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Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 397 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 397 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian J. of Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian J. of Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian J. of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.399, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Water Resources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.156, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
History of Economics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)

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Similar Journals
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Artlink
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0727-1239
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [397 journals]
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: MacGill, Belinda; Bilske, Maria
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Other suns: Cult sci-fi cinema and art
    • Abstract: Russell, Francis
      Review(s) of: Other suns: Cult sci‑fi cinema and art, by Fremantle Arts Centre, 27 July-14 September 2019.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Being an artist and an art teacher
    • Abstract: Ward, Henry
      Teaching art does at times feel like it might be getting in the way of time I could be spending in the studio. But I recognise that the space of teaching has become a vital and integral part of my artistic practice. Artists have almost always been involved in teaching art in schools. Sometimes this has been described as an unwanted but necessary evil to fund the making of work. Sometimes teaching is described as being an essential part of how an artist, like Phyllida Barlow, thinks about their work and ideas. Sometimes, as in the obvious case of Joseph Beuys or the less well‑known Jef Geys, teaching has become an approach to practice itself. The pedagogical role is often the catalyst for the production of the most interesting and engaging elements of an artist's oeuvre, as in the case of John Baldessari. In art schools the teaching is traditionally undertaken by practising artists. There is an expectation that the person delivering the lecture, leading the group crit or undertaking the tutorial has their own creative practice to bolster their teaching. The point being made here is that teaching provides these artists with an income as well as a critical dialogic space, where ideas are discussed, theories generated and developed.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Trying to be at home in the world: New parameters for
           art education
    • Abstract: Biesta, Gert
      In my short book 'Letting Art Teach', I try to respond to what I see as a double crisis in art education. One part of this crisis has to do with the disappearance of art from art education - something that is visible in the ongoing instrumentalisation of the arts in education. The other part of the crisis has to do with the disappearance of education from contemporary art education - something that is visible in what I refer to as "expressivist" approaches to art. In response to these developments I outline a "world‑centred" approach. This approach is neither focused on what children should learn (knowledge or skills) nor on how they should develop and who they should become (the question of identity), but rather puts the question of human existence - the question of what it means to live one's life, and to live it well - at the very heart of art education.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - The housing question
    • Abstract: Wolifson, Chloe
      Review(s) of: The housing question, by Penrith Regional Gallery, 22 June - 25 August 2019.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Choose your own immersion: Art schools as a site of
           creative becoming
    • Abstract: Rey, Una
      The Bauhaus, as the best‑known model of immersive studio‑based teaching and learning across art, craft and design that inspired the "Modern" post‑WW2 art school, opened in Weimar in 1919. What can it teach us a hundred years later, when the model is in retreat' The Bauhaus lasted fourteen years, having relocated three times under three directors, each one amending doctrines and agendas. Ideological bloodletting and stylistic jostling - Expressionism, de Stijl, Functionalism, New Objectivity - along with petty internal politics were part of the Bauhaus fabric, just as they remain constant in all art teaching institutions. The forced closure of the Bauhaus in 1933, during the rise of National Socialism in Germany, puts current anxieties surrounding the pressures on the global tertiary sector and its impact on the traditional late modern art school into context. So, too, does the very idea of the artist's studio as a site of learning and becoming, seem like a golden age privileging our collective desires for more time at the creative coal face, galvanised by romantic recollections of a period when the immersive studio experience was a central tenet of transmitting the skills and ideas through which one might realise one's identity as an artist.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Vanishing into action: Art beyond the contemporary
    • Abstract: Foster, Alasdair
      Suhail Malik, co‑director of the Master of Fine Art at Goldsmiths, University of London, argues in a forthcoming book that there is an urgent necessity for "art to exit from Contemporary Art". This is not a paradox, but a clear differentiation between what he considers the purpose of art to be and the neoliberal system that in his view defines the term Contemporary Art. As such, Contemporary Art describes the dominant system of art and not simply art made in the present time. Malik is not alone. Even key players within the contemporary artworld are despairing of the malaise that has overtaken it. In 2012, the art critic, Dave Hickey, a long‑term advocate of art in a free market economy, announced he was quitting an artworld he is reported to have described as "calcified, self‑reverential and a hostage to rich collectors." "It's nasty and it's stupid," he said, "Art editors and critics - people like me - have become a courtier class. All we do is wander around the palace and advise very rich people."

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Shapes of knowledge: A conversation
    • Abstract: Bilske, Maria; Roe, Alex Martinis; Mathews, Hannah
      Maria Bilske: This exhibition, Shapes of Knowledge, is in your own words, Hannah, an acknowledgment of the shapes, forms, meanings and audiences that connect art with knowledge-making as a form of participation. Why do you think there seems to be a prevalence of pedagogical modes and methods in contemporary art' Is it a natural progression of performative and relational ways of working'

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - MCAD Manila: Learning, sharing and conversation
    • Abstract: Cruz, Joselina; Acuin, Paula
      Dominga Street is in one of the busiest areas of Metro Manila. Lined by street food sellers, it is a thoroughfare for all possible transportation options in Manila that go this way: pedicabs, tricycles, jeepneys, private cars, trucks, bicycles, etc. There is a public school on one side, its gates hugging the sliver of a sidewalk, and every day at noon children spill out from its gates, where parents and guardians, a gaggle of nannies and grandparents, wait outside. A queue of tricycles wait for passengers, while empty jeepneys are double parked. Sometimes a medium-sized cement truck passes through this throng, while food vendors wend their way through the length of the road, avoiding potholes, humps, piles of garbage and the odd homeless person. The street is about six metres wide and runs from a main avenue of the city into a busy one-way street at the end. Just before reaching the street corners where a printing shop and a 7/11 bookend the street there is an unobtrusive metal gate, a side door to the building of the College of Saint Benilde's School of Design and Arts that is the entrance to the Museum of Contemporary Art and Design (MCAD).

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Museum MACAN: Critical conversations through art
    • Abstract: Seeto, Aaron
      The Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara (Museum MACAN) in West Jakarta opened its doors to the public in November 2017. Founded by the collector and philanthropist Haryanto Adikoesoemo, it has been developed and run as a private foundation operating within the public sphere, and currently houses a collection of around 800 works of Indonesian and International modern and contemporary art that has been built up over 25 years. Though Indonesia has many museums (Jakarta alone has 64 registered museums), Museum MACAN's purpose‑built facilities providing a vital and necessary museum infrastructure to support the ambitious program of exhibitions sets it apart; as does the focus on public programs promoting outreach and a broader philosophy of cultural exchange.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Falling in love (or, is the curatorial a
           methodology')
    • Abstract: McDowell, Tara
      What is curatorial research' And what is a curatorial methodology' I founded the Curatorial Practice PhD at Monash University in 2014. Though new and at the time unprecedented in Australia, it is entirely modelled on the Fine Art PhD, which is now offered by more than two dozen courses in this country. And so these questions were put to me repeatedly. They often felt bewildering, the result of putting the square peg of curating into the round hole of academia. Curating's entry into academia was an awkward and artificial event, but I believe this event continues to have tremendous potential, and I hope to tease out its implications and possible paths forward in the essay that follows.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Agatha Gothe-Snape: On art and education eve
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve; Gothe‑Snape, Agatha
      Eve Sullivan: How did you become the creative lead for the Kaldor Public Art Project Symposium on Art Education' What did this entail'

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - FEM-aFFINITY
    • Abstract: Millner, Jacqueline
      Review(s) of: FEM‑aFFINITY, by Arts Project Australia, 15 June - 20 July 2019.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Risky business: Engaging adolescents in activities at
           the art gallery of South Australia
    • Abstract: Neagle, Kylie
      In a recent keynote address for the Arts Inspire conference in Adelaide on the implementation of arts education in schools, Robin Pascoe suggested that the importance of communicating knowledge and expertise is secondary to the creation of opportunities for participation, engagement and self‑expression. These goals are echoed in the Art Gallery of South Australia's focus on expanded models of museum and gallery programming, empowering students and teachers to be self‑directed, rather than relying on a guided tour or lecture by an industry expert. This shift is risky, potentially alienating educators by not providing the kind of support they think they need to justify an excursion.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - About being here
    • Abstract: Spiers, Liv
      Review(s) of: About being here, by Angela Valamanesh, Jam Factory, 26 July - 22 September 2019.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Clague, Pauline; Behrendt, Larissa
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - A personal reflection on self-determining documentary
           filmmaking practice
    • Abstract: Behrendt, Larissa
      I remember the first documentary I saw in a movie theatre. I was fourteen years old and my father took me to a screening of 'Lousy Little Sixpence' (Alec Morgan and Gerald Bostock, 1983). I knew about the stolen generations policy through its impact on my own family but I had never seen Aboriginal people on a cinema screen telling their stories in their own words. There was both power in the telling of the lived experience and a subversive about it. While my brother and I knew this part of Australian history, in this period after the end of the formal removal policy and before the 'Bringing them Home Report and a National Apology', no other student at our high school seemed to. The voices in 'Lousy Little Sixpence' challenged that ignorance but also validated the lived experience of members of our family.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Indigenous storytelling: Deconstructing the archetypes
    • Abstract: Clague, Pauline
      Indigenous archetypes have different rules to our non‑Indigenous counterparts and so in any interpretation of our films it is important to see what sort of lens is being created by Indigenous cinema. As a programmer for imagineNATIVE and Winda Film Festival, I am immersed in Indigenous films made by Indigenous directors and writers. In the last three years I have watched around 400 to 500 Indigenous films made by Indigenous filmmakers, each year observing the vast spectrum across genres and have witnessed a real growth of a strong industry of shorts, features and documentaries. The more I watch these films, the more I see a subtle difference and sometimes not so subtle difference in the portrayal of the central characters as universal archetypes.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Amala Groom: Cosmic body of remembrance
    • Abstract: Donnelly, Hannah
      I remember the first time I saw conceptual video work by an Aboriginal artist. Sitting in a back row, anxious and close to the exit in case I had to leave, I watched the performance projected through video in a sandstone university lecture hall. The scene was from rea's 'Poles Apart' (2009).

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - ImagineNATIVE at 20
    • Abstract: Clague, Pauline; Ryle, Jason
      In October 2019 the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival celebrates its 20th anniversary. As the world's largest presenter of Indigenous‑made screen content, the Toronto‑based imagineNATIVE plays a central role in the international Indigenous screen sector and a vital role in the Canadian media arts landscape. With a specific mandate to support the work of Aboriginal directors, screenwriters, and producers, imagineNATIVE has been a leader in its adherence to fostering and supporting Indigenous narrative sovereignty on screen, at a time when screen‑based storytelling continues to grow in prominence and as more Indigenous storytellers create work.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Sydney Elders: Continuing Aboriginal stories at the
           state library of New South Wales
    • Abstract: Jones, Jonathan
      In 2016 I was asked by the State Library of New South Wales (SLNSW) to curate a project for the redevelopment and launch of their new exhibition spaces. While being briefed on the significance of the library I considered how its collection represents Aboriginal communities and how Aboriginal communities would want to be represented. In order to understand and negotiate these notions of representation and the relations of power they create and reflect, I thought about how our communities self‑represent, where community knowledge accumulates and is maintained, and who we go to for our stories. Within this context elders are familiar anchor points. They are to whom we go for knowledge, and in doing so they continually connect us to our past while strengthening our future. Indeed, within our communities our elders are our libraries.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Speaking back to colonial collections: Building living
           Aboriginal archives
    • Abstract: Thorpe, Kirsten
      During the late‑nineteenth and earlytwentieth centuries a significant number of amateur collectors were on a quest to record, categorise and preserve what they perceived to be the "dying races" of Aboriginal Australia. In New South Wales, collectors such as Alan Carroll (1823-1911) and Clifton Cappie Towle (1888-1946) set out to capture information on Aboriginal cultural practices and languages and to disseminate these through their networks and in published journals. Both used various kinds of methods to gather and document cultural content, be it in the form of diaries, paintings, manuscripts or photographs. This knowledge had previously been held by Aboriginal people in specific locations on Country or transmitted in fluid ways through relationships between people and informed by community protocols.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Unravelling the past: Barbed wire and campfire
           learnings
    • Abstract: Eckermann, Ali Cobby
      How does one truly unravel their past, stripping the barbs of hurt to create a new vessel free from thorns' For me, it took years of journey, searching for my ideal personal paradise even without a definition of what that could be. When a sense of peacefulness arrived in spurting moments, I did not have the skills to retain it in my life, and mourned each time it slipped away. Always I continued my nomadic travel across this land, through its desert heart of richness, the red sand sweeping my footprints away with its wind of wisdom, only my most recent footprints remaining to be seen. Each time I chose to return to the losses of my past, I had to endure a cyclic reoccurrence of the pain. It has taken me years to lessen those cycles. It has taken years of practice, working on my as‑yet‑unseen footprints, centring toward my future.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Dark Emu: Thank the earth
    • Abstract: Pascoe, Bruce
      When Australia fabricated a fairy story of how it came by the country it was so confident of the people's complicity in the fraud that it thought it unnecessary to wash the blood off the knife.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Deaths in custody: We've got to give it everything
    • Abstract: Allum, Lorena
      As an ABC radio news cadet in 1989 I travelled with the Royal Commission into Aboriginal deaths in custody to Walgett in northwest NSW in a small twin‑engine Cessna. It was so cramped that the Commissioner, the wry and avuncular Hal Wootten QC, had to sit in the co‑pilot's seat and hand out the in‑flight biscuits.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Network sovereignty: The internet is Blak
    • Abstract: Hepi, Amrita; Mailangi, Enoch
      Amrita Hepi: Cathy Freeman winning gold in the 2000 Sydney Olympics reverberated through my whole body. I've watched and replayed the great moments of history on screen, let them sink in, commented, liked and subscribed to elevate the accompanying euphoria. The video clips comforted and spurred on my desire to make things.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - The national 2019: New Australian art
    • Abstract: Judd, Craig
      Review(s) of: The national 2019: New Australian art, by Art Gallery of New South Wales 29 March - 21 July 2019; The national 2019: New Australian art, by Carriageworks 29 March - 23 June 2019; The national 2019: New Australian art, by Museum of Contemporary Art Australia - 29 March - 23 June 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Bush women: 25 years on
    • Abstract: Weston, Gemma
      Review(s) of: Bush women: 25 years on, by Fremantle Arts Centre.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Yurtu Ardla
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      Review(s) of: Yurtu Ardla, by South Australian Museum 16 March - 16 June 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Baumann, Rebecca; Sequiera, David; Eliasson, Olafur
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Local colour: Dyeing and women's wealth
    • Abstract: Ewington, Julie
      In retrospect, perhaps I imagined it. These fugitive perfumes-earthy, humid, slightly vegetal-were an olfactory epiphany, possibly even a synaesthetic moment. I was visiting 'Local Colour: Experiments in Nature' at the UNSW Galleries in Sydney's Paddington, surrounded by floating lengths of cloth, a brace of Aboriginal baskets, a row of tiny weavings. Gentle and understated, 'Local Colour' was nevertheless a powerful sensory experience. It addressed the twinned subtlety and intensity of natural dyes married to cloth and fibre, ancient practices being revisited and revised today. Contemporary artists and community-based artisans with generations of knowledge are everywhere experimenting with natural alternatives to industrial chemical dyes and addressing urgent questions of environmental sustainability.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Hi-vis commodities: A body corporate's toxic economy
    • Abstract: Facility, Debris; Laird, Tessa
      Tessa Laird Debris Facility is a Melbourne-based entity dedicated to jewellery-in-the-expanded-field; that is, the propagation of affordable adornments fabricated from waste materials, but also permanently embodied colour in the form of abstract, geometric tattooing, installation practices, guided meditations, the imbibing of elixirs and ritual ablutions.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Revisiting colour problems: Emily Vanderpoel, Hilma af
           Klint, Becca Albee, Claire Milledge
    • Abstract: Wallin, Amelia
      In 1902 American artist, scholar and historian Emily Noyes Vanderpoel published 'Colour Problems: A Practical Manual for the Lay Student of Colour', an extensive analysis of the proportions and harmonies of colour. Her study derived from objects, many of which were from her own collection, including Persian rugs, pottery, and enamelware. Marketed to dressmakers, interior designers and watercolourists, 'Colour Problems' advised its readers to look to nature to find essential harmonies between complementary colours. Many pages of Vanderpoel's book are devoted to hand-drawn rectilinear grids of harmonious coloured squares with captions such as 'Colour Analysis from a Butterfly and Colour Analysis from a Rose-Coloured Vase'.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Vincent Namatjira: Colourful optimism
    • Abstract: Hill, Wes
      Perceptions of colour cannot be trusted. This is something I know because I'm colour blind. Being colour blind means I'm mostly bored by the sunsets that other people enjoy (their vivid pinks just look like greys to me) and I'm also sceptical about the need for exactitude when naming what colour it is that one sees. No wonder the works of Vincent van Gogh first stood out to me. Here was an artist who used colour not to reproduce reality but, remarkably for the 1880s, as a conceptual tool, unafraid to use something like cerulean blue to render a corn field, every tone a metaphor for a particular life force ("What colour is in painting, enthusiasm is in life," he wrote to Theo in 1886). Against the unstructured inclinations of his Impressionist peers, colour in a van Gogh painting is always in dialogue with his rigid, drawing-like forms, waging his own very different battle with the chromophobic tendencies of Western art, which, at least since the time of Aristotle, equated colourful extravagances with modes of vulgar, feminine, Orientalist, primitive or infantile excess.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Jane Skeer: True blue
    • Abstract: Wong, Serena; Sullivan, Eve
      Jane Skeer's art has always been about the sum of its parts. Her works of sculptural assemblage and installation defer to the serial arrangement of mass-manufactured commodities. These found and repurposed waste materials are often derived from packaging or remaindered print stock-bits of old rope, plastic containers, previous year's festival flyers, newspapers and magazines (including remaindered back issues of Artlink). As a comment on the excesses of production, framed through the repetition and amplification of subtle details, there is beauty in obsolescence.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Wardlipari Homeriver: Vulnerable observations
    • Abstract: O'Brien, Lewis Yarluburka; Baker, Ali Gumillya
      Wardlipari is the homeriver in the Milky Way. Purlirna kardlarna ngadluku miyurnaku yaintya tikkiarna.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Queer uses of colour: A tinted hermeneutics
    • Abstract: Kotlarczyk, Abbra
      In her keynote lecture for the 2018 AAANZ conference, 'Aesthetics, Politics and Histories: The Social Context of Art', the prominent art historian and critical feminist scholar Griselda Pollock posed the following question with regards to a cultural hermeneutics: how is the study of a culture a way to understand its "double space", considering "what it is to belong, who we are, and at the same time how meanings are being formed for us and ... lived by us"' Pollock's concerns, while specific to a field of interpretation that pertains to modernity's relationship to the Holocaust, exists as part of her enduring practice of extending cultural and visual analysis through the centering of minority subjects and positions. Her questioning of how a cultural hermeneutics might be embodied, as opposed to externally materialised, is pivotal in considering how minoritarian cultures-in this case LGBTQIA+ cultures-navigate and articulate identities in relationship to majoritarian cultures. Specifically, it is the distinction that Pollock makes between cultural meaning that is being formed for as opposed to lived by, that makes this provocation so essential for thinking through queer uses of colour.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Partnershipping
    • Abstract: Kelly, Sean
      Review(s) of: Partnershipping, by Burnie Regional Art Gallery, 10 November - 16 December 2018.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Unhallowed arts
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren; Weston, Gemma
      Review(s) of: Unhallowed arts, Various venues, Perth, 25 September - 23 December 2018.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - James Turrell: Night life in Brisbane
    • Abstract: Young, Diana
      To coincide with the tenth anniversary of Brisbane's Gallery of Modern Art, QAGOMA commissioned a work by James Turrell to effect an ambitious and astonishing transformation of the gallery's architecture at night. Like much of Turrell's work this one is a response to the building and perhaps also to the position of the gallery in Brisbane's South Bank entertainment precinct. There is a tension which I'll explore here between Turrell's work as a renowned artist making international art and the localness of this work with its public presence creating nightly modifications to the Brisbane cityscape.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Jacky Redgate's patch of yellow (and blue)
    • Abstract: Lakin, Shaune
      There is no substantial discourse of colour photography, no convincing interpretive framework through which we might account for its phenomenology. Perhaps this is because there is no "material indexicality" in a colour photograph, the optical basis of which is wavelengths of reflected light that are themselves invisible and the experience of which is always subjective and cultural. While a colour photograph might approximate perceptual experience, it is only ever a translation. As an example of the sceptical view of the colour photograph held by prominent photographers during the 1970s, the historian Max Kozloff characterised colour as "antirealist" and as "perfectly unsound as a reliable witness." Contemporary commentators remain uncomfortable with colour, or fail to even recognise it: try to find a reference to colour in Michael Fried's resolutely formalist 'Why Photography Matters as Art as Never Before (2008)'.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Gerry Wedd: My blue and white china
    • Abstract: Wedd, Gerry
      As an aesthete Wilde surrounded himself with beautiful objects. This epigram from his Oxford days paid tribute to and satirised the Victorian craze for the exotic. At Oxford University Wilde was introduced to the culture of aesthetes by art critic and philanthropist John Ruskin whose writings on craft also influenced William Morris.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Dress code
    • Abstract: Finegan, Ann
      Review(s) of: Dress code, by Museum of Brisbane - 3 November 2018 - 28 January 2019.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
 
 
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