century to drive mining machinery in areas where sufficient water was available. One of the largest wheels constructed was the Garfield water wheel, with a diameter of 70 feet (21.3 m), which operated from 1887 to 1904 near Chewton in central Victoria. It drew water from the Coliban System of Waterworks, a government-funded supply scheme that delivered water to mining communities in a region that was otherwise too dry for hydraulic power. In this paper we use the archaeological and historical evidence of the Garfield wheel to argue that water wheels offered a reliable and efficient alternative to steam power for many mining parties on the goldfields, and their use reveals the complex choices made by miners in terms of cost, industrial needs and environmental resources.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Mission archaeology in Vanuatu: Preliminary findings, problems,
           and prospects
    • Abstract: Flexner, James L
      Christian missionaries were among the first permanent European settlers in the New Hebrides (as Vanuatu was called before independence in 1980). Notably, Scottish Presbyterians became established in the archipelago from the 1840s through to the early twentieth century. Most of what is known about this early period of interaction between Melanesians and foreigners comes from the official, heroic narratives written by the missionaries themselves, as well as other archival sources such as the accounts of explorers, traders, and naval officers during the nineteenth century. Archaeological research has just begun to explore the sites associated with the earliest New Hebrides missions. Material evidence from these places of interaction hints at the great potential for historical archaeology to create an account of the past that is inclusive of Melanesian and European perspectives, producing new insights about the ongoing role of colonialism in shaping interaction throughout the region.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Historical archaeology and Australia's cultural heritage sector:
           Emerging issues for education and skills development
    • Abstract: Ireland, Tracy; Guthrie, Amy; Mackay, Richard; Smith, Anita
      This paper reviews findings from the Heritage Trades and Professional Training Project (GML et al. 2010) and draws out emerging issues for historical archaeology and heritage management in Australia. The research project was designed to gather and analyse data on the nature of existing education and training for the historic heritage sector and on the skills most used by heritage professionals. The analysis reveals that archaeology differs from other professions working in historic heritage in that most archaeology degrees are likely to contain heritage related content. Further, archaeologists are more likely than other heritage professionals to have gained their most-used workplace skills through formal learning, rather than 'on the job' training, suggesting that archaeology education has responded effectively to the needs of employment in the heritage sector. However, a range of systemic problems in heritage education and training were identified including: the geographic concentration of education in SE Australia; the need for education to respond to the changing theory and practice of heritage; the need for improved national co-ordination and collaboration between education providers and regulatory authorities; and the need to make grant funding and project approvals conditional upon the employment of appropriately qualified specialists, in order to build demand for quality and best practice.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Archaeology of St Bathans cottage hospital, Central Otago, New
           Zealand
    • Abstract: Smith, Ian; Garland, Jessie
      This paper describes the excavation and analysis of an assemblage from a cesspit at St Bathans Cottage Hospital. Artefacts include various items for diagnosis, preparation and delivery of medical treatments, along with patent and proprietary pharmaceuticals and a range of standard domestic items. Consideration is given to the relationship of medical and pharmaceutical products in the hospital setting and also the dual function of the cottage hospital as a residence and medical institution. Comparisons are made with selected artefacts from hospital and non-hospital contexts in Thames and Wellington, in an attempt to identify characteristics that might be distinctive of medical institutions, and to provide a platform for the future development of 'hospital archaeology'.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 A foodways research recipe
    • Abstract: Simmons, Alexy
      Food is an ephemeral staple of daily life that must be constantly renewed, as a biological necessity. Since the founding of the discipline archaeologists have used foodways information as a key for understanding the everyday lives of people, in the past and present. The specific focus of this paper is the study of soldiers' food culture during the Waikato campaign of the New Zealand Wars. The paper presents a research framework and methodology that has increased knowledge about how soldiers got and enjoyed their daily bread. The research model and method may also have broader applications for food studies in archaeology.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Hereweka/Harbour cone: A relict landscape on the Otago Peninsula
    • Abstract: Middleton, Angela
      In 2008 the Dunedin City Council purchased a block of farmland, 324 ha in extent, on the Otago peninsula, near the city of Dunedin in southern New Zealand. This included the old volcanic cone known as Harbour Cone. A survey revealed a pristine archaeological landscape associated with small nineteenth-century dairy farms: stone boundary walls relating to the first cadastral survey, farmstead ruins, disused roads and other related features. However, the Maori name for the area, Hereweka, provides the key to an earlier indigenous cultural layer predating European arrival, repeated in oral history but leaving no archaeological traces. This oral history is associated with conflict between earlier occupants of the south known as Ngati Mamoe, and their conquest and absorption by Ngai Tahu, later arrivals from the north, who were dominant by the time of European annexation and Crown land purchase.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Dalmatian settlement and identity in New Zealand: The Devcich
           farm, Kauaeranga valley, near Thames
    • Abstract: Jones, Martin J
      This paper looks at issues of identity surrounding the settlement of Dalmatian migrants in New Zealand in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Dalmatian migration to this country was part of a global phenomenon as many young Dalmatian men sought short-term work in the New World in response to social and economic pressures at home. Specific experiences in their new environments often helped to shape new identities, especially for migrants who decided to settle permanently. The current paper examines the physical composition of a farmstead belonging to one group of settlers at the Devcich Farm, near Thames, and how it might reflect both an on-going sense of identity linked with cultural origins in Dalmatia, and changing identity acquired through social interaction and other experiences in New Zealand. The investigation has a particular emphasis on evidence from standing structures and plantings on the site, and is assisted by documentary information that provides specific historical context.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 People, place and space: An archaeological survey of the
           maritime cultural landscapes of Otago Harbour, New Zealand
    • Abstract: Carter, Matthew
      A maritime cultural landscape approach was applied to Otago Harbour, New Zealand, in order to investigate the interconnections between archaeological sites and maritime activities in the harbour and the wider maritime cultural landscapes they represent. Evidence of this interaction was investigated through a combination of ecological, historical and archaeological sources. The evidence of these interactions was explored in relation to the themes of: navigation, abandoned watercraft and anthropogenic change, each of which represented an interdependent maritime cultural landscape that was present in Otago Harbour at various points in time. By investigating the harbour in this way the evolution of the maritime use of the harbour could be explored, providing insights into both the timing and location of sites of maritime use around the harbour.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 A 35-year endeavour: Bendigo's rise and shine sluicing syndicate
    • Abstract: Carpenter, Lloyd
      An enduring legacy of the Central Otago gold rush is the network of water races crossing the landscape. Lacking the romance of schist cottage ruins or hint of enterprise inherent in herringbone tailings, mullock heaps and dredging tailings, these watercourses are unremarkable except for their potential re-use for irrigation. But the employment and judicious use of water was critical to the development of gold claims, when selftaught hydraulic engineers organised, financed and built water races to open alluvial mining areas. The Rise and Shine syndicate worked their sluicing claim in Bendigo Creek's headwaters for 35 years and changed the fortunes of the Bendigo Gully gold field. Examination of the syndicate and its archaeology reveals a group of miners who developed a profitable claim, built a community and proved adept at employing their water resource in a way that confounds popular tourism-oriented depictions of the gold rush as rootless men in ephemeral towns.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Information for contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Notes on contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 An archaeology of Australia since 1788 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Connah, Graham
      Review(s) of: An archaeology of Australia since 1788, by Susan Lawrence and Peter Davies, Springer, New York, 2011, 421 pages; hardback, ISBN 9781441974846, US$129.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 The archaeology of maritime landscapes [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hunter, James W
      Review(s) of: The archaeology of maritime landscapes, by Ben Ford (ed), Springer, New York, 2011, 352 pages, 34 illustrations, hardcover, ISBN 9781441982094, US$129.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Archaeology and preservation of gendered landscapes [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Mate, Geraldine
      Review(s) of: Archaeology and preservation of gendered landscapes, by Sherene Baugher and Suzanne M. Spencer-Wood (eds), New York, 2010, 275 pages, hardcover, ISBN 9781441915009, US$129.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Historical archeology of tourism in Yellowstone national park
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Jones, Jennifer M
      Review(s) of: Historical archeology of tourism in Yellowstone national park, by Annalies Corbin and Matthew Russell (eds), Springer, New York, 2010, 253 pages, hardcover, ISBN 9781441910837, US$129.00.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Pakington whaling station, Port Gregory: A short report on site
           inspections and later discoveries of whaling-related features and evidence
           
    • Abstract: Rodrigues, Jennifer
      A series of site inspections and test excavations were carried out at an historic whaling site at Port Gregory, on the mid-west coast of Western Australia, by volunteers and researchers of the Department of Maritime Archaeology, Western Australian Museum. The site contains considerable archaeological evidence associated with shore based whaling activities, which is also confirmed by the available historical resources. This research note provides a brief historical background to contextualise the site and its associated activities. The paper also discusses the findings of the site inspections, the extent and nature of the archaeological evidence distributed across the area (which includes both surface and subsurface evidence), the natural and human impacts from which it suffers and the archaeological potential it contains.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Forging ahead at Hervey's range in the hinterland of Townsville,
           north Queensland
    • Abstract: Clarkson, Marianne
      One of the acknowledged gaps in historical archaeological research themes is that of early Australian secondary industries, such as blacksmith shops, making any comparison to conclusions drawn from research elsewhere in the world very difficult. The classic diagnostic criteria for a stand-alone blacksmith shop was described by Light (1984) following his work at several Canadian fur trade era sites, with Hyett (2002) suggesting some reasons, such as climate, availability of local materials and transportation difficulties, as to why his findings at an early Australian blacksmith did not adhere to these strict descriptions. Recent excavation work on a heritage listed site in the Townsville hinterland has revealed a possible smith dating to the mid-1860s that also deviates from Light's criteria, hinting that other factors, such as the customer base, distance from a main town and the experience of the smithy himself, may be important for the shop's design and layout. Further research in this area could help to define a more specific set of diagnostic criteria for early Australian blacksmiths.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Gentility in the dining and tea service practices of early
           colonial Melbourne's 'established middle class'
    • Abstract: Hayes, Sarah
      Social mobility led to rapid changes in the class structure of early colonial Melbourne as the settlement increasingly came to incorporate many people from different backgrounds. In order to examine the influence of this on Melbourne society through historical archaeology it is useful to conceptualise immigrants to Melbourne as comprising different groups and examine whether these groups have distinctive material cultural patterns. This paper will examine the potential of this approach by focusing on the dining and tea service assemblage of one family who belonged to one of the earliest groups in the colony. By doing so, it will show that indicators of gentility in the assemblage such as matching sets, variety of vessel forms, consistency in goods for both public and private use, and keeping up with fashion can be used to interpret how this group was using gentility to define and maintain its class position.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Harvesting water on a Victorian colonial goldfield
    • Abstract: Davies, Peter; Lawrence, Susan; Turnbull, Jodi
      Water was vital to almost every aspect of gold mining in the colonial period, but many areas had limited access to reliable water supplies. Miners responded by building substantial reservoirs and lengthy races to capture, store and distribute water to mining claims. In this paper we present a case study of the archaeology of water management on the Creswick alluvial goldfield in central Victoria. During the 1850s and 1860s, miners at Creswick constructed numerous dams and several hundred kilometres of races, many of which are well preserved on the goldfield today. The remains indicate the ways in which miners came to terms with environmental limits and created landscapes of water management. The integration of archaeological evidence with a range of historical sources into a GIS system reveals the rapid development of water networks and the complex relationships between water users.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Nineteenth-century buttons from the north Brisbane burial ground
    • Abstract: McGowan, Glenys; Prangnell, Jonathan
      From 2000-2002, a salvage excavation was conducted to record and remove 397 burials exposed by a stadium redevelopment in the centre of the city of Brisbane, Queensland. These burials formed part of the North Brisbane Burial Ground which received interments between 1843 and 1875. During the course of the excavation, 71 buttons were collected, consisting of 40 ceramic buttons, 17 metal buttons, 8 bone buttons, 1 shell button, 2 textile-covered buttons, 2 thread buttons, and 1 ivory button. The buttons were typed and analysed microscopically and compared to those of other sites. The threads used to attach these buttons were preserved in 16 samples, and fragments of a twill woven garment with button holes were preserved on two brass buttons. Given the very poor preservation of burial remains at the site, the complex taphonomic processes are also investigated and of the thirty four burials that contained buttons, six were assigned date ranges of interment based upon button morphology.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 The demon drink: Working-class attitudes to alcohol in
           nineteenth-century Port Adelaide
    • Abstract: Lampard, Susan; Staniforth, Mark
      Alcohol consumption was one of the primary ways in which the nineteenth century middle-class distinguished themselves from the working-class. The working-class were perceived by those above as drunken good-for-nothings whose situation in life was brought about by their own intemperance. Drinking was central to the notion of respectability and the negotiation of one's position in society. As the middle-class used alcohol to define their position so did elements of the working-class. Their voice, however, was often not heard or was misinterpreted. Three assemblages from Port Adelaide tell two different stories - one of indifference to temperance and the other of actively using temperance to elevate social standing.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 29 Editorial
    • Abstract: Ireland, Tracy
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Information for Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Notes on Contributors
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Human Remains: Guide for Museums and Academic Institutions [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Westaway, Michael C
      Review(s) of: Human Remains: Guide for Museums and Academic Institutions, by Vicki cassman, Nancy Odegaard and Joseph Powel (eds), Altamira Press, Lanham, 2008, 330 Pages, Paperback, ISBN 0759109559. USD34.95. Includes references.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Te Puna - a New Zealand Mission Station: Historical Archaeology
           in New Zealand [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hayes, Sarah
      Review(s) of: Te Puna - a New Zealand Mission Station: Historical Archaeology in New Zealand, by Angela Middleton, Contributions to Global Historical Archaeology Series, Springer, New York and London 2008; 276 Pages; Hardcover; ISBN 9780387776200. AUD 178.99 (inc GST). Includes references.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 A Guide to Bone Toothbrushes of the 19th and Early 20th
           Centuries [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Davies, Peter
      Review(s) of: A Guide to Bone Toothbrushes of the 19th and Early 20th Centuries, by Barbara E. Mattick, Xlibris, Bloomington, Indiana, 2010; 82 pages; paperback; ISBN 9781441598615. USD41.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Fantastic Dreaming: The Archaeology of an Aboriginal Mission
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Harrison, Rodney
      Review(s) of: Fantastic Dreaming: The Archaeology of an Aboriginal Mission, by Jane Lydon, AltaMira Press, Lanham, Maryland and Plymouth, UK, 2009; 330 Pages, Hardback, ISBN 9780759111059. AUD 53.95 (inc. GST). Includes references.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Archaeology and the Postcolonial Critique [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lydon, Jane
      Review(s) of: Archaeology and the Postcolonial Critique, by Matthew Liebmann and Uzma Z. Rizvi (eds), AltaMira Press, Lanham MD, 2008; 274 Pages; Hardback; ISBN 9780759110045, AUD 104.95 (inc. GST).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Reply to a 'Straw Person in Paradise'
    • Abstract: Quirk, Kate
      I would like to thank Peter Bell for his comments about my recent paper in Australasian Historical Archaeology, and for this opportunity to clarify my argument.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Reply from a Straw Person in Paradise
    • Abstract: Bell, Peter
      A 'straw man', according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is 'an imaginary adversary, or an invented adverse argument, adduced in order to be triumphantly refuted'. Wikipedia says: 'A straw man argument is an informal fallacy based on misrepresentation of an opponent's position. To 'attack a straw man' is to create the illusion of having refuted a proposition by substituting a superficially similar proposition (the 'straw man'), and refuting it, without ever having actually refuted the original position.'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Wish You Were Here: Historic Inscriptions from the North Head
           Quarantine Station, Manly, NSW
    • Abstract: Clarke, Anne; Frederick, Ursula; Williams, Anna
      From the early nineteenth century many of the ships arriving in Port Jackson, NSW were required to undergo quarantine at North Head, Manly. Thousands of people passed through this site during its 150 year history. Historic inscriptions remain as one of the most intriguing archaeological legacies of this period. In this paper we revisit recordings of these inscriptions and consider what they may tell us about the people who inhabited the site. Using contemporary theories on the material culture of travel and memorialisation we explore the inscriptions as commemorative gestures, or mementoes of passage. In the process we reflect on our own professional ties to the past.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Towards a Thematic Research Framework for Australian Historical
           Archaeology
    • Abstract: Schacht, Ilka
      In a climate of limited resources for the long-term conservation and management of archaeological resources, their significance must be assessed not only with reference to the research design of the archaeological project that recovered them, but also from a clear understanding of wider regional and national research frameworks to which they may be able to contribute new information. Currently, no state or national level research frameworks exist for Australian historical archaeology. There are therefore few reference points against which the relative importance of archaeological resources can be assessed or management policies and decisions justified. This paper presents a preliminary thematic framework for Australian historical archaeology and discusses the results of the publications analysis on which it is based. The framework was developed in the context of a broader research project aimed at developing a model for assessing the research significance of Australian historical archaeological collections. The preliminary thematic framework is presented here as a foundation upon which state and national research frameworks for Australian historical archaeology can begin to be built.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 28 Say It with Assemblages: A Simple Method for Comparing Sites
    • Abstract: Higginbotham, Edward
      This paper develops a simple methodology for the analysis of artefact assemblages to enable comparisons between sites in a wide range of chronological and geographical contexts, from the early 'convict huts' of Parramatta to the most affluent sites of the late nineteenth century. First used on the excavation of a mining village at Cadia in Central Western NSW, the methodology has the capacity to provide comparative data on levels of affluence or on social and economic standing, also highlighting the key roles of literacy, marriage and children. The methodology is one layer of analysis among several standard techniques, but has the potential to provide powerful explanations of people's lives and decision-making when integrated with historical documentation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:32 GMT
       
 
 
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