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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 403 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 403 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 8)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 5)
AlterNative: An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 11)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 27)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 51)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 3)
Australasian J. of Human Security, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 6)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.491, h-index: 15)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.143, h-index: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, h-index: 31)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 6)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.252, h-index: 24)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 26)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, h-index: 3)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, h-index: 18)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 7)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 9)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 4)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.122, h-index: 5)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.178, h-index: 20)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 8)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.226, h-index: 9)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.31, h-index: 19)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.143, h-index: 10)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 3)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 27)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.737, h-index: 24)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 7)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 6)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 8)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 19)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 7)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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   ISSN (Print) 0727-1239
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Hiromi Tango's art magic: Cathartic practices for
           mental health
    • Abstract: Groves, Alison
      Hiromi Tango's sculptural installations are dense aggregates of bound, wrapped, stitched and anxious thoughts. Within the framework of her project Art Magic each piece signifies a small cathartic remnant performed by hands tidily bandaging the maker's anxieties. Tango weaves this empathic dialogue with her workshop participants into her works, seeing them as the labour of many and as iterations rather than conclusions.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Warwuyun (worry) in the age of the selfie
    • Abstract: Deger, Jennifer
      The affective power of a photograph is perhaps never more potent than when the subject is a lost loved one, as Roland Barthes famously discussed on contemplating a portrait of his dead mother. This appreciation of the role of photography is harnessed in a new digital artwork by the Miyarrka Media collective which uses family photographs, including many images of deceased family members, as the basis for an interactive digital artwork about the importance of family and feeling in an age of interconnection.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - On paranoia and conspiracy: Recent art from Western
           Australia
    • Abstract: Lorange, Astrid; Russell, Francis
      Emily Apter uses the term "oneworldedness" to describe a dominant mode of paranoid thought in the twenty-first century. Emerging from postwar paranoia and conspiracy theory in the Cold War era and the idea of interconnectedness that accompanies globalism and transnationalism, oneworldedness is a contemporary version of a much older tendency the tendency to perceive the world's complexity as symptomatic of a fated relatedness. In this article, we are interested in recent work by artists from Western Australia focused on conspiracy theory in a manner that seems sympathetic to the production of self-reflexive, speculative counter-narratives and alternative histories that yet cautiously avoid reproducing the totalising logic of oneworldedness. Following Ned Rossiter's recent work on "paranoia as method", we are reading these works as attempts to understand paranoia as one mode of addressing a world in crisis; that is, we are interested in how paranoia might be taken up in creative practices in order to negotiate the affective conditions that crisis produces.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Reflections on the neurodiverse city
    • Abstract: Leong, Dawn-Joy
      I am autistic. I perceive and experience the world through sensory and cognitive pathways unique to autism. Neuroscience documents this as "sensory atypicality" and "detail-focused perception." In terms of lived-experience, this means the senses react in ways different from the norm, and the mind attends to minutiae that most others dismiss or miss altogether. Autistic sensory-cognitive idiosyncrasy unpacks in myriad ways, varying from person to person and in modulations that range from intense attraction to extreme aversion.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Performing panic: How does your data glow'
    • Abstract: Barratt, Virginia
      I am in France. I have been working towards a presentation related to my research on panic at the Sorbonne, at a conference called Lire Pour Faire. I am anxious, sick with it, actually. My paper is dry and I need wet. The wet of tears, the wet of biochemicals pumping through blood, the wet of fear-piss. I want to vomit and I want to scream. Instead I sit in my room and hyperventilate. I find my friend and disclose my fears to her. I am in a state. She convinces me to do a practice presentation for a group of people who will be kind and supportive. I perform my disquiet and my insecurity and it is painful, and the pain is felt, and there is silence. There is a sitting back, a sinking down, a closing of laptop lids. There is quiet. Sometime after the quiet somebody tells a story and there is talk, feedback, questioning, exchange, confusion. This is where the research happens. Elsewhere, and otherwise, and afterwards.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Kader Attia
    • Abstract: Rey, Una
      Kader Attia: Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia, 12 April - 30 July 2017; Kader Attia: Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 30 September - 19 November 2017.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Stuart ringholt: Anxiety, laughter and stress
           reduction
    • Abstract: Trotter, Penelope
      Stuart Ringholt's anti-anxiety Anger Workshops and stress-healing Naturist Tours step outside the usual model of clinical healing practices. They revisit the potential of being happy by living in the moment as a form of liberation and group therapy that is creatively driven. The first of the Naturist Tours began as part of a show on art and therapy named Let The Healing Begin (2011) at the IMA in Brisbane. Curator Robert Leonard commented that many regular gallery goers politely declined the invitation to take part, and although he was low key in his advertisement of this aspect of the show, it created a tremendous amount of community and media interest. Fast forward to the subsequent tours through the Wim Delvoye Retrospective at MONA (2011), and James Turrell: A Retrospective at the National Gallery of Australia, and Ringholt's practice has all but surrendered to the demand, with an accelerated following.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Bennett, Jill
      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Diversity and disruption in arts and health
    • Abstract: Parkinson, Clive; Bennett, Jill
      Jill Bennett - Arts for Health at MMU is the UK's longest established arts and health program, and one of the most progressive with its focus on health inequalities and creating a better society. In contrast to the many arts-health projects, which focus on more immediate gains, your program takes "the long view", mobilising for generational change.

      Clive Parkinson - The arts might well be a potent social determinant of long-term public health and wellbeing. But we'll never address the health and wellbeing of communities until we get to grips with the injustices and inequalities that poison our communities. In my presentation/ video Weapons of Mass Happiness for Artlands, Dubbo (2016), I suggested that as the UK embarks on its ugly divorce from the European Union and the USA on its next wave of selfish individualism led by Donald Trump, the arts should proactively disrupt inequality of race, gender, disability and sexual identity.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Art at the edge of emotion: Living in a state of
           anxiety
    • Abstract: Albano, Caterina
      Since the mid-1990s we live in what has been variously called an "age of anxiety", a "risk society" and a "culture of fear". Sociologist Zygmunt Bauman coined the phrase "liquid fear" to suggest the pervading and pervasive sense of insecurity, uncertainty and profound anxiety that has now-in Bauman's words- "settled inside, saturating our daily routines; it hardly needs further stimuli from outside, since the actions it prompts day in, day out supply all the motivation and all the energy it needs to reproduce itself." Such condition is maintained through a privatisation of public fears and a projection of private ones into the public sphere by rendering them a blueprint of daily interaction. Individual anxieties reflect socio-cultural constructs and vice versa: to various degrees we are all participants, observers and complicit in our actions and responses to the dense perpetuation of the current emotional climate. The increase in anxiety-related disorders, racial and social phobias, economic insecurity, political uncertainty, surveillance and terrorism are only some of the overt symptoms of the pervasiveness of anxiety as the affective currency that dominates our lives and the lens through which we read reality. Bauman's metaphor of liquidity well conveys the angst in which we live, the constant "low-level fear" that, as he argues, characterises our apprehensive response to circumstances and environments as they are fuelled by the politics of fear.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - The art of dis‑ease
    • Abstract: Dean, Bec
      I have lifted the title for this essay from Narratives of Dis-ease (1990), a series of works by the late British photographer Jo Spence. The series was made following the artist's partial mastectomy for the treatment of breast cancer. Closely-cropped around her body, the photographs show Spence partially nude, using props and performing emotive gestures, compositions and sight gags that were suggestive of the sub-titles she ascribed to each individual image: Expunged, Exiled, Included, Excised and Expected.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - The double bind effect: Art and anxiety in a digital
           age
    • Abstract: Bartlett, Vanessa
      It's not uncommon to hear people joke that they are addicted to the internet. While internet addiction is not yet an accepted part of official diagnostic vocabulary, it looms large in the popular imagination, acting as a vessel for widespread anxieties about the mental health impacts of technological progress. According to psychologist Mark D. Griffiths, the term has been present in scientific literature since the mid-1990s and is likely to eventually gain recognition from official medical bodies as a similar phenomenon to other behavioural addictions like "gambling disorder".

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Snoosphere: Transforming pathology into play
    • Abstract: Loke, Lian
      Anxiety has been a subject of medical scrutiny since the ancient Greeks.1 Definitions change as each era interprets it according to the dominant paradigms of the day. Anxiety can be compared in a social sense to the phenomenon of hysteria, a nineteenth-century medical condition that appeared at a time when science and medicine were beginning to define a secular body of disease. No longer were people possessed by the devil or in a state of religious rapture. Instead, their condition was medically diagnosed and pathologised as hysteria. By naming phenomena as symptoms in the canon of medicine, scientists created a socially constituted condition with which an increasing number of people (predominantly women) were identified.

      PubDate: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 14:54:21 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Montages: The full cut, 1999-2015
    • Abstract: Clark, Maddee
      Review(s) of: Montages: The full cut, 1999-2015, An Artspace touring exhibition.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Kanalaritja: An unbroken string
    • Abstract: Lehman, Greg
      Review(s) of: Kanalaritja: An unbroken string, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, 9 December 2016 - 21 May 2017.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Politics of sharing / on collective Wisdom
    • Abstract: Phillips, Bruce E
      Review(s) of: Politics of sharing / on collective Wisdom, Artspace, Auckland, 4 March - 1 April 2017.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Down under world: Christian Thompson at the Pitt
           Rivers Museum
    • Abstract: Hutchens, Jessyca
      An emerging history of transcultural engagements in recent years is evident in the growing number of projects by Australian Indigenous artists working with collections held by British cultural institutions. From Judy Watson's research at the British, Horniman and Science museums in the 1990s, to Daniel Boyd's residency with the Natural History Museum and projects by Brook Andrew and Julie Gough at the Cambridge Museum of Archeology and Anthropology, these Australian Indigenous artists have negotiated complex histories of colonial collecting practices, contemporary modes of museum display, issues of cultural ownership and repatriation, as well as the role of the artist as a new kind of researcher and interpreter of archives and cultural heritage.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Indigenous perspectives on museum collections
    • Abstract: Andrews, Jilda
      I can remember the first time I was taken into a museum storeroom. I remember it being still, organised, open and unashamed. I could see countless rows of shelving stretching from the floor to a ceiling so high that the optical illusion it created masked its vastness. The air was unmoving, the smell musty and organic. When my eyes adjusted to what lay on these shelves I had trouble taking it all in: wood, feathers, stone, bark, ochre worked in countless combinations. I searched for the clues which would guide me to material from north‑western New South Wales, to my Father's country, and my ngurrambaa (Yuwaalaraay) or "family land".

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Brook Andrew: The right to offend is Sacred
    • Abstract: McLean, Ian
      Review(s) of: Brook Andrew: The right to offend is Sacred, National Gallery of Victoria, 3 March - 4 June 2017.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Collisions: The Martu respond to Maralinga
    • Abstract: Cumpston, Nici; Rey, Una
      Shaping the globally‑inflected histories of today are endless encounters between worlds. They can be seen across Australia in the exchanges between Aboriginal and settler groups and they paint myriad stories of who we are - some told, many untold. These cross‑cultural collisions are striking motifs for artists and storytellers, running like veins through our collective body, further amplified as the last generation of pre- and first‑contact Aboriginal people pass away. Not only is there a mutual desire to express and to hear these stories but there is an urgency to archive them for the world.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - The Acti.VA.tions of Rosanna Raymond
    • Abstract: McMullin, Dan Taulapapa
      Walking through East Harlem with Rosanna Raymond wearing bodysuits covered in artificial flowers and leaves from head to foot, on the first glorious late April Spring day when New York seemed to go directly from winter to summer, we were stopped again and again by astonished residents of the mostly Latinx and Black neighbourhood as they burst into smiles, asking us to take photos with them.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Becoming-with and together: Indigenous transgender and
           transcultural practices
    • Abstract: Clark, Maddee
      Blak Dot Gallery's Midsumma show 'Tran‑Sational' uses, as one of its key video installations, a montage of archival interviews of trans and gender‑diverse Indigenous community members. The interviews are cut together from footage taken during the Kunghah retreat held in November, a gathering that hosted gender‑diverse Indigenous people from all over Australia and ended on Transgender day of Remembrance. The video installation, much like the event itself, is a reminder that the trans identity is a culturally contingent one; a well‑travelled word. For Indigenous trans peoples, there is a struggle to understand our gendered and sexual identities in relation to colonialism, to our relationships with religion, and our place within the queer community at large.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Emily Kame Kngwarreye: The impossible modernist
    • Abstract: Neale, Margo
      Why do those fellas paint like me ... ? Emily Kame Kngwarreye

      Art critic Robert Hughes made the assessment that Aboriginal art was the last great art movement of the twentieth century.1 It started at the Aboriginal community called Papunya, in which Aboriginal men had been painting on canvas for the outside market with great success since the 1980s. The Papunya art style as it became known, sometimes compared to forms of Western modernism - from abstract expressionism to minimalism and even conceptual art - presented a comparison that was rarely taken literally, although some critics of the 1987 Dreamings exhibition in New York did wonder if the Aboriginal artists had been appropriating New York art. But when it came to the late paintings of Emily Kame Kngwarreye, critics really did start to question the relationship between modernism and Western Desert painting, ascribing to her the genius and expressive freedom associated with the masters of Western modernism.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Tradition and postcolonial modernism in the work of
           Obiora Udechukwu
    • Abstract: Okeke‑Agulu, Chika
      In his contribution to a 2013 edition of Art Bulletin, exploring the idea of "tradition", the Nigerian painter and poet Obiora Udechukwu (born in 1946) describes his deep connection to Uli traditional body and mural art of the Igbo people of southeastern Nigeria. Uli, he noted, provided him the aesthetic grounds from which he developed his own aesthetics and visual language. Trained in the art department at University of Nigeria, Nsukka, and conversant with the work of European modernists from the early years of the twentieth century, Udechukwu was aware of the enduring claim for a self‑conscious break with tradition in order to forge a radically new aesthetic. According to Udechukwu: "In the same spirit that European modernists borrowed from African sculpture and Japanese woodblock prints to revitalize their work and, by extension, their tradition, I am open to using ideas or media from anywhere to advance my own."

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Annie Pootoogook: Depicting Arctic modernity in
           contemporary Inuit art
    • Abstract: Igloliorte, Heather
      When graphic artist Annie Pootoogook passed away last year, there was an outpouring of public grief. Numerous articles were also published in the popular press, primarily focusing on her artistic career as a rising star whose success was marred by a descent into poverty and struggles with addiction. Pootoogook first gained national attention by winning the Sobey Award in 2006, a fifty‑thousand‑dollar prize for a Canadian contemporary artist under forty years of age; a decade later she died, destitute and homeless, in Ottawa, Ontario. In Canada, we have been quick to scandalise her personal history as a tragic example of an Indigenous artist's meteoric rise to fame and rapid fall into homelessness and substance abuse. Yet we are slower to connect her individual experiences, as reflected in her insightful works, to the history and ongoing colonisation of the Arctic, and slower still to understand that history in relation to the development of the modern and contemporary Inuit art industry. Pootoogook's oeuvre draws these threads together. Her drawings provide shrewd and significant commentary on contemporary Inuit society in light of the lasting impacts of the colonisation and modernisation of the Arctic. Her work also reveals how she viewed her practice within the context of Inuit art history in relation to her remarkable artistic lineage, experiences with the Kinngait (Cape Dorset, Nunavut) art studio co‑operative, and even her own burgeoning celebrity.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Sonabai Rajwar: The museum effect
    • Abstract: Jain, Jyotindra
      Generally speaking, early ethnographic museum practices in Europe, later transferred to the colonies, were marked by a variety of overlapping grand narratives, such as the hierarchisation of cultures in evolutionary mode; racio‑geographical configurations and material culture; climate and cultural development; the ergology and technology of so‑called primitive peoples; the accumulation and classification of encyclopedic knowledge about the natural history of the colonial world, as well as the range of artistic productions and aesthetic criteria.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Lisa Reihana: Encounters in Oceania
    • Abstract: Thomas, Nicholas
      In a number of art museums and decorative arts collections in Australia, France and the United States, there are sections to be found of an extraordinary expression of the European imagining of Oceania, 'Les Sauvages de la mer Pacifique (The Voyages of Captain Cook)', a 20‑panel wallpaper designed by Jean Gabriel Charvet and printed by Joseph Dufour, around 1804-6. Said to be the largest such composition ever made, over two metres in height, and over ten in length in its complete form, this is an impressive but also a disconcerting panorama of the peoples, costumes, customs and environments of the Pacific.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Into the transpocene: The future of indigenous art
    • Abstract: McLean, Ian
      Seemingly fixed discourse positions are ... mixed up. Black becomes white - white becomes black. Thomas Reinhardt on Kader Attia's exhibition Repair. 5 Acts.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Introducing the multiple modernisms project
    • Abstract: Phillips, Ruth B; Harney, Elizabeth
      During the twentieth century, Inuit sculptors in the Canadian Arctic, Aboriginal painters in the central Australian desert, printmakers in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, creole photographers along the coast of West Africa, and many other artists in colonised and Indigenous societies around the globe produced outstanding works of art in a wide range of modernist artistic genres. To better address the rapid changes that accompanied or characterised specific iterations of modernity, these artists also often re‑configured or re‑animated inherited artistic traditions. In different places and at different moments artists drew on both local and foreign artistic methods, materials, and ideas to articulate their modern life experiences, revisited colonial pasts marked by oppression and forced assimilation, and questioned definitions of authenticity and value long promoted within Western art worlds.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - The masque ball of Tracey Moffatt
    • Abstract: Mundine, Djon
      One of Tracey Moffatt's lasting cinematographic memories, as she told me, is of films with harbour scenes, of working ports, rough workmen, the coming and going of exotic people, fogs, and foghorns. Tracey Moffatt's photographic and film work commissioned for the Australian Pavilion in Venice responds to this landscape of cinematic time.

      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Neale, Margo
      PubDate: Mon, 5 Jun 2017 22:23:45 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Metadata and the rhizome of museum practice
    • Abstract: Yip, Andrew
      When the young Carl Linnaeus - the botanist now known as the father of taxonomy and perhaps also data architecture more generally - grew tiresome, his parents calmed him by placing a flower in his hand. As the apocrypha goes, it was perhaps these early ministrations that inspired in him the enduring fascination with the natural world that would lead him away from the career in the church that his parents intended, towards studies in medicine. Through medicine he found botany, and in 1735 published the Systema Naturae, formalising the process of defining biological nomenclatures whose roots persist today. Carl was obviously something of an original, but in Linnaean terms the apple did not fall far from the tree. His father had been a keen amateur botanist and also a product of self‑definition; contrary to the Swedish patronymic convention Nils Linnaeus had fashioned his own surname from the Swedish word for the linden tree.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Fake news, artificial intelligence and data
           visualisation
    • Abstract: Dockray, Sean
      Truth has been under pressure for the whole history of the Web, but it seems to have finally collapsed with Donald Trump's election as President of the United States of America. After a series of minor experiments in which consumers of media became producers (think about Bertolt Brecht's "Radio as a Means of Communication", Bologna's Radio Alice, public‑access television, zine culture, etc.), people have had not only read‑access but write‑access to the internet, through websites, mailing lists, chats. If these were once only marginal media, they have become indisputably dominant over the past ten years as major platforms like YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter have completely eclipsed traditional media, which have themselves become mere content producers among many for the platforms.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Sadokierski, Zoe; Sweetapple, Kate
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Tatsuo Miyajima: Connect with everything; Time, light,
           Japan: Japanese art 1990s to now
    • Abstract: Yip, Andrew
      Review(s) of: Tatsuo Miyajima: Connect with everything, by MCA, Australia, 3 November 2016 - 5 March 2017; Time, light, Japan: Japanese art 1990s to now, by Art Gallery of NSW, 17 December 2016 - 30 April 2017.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Big data: The panoptic medium of the information age
    • Abstract: Biggs, Simon
      Big data is everywhere, all the time pervasive. It expands in all directions, both outwards and inwards, as if space is infinite in scale and infinitely divisible, evoking Zeno's "dichotomy paradox" as a bi‑directional, exploding and imploding teleology. Artists have been asking what big data looks like, and what it means for us. Recently a number of exhibitions and commissions in Australia and elsewhere have offered opportunities to engage in such work.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Australasian data practices: Mining, scraping,
           mapping, hacking
    • Abstract: Whitelaw, Mitchell
      Our society has spent the past couple of decades rapidly digitising itself: migrating communication, commerce and culture into the network, and transforming everything it touches into data. The scale of "big data" is matched only by the hype that surrounds it. 'The Economist' trumpeted the "Data Deluge" on their February 2010 cover: a businessman catches falling data in an upside‑down umbrella, funnelling it to water a flower whose leaves are hundred dollar bills. Data has been called "the new oil"; fuel for the next boom, as the current one falls apart. We have every reason to be sceptical when big business and government sing its praises in unison, but for better or worse data is now tightly woven into our world. One of the key challenges for our culture at this point is to come to grips with data; to work with it, learn its language, question and apply it.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Zoe Sadokierski and Kate Sweetapple: Unlikely Avian
           Taxonomies
    • Abstract: Lee, Thomas
      A seminal data visualisation paper, "Graphical Perception: Theory, Experimentation, and Application to the Development of Graphical Methods" by Cleveland and McGill, begins by naming and defining nine different elementary perceptual tasks and eleven different kinds of graphs. The perceptual tasks include: position common scale, position non‑aligned scales, length, direction, angle, area, volume, curvature and shading. The graphs include: sample distribution function plot, bar charts, pie charts, divided bar charts, statistical maps with shading, curve‑difference charts, Cartesian graphs, triple‑scatter plots, volume charts and juxtaposed Cartesian graphs. The key premise of the paper is that graphs are interpreted according to basic perceptual tasks, and graphs which appeal to these more accurately performed tasks are likely to be more successful in conveying the desired information than others.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Wild food mapping as global cultural maintenance
    • Abstract: Fisher, Laura
      Most of us have adjusted to the idea that social media and networked knowledge exchange extend the reach of our embodied, situated encounters. For better or worse, we have shown that we love to tell the world "this is where I am and this is what I'm doing." In the case of foraging, knowledge that is vital to human survival can bounce usefully between the material world and the cloud and back again, fostering human‑plant relationships in the process. And this is all beautifully illustrated by the Australian‑born 'Wild Food Map'.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Hans Haacke and data: Infusing the banality of fact
           with meaning
    • Abstract: Nash, Chris
      Data visualisation is a creative practice that requires a commitment to accuracy and truthfulness. In this it is similar to journalism (my own discipline), and it is no accident that the two practices are expanding their mutual engagement in both their core functions: as research and as communication. This is not to claim that all journalism and all data visualisation is art, but rather that both practices raise issues about the role of human creativity in the interrogation of reality, and communication about that interrogation. Accuracy, truthfulness and reality are far from simple concepts. They are fundamental to art as well as data analysis and journalism, as with any creative practice in any knowledge‑seeking activity.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Speculative space: Artists working with data
    • Abstract: Berry, Vanessa
      Data can only tell a selective story, no matter how comprehensive or authoritative its collection or presentation. There are always gaps and elisions and alternative interpretations. Working with data in the creative arts foregrounds the process of interpretation and the tension between authority and speculation that comes along with it. In 'Mirror Sydney', a writing, mapping and illustration project about the urban environment that I began in 2012, I have drawn on a combination of information from archives and more speculative or associative forms of data: rumours and myths, encounters and memories.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Particulate cinema: Visualising data and posthuman
           physics
    • Abstract: Brophy, Philip
      Movies used to be made. They were things: overwhelmingly sensational yet entirely immaterial in their manifestation of audiovisual eventfulness. In a sense, cinema produced things in a parallel universe running in tandem with modern art's desperate drive to "immaterialise'" its artworks and "de-objectify" its creative economy. Yet movies did this uncontrollably and inevitably. Are not movies large‑scale, immersive, collaborative, multi‑tasked, industrial commissions? And is that not what eventually became the imprimatur of internationalist biennales bent on spectacular production?

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - EXIT 2008-2015: Exhibiting global crisis
    • Abstract: Finegan, Ann
      Unashamedly corporate in its visual language, 'EXIT 2008-2015' is an ambitious assemblage of data sets aimed at informing and mobilising an active global citizenry. With core themes of mass human displacement, refugees, loss of native lands and culture, remittances, and the relative economic ability of the world's nations to mitigate the effects of global warming, rising sea levels, deforestation and conflict zones, 'EXIT' has migrated the information architecture of the world's stock market exchanges into the spheres of contemporary art and activism.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - The Samstag legacy: An artist's bequest [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Rackham, Melinda
      Review(s) of: The Samstag legacy: An artist's bequest, edited by Ross Wolfe, Samstag Museum, University of South Australia, hardback, 190 images, 392 pp.

      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:13:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Patricia Piccinini: Meet Graham
    • Abstract: Knezic, Sophie
      Review(s) of: Patricia Piccinini: Meet Graham, by First exhibited at the State Library of Victoria in 2008.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - The new capitalist realism science fiction in art of
           the 2010s
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      When artists and curators became interested in science fiction in the 1960s it was because the genre offered a way of bringing the future into art, and art into the future. In Europe, curators cluttered galleries with robots and spaceships, while Robert Smithson terraformed the American West. Science fiction was a way of provoking new states of mind, new ways of being in the world. It was estranging because it imagined that one day people would live differently. Today such dreams have passed us by, as the present presses upon us with its anxieties about ecological collapse. The future is no longer the province of a hopeful, techno-scientific imagination, but a place where technologies are in the service of the powerful. Such world-shaking sciences as biotech and robotics that once promised to save the world now threaten to destroy it, as genetically engineered crops and flying drones participate in extinctions and wars.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Louise Hearman
    • Abstract: Desmond, Michael
      Review(s) of: Louise Hearman, by Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Indian ocean shipwrecks: Four exhibitions in Western
           Australia
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      Review(s) of: Descendants of the VOC, Western Australian Museum, Geraldton; Invisible Genres, John Curtin Gallery; Saltwater Mapping, Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery; Travellers and Traders in the Indian Ocean World, Western Australian Maritime Museum.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - The many fictions of Heman Chong
    • Abstract: Burns, Aileen; Lundh, Johan
      Aileen Burns and Johan Lundh _ Going into this conversation, we are conscious that it will be published in the context of a focus on science fiction. Your work Calendars (2020-2096), made up of 1001 photographs, addresses a long future timeline and is also resolutely grounded in our time. The photographs were taken in Singapore over the course of seven years and we understand that you established a set of rules to guide the work: spaces such as malls, cafeterias, airports, and housing estates were documented at times when they were open to the public but empty of people. If this is a projection of the future, it is pretty bleak. If these calendars are for a future audience, what are they telling people about our time? And if they are a project of a future reality, what can be learned from this cold and un-fantastical future?

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Chris Bond: Fictional play
    • Abstract: Trotter, Penelope
      Chris Bond's collaboration with channelled Norwegian black metal artist Tor Rassmussen created controversy when the artists were included in Magic Object, the 2016 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art. Rassmussen was said to have been operating Bond's jaw and tongue to name their book works amongst other unsettling acts. Since then, Bond has collaborated with other artists who engage in occultist practices. In such collaborations Bond uses what he terms "fictional play", or the performing of multiple invented artistic alter-egos during the initial stages of form generation in his practice.1 To become disembodied, Bond can be inspired by the lyrics of a song, a concept or materials. In the guise of the new character he writes open-ended stories to develop their biographies, and in-depth descriptions of their artistic practices using a layered style of writing that can be classed as autofiction.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Roy Ananda: How to write a fan letter
    • Abstract: McKenzie, Jenna
      Roy Ananda's How to write a fan letter (2016) is the artist's latest installment in his ongoing engagement with fan cultures. Succumbing to the fan's impulse to bring fictional characters into real life, comment on and extend the narrative, How to write a fan letter is rich with pop-cultural references to heavy-hitting luminaries such as H. P. Lovecraft, Batman, and Jim Jarmusch's Ghost Dog. Intelligent, playful, and multi-layered, it is a deeply engaging celebration of fandom.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Matthew Bradley: The year of a thousand suns
    • Abstract: Hoskin, Teri
      I've often thought of Matthew Bradley as a survivor, ever since he scaled the tallest tower in the plains of suburban Adelaide, with a video camera gaffer-taped to his helmet, because it was there. He took the wide view, a view that could be experienced only by doing it: preparing for and making the climb, at risk (May Dawn, 2001). Around the same time we had one of those brief intense conversations that can occasionally be had at an exhibition opening. David Hicks was in trouble, and Matthew said, "That could've been me". There's never more than a hair's breadth between one world and something else-be it the paradoxical nothing or another kind of world.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Ella Barclay: A feeling of lost connections
    • Abstract: Sivanesan, Sumugan
      Ella Barclay's first institutional solo exhibition, I Had To Do It at UTS Gallery, is entered down a long darkened corridor. Blinds pulled down over the gallery's floor-to-ceiling windows, obstruct the light and sway to the air-conditioning. Turning the corner one encounters a cluster of five scrunched-up paper objects accompanied by a series of pale blue sculptural squiggles, Greetings Program (best left unsaid) (2016). The large sheets, washed with violet, pale blue and yellow watercolour, are overlaid with erratic note-taking. The barely legible handwriting leads the eye across the folds and contours of the paper. Hand-cut and coloured letterforms are pasted onto the sheets, peeling away at the edges. I can make out a single phrase: "Make them suffer".

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Virtual reality and the museology of consciousness
    • Abstract: Yip, Andrew
      A familiar trope of science fiction is that journeys into alternate realities leave neither the travellers nor their worlds unchanged. In Paul Verhoeven's Total Recall an implanted memory of a fantasy holiday to Mars sets in train a sequence of events through which construction worker Douglas Quaid becomes a secret agent who terraforms the planet's atmosphere. In Tron software engineer Kevin Flynn, digitised and ingested into the virtual worlds he creates, finds he is able to change the system from within, defeating the Master Control Program and ultimately finding justice for himself in the real world. When Alice goes through the looking glass she is promoted from child to monarch, usurping the Red Queen's rule over her domain. The portals through which the characters move have a destabilising effect, and each traveller wonders whether their actions were the dreams of another. But there is a common thread: when narratives are formed where consciousness is a medium, the system itself becomes the subject.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Superfictions and adventurism: The art in everyday
           life
    • Abstract: Hill, Peter
      In November 1989, I attended the Cologne Art Fair. As I walked around the maze of art fair booths, the Berlin Wall was being demolished, hammer-blow, by hammer-blow. Across Germany, Europe, and the world, there was a feeling of excitement that I haven't experienced before or since. "New Beginnings Are In The Offing", as Joseph Beuys once wrote across a photo-portrait. How the world hasn't changed since then, as we once more consider the threat of nuclear strikes and occupy a world fraught by new global terrorist threats. But back then, it did seem like a new beginning. Just as, fifteen years earlier, the end of the Vietnam War had, to my generation, appeared to mark a step back from the edge. One of the things we didn't see coming was neoliberalism and the rise of the super-rich. And here I was, in 1989, surrounded by the nascent super-rich, because Cologne was the world's leading art fair at the time. There were Richters to the left, and Warhols to the right ...

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Soda_Jerk: Flowers from the barrel of a gun
    • Abstract: Martin, Adrian
      In 1985 the film critic David Thomson wrote a novel titled Suspects. Its premise is simple, but goes a long way. What happens to beloved movie characters before and after the boundaries of the narratives that contain them? What did George Bailey (James Stewart) do after his life was put back together by a handy guardian angel in It's a Wonderful Life (1946)? What if he was somehow related, through secret family ties, to Private Detective Jake Gittes (Jack Nicholson) in Chinatown (1974)? What if they had both been romantically involved, at separate moments, with Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) in Casablanca (1942)? And so on, and on. The movie industry that pumps out sequels and spin-offs tries to tame and manage this kind of imagining, but it runs rampant. It is in all our heads, and in contemporary works of art of every kind.

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 4 - Possible futures: Science fiction in contemporary art
    • Abstract: Frost, Andrew
      An email arrived from the online journal e-flux promoting the 9th World Futurological Congress, a one-day event in Warsaw in September 2016. "For the past months, we have witnessed the present making a clown out of itself - between impossible political candidates and leaders, the rise of a global right, climatechange deniers, and a worldwide anti-intellectual sentiment, it is hard to take the present seriously ... The present is being dismal, so instead of keeping a temporality where the present and the past influence the future, we want to switch things around and have the future influence the present ... to write the first chapter of a possible common future".

      PubDate: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 16:02:06 GMT
       
 
 
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