Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 387 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 387 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Narrative Therapy & Community Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Irrigation Australia: The Official J. of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
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Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0727-1239
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [387 journals]
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - The Stranger Artist: Life at the Edge of Kimberley
           Painting [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Kean, John
      Review(s) of: The Stranger Artist: Life at the Edge of Kimberley Painting, by Quentin Sprague, Hardie Grant, 2020.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Between worlds: Belinda Mason and Blur Projects
    • Abstract: Foster, Alasdair
      "My name is Georgia. I was born with cerebral palsy. It has a profound impact on who I am, as does being gay. People make assumptions about me, like just because I live in an unruly body I am not a sexual being or sexually desirable. I don't like how these assumptions infantilise me. I am proud of my body and my sexuality. Sex is a human urge. In recognition of that, we can be viewed as socially equal."

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Foster, Alasdair
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Escaping freedom: Towards a culture of mutuality
    • Abstract: Milliss, Ian
      The one option no longer available is a return to an earlier order. Although there may be moments of calm there will never be peace again in our lifetimes, caught as we are between the ongoing crises of climate change and the social collapse of a disintegrating neoliberal economic order. Our contemporary culture is in transition as a new culture builds itself within it, each bit ferociously contested not by the left or right so much as the faction of compassion and mutual aid versus the faction of dominance and individualism.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Shahidul Alam: You're blocking the sun
    • Abstract: Hussey-Smith, Kelly
      "Sorry for the inconvenience. We're fixing a failed state" read a sign from the 2018 student protests in Bangladesh. Sparked by issues of road safety, following the death of two students, a large protest movement emerged in the lead up to elections, voicing broader frustrations about corruption, violence, and inequality. Shahidul Alam had been reporting from the protests and had publicly criticised the Awami League government's response live on Facebook and other social media. On 5 August he was abducted from his apartment by dozens of plain clothed police just hours after giving an interview to Al Jazeera. He spent the next six days on remand, initially unsure if anyone had heard his screams or knew his whereabouts, after which he spent 101 days in Keraniganj jail before being granted bail. His disappearance and incarceration catalysed national and international protests and campaigns led by peers, friends, and collaborators - campaigns that were advanced by Shahidul being named a 2018 'Time Magazine' person of the year, alongside a number of journalists and whistle-blowers persecuted for their work. At the time of writing, Shahidul, while released on bail,

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - The visual journalist as a social entrepreneur
    • Abstract: Stieven-Taylor, Alison
      The desire to effect social change has influenced the work of photographers since the nascent years of the medium. There is ample historical proof that pictures can influence change. In New York City in the late 1800s, journalist Jacob Riis used photography to expose the appalling living conditions in the city's tenements. Riis' visceral photographs of overcrowded slums revealed the wretched existence of thousands of New Yorkers. Horrified and shamed by what they saw, citizens advocated for change forcing politicians to take action. These pictures proved the power of photography as a critical mirror for society.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Flesh after fifty: Changing images of older women in
           art
    • Abstract: Millner, Jacqueline
      When I was eleven, I assumed the role of keeper of the family archives: with both parents working and me the younger sibling, I probably had the most time on my hands. But I also felt a strong compulsion to guard mementos from family holidays and special occasions, including images. With the solid moral universe of a child that age, I wanted to capture the "true" version of events, preferring candid to posed photographs. I was renowned for gonzoing formal photo opps by pulling a face or kicking out an inopportune leg. You can imagine my outrage when I discovered my carefully compiled albums had been raided. Every "unflattering" photo of my mother had been removed, leaving virtually no trace of her. When confronted, my mother was unrepentant and refused to return the photos, claiming she had destroyed them as was her right. I was so angry that she would presume to interfere in our collective family record and incensed at what I saw as her hypocrisy and inability to face "the truth"-that she was ageing. Looking back, I have a great deal more compassion for my mother's response. But this poignant memory makes me reflect: how many other family archives suffered a similar fate (let alone in the digital era)' Was internalised shame at work' And, what counter‑truth was my mother asserting'

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - How can I live in your world': Empathic strategies
           in contemporary Asian art
    • Abstract: Keehan, Reuben
      This essay takes its title from the way in which Korean artist Lim Minouk once described the central question driving her practice. It was in the context of her work around the year 2010, which was difficult to pigeon‑hole in that it took the form of collective performances of real depth and meaning, documented in beautifully executed videos. What Lim was trying to do at the time was to unify fragmented personalities in song, and to martial them against the forces that would divide them again. It was a decidedly feminine resistance, quite distinct from the macho posturing and sloganeering that alienates so many from collective struggle. A resistance without preconditions, 'International Calling Frequency' (2011) was a melody, written as a duet so that it had to be performed with another, without lyrics allowing it to be applicable to any situation. 'Weight of Hands' (2010) registered the force of implacable environmental destruction with the lone, melancholy voice of a karaoke singer, borne aloft by the combined strength of a coachload of protestors. Lim's strivings toward unifying actions have followed ever more striking and ambitious trajectories over the past decade. For the moment, though, her question of how to live in another's world and her clear articulation of shared experience as a mode of resistance offer interesting starting points for considering the kind of roles that empathy might play in contemporary Asian art.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Body remembers: Wrap me in a sister cloak
    • Abstract: Baker, Ali Gumillya
      Tracey Moffatt's series 'Body Remembers' (2017) draws its title and responds to the poem by Constantine P. Cavafy (1918). In each of the series of large photographs we see a woman alone, in the ruins of colonial buildings, on the shadows of eroded stones. We see her looking out of windows, looking out into the distance. As the viewer, we see the back of the woman's head, or the shadow of the woman, or her face that is covered by her hands as the Aboriginal woman maidservant looking out. The body in this title could be read as both our country and our flesh. The sovereign woman mourns. What do we mourn'

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - Regimes of care: Concerning the afterlife of artists
    • Abstract: Cook, Robert
      I submit to my stocktake shifts, become their restless subject, sighting, countersigning, pitting numbers and images against objects. "Randomised", my colleague tells me, from an appropriate social distance. A performance of witnessing without expectation (at least on my part) which is why his appearance was closer to a manifestation.

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - The idea of redemption: Artmaking in prison
    • Abstract: Foster, Alasdair
      Why do we imprison those who break the law' Is it a form of retribution meted out by the state on behalf of the community' Is it in order to deter others who may consider a life of crime from taking that path and to discourage recidivism' Is it simply a way of removing and containing dangerous individuals in order to maintain the peace and safety of society' Or is it a way to rehabilitate those who have made bad choices, so that they may be re‑integrated into society when their sentence has been served'

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 3 - On thin ice: Creating a life beyond addiction
    • Abstract: Gorman, Ginger
      Paul, 38, is a tall, good-looking bloke with a deep voice and sandy hair. He tells a good yarn and laughs easily. He is also a recovering ice-addict who hasn't touched the stuff for fifteen months. Talking to me on the phone during a lunch break from his full-time sales job, he said: "A lot of addicts use [methamphetamine to escape] pain and shame and guilt ... if you're feeling like you're not treated like a human being, there's a lot of shame around it ... You want to mask that feeling with using again [because] that takes away that pain. Your mind just wants to give up and ... go back to what you know."

      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:16:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Knowledge positions in Aotearoa and Turtle Island art
           museums
    • Abstract: Eshraghi, Leuli; Ash-Milby, Kathleen; Nuku, Maia; Borell, Nigel
      Which practices do you most align with and feel responsible to represent and frame in your museological work' How far does this take you, in writing, curating and supporting artists from your own Ancestral territory, nation or language'

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Dindi Thangi Wudungi
    • Abstract: Kennedy, Brendan
      I am of the Tati Tati, Latji Latji, Wadi Wadi, Mutti Mutti, Yitha Yitha and Nari Nari peoples of the Murray River, Murrumbidgee River, Lachlan River, Edwards River and Wakool River Country in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Kin constellations languages waters futures
    • Abstract: Eshraghi, Leuli; Moulton, Kimberley
      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - New guises
    • Abstract: Gordon‑Smith, Ioana
      In his landmark essay "Towards a new Oceania," Samoan writer Maualaivao Albert Wendt implores an assumed, well‑meaning Moana reader to refuse the impulse to romanticise Oceanic cultures. To do so, he argues, would simply replicate false notions of stasis. Instead, Wendt argues that "[a]ny real understanding of ourselves and our existing cultures calls for an attempt to understand colonialism and what it did and is still doing to us."

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Palawa Kani: Expressing the power of language in art
           and the museum context
    • Abstract: Rimmer, Zoe; Sainty, Theresa
      Pakana, Tasmanian Aborigines, were the first astronomers in lutruwita, later known as Tasmania. We know this because we have language words describing the skies - in darkness and light - that refer to the brightest "stars" and the light and dark between them; in fact, our story of creation tells us that the first (black) man, Palawa, was made by Muyini, who cut the ground and made the rivers; and a bright star in the sky, Rrumitina, who gave Palawa joints. And we know these stories because of language revival. In Lutruwita, invasion and colonisation was swift and violent. Ancestral and intellectual traditions have been severely impacted - often to the extent of huge gaps in knowledges. Some of those gaps can be, and have been, narrowed, and even closed due to Ancestral memory and information resting in the pages of manuscripts, journals and correspondence of the colonisers.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Qsiqsimuʔ, many stars, many Olivella
    • Abstract: Biscarra Dilley, Sarah
      Qsimuʔ, like many words in tinismuʔ tilhinktityu, explains a story rather than a fixed or singular vocabulary. Olivella biplicata has a gorgeous shell, with colours that smoothly transition from stark white to milky lavender to rich honey golds, in combination or alone, along a softly curving spire. A being reflecting spiritual wealth and a symbol of exchange from our homelands spanning mountain ranges east to nitspu nakota ktityu, south well beyond recently imagined lines of occupying nations, and along margins of the sea north to nitspu unangan ktityu, qsimuʔ grounds yak tityu tityu yak tilhini in a vast network of relation. yakʔitinismuʔ wa yakʔitotomol, which echo the cadence, vocabulary, and sewn-planks of many other nations, extend these connections well across lpasini, the one ocean.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Puna'oa: Resources
    • Abstract: Eshraghi, Leuli
      In 2019 I composed a poster form multilingual guide in Samoan, French and English called 'Puna'oa o 'upu mai 'o atumotu/Glossaire des archipels' to represent currents of thought and action in international Indigenous visual cultures. I worked with my friend, celebrated Nehiyaw typographer and graphic designer Sebastien Aubin, to render my learnings from a constellation of mentors, knowledge keepers and sources during my doctoral research into international Indigenous curatorial practice into a poster form multilingual guide. The work draws on extensive discussions, residencies, exhibitions, gatherings throughout 2015-18 across the Great Ocean from north‑eastern North America to south‑eastern Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Jack Anselmi and Cynthia Hardie: Midden
    • Abstract: Briggs, Belinda
      Through millennia, our movements over woka (country/land) read like choreography, a repetition and series of sequences across the landscape as the river falls, rises and floods. Bone and mussel shell remnants are layered in the Earth's strata like musical notes descending the bars on a sheet of music. They denote a continual dance of life, ceremony, gathering, and feasts held on country, at one with the rhythm and tune of the cycles and seasons.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Reconnecting the Yaghan community to cultural
           belongings: 90 years on
    • Abstract: Carland, Rebecca
      My name is Rebecca Carland. I am a senior curator at Museums Victoria, based at Melbourne Museum. My work centres on the history of the museum's collections, how they came to the museum, and their journey through time and space. Like many museums established in the nineteenth century, we care for vast First Nations collections, from Australia and around the world. Increasingly, our work with these collections occurs against a backdrop of profound change in the museum's approach to First Peoples' authority. We are guided by a transformational principle which seeks to place First Peoples' living cultures and histories at the core of our practice. Our current project, 'Lost in Translation', sits at the intersection of this new paradigm and the colonial legacy - collaborating with and giving back to the Yaghan community of Chile, who continue to practice their culture and connection to their lands.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Weaving memory, living embodiment
    • Abstract: Carmichael, Freja
      Standing proudly in front of the Gulayi women's bag woven by my mother and sister, Sonja and Elisa Jane Carmichael, in the Australian art collection of the Queensland Art Gallery, I look back to my very first experience with Quandamooka fibre work. My significant engagement with the Queensland Museum collection reunited me with the bags and baskets woven by the hands of our Ancestors from the Ngugi clan of Quandamooka and introduced me to the work of other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from near and afar. In the presence of these spirited works I was reminded of the expansive visual language, meaning and innovation of artistic traditions belonging to our First Nations communities. Each woven basket and bag, looped net and intricate adornment or string work reverberates with a strong sense of place and shared stories of people and Country.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Everything together: Partisan ecologies and painting
    • Abstract: Bullen, Clothilde
      When you travel to Yirrkala one of the first things you notice is the lack of division between the waters of the Arafura Sea and the vast blue sky. Indeed, the smooth, honey-coloured shore seems to blend in effortlessly with the liquid of the ocean as the water laps its edges. If you take the time to sit in the shallow water just near the beach, away from lurking crocodiles, it is warm and silky. Once immersed, you begin to understand how it is possible to feel a part of something much larger. Things slow down. Once I saw a mass of butterflies move as a soft group across the top of me as I sat in waist-deep water, and a stingray meandered past, not concerned with the human in the water. The clear air acts like a conduit. During times of tropical storms that lash the coast and send stabs of water shearing up the rocks on the edges and boundaries of this place it becomes electric, humming.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Sovereign acts: In the wake
    • Abstract: Baker, Ali Gumillya; Blanch, Faye Rosas; Harkin, Natalie; Tur, Simone Ulalka; O'Brien, Lewis Yarluburka
      'In the WAKE' is a retrospective of five Sovereign Acts that considers what it means to be bound, and what it means to be free. We began in 2015 with Tarnanthi, first light. We close with Karrka, a time to reflect in the wake of the last light.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Kin‑dling and other radical relationalities
    • Abstract: Johnson, Emily; Recollet, Karyn
      "On a night in the woods north of Tallahassee at Pine Arbor Tribal Community, Mvskoke scholar, linguist and elder Sakim told me that in Muscogee (Creek) cosmology, what we know of as the Milky Way is the path of ancestors-and he said, "I think we all know, our bodies are stars." And the belt of Orion' It isn't a belt. And it isn't Orion. It's a butterfly. And the belt part is actually the juicy middle part of the butterfly. And the top wing is this world and the bottom wing is a reflection of this world. And then there's that liminal, juicy line. So there's always you, and there's always the reflection of you, in play."

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Notes from Kaho'olawe, Ka Pae'aina o Hawai'i,
           Moananuiakea
    • Abstract: Tengan, Josh; Broderick, Drew Kahu'aina
      In July 2019 we visited Tamaki Makaurau Auckland to attend a week-long curatorial intensive, a collaboration between Artspace Aotearoa and Independent Curators International (ICI). Artists, writers and curators from throughout Moananuiakea the Pacific and elsewhere gathered.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Jeremy Dutcher: Wolastoqiyik futurities
    • Abstract: Aker, Rudi
      Pesk, nis, nihi, new, nan ... I count my fingers in a language that lies quietly in my tongue. I string together the words I know to form a linguistic constellation, of sorts. Speaking mostly in English, while peppering in the words that have been witnessed by time far unknown to my consciousness and which still travel through the air today, I wait intently for when the language might grace me: at the kitchen table, on the phone with my muhsum, a "qeyyy nitap!!!!" in my Instagram DMs.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Making Inuit art in the moment
    • Abstract:
      As I find myself sitting down to write about the many mediums Inuit artists employ, I reflect upon the last ten years of my life. It is in these years that I have studied art and began my career as an artist and curator. It is my delighted joy to see what the minds of artists create; taking in the form and the meaning of their work. I often wonder to myself "What is Inuit art'" Take a moment to see if an image pops up in your head when you hear the words "Inuit Art." Please keep whatever you pictured in mind as you read. For myself, no matter what image I conjure up in a heartbeat, I tell myself, whatever an Inuk makes is Inuit art. I know that Inuit art is not a style or a look, it is a way of creating and sharing that comes from a culture that has as many ways of thinking as there are people. While it is simple to me, there are so many forces outside of me that confuse this concept in my mind. So, here we are dear reader, decades after the brightly coloured prints and polished soapstone carvings of Inuit artists have seeped deeply into the minds of art lovers around the world. Together, if you agree, we will take a little journey pondering what Inuit art is.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - A conversation with Perisak Juuso
    • Abstract: Snarby, Irene
      It was a cold morning in early February when me and my husband Dag set out from Tromso, a town located on the northern coast of Norway. Before us was a journey through Sapmi, through three countries, before we finally arrived at Perisak (Berissat) Juuso's home village, Mertajavri, in the northernmost part of Sweden. Our trip brought heavy snow covering almost all that we could see, reindeer, moose and foxes that suddenly jumped onto the road in front of the car, and a breathtaking sunset at about one o'clock, before we finally found the house where hot coffee and exciting stories awaited.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Desert Aboriginal art centres adapt to the pandemic
    • Abstract: Finnane, Kieran
      Opportunities for the desert Aboriginal art centres have fallen like dominos in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The experiences are far from uniform, as each art centre is on its own life cycle. Some have been hit at a fragile moment, while others, in a more robust phase, have nonetheless had to swallow big disappointments. They are all adapting as best they can-as one manager said to me, "Aboriginal people have a history of adapting to change, they'll get through this." But, as for so many others around the world, the longer the restrictions and uncertainty last, the harder it will become.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Looking for murnong
    • Abstract: Bennett, Lou; Moreton, Romaine
      We live in the country of people from the land of the volcano. 'Jaara Jharr', the country of the Jaara Jaara, Lou Bennett's people. This land is vibrant, ancient, dynamic and powerful. Our home in Malmsbury sits on ancient volcano plains, where basalt, sandstone, quartz, granite, and tachylyte cushion our every step. 'Boitchedjina', the soft instep of the foot pressed against 'Lar', the word for tachylyte, or volcano iron glass or obsidian, important to the Jaara people. 'Lar' is also the root word for home in Dja Dja Wurrung. Ancient volcanoes stand proud, rising from the basalt plains. This country, Jaara Jharr, a country of constant change, movement, and creation, like our languages, never sleeps. In Western colonial text and mind, this country has been domesticated, is fixed and known. The Western colonial industry has always relied on the exploitation of the storied lands of Indigenous peoples. The rich soil of the basalt plains, perfect for growing crops, orchards, and farming sheep or 'yeep' in the language of the Original peoples. 'Lar', home, carried in the baskets of Jaara women, fashioned into artefacts such as spear tips or cutting utensils, fired up in ovens to roast the roots of the murnong. The ancient hands of the Jaara have fashioned these necessities with intimacy, love and familiarity. 'Lar'. Home. Familiar. The treeless country, the wide roving plains, pre-date colonialism and invasion. The storied landscapes of Jaara Jharr.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Crafty prepping
    • Abstract: Waters, Sera
      An apocalyptic future, which seemed millennia away or even fictional in the 1980s of my childhood, is arriving. Generations of abuse and neglect in Australia, as well as other parts of the world, have built up into a crescendo of bushfires, dust storms, floods, drought, heatwaves, hail, hot blobs, melting glaciers, global trash and a thousand other variations to mark out this period, our period, finger‑pointedly known as the Anthropocene. Scientific researchers, First Nations peoples and the rational alike warned that the speeding‑up of mass production and resource grabbing, driven by the greedy and power‑hungry over the last two centuries, would have dire consequences. Alongside the accelerated and overwhelming spread of information, time now feels increasingly fleeting, vulnerably finite and out of pace with maintainable or even tolerable rhythms. These perceptions, supported by mounting evidence, have convinced an increasing number of citizens, including artists, that we cannot sustain this rapidity and have only a small window of time to shift pace - a decade or so, if that.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Nicholas Folland: Secondhand time
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve
      It is easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism.

      Sometime on from this provocative trueism attributed to Fredric Jameson or Slavoj Zizek, attempting to capture the momentum of the climate crisis and an associated distrust of the ability of governing bodies to tackle the systemic imbalances has proved to be a growth industry for die‑hard aesthetes. This is the new normal, a contagious meme, signalling the putative end times.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Art in the time of the burning
    • Abstract: Milliss, Ian
      As Samuel Johnson said to Boswell, "Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully."

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Duchamp and Australia: In opposition
    • Abstract: Butler, Rex; Donaldson, ADS
      The following essay is something of a "delayed" response to the 'The Essential Duchamp' at the Art Gallery of New South Wales (27 April - 11 August 2019). The exhibition consisted of some 125 works from the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, including the well‑known 'Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2' (1912) and 'Fountain' (1917), as well as a number of Duchamp's designs for chess boards and chess pieces. Our argument here takes up and extends ideas originally developed in "Marcel and Felix: An Australian Rendezvous", appearing in the collection 'Apostrophe Duchamp', published by 'Art + Australia' in 2018. Both in that essay and here we are concerned to think the relationship of Duchamp to Australia, what it is about his life and work that we might find useful to reflect upon our art‑historical situation today. More particularly, how might Duchamp be understood to intervene in contemporary debates about globalisation' And our point here is that Duchamp does this not so much in his art as in his 'chess'. Thinking about Duchamp's chess career as seen from here and reading his famous book on the phenomenon of "opposition" in chess, 'Opposition and Sister Squares are Reconciled' (1932), might allow a different conception of Australian art in the twenty‑first century. This for us would be the ultimate lesson of 'The Essential Duchamp' and the fact that for the inevitable children's activities associated with the exhibition the Gallery set up chessboards where the art‑going public of the future could play.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Geological pit stops: Kate Hill and Isadora Vaughan
    • Abstract: Kotlarczyk, Abbra
      In satellite view on Google maps, the rural town of Copley in South Australia can be seen in proximity to the grey horseshoe of an open‑cut mine, akin to the recollected aerial view of an ancient amphitheatre I once visited as a child in Turkey. The township of Copley on Adnyamathanha country (population 72 according to a 2016 census), sits approximately 560 km north of Adelaide in the intermediary zone between the green belt of the state's capital, and the deep red of the northern desert region. The surrounding landscape is defined by grand salt lakes, the undulating contours of the Flinders Ranges and a digitally‑rendered road passing through its seeming corridor.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Time and transition in the work of Lee Harrop
    • Abstract: Treagus, Mandy
      On 10 December 2019 Lee Harrop returned pieces from her work 'Still Lives' (2019) to the Northern Territory Core Library in Darwin, thereby taking them out of circulation. For Harrop, rather than closing down the meanings of these works, this moment represented a vital stage, part of the circle of life for artwork, rock, and ultimately the very matter of the universe. Harrop works with drill core rock samples, often drawn from core libraries. Respect for the material defines every stage of the artistic process. Harrop's statement that she wants "the value of the rock itself to be recognised" is just one aspect of a practice that rejects the maintenance of hierarchies between artist and material, including that between rock and inscribed text, the other major component of the work.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Living rocks: A fragment of the universe
    • Abstract: Darling, James
      Following directions from a young ecologist, Lesley Forwood and I waded through a shallow, ephemeral swamp in the south-east of South Australia and found thrombolites, rock‑like microbial accretions, which, along with layered microbial stromatolites and over a period of three billion years, became the source of oxygen for our planet. It was a rare, exhilarating, other‑worldly experience.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Stuart Ringholt: Time pressures
    • Abstract: Hill, Wes
      'Untitled (Clock)' (2014) by the Perth‑born, Melbourne‑based artist Stuart Ringholt is modelled on an antique mantelpiece clock, stands three metres high, and completes a minute in forty‑five seconds. I've only ever experienced the work as part of 'Today Tomorrow Yesterday': the almost absurdly lazy four‑year‑long exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia, on show to July 2020. Because of the sculpture's prominence in a show catering mostly to drop‑by tourists wandering around Circular Quay, I usually see the work incidentally, on my way to other shows in the same building. In my mind, at least until the exhibition closes later this year, Ringholt's clock is a permanent public‑art object, heavy with everyday context yet recurrently passing its 18‑hour days as if in a zone of its own.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - 2019: The year of our cyberpunk future
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      Three of the great science fiction films of the twentieth century, 'Akira' (1988), 'Blade Runner' (1982) and 'The Running Man' (1987) were set in 2019. Their sprawling, neon‑lit streetscapes have proved to be not so unlike the futures they predicted, with extremes of technology, power and wealth concentrating in the mega‑cities of today. In each film there are heroes and anti‑heroes who contest this hi‑tech power, from 'Blade Runner's' escapee android to 'The Running Man's' policeman who refuses orders to open fire on an innocent crowd. Security cameras and police are a notable presence in these films, driving early fantasies of a society of surveillance.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Therese Ritchie: Burning hearts
    • Abstract: Mackinolty, Chips
      Review(s) of: Therese Ritchie: Burning hearts, by Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, 29 November 2019 - 28 June 2020.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Cementa 19
    • Abstract: Marcon, Marco
      Review(s) of: Cementa 19, by Kandos, New South Wales, 21 - 24 November 2019.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - The Brazilian moment: A picture gallery in
           transformation
    • Abstract: Mateer, John; Ortega, Eduardo
      'Pinacoteca em Transformacao (Picture Gallery in Transformation)', the 2015 rehang of the main collection of the Museum of Art Sao Paulo (MASP) marked a return to that particular mode of display which for generations of gallery‑goers had been synonymous with the installation of its impressive pre‑modern and modern collections. It was a popular intervention, and I have the impression many Paulistas felt it a return to those days when Sao Paulo was thought to be a competitor with that other great new world city, New York. Adriano Pedrosa, the recently appointed director of MASP, had decided to reinstate the display of the gallery's permanent collection. It was a return to how the works had been presented at the building's inauguration nearly forty years earlier. This installation at Brazil's (and possibly even, South America's) premier art museum, was also news in the international artworld, being reported in many publications.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
 
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