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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Artlink
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0727-1239
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Metadata and the rhizome of museum practice
    • Abstract: Yip, Andrew
      When the young Carl Linnaeus - the botanist now known as the father of taxonomy and perhaps also data architecture more generally - grew tiresome, his parents calmed him by placing a flower in his hand. As the apocrypha goes, it was perhaps these early ministrations that inspired in him the enduring fascination with the natural world that would lead him away from the career in the church that his parents intended, towards studies in medicine. Through medicine he found botany, and in 1735 published the Systema Naturae, formalising the process of defining biological nomenclatures whose roots persist today. Carl was obviously something of an original, but in Linnaean terms the apple did not fall far from the tree. His father had been a keen amateur botanist and also a product of self‑definition; contrary to the Swedish patronymic convention Nils Linnaeus had fashioned his own surname from the Swedish word for the linden tree.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Fake news, artificial intelligence and data
           visualisation
    • Abstract: Dockray, Sean
      Truth has been under pressure for the whole history of the Web, but it seems to have finally collapsed with Donald Trump's election as President of the United States of America. After a series of minor experiments in which consumers of media became producers (think about Bertolt Brecht's "Radio as a Means of Communication", Bologna's Radio Alice, public‑access television, zine culture, etc.), people have had not only read‑access but write‑access to the internet, through websites, mailing lists, chats. If these were once only marginal media, they have become indisputably dominant over the past ten years as major platforms like YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter have completely eclipsed traditional media, which have themselves become mere content producers among many for the platforms.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Sadokierski, Zoe; Sweetapple, Kate
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Tatsuo Miyajima: Connect with everything; Time, light,
           Japan: Japanese art 1990s to now
    • Abstract: Yip, Andrew
      Review(s) of: Tatsuo Miyajima: Connect with everything, by MCA, Australia, 3 November 2016 - 5 March 2017; Time, light, Japan: Japanese art 1990s to now, by Art Gallery of NSW, 17 December 2016 - 30 April 2017.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Big data: The panoptic medium of the information age
    • Abstract: Biggs, Simon
      Big data is everywhere, all the time pervasive. It expands in all directions, both outwards and inwards, as if space is infinite in scale and infinitely divisible, evoking Zeno's "dichotomy paradox" as a bi‑directional, exploding and imploding teleology. Artists have been asking what big data looks like, and what it means for us. Recently a number of exhibitions and commissions in Australia and elsewhere have offered opportunities to engage in such work.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Australasian data practices: Mining, scraping,
           mapping, hacking
    • Abstract: Whitelaw, Mitchell
      Our society has spent the past couple of decades rapidly digitising itself: migrating communication, commerce and culture into the network, and transforming everything it touches into data. The scale of "big data" is matched only by the hype that surrounds it. 'The Economist' trumpeted the "Data Deluge" on their February 2010 cover: a businessman catches falling data in an upside‑down umbrella, funnelling it to water a flower whose leaves are hundred dollar bills. Data has been called "the new oil"; fuel for the next boom, as the current one falls apart. We have every reason to be sceptical when big business and government sing its praises in unison, but for better or worse data is now tightly woven into our world. One of the key challenges for our culture at this point is to come to grips with data; to work with it, learn its language, question and apply it.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Zoe Sadokierski and Kate Sweetapple: Unlikely Avian
           Taxonomies
    • Abstract: Lee, Thomas
      A seminal data visualisation paper, "Graphical Perception: Theory, Experimentation, and Application to the Development of Graphical Methods" by Cleveland and McGill, begins by naming and defining nine different elementary perceptual tasks and eleven different kinds of graphs. The perceptual tasks include: position common scale, position non‑aligned scales, length, direction, angle, area, volume, curvature and shading. The graphs include: sample distribution function plot, bar charts, pie charts, divided bar charts, statistical maps with shading, curve‑difference charts, Cartesian graphs, triple‑scatter plots, volume charts and juxtaposed Cartesian graphs. The key premise of the paper is that graphs are interpreted according to basic perceptual tasks, and graphs which appeal to these more accurately performed tasks are likely to be more successful in conveying the desired information than others.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Wild food mapping as global cultural maintenance
    • Abstract: Fisher, Laura
      Most of us have adjusted to the idea that social media and networked knowledge exchange extend the reach of our embodied, situated encounters. For better or worse, we have shown that we love to tell the world "this is where I am and this is what I'm doing." In the case of foraging, knowledge that is vital to human survival can bounce usefully between the material world and the cloud and back again, fostering human‑plant relationships in the process. And this is all beautifully illustrated by the Australian‑born 'Wild Food Map'.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Hans Haacke and data: Infusing the banality of fact
           with meaning
    • Abstract: Nash, Chris
      Data visualisation is a creative practice that requires a commitment to accuracy and truthfulness. In this it is similar to journalism (my own discipline), and it is no accident that the two practices are expanding their mutual engagement in both their core functions: as research and as communication. This is not to claim that all journalism and all data visualisation is art, but rather that both practices raise issues about the role of human creativity in the interrogation of reality, and communication about that interrogation. Accuracy, truthfulness and reality are far from simple concepts. They are fundamental to art as well as data analysis and journalism, as with any creative practice in any knowledge‑seeking activity.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Speculative space: Artists working with data
    • Abstract: Berry, Vanessa
      Data can only tell a selective story, no matter how comprehensive or authoritative its collection or presentation. There are always gaps and elisions and alternative interpretations. Working with data in the creative arts foregrounds the process of interpretation and the tension between authority and speculation that comes along with it. In 'Mirror Sydney', a writing, mapping and illustration project about the urban environment that I began in 2012, I have drawn on a combination of information from archives and more speculative or associative forms of data: rumours and myths, encounters and memories.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Particulate cinema: Visualising data and posthuman
           physics
    • Abstract: Brophy, Philip
      Movies used to be made. They were things: overwhelmingly sensational yet entirely immaterial in their manifestation of audiovisual eventfulness. In a sense, cinema produced things in a parallel universe running in tandem with modern art's desperate drive to "immaterialise'" its artworks and "de-objectify" its creative economy. Yet movies did this uncontrollably and inevitably. Are not movies large‑scale, immersive, collaborative, multi‑tasked, industrial commissions? And is that not what eventually became the imprimatur of internationalist biennales bent on spectacular production?

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - EXIT 2008-2015: Exhibiting global crisis
    • Abstract: Finegan, Ann
      Unashamedly corporate in its visual language, 'EXIT 2008-2015' is an ambitious assemblage of data sets aimed at informing and mobilising an active global citizenry. With core themes of mass human displacement, refugees, loss of native lands and culture, remittances, and the relative economic ability of the world's nations to mitigate the effects of global warming, rising sea levels, deforestation and conflict zones, 'EXIT' has migrated the information architecture of the world's stock market exchanges into the spheres of contemporary art and activism.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - The Samstag legacy: An artist's bequest [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Rackham, Melinda
      Review(s) of: The Samstag legacy: An artist's bequest, edited by Ross Wolfe, Samstag Museum, University of South Australia, hardback, 190 images, 392 pp.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Patricia Piccinini: Meet Graham
    • Abstract: Knezic, Sophie
      Review(s) of: Patricia Piccinini: Meet Graham, by First exhibited at the State Library of Victoria in 2008.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - The new capitalist realism science fiction in art of
           the 2010s
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      When artists and curators became interested in science fiction in the 1960s it was because the genre offered a way of bringing the future into art, and art into the future. In Europe, curators cluttered galleries with robots and spaceships, while Robert Smithson terraformed the American West. Science fiction was a way of provoking new states of mind, new ways of being in the world. It was estranging because it imagined that one day people would live differently. Today such dreams have passed us by, as the present presses upon us with its anxieties about ecological collapse. The future is no longer the province of a hopeful, techno-scientific imagination, but a place where technologies are in the service of the powerful. Such world-shaking sciences as biotech and robotics that once promised to save the world now threaten to destroy it, as genetically engineered crops and flying drones participate in extinctions and wars.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Louise Hearman
    • Abstract: Desmond, Michael
      Review(s) of: Louise Hearman, by Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Indian ocean shipwrecks: Four exhibitions in Western
           Australia
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      Review(s) of: Descendants of the VOC, Western Australian Museum, Geraldton; Invisible Genres, John Curtin Gallery; Saltwater Mapping, Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery; Travellers and Traders in the Indian Ocean World, Western Australian Maritime Museum.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - The many fictions of Heman Chong
    • Abstract: Burns, Aileen; Lundh, Johan
      Aileen Burns and Johan Lundh _ Going into this conversation, we are conscious that it will be published in the context of a focus on science fiction. Your work Calendars (2020-2096), made up of 1001 photographs, addresses a long future timeline and is also resolutely grounded in our time. The photographs were taken in Singapore over the course of seven years and we understand that you established a set of rules to guide the work: spaces such as malls, cafeterias, airports, and housing estates were documented at times when they were open to the public but empty of people. If this is a projection of the future, it is pretty bleak. If these calendars are for a future audience, what are they telling people about our time? And if they are a project of a future reality, what can be learned from this cold and un-fantastical future?

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Chris Bond: Fictional play
    • Abstract: Trotter, Penelope
      Chris Bond's collaboration with channelled Norwegian black metal artist Tor Rassmussen created controversy when the artists were included in Magic Object, the 2016 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art. Rassmussen was said to have been operating Bond's jaw and tongue to name their book works amongst other unsettling acts. Since then, Bond has collaborated with other artists who engage in occultist practices. In such collaborations Bond uses what he terms "fictional play", or the performing of multiple invented artistic alter-egos during the initial stages of form generation in his practice.1 To become disembodied, Bond can be inspired by the lyrics of a song, a concept or materials. In the guise of the new character he writes open-ended stories to develop their biographies, and in-depth descriptions of their artistic practices using a layered style of writing that can be classed as autofiction.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Roy Ananda: How to write a fan letter
    • Abstract: McKenzie, Jenna
      Roy Ananda's How to write a fan letter (2016) is the artist's latest installment in his ongoing engagement with fan cultures. Succumbing to the fan's impulse to bring fictional characters into real life, comment on and extend the narrative, How to write a fan letter is rich with pop-cultural references to heavy-hitting luminaries such as H. P. Lovecraft, Batman, and Jim Jarmusch's Ghost Dog. Intelligent, playful, and multi-layered, it is a deeply engaging celebration of fandom.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Matthew Bradley: The year of a thousand suns
    • Abstract: Hoskin, Teri
      I've often thought of Matthew Bradley as a survivor, ever since he scaled the tallest tower in the plains of suburban Adelaide, with a video camera gaffer-taped to his helmet, because it was there. He took the wide view, a view that could be experienced only by doing it: preparing for and making the climb, at risk (May Dawn, 2001). Around the same time we had one of those brief intense conversations that can occasionally be had at an exhibition opening. David Hicks was in trouble, and Matthew said, "That could've been me". There's never more than a hair's breadth between one world and something else-be it the paradoxical nothing or another kind of world.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Ella Barclay: A feeling of lost connections
    • Abstract: Sivanesan, Sumugan
      Ella Barclay's first institutional solo exhibition, I Had To Do It at UTS Gallery, is entered down a long darkened corridor. Blinds pulled down over the gallery's floor-to-ceiling windows, obstruct the light and sway to the air-conditioning. Turning the corner one encounters a cluster of five scrunched-up paper objects accompanied by a series of pale blue sculptural squiggles, Greetings Program (best left unsaid) (2016). The large sheets, washed with violet, pale blue and yellow watercolour, are overlaid with erratic note-taking. The barely legible handwriting leads the eye across the folds and contours of the paper. Hand-cut and coloured letterforms are pasted onto the sheets, peeling away at the edges. I can make out a single phrase: "Make them suffer".

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Virtual reality and the museology of consciousness
    • Abstract: Yip, Andrew
      A familiar trope of science fiction is that journeys into alternate realities leave neither the travellers nor their worlds unchanged. In Paul Verhoeven's Total Recall an implanted memory of a fantasy holiday to Mars sets in train a sequence of events through which construction worker Douglas Quaid becomes a secret agent who terraforms the planet's atmosphere. In Tron software engineer Kevin Flynn, digitised and ingested into the virtual worlds he creates, finds he is able to change the system from within, defeating the Master Control Program and ultimately finding justice for himself in the real world. When Alice goes through the looking glass she is promoted from child to monarch, usurping the Red Queen's rule over her domain. The portals through which the characters move have a destabilising effect, and each traveller wonders whether their actions were the dreams of another. But there is a common thread: when narratives are formed where consciousness is a medium, the system itself becomes the subject.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Superfictions and adventurism: The art in everyday
           life
    • Abstract: Hill, Peter
      In November 1989, I attended the Cologne Art Fair. As I walked around the maze of art fair booths, the Berlin Wall was being demolished, hammer-blow, by hammer-blow. Across Germany, Europe, and the world, there was a feeling of excitement that I haven't experienced before or since. "New Beginnings Are In The Offing", as Joseph Beuys once wrote across a photo-portrait. How the world hasn't changed since then, as we once more consider the threat of nuclear strikes and occupy a world fraught by new global terrorist threats. But back then, it did seem like a new beginning. Just as, fifteen years earlier, the end of the Vietnam War had, to my generation, appeared to mark a step back from the edge. One of the things we didn't see coming was neoliberalism and the rise of the super-rich. And here I was, in 1989, surrounded by the nascent super-rich, because Cologne was the world's leading art fair at the time. There were Richters to the left, and Warhols to the right ...

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Soda_Jerk: Flowers from the barrel of a gun
    • Abstract: Martin, Adrian
      In 1985 the film critic David Thomson wrote a novel titled Suspects. Its premise is simple, but goes a long way. What happens to beloved movie characters before and after the boundaries of the narratives that contain them? What did George Bailey (James Stewart) do after his life was put back together by a handy guardian angel in It's a Wonderful Life (1946)? What if he was somehow related, through secret family ties, to Private Detective Jake Gittes (Jack Nicholson) in Chinatown (1974)? What if they had both been romantically involved, at separate moments, with Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) in Casablanca (1942)? And so on, and on. The movie industry that pumps out sequels and spin-offs tries to tame and manage this kind of imagining, but it runs rampant. It is in all our heads, and in contemporary works of art of every kind.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Possible futures: Science fiction in contemporary art
    • Abstract: Frost, Andrew
      An email arrived from the online journal e-flux promoting the 9th World Futurological Congress, a one-day event in Warsaw in September 2016. "For the past months, we have witnessed the present making a clown out of itself - between impossible political candidates and leaders, the rise of a global right, climatechange deniers, and a worldwide anti-intellectual sentiment, it is hard to take the present seriously ... The present is being dismal, so instead of keeping a temporality where the present and the past influence the future, we want to switch things around and have the future influence the present ... to write the first chapter of a possible common future".

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Looking for art in all the wrong places: Repositioning
           art in a regional context
    • Abstract: Marcon, Marco
      Nearly two decades ago, when artist Rodney Glick and I started discussing the possibility of developing an international contemporary art space in a small country town, people found the idea both comical and intriguing. They laughed when they heard it first but then reconsidered, perceiving a potential beyond the apparent joke. The reason for such hilarity is obvious: contemporary art is so closely associated with the inner city areas that the idea of transplanting it among paddocks and feedlots came across as funny, like a hairy man wearing a tutu.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Losing the big picture: Surviving the art hunger games
    • Abstract: Mendelssohn, Joanna
      In 2016 the arts in Australia inhabit a dystopian world. It could be described as a place of absurdist contradictions, where only those who have mastered the arcane rules of the Hunger Games have any chance of surviving. Possibly the greatest change is that arts funding is now a partisan political issue in a way that it has not been for some generations. In the past there were concerns about the internal politics of art bureaucracies, but now the allocation of funds to support the arts (or not) has become a party‑political issue. The Commonwealth Government recently presided over the greatest reduction in arts funding in Australian history, but when questioned on this in a public forum, the art‑loving/art collecting Prime Minister was unaware of the impact of his party's budgets on the arts.1 It is probably unfair to blame the current Prime Minister for the devastation that was wrought in the time of his predecessor. Many of the policies from 2013 to 2015 in other areas - health, education, social security - continue to have unfortunate consequences and damage is not so easily undone. In relative terms, the arts budget is a small proportion of overall expenditure. In 2016-17 the total allocation for Arts and Cultural Heritage (excluding broadcasting) was $1,252 million. Compared with a Defence budget of $27,155 million, this seems miniscule, easily overlooked when devising the grand narrative of government.2 Restoring funds to the arts would have the fringe benefit of once again making the arts politically neutral, which surely must have its attractions.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - The palmer sculpture biennial
    • Abstract: Lock, Tracey
      The Palmer Sculpture Biennial is a characteristically transient, remote art event that takes place in the Mount Lofty Ranges of South Australia, some 70 kilometres east of Adelaide. Led by sculptor Greg Johns, who purchased the 163‑hectare property of rain‑shadow country at Palmer in 2001, it has become a place for artistic nomads, who converge on the landscape to create ephemeral and site‑specific art. This unique art event that takes place every two years is aligned with an ongoing program of land regeneration, supported by a community of artists and environmentalists.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Josephine Starrs and Leon Cmielewski: And the earth
           sighed
    • Abstract: Pierce, Julianne
      Land art is a form of practice that could be seen as slow art, embodying a long-term relationship and response to land and landscape. It embraces longevity and evolution over time and encourages contemplation and stillness. Artists Josephine Starrs and Leon Cmielewski have made this the focus of their work with landscape and have embarked on an approach to life and art that defers to ecological thinking and the environment.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - The Derwent project
    • Abstract: Stephenson, David; Walch, Martin
      The morning-after complaint of a Currawong pierces the pre-dawn silence as we drift soundlessly through a thick fog blanketing the glassy waters of Lake King William. Our own voices have been silenced since the video take began; slow measured breaths merge in puffs of steam with the icy fog, congealing in a crystalline icing on every surface of the boat and our recording equipment. The blinking red recording lights of the four video cameras are the only chromatic punctuation in the dim monochrome ether we float through. Slowly, the soft darkness grows brighter from a magenta glimmer to the east, gradually suffusing a warm tint through the grey soup of our world. The ruined skeletons of the drowned forests of the Derwent gradually emerge from the mist as the pink light grows in intensity and the fog transforms into a brilliant white cloud around us.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Interview: Lucas Ihlein: 1:1 scale art and the Yeomans
           project in North Queensland
    • Abstract: Andrews, Max; Luna, Mariana Canepa
      We first met Lucas Ihlein in May 2014 at the recommendation of artist Nicholas Mangan. We had been invited to Melbourne to participate in Gertrude Contemporary's Visiting Curator Program in partnership with Monash University of Art Design and Architecture, and had taken a few days out to visit the Biennale of Sydney and meet some Sydney-based artists. Nicholas was already familiar with our curatorial interests, stemming from ecology and site-specific practices; indeed, we've recently made an extended interview with him for the catalogue of his exhibition Limits to Growth, so his matchmaking with Lucas was prescient. We talked for hours and have been corresponding ever since, with a view to collaborating further.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Solastalgia and its cure
    • Abstract: Finegan, Ann
      Solastalgia has come to signify distress caused by environmental damage. The term, originally coined by philosopher Glenn Albrecht, specifically addressed the condition of existential distress caused by the physical destruction of one's immediate environment. As the global extraction industries and the financial institutions that bankroll their reach increasingly dominate, with direct impacts on land, solastalgia is fast becoming a common contemporary condition associated with the loss of ground in our occupation of the planet and a general sense of helplessness.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Fieldwork: Artist encounters
    • Abstract: Finegan, Ann
      Review(s) of: Fieldwork: Artist encounters, Sydney College of the Arts

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Tempest
    • Abstract: Kelly, Sean
      Review(s) of: Tempest, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Dani Marti: New York, Sydney, Cessnock
    • Abstract: Messham-Muir, Kit
      Dani Marti has a residency at the Australia Council Greene Street Studio, and I'm here to interview him for my StudioCrasher project. It's a classic New York loft. And it's big - 134 square metres - with bright daylight diffused throughout the space from skylight windows high above. In front of me, there's a living room area with a large couch and a coffee table next to an open window leading onto the typical Manhattan fire escape. To the right is an office or workshop area and in the far corner is a small kitchen. At the centre of the cavernous space is the main work area. As a failed artist turned theorist, I'm impressed. This loft in Soho ticks all the boxes about what an artist's studio should be - large, semi‑industrial, with high ceilings, at the heart of a major metropolitan centre.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Henry Jock Walker: Surfer, artist, localist
    • Abstract: Lumb, Jessie
      You can't ignore the connection between Henry Jock Walker, his art and his surfing. The culture that surrounds the sport has long been the driving force behind his making. Although he tends to keep one hand in the sphere of painting, he also works with live performance, installation and video, slipping between the processes of making art and catching waves. The result is a dynamic and liminal practice that defies easy classification.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Trevor Flinn In the Mallee
    • Abstract: Flinn, Trevor
      I grew up in a small town in Western Victoria. This equipped me with a wonderfully solid foundation and has given me access to a variety of skills that have assisted me to find a creative niche, nurturing a fertile imagination and intensity inspired by the world around me. I see value and opportunity in even the most decrepit of materials - an attitude that, I feel, is increasingly undermined by consumerism and our obsession with the cult of the new.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 3 - Catherine Truman: touching distance [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Pierce, Julianne
      Review(s) of: Catherine Truman: touching distance, by Melinda Rackham, Wakefield Press (2016 SALA monograph), 2016, 192 pp.

      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 19:12:28 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Warmun arts: You got a story?
    • Abstract: Crane, Anna
      Painting at Warmun has long been linked with the desire of the old people to pass on Gija language to children. At the same time as the Goorirr-goorirr song and dance cycle was given to Rover Thomas by a spirit, Gija elders were requesting that the Ngalangangpum School teach their language. Paintings carried in the dance helped launch the local art movement and the singers and dancers were also the language teachers. They made objects as teaching aids that are now part of the Warmun Community Collection. Here, the image of Queenie McKenzie includes a painting depicting people going out to collect the small white fruit of ngoorrwany or berenggarrji. McKenzie sits holding a branch of the bush food.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Tiwi now
    • Abstract: O’Riordan, Maurice
      In March 2016 the French cruise ship Le Soleal was the first international liner to drop anchor at a remote community on the Tiwi Islands. After struggling to make the narrow Apsley Strait between the islands, the ship had to anchor a few hundred metres from shore, with small boats "delivering hundreds of high-end tourists hunting for art and unique experience" to the community of Wurrumiyanga (formerly Nguiu) on Bathurst Island. Art sales from the visit were anticipated to reach $250,000.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - The land and the sea can't talk We have to talk for
           them
    • Abstract: Marawili, Djambawa; Kogolo, Annette; Davidson, Christina Balcombe
      Through the decade from 1997 to 2009 major collective painting projects played pivotal roles in two of Northern Australia's largest land and sea rights claims. This conversation recalls and celebrates the Saltwater Collection, now held by the National Maritime Museum, Sydney, and Ngurrara II, "The Great Sandy Desert Canvas", held at Mangkaja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - A short history of Yolngu activist art
    • Abstract: Marawili, Djambawa
      This is an account of some objects that appeared in the 2015 Istanbul Biennial and how two people responded to them very differently. Carolyn Christov Bakagiev was the curator of that Biennial and the person who identified and assembled the objects for exhibition. She proposed in her accompanying text that the land and sea rights achieved through art from Yirrkala formed perhaps the first case of activist art. And, as reported by The Australian, in her opening speech at the media launch "Christov Bakargiev mentioned the bark petition and Saltwater Collection - the theme of the biennial is saltwater - as early examples of art used to further claims to land." As she stated, "The bark petition triggered the whole process of restitution of lands and it started with this gift of an artwork."

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Revealed: We are a sovereign people
    • Abstract:
      As Indigenous people of this nation we are a sovereign people, standing strong in our culture and remaining true to our heritage. We stand strong in our art; we stand strong in our culture and we stand strong on our country. Our ancestors, communities and families have welcomed many non-Indigenous peoples into this country, and today we see the continuity of our shared culture, history and traditions, I see Aboriginal art and culture at the very forefront of Australian identity and celebrated in such a way that previous generations would not have imagined.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Davidson, Christina Balcombe
      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Two laws protecting Kimberley rock art
           Wanjina-Wunggurr-Wilinggin
    • Abstract: Holmes, Rosita; Charles, Rona
      Recent changes to the Western Australian Heritage Act undermine the connection between people and country, placing thousands of rock art galleries at risk. Since the introduction of the cattle industry to the Kimberley region during the early 20th century and the subsequent forced removal of Aboriginal people from their traditional homelands, negative impacts on Aboriginal communities have been well documented. The impact on country, when its people are removed, is equally dire according to Ngarinyin/Nyikina1 artist, cultural leader and land management professional Rona Charles: "You can't take people, objects, Junba [song and dance] away from Country and think nothing will happen. Because water, plant, song, animal, people - they all depend on each other. People, for their identity and social wellbeing, and country for ecology."

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - The rock art of Injalak
    • Abstract: Wright, Felicity; Marshall, Melissa; Djorlom, Garry; Djorlom, Christina; Burrunali, Roland
      This is a story of exquisite ancient art and its living custodians and interpreters who generously share the rock art galleries of Injalak with visitors. First-time visitors to Gunbalanya (Oenpelli) are always gobsmacked by the sheer beauty of the landscape. The fifteenkilometre dirt road leaves Kakadu National Park via Cahill's Crossing and enters West Arnhem land to skirt the edge of floodplains opening up panoramic vistas to the north of green meadows punctuated by billabongs, while to the south and east is the dramatic escarpment of the "stone country" stretching into the distance.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Kabimbebme: It really pops!
    • Abstract: Kennedy, Dan
      The Antilopine Kangaroo and the Dingo were once two Yirridjdja moiety men who decided to paint each other. ... Once the Kangaroo had painted the Dingo, the Dingo jumped up and looked at his body. He didn't like what he saw. He said, "You've painted my body wrong and my mouth is too big!"... So he told the Kangaroo, "From now on, you will be my meat".

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Design on country: Printing textiles in Indigenous art
           centres
    • Abstract: Bonson, Raylene; Charlie, Maxine; Kumbi, Gracie; Nagurrgurrba, Isaiah; Warlapinni, Vivian; Grant, Frances; Foster, Belinda
      Beginning with batik printing at Ernabella in the APY Lands in the 1940s, hand-printed textiles in Indigenous art centres have become a rich and varied tradition. It has emerged as a significant art form in recent years, particularly for art centres in the Top End.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - The mulka project
    • Abstract: Wanambi, Wukun; Marika, Ishmael
      Yolngu people, the traditional Aboriginal owners of North East Arnhem Land, use the word mulka to describe a sacred, but public, ceremony. Mulka also means to protect and share things that are important to us - things that hold our identity, our culture, our connection to country and our past. When our people decided to bring together the films, photographs and audio recordings made in and about our community, The Mulka Project was born.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Ngarralja Tommy May: Jila Kurtal
    • Abstract:
      I was big when I left my country. I was already hunting by myself. I was with my young brother and my mother. My father was dead by this time. He passed away in the desert. We walked to the north, to Lampu well [Well 49 on the Canning Stock Route]. We came to old Balgo mission and spent time walking around Old Billiluna Station, Old Balgo Mission and Paraku (Lake Gregory).

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Jonathon Saunders: They walk among us
    • Abstract: Holder, Jo
      Hat shading face, hoodie up, sunglasses on. Is this minority racial profiling or a disguised action hero hunched on the car bonnet in this poster-scale artwork? In Darwin they know the answer: for justice and equal rights writ large you can turn to the art collective TaNTrum, co-founded by Jonathon Saunders with artist Koulla Roussos to celebrate Darwin's creole splendour - Indigenous, Greek and Southeast Asian - sometimes called Darwin Pop. This small band of art heroes fight against Offshore Money and Oil Inc., especially the destruction of the ragged geography of the city's built form, with witty group exhibitions or manifests in pasteups in declared laughter zones aka street art spaces.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Kieren Karritpul: Old ways, new eyes
    • Abstract: Baum, Tina
      Kieren Karritpul is a quiet but dynamic Ngenwurmirri/ Ngangikurrgurr artist from the Nauiyu Nambiyu community at Daly River, about 230 kilometres south of Darwin in the Northern Territory. Born in 1994 in Darwin he was named after his great-grandfather Karritpul by his mother Patricia Marrfurra. Kieren first remembered wanting to be an artist as a five-year-old after watching his mother, aunty and grandmother make art. Coming from a family of talented artists including brother and fellow printmaker Aaron McTaggart, it's no wonder he became an artist too.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Cornelia Pilmirrapayu Tipuamantumirri: Tiwi artist
    • Abstract: Puruntatameri, Jedda
      Under the guardians of the mission, Cornelia Tipuamantumirri grew up on Bathurst Island in the Tiwi Islands. She went to school under the old mission church and was given a slate and chalk. Salvation came in the form of the Catholic nuns. She lived in a dormitory with the other Tiwi girls. She was never allowed to speak her language or practice our culture.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Gunybi Ganambarr: Giving the trees a rest
    • Abstract: Moon, Diane
      Gunybi Ganambarr recently exhibited his work in the 8th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art at Brisbane's Queensland Art Gallery and Gallery of Modern Art, representing 80 visual and performance artists from 36 countries (including PNG, Fiji, Vanuatu, India, South Korea, Mongolia and Australia) who shared their cultural, social and political views. Following the conceptual leaps taken in APT5 by elder statesman and celebrated artist Djambawa Marawili (his mentor and father-in-law) Gunybi has thrilled APT8 audiences with his revolutionary sculptural works.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Regina Pilawuk Wilson: Peppimenarti and Durrmu Arts
    • Abstract: Wilson, Regina; Wilson, Harold; Pungily, Leon
      Harold Junior Harold [Senior] got taken away from the Daly mission and got sent to Melville Island on the Tiwi Islands. He had no choice - he was part of the Stolen Generation. And Cornelia [Tipumantimirri, renowned Tiwi artist] grew him up. So he spoke Tiwi, different language from here. But he also learnt the languages from here, when he was young, before he was taken away.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Jacky Green: Desecrating the rainbow serpent
    • Abstract: Green, Jacky; Kerins, Sean
      I am a Garawa man. My country is in the southwest Gulf of Carpentaria.

      When I was young there was no whitefella schooling for us Aboriginal kids. My school was the bridle and the blanket, learning on the pastoral stations where my father worked. Our future was set as labourers on whitefella stations. This is the reason I don't read and write. I'm not ashamed of this

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - The wanarn painters of place and time: Old age travels
           in the Tjukurrpa [Book Review]
    • Abstract: McLean, Ian
      Review(s) of: The wanarn painters of place and time: Old age travels in the Tjukurrpa, by David Brooks and Darren Jorgensen UWA Publishing, 2015, 100 pp.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Jukuja Dolly Snell
    • Abstract: Cook, Belinda
      On 30 December 2015, Jukuja Dolly Snell, one of the Kimberley's most treasured senior artists and significant cultural leaders left us, her spirit returning to the place of her birth and her family, to Kurtal in the heart of the Great Sandy Desert. She passed quietly with her devoted husband, Nyirlpirr Spider Snell, and grandson Japeth Rangi by her side.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - My country, no home
    • Abstract: Charlie, Miriam
      I am a Yanyuwa/Garrwa woman. This series explores living conditions in our community of Borroloola in the Gulf of Carpentaria, Northern Territory.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Mobile phone remix: Miyarrka Media
    • Abstract: Gurrumuruwuy, Paul; Deger, Jennifer
      Yolngu have always had art inside our 'rumbal' (bodies) and our 'doturrk' (hearts). What people make depends on their aims, skill and style. With mobile phones and video cameras we're making a new kind of Yolngu art. But it still comes from inside. It still comes from Yolngu 'doturrk'.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 19:15:44 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - On first nations agency in our European-based cultural
           institutions
    • Abstract: Eshraghi, Leuli; Allas, Tess; McLean, Bruce; Moulton, Kimberley; Raymond, Rosanna
      Art, performance, and spoken or now written text, all belong to the same register of cultural practice in the First Nations I am familiar with or belong to: ceremony. This ceremonial register takes place in a set of spaces created to enact cultural responsibilities to place, people and balance. Galleries and museums, as sites of cultural production and presentation, have the potential to nurture new ceremonies and new working methods.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Return to the Wunderkammer
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve; Slade, Lisa
      There is something refreshingly retro about an exhibition that foregrounds the magic of the object and the exchange of meaning between creative practices and object histories. I understand that this comes from your ongoing research into ideas of the Wunderkammer.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve
      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - The 8th Asia-Pacific Triennial of contemporary art
    • Abstract: Hjorth, Larissa
      Review(s) of: The 8th Asia-Pacific Triennial of contemporary art, by Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Francis Upritchard: Stilted figures
    • Abstract: Werkmeister, Sarah
      There's something very confronting about these theatrically lit, stilted figures by Francis Upritchard on exhibition in Brisbane's Gallery of Modern Art as part of the 8th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art. With their clothdraped bodies, flailing limbs and half-closed eyes aligned with yours, you can't quite tell if they are suspicious, malignant, benign, dreaming or just tired. The work of this New Zealand-born, London-based artist, has always teetered on the edges of mysticism, folklore and the tensions between utopian or dystopian guises. Upritchard mines the past and present to create these characters, sourced from folk tales like Robin Hood and the narratives of the Bayeux Tapestry. Different cultural mythologies and the traces of history and popular culture in everyday objects influence the artist's practice.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Let's boycott all biennales!
    • Abstract: Milliss, Ian
      In early 2014 at the height of the brouhaha surrounding the non-boycott of the 19th Biennale of Sydney I commented that I had boycotted the previous eighteen biennales so I would happily boycott the nineteenth as well, but I wasn't prepared to promote the delusion that artists boycotting an exhibition could in any way assist asylum seekers. Sure enough, after Luca Belgiorno-Nettis had been scapegoated and the artists claimed victory as they hastily retreated, it was back to biennale business as usual and absolutely nothing had changed for refugees.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Artist-run initiative: Fontanelle, Adelaide moving to
           the port
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve; Noone, Brigid; Leslie, Ben
      Fontanelle has made its mark in Bowden, once a forgotten part of Adelaide, now a massive site for urban renewal. How do you now reflect on what you have achieved and where you will go from here? Will the new location at Port Adelaide change the way you operate as an artist-driven creative space?

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Po Po: VIP project: Yangon/Dhaka
    • Abstract: Stephens, Jasmin
      As Myanmar emerges from five decades of military rule, artist Po Po has recently opened a gallery, studio and community centre adjacent to his home in Yangon. At the same time, he has begun to realise works in a material form that have long functioned in his art and life as an "archive of ideas". Despite enjoying the privilege of international travel since his participation in the first Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale in Japan in 1999, Po Po has rarely exhibited in Myanmar.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Icanhardlywaittilmorning
    • Abstract: Barkley, Glenn
      Sometimes my life as an artist feels a little fraudulent. For twenty years I worked and still work as a curator although I was trained as a painter. No art administration for me! I am an artist. So I always felt a little fraudulent as a curator as well. When I left university I wanted desperately to be an artist. Living and working in Wollongong did not present many options so we created them ourselves. In 1995, along with Lisa Havilah and Nathan Clarke, we opened Project Contemporary Art Space. About a year later I started working with Guy Warren at the University of Wollongong. Then that's it for the artists' life for nearly the next twenty years.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - The new National Gallery Singapore: A monument for
           intersecting histories
    • Abstract: Cruickshank, Alan
      Alan Cruickshank on branding the city-state as a global city for the arts.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Material thinking and sustainability in contemporary
           ceramics
    • Abstract: Roelants, Altair
      Ceramics has always been about the sticky materiality of clay. Unlike other mediums where the material is often the passage for the artistic idea or vision, the medium itself drives the concept. This gooey, organic substance has for thousands of years been crafted into a myriad of forms and textures. Recently, we've been hearing of a "revival" or "rediscovery" but potters and ceramicists have always engaged critically with their material - challenging form, pushing technical boundaries, experimenting with the baffling chemistry of glazes, subverting embodied narratives - in an attempt to understand their material. Over the last decade the field of ceramics has expanded to incorporate those that work with clay, rather than just those that were trained in clay, and along with it a flow of critical thinking and collaboration in art, craft and design is blossoming, driven by the possibilities of new artistic materials, and the need to find sustainable solutions for those already in use.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - George Gittoes and the social turn in Afghanistan
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      Much of the discourse around contemporary art in the last twenty years has been about the social turn, a catch-all for collaborative, conversational and relational practices of one kind or another. Claire Bishop has argued that much of this discourse is not about art at all, but ethics. She says that social practices should not be mistaken for ethical practices, comparing the art gallery dinners of Rirkrit Tiravanija to Santiago Sierra's tattooed Mexican junkies, and the community outreach of Oda Projesi to Jeremy Deller's re-enactment of a miner's strike protest in Britain. Here an ethical debate turns into a political one, as Bishop finds an analogy for social conflict in Deller and Sierra, in the way that their work does not carry a clear social message but enacts an ambivalence that suspends ethical judgement.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - The bicycle as dissident object
    • Abstract: Fisher, Laura
      One of the centrepieces of 'Andy Warhol/Ai Weiwei' at the National Gallery of Victoria is a fresh iteration of Ai's Forever Bicycles. Located in the foyer, the sculpture consists of a towering arch of just under 1,500 interconnected bicycles, all uniformly produced to a minimalist design. The Forever series is now among Ai's most known works, having been exhibited in many configurations in museums and public spaces in London, Taiwan, Taipei, Venice, Toronto and elsewhere. The namesake is China's Yong Jiu (which translates as "Forever") brand of bicycle. Established in the 1940s, the prized Forever brand dominated China's cycling culture for several decades before the car became more widely used. For Ai there is a tainted nostalgia about the Forever bicycle. In the remote village where he was raised after his father - an enlightened and popular poet - was exiled from Beijing, the bicycle was not only needed for travel but for transporting things. It was also out of reach to all but the well-off, a high status object of intense desire for a child like Ai living in poverty.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Bauhaus on the Swan: Elise Blumann, an emigre artist
           in Western Australia, 1938-48 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lock-Weir, Tracey
      Review(s) of: Bauhaus on the Swan: Elise Blumann, an emigre artist in Western Australia, 1938-48, by Sally Quin, UWA Publishing, 2015, 160 pp.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Creating cities [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Johnston, Stephanie
      Review(s) of: Creating cities, by Marcus Westbury, Niche Press, 2015, 194 pp.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Hossein Valamanesh: Char Soo
    • Abstract: Rowe, Kelli
      Review(s) of: Hossein Valamanesh: Char Soo, by Samstag Museum of Art, Adelaide, 9 October - 4 December 2015.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Hacking conflict: Indonesia meets Nigeria
    • Abstract: Kent, Elly
      Review(s) of: Hacking conflict: Indonesia meets Nigeria, by Biennale Jogja XIII, Yogyakarta, 1 November - 10 December 2015.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Lucy Bleach: Tectonic slowness
    • Abstract: Wise, Kit
      Lucy Bleach quietly moved mountains in 2015. Based in Hobart, for a number of years her work has used the language of geology to explore volatility, impact and resonance. By slowing down the experience of these forces, the slow flux of her artworks present opportunities for intimate encounter and reflection. Increasingly, her innate sculptural sensibility has also brought these concerns to an expanded field of sites, communities and histories, generating collaborative projects that engage people in deeply felt, transformative processes. Last year saw these concerns blossom in a series of five major projects, that collectively identify her as one of the most exciting, dynamic and significant artists operating in Tasmania today.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Artist-run initiative: Moana project space: A
           Fremantle "Success" story
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve; Buckley, Dale
      Eve Sullivan in conversation with director Dale Buckley about a new venue in the basement of a former department store in Fremantle.

      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2016 00:27:38 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - A short guide to modern and contemporary art in Korea
    • Abstract: Yi-soon, Kim
      During the early 20th century, the flourishing of Western culture in Korea introduced the concept of misul (fine art), along with definitions of "genre" in areas such as painting, sculpture, and the craft arts, which had not existed in traditional Korean society. Terms such as Western Painting (Seoyang-hwa) and Eastern Painting (Dongyang-hwa) entered the discourse. Art institutes were established to educate professional artists and public art museums and galleries began operating as places where people could freely appreciate works of art. Meanwhile, growing numbers of professional artists were graduating from art institutes, and showing their work in competitions or solo exhibitions.

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Reciprocity : The region and the world
    • Abstract: Jin Sup, Yoon
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Wave theory : Contemporary Korean art
    • Abstract: Britton, Stephanie
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - The rogue aesthetic practice of crossing the DMZ
    • Abstract: Jong-gil, Gim
      The phrase "yonder space is a Demilitarized Zone, yonder space alone is a Demilitarized Zone" is such an absurd statement. The sorrowful melancholy fact is that this piece of land is the only place devoid of military presence on the Korean peninsula. The entirety of this peninsula, or even the whole world, should be demilitarised, but as if this dream is still too far out on the horizon, I wish I could reverse the situation, and assign military presence to that limited plot we currently call the DMZ instead of having it the other way round.

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - An alternative to the Korean Wave
    • Abstract: Maliangkay, Roald
      The Korean Wave did not so much creep up as deluge us with its wildness, banality and sheer chutzpah. It is hard to pin down what it says about the society from which it suddenly emerged and perhaps this is the point.

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - The world of Dansaekhwa : Spirit, tactility and
           performance
    • Abstract: Yoon Jin, Sup
      Yoon Jin Sup, the acknowledged authority on the 20th-century movement of Dansaekhwa, traces its resurgence today as an expression of the enduring presence of ancient culture in this outwardly most material of societies

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Art-science convergence :
           High-tech/media/robotics/post-human
    • Abstract: Hye, Jin Mun
      Hye Jin Mun on the intersection between the arts and sciences in Korean art

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Filling the holes of history with the present
    • Abstract: Hyun, Jung
      Every history is a documentation of the rise and fall of umans. There is no history without loss and sadness, or without people's sublime efforts to overcome their limits. The lessons taught by history are about the process of moving forward towards individual liberation, social equality and democracy, in spite of many sufferings. But history, despite being a pathway to the realisation of a democratic state, cannot represent real life.

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Ecology and new border paradigms : The real DMZ
           Project 2015
    • Abstract: Young, Lee Sun
      Lee Sun Young on practices that shed light on the division and possibilities for reunification of North and South Korea

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - We are Korean : Cultural agency is power
    • Abstract: Pledger, David
      David Pledger looks at the potential of the arts and culture sector for globalising national economies and contrasts Korean and Australian strategic thinking

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Video and performance art in Korea : A force majeure
    • Abstract: Sang, Yoo Jin
      Yoo Jin Sang on the evolving forms of performative practice in contemporary Korean art

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Resilience and imagination : Women and art in Korea
           today
    • Abstract: Lee, Phil
      The feminist movement in Korean art began in the mid-1980s. The well-known Chon Kyung Ja was active in the 1960s exploring her female identity, and in the 1970s the group Expression was formed; during these years, the artists involved, who are now considered female artists rather than feminists, were mostly interested in expressing the lives and inner worlds of women using figurative images. By the 1980s, female artists affiliated with the Minjung or People's Art movement were working to actively improve the status and human rights of lower class women and, in this sense, we consider them as the beginning of Korean feminist art. Around the same time, a group of middle class women including Yun Suk Nam, while criticising palo-centralism and sexual discrimination against women, continued to employ the stereotypical female imagery of mother and wife formed by the long-standing Confucian society. Both feminist tendencies of the 1980s chose figuration as their main method of expression.

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Artnotes Korea
    • PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - An oral history project
    • Abstract: McGillick, Paul
      Paul McGillick on an online archive generating a unique cultural exchange between Australia and South Korea

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Are we engaged or just hanging out?
           Korea-Australia arts exchange
    • Abstract: Bond, Sarah
      Sarah Bond on the act of giving and taking as cultural exchange

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Art museums rule State support for grand visions
    • Abstract: Inhye, Kim
      Kim Inhye on Seoul's evolving infrastructure of museums, independent artists' spaces and residency programs

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - An interview with BG Muhn on the art of North Korea
    • Abstract: Boag, Yvonne
      Yvonne Boag interviews BG Muhn about his forthcoming book on the Passion, Propaganda and Paradox of North Korean Art to be published by Seoul Selections, and an exhibition at the American University Museum in Washington in 2016

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - The public good of private museums in Korea
    • Abstract: yeon, Chang Seung
      Chang Seung yeon on the the conspicuous activity of the private art museum run by corporations and individuals

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 4 - Three Korean artists at the 8th Asia Pacific Triennial
           of Contemporary Art
    • Abstract: Yeon, Shim Chung
      Since the establishment of the Asia Pacific Triennial in 1993 at the Queensland Art Gallery (now QAGOMA), South Korea has been represented in every exhibition. This year, Choi Jeong-Hwa, Haegue Yang, and siren eun young jung are participating in APT8.

      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 16:11:59 GMT
       
 
 
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