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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 399 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 399 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover
Artlink
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0727-1239
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [399 journals]
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve
      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Journey to nowhere
    • Abstract: McLean, Ian
      Review(s) of: Journey to nowhere, by Imants Tillers, Latvian National Museum of Art, Riga.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Sublime plight: Richard Mosse, Ai Weiwei and the
           social turn
    • Abstract: Hill, Wes
      Some part of me wishes I was profoundly moved by Richard Mosse's video installation, Incoming (2014-17), at the National Gallery of Victoria's 2017 Triennale. Although most viewers were captivated by it, I felt uncomfortably cynical, not indifferent to the suffering it purported to show but to its overt use of theatrics. While I can appreciate Mosse's ghost‑like imagery of refugees who appear at once distant and intimate, I think the emotional core of the work owes more to collaborator Ben Frost's lively electronic soundtrack, which is ultimately manipulative in its effect. This is the dilemma of politically‑motivated, pathos‑laden work: how do we negatively judge something that has such a good heart' Confronted with Mosse's images of a child's autopsy whose body has decomposed, it is hard not to feel callous when judging such things based on formal superficialities.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Living and dying under surveillance: Xu Bing's
           Dragonfly eyes
    • Abstract: Grbich, Sasha
      A person walks alone through the night in a city street. Without warning they teeter sideways, slipping noiselessly into a body of water. There is neither slow close‑up, nor the dramatic fight against death Hollywood Cinema has led me to expect. The water soon closes over and settles. The pause that follows the quieting scene gives way to the horror of realising that I have just watched someone die.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Inhuman flow: Censorship and art in the two Chinas
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      "Well, Dorothy, you're not in Kansas anymore!" Luise Guest reminds herself in 'Half the Sky', her book on Chinese women artists. She might well be writing about Australia's very current dilemma of being forced to rethink its place in the world as China comes to dominate the economy and politics of East Asia. While politicians tread lightly around Chinese influence and the US alliance, certain quarters including the Australian media have been near hysterical about the decline of the Anglosphere, and the rise of a foreign power whose language and values are often at odds with their own.2 In the middle of this are the artists who work between China and Australia, who may as well be travelling between planets as between countries and cultures. For while these artists have, for the most part, adopted the liberal ideas of the contemporary artworld, in China they remain at risk of being censored and imprisoned. They cannot play out the fantasy of freedom and social mobility that Western artists entertain without putting themselves at significant risk.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Foreign returned between expatriate and repatriate in
           Mumbai
    • Abstract: Shingade, Balamohan
      Byculla is a neighbourhood in South Mumbai, the fourth station on the central railway line. A century ago, when the megalopolis of Mumbai was the seven islands of Bombay, Byculla was won from the sea as part of the great reclamation scheme. I find my exact location on a series of topographic maps displayed at the Dr Bhau Daji Lad Museum in Byculla, Mumbai, ten minutes from the railway station, through the city's largest vegetable market, and into the grounds shared by the museum and the zoo. These surrounds, I see on the maps, would have once been an extension to the fishing island of Mazagaon.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Human flow in Melanesia: Taloi Havinis artefacts and
           habitats
    • Abstract: Thomas, Nicholas
      Over the last fifty years, modern and contemporary art in Oceania has emerged, not just as one movement but many. Across the Pacific, new expressions of customary practice, from weaving to tattooing, have diverse local lives, while increasingly accomplished artists in installation, digital media, performance, adornment, photography and painting have gained prominence and international recognition. But this history has been notably discontinuous and uneven.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Alana Hunt with Sanjay Kak: A conversation about
           Kashmir
    • Abstract: Kak, Sanjay; Hunt, Alana
      Sanjay Kak - Tell me about that first cup of nun chai in Kashmir, that first conversation. Were you prepared for what you were to encounter'

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Global flows in Ruth Watson's Geophagy
    • Abstract: Phillips, Bruce E
      The late geographer Doreen Massey once wrote that "the world is specific and structured by inequalities. It matters who moves and how you move."1 New Zealand artist Ruth Watson has spent her 34‑year career unravelling the disparities in agency that Massey alludes to. Preoccupied for the most part in an examination of cartography, its history and politics, her practice has more recently led her to explore the mapping of our environmental crisis and the systems of power that govern international flows of people. Her elaborate installation 'Geophagy' (2017), the focus of a forthcoming publication, furthers this thread of enquiry as arguably her most ambitious and complex to date and provides a nuanced glimpse into the enormity of our current global situation.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Fragmentation and complexity in crossings by Wei Leng
           Tay
    • Abstract: Nelson, Roger
      "When we first met, he had prepared several pages of text about his life. He had even checked words in the dictionary," explains Wei Leng Tay. The artist is speaking about an unnamed octogenarian man, whose recorded voice forms a major component of 'And the first chapter it begins with the horses' (2017-18). An installation comprising a 32‑minute video projection of waves lapping on sand, projected onto and through a jute sack and accompanied by an audio soundtrack, the work is the second of four separate iterations of Tay's 'Crossings', curated by Siddharta Perez for the NUS Museum, National University of Singapore.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Ryoji Ikeda: The aesthetics of data flow
    • Abstract: Palmer, Daniel
      Ominous, disorienting and relentless, incorporating strobe effects and sonic frequencies on the edge of human hearing, the experience of Ryoji Ikeda's art is often described as a kind of data sublime. Evoking a posthuman, post‑nature universe, the technical virtuosity, spectacular scale and intensity of his installations draws crowds wherever they are shown. Ikeda's appeal to institutions competing for attention in the experience economy is obvious. As a typical promotion reads: "Ikeda's work overwhelms the viewer - don't miss this chance to see it in person." In other words, even as prolific documentation inevitably accompanies his work, Instagram cannot replace the physical encounter of being exposed to it, because the immersive scale and soundscape are so integral to the encounter. Tellingly, Ikeda started out as a DJ in Tokyo, and he continues to orchestrate singular experiences for visitors en masse on a global circuit, where works can be re‑versioned to suit the venue.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Juilee Pryor: The army of unrequited dreams
    • Abstract: Finegan, Ann
      The figure of the army haunts the imaginary, alternatively conjuring hope and despair. For many it can embody the most terrifying of human flows wrought on a path of hellish destruction, while for others it symbolises the righteous fury of moral redemption. Juilee Pryor's multi‑layered installation, 'The Army of Unrequited Dreams', captures this ambivalence and dares to merge the fantastical imaginings of childhood and war through an elaborate installation that couples the ornate details of the Victorian era with the extravagant fancies of its children's authors like J.M. Barrie. Chillingly contemporary in its allusions to the captured and weaponised children of struggling African states from Sierra Leone to Sudan, her rag tag army of salvaged toys, brandishing weaponry, serves as an allegory for current states of war.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - From here to there: Australian art and walking
    • Abstract: Hill, Wes
      Review(s) of: From here to there: Australian art and walking, by Lismore Regional Gallery, 7 July - 26 August 2018.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 3 - Delay
    • Abstract: Kelly, Sean
      Review(s) of: Delay, by James Newitt, Contemporary Art Tasmania, 9 June - 15 July 2018.

      PubDate: Thu, 6 Sep 2018 09:24:54 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Bullen, Clothilde; Tylor, James
      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Tasmania's black war: Undermining the foundations of
           terra nullius
    • Abstract: Lehman, Greg
      A couple of years ago I quipped to my friend Alec Coles, who had recently taken up the position of CEO at the West Australian Museum, that the spirit of 'terra nullius' lurks beneath the floorboards of every museum and art gallery in Australia. Apparently, he has dined out on this slightly parsimonious comment once or twice since. Alec likes to raise the stakes in discussions with his colleagues about the responsibilities that history demands of them as leaders of major collecting institutions - each with its own problematic legacy in terms of respecting and representing Indigenous culture.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Walking in deadly blak women's footprints
    • Abstract: Balla, Paola
      Working in white institutional spaces requires a way of working in which I have to speak back and speak blak - which is the focus of my creative project PhD; the work of Aboriginal women artists and activists who disrupt colonial and patriarchal narratives in public spaces. To disrupt an art‑bound terra nullius that erases the contribution of Aboriginal sovereign women warriors3 and matriarchs from documented history.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Camping in the shadow of the racist text
    • Abstract: Baker, Ali Gumillya
      How is historical agency enacted in the slenderness of narrative' How do we historicize the event of the dehistoricized' If, as they say, the past is a foreign country, then what does it mean to encounter a past that is your own country reterritorialized, even terrorized by another'

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Four thousand fish: Our language of memory
    • Abstract: McDaniel, Emily
      In early 2018 I curated 'Four Thousand Fish', a large‑scale participatory art project for the Sydney Festival that told the story of British colonists hauling an excessive four thousand fish from 'Warrane' (Sydney Harbour) in one day in 1790. The colonists' action disrupted the delicate ecosystem that the accomplished Eora fisherwomen of 'Warrane' had preserved for millennia, and undermined the status of women as the main food providers for family and community.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Surfacing histories: Memorials and public art in Perth
    • Abstract: Gilchrist, Stephen
      While walking through the Esplanade Park in the port city of Fremantle in the late 1990s, I saw something on a monument that I had not noticed before. Surrounded by towering Norfolk Island Pines is a carved granite monument to the explorer, politician and pastoralist Maitland Brown (17 July 1843 - 8 July 1905). Stained by bore water, the six‑metre‑high monument principally commemorates Brown's command of a search party for the explorers Frederick Panter, James Harding and William Goldwyer who are memorialised in the same monument with smaller bas‑relief sculptures.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Songlines, museology and contemporary Aboriginal art
    • Abstract: Poll, Matt
      Long before contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island art transformed Australian art history through its proactive assertion of the sovereignty of Australian First Nations people, museums in Australia had been constructing and distributing a version of the Aboriginal past that was entirely authored and often misrepresented by non‑Indigenous people. Following the self‑determination movements of the 1970s, artists and communities have successfully asserted the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people to depict and represent their culture on their own terms. This transformation has come about through the work and struggles of many artists, activists and curators. The results of their arduous fight for change can be read through several recent precedents that signal an altogether different understanding of how Aboriginal philosophies can enlighten audiences today.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Archie Moore: Daze of our lives
    • Abstract: Moore, Archie
      You grew up in a dry, flat and hot land way out West. It seemed to you the furthest out West you could get but this place is only 297 kilometres west of Brisbane. The earliest memory you can recall is of a kindergarten friend relinquishing their golden glitter‑encrusted, cardboard crown in an exchange for your broken one and quite possibly to stop you embarrassing yourself - and everyone else! - who just wanted to get on with the Christmas play. You didn't know something so banal could be so seductive, or that another's kind gesture could placate you so instantly. The memory of this incident may be vivid because it is steeped in frequent viewings of faded and stained images from the family album, for there are very few other memories over the next decade. So, you think now, maybe you are remembering the remembering of an image that has replaced the event. Instead of recalling that day with eyes closed, it is the photograph that has overwritten your memory.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - YARN: The art of conversation
    • Abstract: Edgar, Coby
      Warren Roberts is a Thunghutti Bungalung man and the founder and CEO of YARN Australia, a social enterprise organisation that collaborates with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non‑Indigenous Australians. The aim of YARN is to unite all Australians through the sharing of stories in safe and respectful spaces, with events and programs held in Sydney and Melbourne.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Don't scare me, coloniser: Empowerment through digital
           innovation
    • Abstract: Anderson, Susie
      Museums are fraught spaces. The knowledge they hold is critical for us, as Indigenous people. It's where I've seen objects from my country for the first time. But that they "hold knowledge" does not convey enough of the dilemma of encountering our histories in compromised institutional spaces. There's a scene in Black Panther, the 2018 film based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name, that summarises this dilemma. The antagonist Erik Killmonger is at a British Museum looking at African objects in a glass cabinet. "I'll be taking these off your hands pretty soon," he says to the curator. She protests that he does not have permission. He replies, "You think your ancestors had permission when they took these off my people'" Permission was not asked for, nor given. Objects were taken. Lives were lost. Something made by ancestors may never be touched by a descendant. There's a certain humanity lost forever.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Colony: A two-part exhibition bridging both sides of
           the divide
    • Abstract: Russell‑Cook, Myles
      In all societies it is polite to introduce yourself properly to your audience, your host and, others. In Aboriginal culture introductions and identification are essential. People want to know who they are meeting, where they come from and how they are, or may be related. It is more than a formality: it is a cultural protocol.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Brad Darkson: Ritual space
    • Abstract: Falcinella, Marie
      As an artist of Narungga and Anglo descent, Brad Darkson, has long been fascinated by the status of objects and artefacts held in museums and considered to be culturally significant. Recognising the contradiction between this status as a revered object and their ultimate use value, Darkson writes "Ritualistic objects can be considered to foster a transcendent experience, and necessarily fall short in reproducing the same experience when displayed for consumption." The object becomes a representation of an action from the past, a mere relic of the ephemeral trace of something that no longer exists. As he says further, "It becomes irrelevant what the original custodians intended. Artefacts are made public and deemed 'significant'. How that object then performs in galleries and museums does not necessarily align with original intent." While acknowledging the complex and problematic nature of collecting institutions, it is the physical placement of objects within this secular space that is of most interest to him. The display of hundreds of artefacts is designed to engage the viewing public, who more often than not move quickly from one to the next, impacting the performative role of the cultural object in facilitating and registering a belief system as transcendent experience.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Katie West: Living well
    • Abstract: West, Katie
      'Muhlu' means "cool time" and 'garwarrn' means "hot time" in Yindjibarndi language. During muhlu I work with a hot natural dyeing process, collecting leaves, flowers and bark, to bundle up in fabric, prepared to be placed in a pot of water and left to boil on the fire. During the season there are many fires and many resulting pieces of fabric infused with place, the colour and smell of the country where I have been walking and collecting. The slower process of solar dying happens in 'garwarrn', when it is too hot to have a fire. Once again leaves, flowers and bark are bundled together, but this time are placed in glass jars of water. The jars are sealed and left in a sunny spot. Over a number of weeks the tannins migrate from plant material to organic fabric fibres.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Creation art from Yamaji Country
    • Abstract: Papertalk-Green, Charmaine
      Yamaji (also spelt Yamatji) Country is in the mid‑West and Gascoyne regions of Western Australia and stretches from Carnarvon in the north to Meekatharra in the east, to Jurien in the south. The Yamaji area covers nearly one fifth of Western Australia and includes coastal, regional and remote areas. The traditional cultural groups belonging to this country include the Wajarri, Badimia, Nhanda, Nhanagardi, Naaguja, Widi, Yununga‑Nya, Malgana, Gnulli, Thugardi, Inggarda and Baiyungu.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Archie Moore: 1970-2018
    • Abstract: Mundine, Djon
      Review(s) of: Archie Moore: 1970-2018, by Griffith University Art Museum, Brisbane, 8 March - 21 April 2018.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Soda_Jerk: Terror nullius
    • Abstract: Heller-Nicholas, Alexandra
      Review(s) of: Soda_Jerk: Terror nullius, by Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI), Melbourne, 20 March - 1 July 2018.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - In the light of shadows: Ways of seeing
    • Abstract: Sen, Krishna
      Review(s) of: In the light of shadows: Ways of seeing, by Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, University of Western Australia, 10 February to 7 July 2018.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Michael Parekowhai: Detour; Pacific sisters: He Toa
           Tera fashion activists
    • Abstract: Phillips, Bruce E
      Review(s) of: Michael Parekowhai: Detour, by 17 March - 4 November 2018; Pacific sisters: He Toa Tera fashion activists, by Toi Art, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington 17 March - 8 July 2018.

      PubDate: Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:02:15 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Madison Bycroft's mollusc worlds
    • Abstract: Barlow, Matt
      "I don't know" sings the chorus in response as Madison Bycroft rallies off quip after quip the characteristics of a mollusc life-world while occupying a mollusc-like dress at the back of the mollusc-like stage. What this lecture-performance Soft Bodies (2017) addresses is a problem that faces much of the arts and humanities in the twenty-first century: a grappling with the ontological becomings and tentacular thinking, of those things that are and are not us.1 As science continues to illuminate the molecules and viruses that make up our bodies, we are plunged into a world where ideas about what distinguishes us as humans (and our understanding of what a human is) have become increasingly vague. As environmental philosopher Timothy Morton avows in solidarity, we are more non-human than we are human.2 So what happens when boundaries that previously demarcated one thing from another disintegrate' And what do molluscs have to do with it'

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Becoming-horse: Jenny Watson, art oriente objet and
           berlinde de bruyckere
    • Abstract: Downey, Georgina
      There has been a significant increase in the visibility of horses in recent art. This is in spite of the fact that horse power was replaced by horsepower over a century ago, and the presence of horses in daily life has been limited to the arenas of leisure or sport for the few. The phantasmagorical return of what is extinct or absent from our lives was something John Berger warned about in his essay from 1977 "Why Look at Animals'": "In the last two centuries, animals have gradually disappeared. Today we live without them. And in this new solitude, anthropomorphism makes us doubly uneasy."

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Surreal conjunctions in sartorial contexts: A testing
           ground for human-animal relations
    • Abstract: Finegan, Ann
      Mella Jaarsma's Dogwalk engages tropes of contemporary haute couture to speculate on the broader ethics of our engagement with animals. The catwalks of fashion might seem a far remove from animal welfare and more philosophical discussions around our being with animals, yet there has long been a rich tradition combining animals and couture. The history of painting contains numerous examples of fashionable aristocrats showing off their animals in Arcadian settings for picnics or walks. Sartorial display affirmed wealth and class. The inclusion of treasured pets in family portraits indicated a moral generosity that extended towards fellow creatures and could be read as a form of propaganda consolidating the wealthy patron within a broader world of affective ties. In a Europe in which political and social power was largely based on rural wealth, the embrace of the animal within these paintings signified the broader moral responsibility of the master to the living beings within his domain of care.

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Trevor "Turbo" brown and company
    • Abstract: Morrow, Christine
      Vivid and arresting paintings of Australian wildlife are the hallmark of an artist known mononymously as Turbo. Born Trevor Brown (1967-2017) in Mildura, he took up painting in his mid-thirties after he had relocated to Melbourne. He rapidly gained critical and commercial attention for works using a quick and direct application of pure colour, bursting with raw energy, and featuring a varied cast of native fauna. So exclusive-obsessive, even-was his portrayal of animals that there arose a kind of origin story explaining his single-mindedness: "Uncle Herb [P]atten, the man he loves as a father, once asked Brown why he only painted animals. He replied that when he was fifteen and living on the Mildura streets and the Murray River bank, the animals were his only friends." Other explanations Turbo gave for his choice of subject matter included, "Animals are my friends. They come to me in my dreams" and "When I paint, I feel like I'm in the Dreamtime and can see all the animals that live there."

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Heading for trouble: Non-human futures in recent art
    • Abstract: Ballard, Susan
      Sometimes the truth is impossible to hear. At year's end, dinner table conversation turns from climate change to mass extinctions, and people consult their pocket encyclopaedias for facts. Someone asks: "Exactly how many birds in Aotearoa have gone extinct'" Even Wikipedia claims an incomplete list. In Te Ara ecologist Richard Holdaway tells the numbers more clearly: 50% of vertebrate fauna gone in the 750 years since human arrival in New Zealand.

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Entangled looking: The crisis of the animal
    • Abstract: Creed, Barbara
      Contemporary animal theory confronts some of the most profound issues of our time-what it means to be human in the Anthropocene, anthropocentrism and the mass extinction of species, the rights of nonhuman animals and the future of ethical thinking. Artists, writers and filmmakers explore these and related issues in works that are experimental and challenging, testifying to this time of crisis. These include Michael Cook's human-nature studies (Civilised, 2012; Invasion, 2017), Janet Laurence's work on extinction (After Eden, 2012), Patricia Piccinini's exploration of the posthuman (Evolution, 2009), Sue Coe's bearing witness to slaughterhouses (Dead Meat, 1996; Porkopolis, 2001), J.M. Coetzee's writings on animals and ethics (Elizabeth Costello, 2003, Disgrace, 1999) and Nicolas Philibert's indictment of zoos in his documentary, (N nette, 2010).

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve
      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Rarbor temporis momentum: Louiseann king
    • Abstract: Saddington, Roger
      Review(s) of: Rarbor temporis momentum: Louiseann King, Bendigo Art Gallery, 25 November 2017 - 18 February 2018.

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - In cahoots: Artists collaborate across country
    • Abstract: Pam, Jack
      Review(s) of: In cahoots: Artists collaborate across country, Fremantle Arts Centre, 25 November 2017 - 28 January 2018.

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Songlines: Tracking the seven sisters
    • Abstract: Johnson, Vivien
      Review(s) of: Songlines: Tracking the seven sisters, National Museum of Australia, 15 September 2017 - 25 February 2018.

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - From god-head to bin chook: Ibis in the Australian
           cultural imagination
    • Abstract: Allatson, Paul; Connor, Andrea
      From the early 1970s, driven by drought and degradation of interior wetlands, the Australian White Ibis (Threskiornis moluccus) began migrating to the nation's coastal cities, towns and inland centres from north Queensland through to Perth. Ibis have flourished in urban spaces, where there is a ready food supply guaranteed by our endemic over-consumption. Their robust colonisation and presence has garnered the bird a reputation as unwelcome pests and interlopers, reflected in the quotidian idiom: dumpster diver, flying rat, tip turkey, pest of the sky, trash vulture, dump chook, bin chicken, bin chook.

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - In the beginning there was the worm: Animal voices
           beyond the verbal
    • Abstract: Laird, Tessa
      Four humanimals creep, crawl, sniff and moan their way through a seated audience, towards an empty performance area which awaits their presence. Snorting and snuffling is audible as the liminal creatures rub themselves against giggling audience members, rolling across laps and crawling under chairs. Their faces are painted with dark bands across the eyes-like a species of bird, bandit, or warrior. When they reach the performance area, they crouch in a circle, continuing their muffled cries as one of them stands.

      PubDate: Thu, 1 Mar 2018 01:52:40 GMT
       
 
 
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