Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 387 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 387 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Narrative Therapy & Community Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Irrigation Australia: The Official J. of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
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Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0727-1239
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [387 journals]
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Knowledge positions in Aotearoa and Turtle Island art
           museums
    • Abstract: Eshraghi, Leuli; Ash-Milby, Kathleen; Nuku, Maia; Borell, Nigel
      Which practices do you most align with and feel responsible to represent and frame in your museological work' How far does this take you, in writing, curating and supporting artists from your own Ancestral territory, nation or language'

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Dindi Thangi Wudungi
    • Abstract: Kennedy, Brendan
      I am of the Tati Tati, Latji Latji, Wadi Wadi, Mutti Mutti, Yitha Yitha and Nari Nari peoples of the Murray River, Murrumbidgee River, Lachlan River, Edwards River and Wakool River Country in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Kin constellations languages waters futures
    • Abstract: Eshraghi, Leuli; Moulton, Kimberley
      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - New guises
    • Abstract: Gordon‑Smith, Ioana
      In his landmark essay "Towards a new Oceania," Samoan writer Maualaivao Albert Wendt implores an assumed, well‑meaning Moana reader to refuse the impulse to romanticise Oceanic cultures. To do so, he argues, would simply replicate false notions of stasis. Instead, Wendt argues that "[a]ny real understanding of ourselves and our existing cultures calls for an attempt to understand colonialism and what it did and is still doing to us."

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Palawa Kani: Expressing the power of language in art
           and the museum context
    • Abstract: Rimmer, Zoe; Sainty, Theresa
      Pakana, Tasmanian Aborigines, were the first astronomers in lutruwita, later known as Tasmania. We know this because we have language words describing the skies - in darkness and light - that refer to the brightest "stars" and the light and dark between them; in fact, our story of creation tells us that the first (black) man, Palawa, was made by Muyini, who cut the ground and made the rivers; and a bright star in the sky, Rrumitina, who gave Palawa joints. And we know these stories because of language revival. In Lutruwita, invasion and colonisation was swift and violent. Ancestral and intellectual traditions have been severely impacted - often to the extent of huge gaps in knowledges. Some of those gaps can be, and have been, narrowed, and even closed due to Ancestral memory and information resting in the pages of manuscripts, journals and correspondence of the colonisers.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Qsiqsimuʔ, many stars, many Olivella
    • Abstract: Biscarra Dilley, Sarah
      Qsimuʔ, like many words in tinismuʔ tilhinktityu, explains a story rather than a fixed or singular vocabulary. Olivella biplicata has a gorgeous shell, with colours that smoothly transition from stark white to milky lavender to rich honey golds, in combination or alone, along a softly curving spire. A being reflecting spiritual wealth and a symbol of exchange from our homelands spanning mountain ranges east to nitspu nakota ktityu, south well beyond recently imagined lines of occupying nations, and along margins of the sea north to nitspu unangan ktityu, qsimuʔ grounds yak tityu tityu yak tilhini in a vast network of relation. yakʔitinismuʔ wa yakʔitotomol, which echo the cadence, vocabulary, and sewn-planks of many other nations, extend these connections well across lpasini, the one ocean.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Puna'oa: Resources
    • Abstract: Eshraghi, Leuli
      In 2019 I composed a poster form multilingual guide in Samoan, French and English called 'Puna'oa o 'upu mai 'o atumotu/Glossaire des archipels' to represent currents of thought and action in international Indigenous visual cultures. I worked with my friend, celebrated Nehiyaw typographer and graphic designer Sebastien Aubin, to render my learnings from a constellation of mentors, knowledge keepers and sources during my doctoral research into international Indigenous curatorial practice into a poster form multilingual guide. The work draws on extensive discussions, residencies, exhibitions, gatherings throughout 2015-18 across the Great Ocean from north‑eastern North America to south‑eastern Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Jack Anselmi and Cynthia Hardie: Midden
    • Abstract: Briggs, Belinda
      Through millennia, our movements over woka (country/land) read like choreography, a repetition and series of sequences across the landscape as the river falls, rises and floods. Bone and mussel shell remnants are layered in the Earth's strata like musical notes descending the bars on a sheet of music. They denote a continual dance of life, ceremony, gathering, and feasts held on country, at one with the rhythm and tune of the cycles and seasons.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Reconnecting the Yaghan community to cultural
           belongings: 90 years on
    • Abstract: Carland, Rebecca
      My name is Rebecca Carland. I am a senior curator at Museums Victoria, based at Melbourne Museum. My work centres on the history of the museum's collections, how they came to the museum, and their journey through time and space. Like many museums established in the nineteenth century, we care for vast First Nations collections, from Australia and around the world. Increasingly, our work with these collections occurs against a backdrop of profound change in the museum's approach to First Peoples' authority. We are guided by a transformational principle which seeks to place First Peoples' living cultures and histories at the core of our practice. Our current project, 'Lost in Translation', sits at the intersection of this new paradigm and the colonial legacy - collaborating with and giving back to the Yaghan community of Chile, who continue to practice their culture and connection to their lands.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Weaving memory, living embodiment
    • Abstract: Carmichael, Freja
      Standing proudly in front of the Gulayi women's bag woven by my mother and sister, Sonja and Elisa Jane Carmichael, in the Australian art collection of the Queensland Art Gallery, I look back to my very first experience with Quandamooka fibre work. My significant engagement with the Queensland Museum collection reunited me with the bags and baskets woven by the hands of our Ancestors from the Ngugi clan of Quandamooka and introduced me to the work of other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from near and afar. In the presence of these spirited works I was reminded of the expansive visual language, meaning and innovation of artistic traditions belonging to our First Nations communities. Each woven basket and bag, looped net and intricate adornment or string work reverberates with a strong sense of place and shared stories of people and Country.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Everything together: Partisan ecologies and painting
    • Abstract: Bullen, Clothilde
      When you travel to Yirrkala one of the first things you notice is the lack of division between the waters of the Arafura Sea and the vast blue sky. Indeed, the smooth, honey-coloured shore seems to blend in effortlessly with the liquid of the ocean as the water laps its edges. If you take the time to sit in the shallow water just near the beach, away from lurking crocodiles, it is warm and silky. Once immersed, you begin to understand how it is possible to feel a part of something much larger. Things slow down. Once I saw a mass of butterflies move as a soft group across the top of me as I sat in waist-deep water, and a stingray meandered past, not concerned with the human in the water. The clear air acts like a conduit. During times of tropical storms that lash the coast and send stabs of water shearing up the rocks on the edges and boundaries of this place it becomes electric, humming.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Sovereign acts: In the wake
    • Abstract: Baker, Ali Gumillya; Blanch, Faye Rosas; Harkin, Natalie; Tur, Simone Ulalka; O'Brien, Lewis Yarluburka
      'In the WAKE' is a retrospective of five Sovereign Acts that considers what it means to be bound, and what it means to be free. We began in 2015 with Tarnanthi, first light. We close with Karrka, a time to reflect in the wake of the last light.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Kin‑dling and other radical relationalities
    • Abstract: Johnson, Emily; Recollet, Karyn
      "On a night in the woods north of Tallahassee at Pine Arbor Tribal Community, Mvskoke scholar, linguist and elder Sakim told me that in Muscogee (Creek) cosmology, what we know of as the Milky Way is the path of ancestors-and he said, "I think we all know, our bodies are stars." And the belt of Orion' It isn't a belt. And it isn't Orion. It's a butterfly. And the belt part is actually the juicy middle part of the butterfly. And the top wing is this world and the bottom wing is a reflection of this world. And then there's that liminal, juicy line. So there's always you, and there's always the reflection of you, in play."

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Notes from Kaho'olawe, Ka Pae'aina o Hawai'i,
           Moananuiakea
    • Abstract: Tengan, Josh; Broderick, Drew Kahu'aina
      In July 2019 we visited Tamaki Makaurau Auckland to attend a week-long curatorial intensive, a collaboration between Artspace Aotearoa and Independent Curators International (ICI). Artists, writers and curators from throughout Moananuiakea the Pacific and elsewhere gathered.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Jeremy Dutcher: Wolastoqiyik futurities
    • Abstract: Aker, Rudi
      Pesk, nis, nihi, new, nan ... I count my fingers in a language that lies quietly in my tongue. I string together the words I know to form a linguistic constellation, of sorts. Speaking mostly in English, while peppering in the words that have been witnessed by time far unknown to my consciousness and which still travel through the air today, I wait intently for when the language might grace me: at the kitchen table, on the phone with my muhsum, a "qeyyy nitap!!!!" in my Instagram DMs.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Making Inuit art in the moment
    • Abstract:
      As I find myself sitting down to write about the many mediums Inuit artists employ, I reflect upon the last ten years of my life. It is in these years that I have studied art and began my career as an artist and curator. It is my delighted joy to see what the minds of artists create; taking in the form and the meaning of their work. I often wonder to myself "What is Inuit art'" Take a moment to see if an image pops up in your head when you hear the words "Inuit Art." Please keep whatever you pictured in mind as you read. For myself, no matter what image I conjure up in a heartbeat, I tell myself, whatever an Inuk makes is Inuit art. I know that Inuit art is not a style or a look, it is a way of creating and sharing that comes from a culture that has as many ways of thinking as there are people. While it is simple to me, there are so many forces outside of me that confuse this concept in my mind. So, here we are dear reader, decades after the brightly coloured prints and polished soapstone carvings of Inuit artists have seeped deeply into the minds of art lovers around the world. Together, if you agree, we will take a little journey pondering what Inuit art is.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - A conversation with Perisak Juuso
    • Abstract: Snarby, Irene
      It was a cold morning in early February when me and my husband Dag set out from Tromso, a town located on the northern coast of Norway. Before us was a journey through Sapmi, through three countries, before we finally arrived at Perisak (Berissat) Juuso's home village, Mertajavri, in the northernmost part of Sweden. Our trip brought heavy snow covering almost all that we could see, reindeer, moose and foxes that suddenly jumped onto the road in front of the car, and a breathtaking sunset at about one o'clock, before we finally found the house where hot coffee and exciting stories awaited.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Desert Aboriginal art centres adapt to the pandemic
    • Abstract: Finnane, Kieran
      Opportunities for the desert Aboriginal art centres have fallen like dominos in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The experiences are far from uniform, as each art centre is on its own life cycle. Some have been hit at a fragile moment, while others, in a more robust phase, have nonetheless had to swallow big disappointments. They are all adapting as best they can-as one manager said to me, "Aboriginal people have a history of adapting to change, they'll get through this." But, as for so many others around the world, the longer the restrictions and uncertainty last, the harder it will become.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 2 - Looking for murnong
    • Abstract: Bennett, Lou; Moreton, Romaine
      We live in the country of people from the land of the volcano. 'Jaara Jharr', the country of the Jaara Jaara, Lou Bennett's people. This land is vibrant, ancient, dynamic and powerful. Our home in Malmsbury sits on ancient volcano plains, where basalt, sandstone, quartz, granite, and tachylyte cushion our every step. 'Boitchedjina', the soft instep of the foot pressed against 'Lar', the word for tachylyte, or volcano iron glass or obsidian, important to the Jaara people. 'Lar' is also the root word for home in Dja Dja Wurrung. Ancient volcanoes stand proud, rising from the basalt plains. This country, Jaara Jharr, a country of constant change, movement, and creation, like our languages, never sleeps. In Western colonial text and mind, this country has been domesticated, is fixed and known. The Western colonial industry has always relied on the exploitation of the storied lands of Indigenous peoples. The rich soil of the basalt plains, perfect for growing crops, orchards, and farming sheep or 'yeep' in the language of the Original peoples. 'Lar', home, carried in the baskets of Jaara women, fashioned into artefacts such as spear tips or cutting utensils, fired up in ovens to roast the roots of the murnong. The ancient hands of the Jaara have fashioned these necessities with intimacy, love and familiarity. 'Lar'. Home. Familiar. The treeless country, the wide roving plains, pre-date colonialism and invasion. The storied landscapes of Jaara Jharr.

      PubDate: Thu, 28 May 2020 11:05:55 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Crafty prepping
    • Abstract: Waters, Sera
      An apocalyptic future, which seemed millennia away or even fictional in the 1980s of my childhood, is arriving. Generations of abuse and neglect in Australia, as well as other parts of the world, have built up into a crescendo of bushfires, dust storms, floods, drought, heatwaves, hail, hot blobs, melting glaciers, global trash and a thousand other variations to mark out this period, our period, finger‑pointedly known as the Anthropocene. Scientific researchers, First Nations peoples and the rational alike warned that the speeding‑up of mass production and resource grabbing, driven by the greedy and power‑hungry over the last two centuries, would have dire consequences. Alongside the accelerated and overwhelming spread of information, time now feels increasingly fleeting, vulnerably finite and out of pace with maintainable or even tolerable rhythms. These perceptions, supported by mounting evidence, have convinced an increasing number of citizens, including artists, that we cannot sustain this rapidity and have only a small window of time to shift pace - a decade or so, if that.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Nicholas Folland: Secondhand time
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve
      It is easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism.

      Sometime on from this provocative trueism attributed to Fredric Jameson or Slavoj Zizek, attempting to capture the momentum of the climate crisis and an associated distrust of the ability of governing bodies to tackle the systemic imbalances has proved to be a growth industry for die‑hard aesthetes. This is the new normal, a contagious meme, signalling the putative end times.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Art in the time of the burning
    • Abstract: Milliss, Ian
      As Samuel Johnson said to Boswell, "Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully."

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Duchamp and Australia: In opposition
    • Abstract: Butler, Rex; Donaldson, ADS
      The following essay is something of a "delayed" response to the 'The Essential Duchamp' at the Art Gallery of New South Wales (27 April - 11 August 2019). The exhibition consisted of some 125 works from the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, including the well‑known 'Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2' (1912) and 'Fountain' (1917), as well as a number of Duchamp's designs for chess boards and chess pieces. Our argument here takes up and extends ideas originally developed in "Marcel and Felix: An Australian Rendezvous", appearing in the collection 'Apostrophe Duchamp', published by 'Art + Australia' in 2018. Both in that essay and here we are concerned to think the relationship of Duchamp to Australia, what it is about his life and work that we might find useful to reflect upon our art‑historical situation today. More particularly, how might Duchamp be understood to intervene in contemporary debates about globalisation' And our point here is that Duchamp does this not so much in his art as in his 'chess'. Thinking about Duchamp's chess career as seen from here and reading his famous book on the phenomenon of "opposition" in chess, 'Opposition and Sister Squares are Reconciled' (1932), might allow a different conception of Australian art in the twenty‑first century. This for us would be the ultimate lesson of 'The Essential Duchamp' and the fact that for the inevitable children's activities associated with the exhibition the Gallery set up chessboards where the art‑going public of the future could play.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Geological pit stops: Kate Hill and Isadora Vaughan
    • Abstract: Kotlarczyk, Abbra
      In satellite view on Google maps, the rural town of Copley in South Australia can be seen in proximity to the grey horseshoe of an open‑cut mine, akin to the recollected aerial view of an ancient amphitheatre I once visited as a child in Turkey. The township of Copley on Adnyamathanha country (population 72 according to a 2016 census), sits approximately 560 km north of Adelaide in the intermediary zone between the green belt of the state's capital, and the deep red of the northern desert region. The surrounding landscape is defined by grand salt lakes, the undulating contours of the Flinders Ranges and a digitally‑rendered road passing through its seeming corridor.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Time and transition in the work of Lee Harrop
    • Abstract: Treagus, Mandy
      On 10 December 2019 Lee Harrop returned pieces from her work 'Still Lives' (2019) to the Northern Territory Core Library in Darwin, thereby taking them out of circulation. For Harrop, rather than closing down the meanings of these works, this moment represented a vital stage, part of the circle of life for artwork, rock, and ultimately the very matter of the universe. Harrop works with drill core rock samples, often drawn from core libraries. Respect for the material defines every stage of the artistic process. Harrop's statement that she wants "the value of the rock itself to be recognised" is just one aspect of a practice that rejects the maintenance of hierarchies between artist and material, including that between rock and inscribed text, the other major component of the work.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Living rocks: A fragment of the universe
    • Abstract: Darling, James
      Following directions from a young ecologist, Lesley Forwood and I waded through a shallow, ephemeral swamp in the south-east of South Australia and found thrombolites, rock‑like microbial accretions, which, along with layered microbial stromatolites and over a period of three billion years, became the source of oxygen for our planet. It was a rare, exhilarating, other‑worldly experience.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Stuart Ringholt: Time pressures
    • Abstract: Hill, Wes
      'Untitled (Clock)' (2014) by the Perth‑born, Melbourne‑based artist Stuart Ringholt is modelled on an antique mantelpiece clock, stands three metres high, and completes a minute in forty‑five seconds. I've only ever experienced the work as part of 'Today Tomorrow Yesterday': the almost absurdly lazy four‑year‑long exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia, on show to July 2020. Because of the sculpture's prominence in a show catering mostly to drop‑by tourists wandering around Circular Quay, I usually see the work incidentally, on my way to other shows in the same building. In my mind, at least until the exhibition closes later this year, Ringholt's clock is a permanent public‑art object, heavy with everyday context yet recurrently passing its 18‑hour days as if in a zone of its own.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - 2019: The year of our cyberpunk future
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      Three of the great science fiction films of the twentieth century, 'Akira' (1988), 'Blade Runner' (1982) and 'The Running Man' (1987) were set in 2019. Their sprawling, neon‑lit streetscapes have proved to be not so unlike the futures they predicted, with extremes of technology, power and wealth concentrating in the mega‑cities of today. In each film there are heroes and anti‑heroes who contest this hi‑tech power, from 'Blade Runner's' escapee android to 'The Running Man's' policeman who refuses orders to open fire on an innocent crowd. Security cameras and police are a notable presence in these films, driving early fantasies of a society of surveillance.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Therese Ritchie: Burning hearts
    • Abstract: Mackinolty, Chips
      Review(s) of: Therese Ritchie: Burning hearts, by Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, 29 November 2019 - 28 June 2020.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - Cementa 19
    • Abstract: Marcon, Marco
      Review(s) of: Cementa 19, by Kandos, New South Wales, 21 - 24 November 2019.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 40 Issue 1 - The Brazilian moment: A picture gallery in
           transformation
    • Abstract: Mateer, John; Ortega, Eduardo
      'Pinacoteca em Transformacao (Picture Gallery in Transformation)', the 2015 rehang of the main collection of the Museum of Art Sao Paulo (MASP) marked a return to that particular mode of display which for generations of gallery‑goers had been synonymous with the installation of its impressive pre‑modern and modern collections. It was a popular intervention, and I have the impression many Paulistas felt it a return to those days when Sao Paulo was thought to be a competitor with that other great new world city, New York. Adriano Pedrosa, the recently appointed director of MASP, had decided to reinstate the display of the gallery's permanent collection. It was a return to how the works had been presented at the building's inauguration nearly forty years earlier. This installation at Brazil's (and possibly even, South America's) premier art museum, was also news in the international artworld, being reported in many publications.

      PubDate: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 00:21:02 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Dianne Yulawirri Hall: White food
    • Abstract: Morrow, Christine
      Curved discs of a glossy translucent amber colour are suspended on acrylic lines. Radiated heat from the gallery windows melts them a little and they drip their sticky substance onto crusty brown hillocky shapes below. Close inspection reveals this art installation to be a dynamic food landscape. Titled 'Sugar Coated' (2018) it's one of a series of giant‑toffee‑and‑baked‑damper‑loaf works by Dianne Yulawirri Hall. Her art practice explores the changes colonisation wrought by introducing the Western diet - especially the white foods of refined sugar and bleached flour - to Indigenous Australia.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Elizabeth Willing: The shelf life of food
    • Abstract: Stephens, Andrew
      In the story of 'Hansel and Gretel' food is strategically deployed to invoke fears of abandonment and anxiety occasioned by the ultimate food‑related terrors: starvation and cannibalism. Within the dark woods lurks the witch who devours juicy children, while at the forest's edge the father and stepmother trade parental responsibilities for better food security. At the centre of all this is the exquisite cottage made of bread, with a roof of cake and windows of sparkling sugar, which the desperate children hungrily tear off and devour in great chunks.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Eat the problem: MONA's carnivalesque of cuisine
    • Abstract: Crawford, Ashley
      When art meets food, their offspring are often surreal. One need only look back to the ubiquitous presence in kitchens world-wide of reproductions of Giuseppe Arcimboldo's fruity portraits or Rene Magritte's iconic green apple to find triggers for this impulse.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Fair Share Fare: Recipe for disaster
    • Abstract: Rae, Jen
      In 1906 Alfred Henry Lewis famously stated in 'Cosmopolitan' that "there are only nine meals between mankind and anarchy." Food has the capacity to bring us together. It is familiar, relational and cultural. But in times of conflict and scarcity, food also can be the trigger for chaos and social disruption. In a world with increasing and unprecedented ecological degradation and economic inequality in the distribution of resources, future food security is a global concern and a food fight to avoid. We are distracted, choking and bloated on choice and misinformation when it comes to food and health (our own and that of the planet).

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Violent dreams of development: A food bowl in the
           northwest of Australia'
    • Abstract: Hunt, Alana
      In the largest non‑nuclear explosion in Australian history, a mountain was blasted apart. These smashed pieces of stone were destined for a dam wall that now incarcerates a once‑roaring river at a capacity of twenty times the size of Sydney Harbour. Today tourists marvel at its grandeur and apparent beauty. But violent dreams shadow this development. In December 1971 the West Australian Wildlife Association launched Operation Ord Noah, a stunt as absurd as its title and the tragedy of the "operation". As the waters of Lake Argyle rose for the first time, a few white Australian men spent over a month whizzing around in tinnies rescuing animals from the waters that submerged huge tracts of Miriwoong country permanently. Colonists marvel at these images-which have entered the lexicon of local settler‑history-just as we marvel at more recent photographs from 2019 of teapots and windmills and power lines submerged by Lake Argyle at the old Durack Homestead. Kununurra, whose real Miriwoong name is Goonoonoorrang, is a town established in the 1960s to realise colonial dreams of a northern food bowl fed by this monumental lake.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Mai Contemporary Kaurna Food
    • Abstract: Tylor, James
      Mai Contemporary Kaurna Food is a local Indigenous food project based in the Adelaide Plains of South Australia. The word Mai means "food" in the Kaurna language and is pronounced "may". The idea behind the project was to create a series of recipes that draw from Kaurna culture and the unique environment of the Adelaide Plains. The seasonal recipes are named after regional ecosystems and emphasise the biodiversity of these areas. They use a specific selection of local Australian Indigenous ingredients. Mai is designed to be affordable, local, healthy and environmentally friendly, but most importantly tasty.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Bunha-bunhanga: Once these were lands of plenty
    • Abstract: Finegan, Ann
      A party of Yolŋu men, standing in shallow bark canoes, are using poles to push through the waters of the Arnhem wetlands in Rolf de Heer's 'Ten Canoes' (2006), a tale of seasonal hunting of magpie geese eggs. Set in a timeless present, and commissioned by the Yolŋu community, the film is a visionary recuperation of traditional Yolŋu life suffused with stories of law and the Dreaming. Throughout, laughter and camaraderie accompany the stages of the hunt, from the stripping and fire seasoning of the bark to the final cook-up of the geese eggs. Ostensibly a narrative about the means of procurement of a traditional food source, at a deeper level the film is about the revival of cultural knowledge, strengthening community and supporting wellness of being. Nonetheless, the film is a reconstruction of the practices of a lifestyle that no longer fully exists. It's a position familiar to many First Nations People, and it comes as no surprise that at the time of the making of the film, the annual goose egg hunt had ceased, and that the inspiration had come from a 1930s photograph of ten men in canoes by the anthropologist David Thompson.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve
      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Reading the entrails: Digesting posthuman entanglement
    • Abstract: Grbich, Sasha
      Walking through Adelaide on a typically warm summer evening, around this time last year I can still recall the waft of food and conversation emanating from small eateries protruding between sandstone houses. I passed the Greek restaurant with the aromas of garlic and meat chargrilling and paused in front of an Italian place where, more controversially, patrons could be found bathed in warm light and drinking wine under the full hanging body of a taxidermy cow. Schvitzy (as she was named on the farm where she was kept) was the weighty centrepiece on display in a double‑height front window: strung up, ready for the guillotine, and poised as if to plummet to the ground or pour blood on the diners below. Commissioned by the owners of Bar Etica, to highlight the harsh realities of the dairy industry, Schvitzy - a milking cow, who after eight years proving milk was considered waste - had been slaughtered, her time and death planned in advance; but once installed above the meat and cheese eaters, her involuntary obsolescence became a monument to the messy entanglement of human and nonhuman animals over the dinner table.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Eating together online: The ambivalent conviviality of
           ASMR videos
    • Abstract: Russell, Francis
      The proliferation of food media is a mainstay of late‑capitalist culture and our compulsion to participate online. Through the circulation of videos and images of food, individuals can climb social hierarchies, display their worldliness and sophistication, revel in comfort and leisure, and connect to competing notions of nationality and heritage. While the social function of food is nothing new, social media has helped to commodify all aspects of the culinary and gastronomic lifestyle. Food dominates online platforms, from the occurrence of individuals photographing, posting, sharing and commenting on their lunches to the fact that the most‑liked image on Instagram is an egg. Despite its pervasiveness, such media is unsparing in its variety with the homely, chic, orientalist and molecular all competing for attention by offering divergent visions of food. This aestheticisation is evident in Instagram posts of bottles of olive oil arranged on a countertop with the simplicity of a Morandi; a video tutorial of a BBQ in which hands are shown pulling apart meat like Viennese Actionism; or, scrolling through the feed, a highly technical lab prep for a tagliatelle that wouldn't be out of place in a 'SymbioticA' exhibition.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Deborah Kelly: CREATION: Sustenance workshop
    • Abstract: Pierce, Julianne
      It was a rare treat to be at the formation of a new work by artist and activist Deborah Kelly, with her three‑day workshop CREATION: Sustenance presented at Vitalstatistix's annual experimental hothouse Adhocracy. Spread over three days, Kelly invited participants into a shared food pilot workshop, where the processes of making, sharing and eating would contribute to the creation of an emergent belief structure. The workshop was an early step towards a speculative and ambitious new project for Adhocracy, proposing "lateral, experimental ways to creatively engage with climate denialism."

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Shared food conversations: Jason Phu and Nagesh
           Seethiah
    • Abstract: Phu, Jason; Seethiah, Nagesh; Baker, Sabrina
      In recent years, I have worked alongside Jason Phu on a number of projects, notably 'My Parents Met at the Fish Market' commissioned for West Space in 2017. This professional relationship became a friendship, with Jason often staying with my partner and chef Nagesh Seethiah and I on his frequent trips to Melbourne. Almost every visit would become a conversation over dinner about life, politics, family, careers, love and of course food. These are also recurring topics in Jason's art practice. With this in mind I asked Nagesh and Jason if they would be keen to share their passion for cooking and storytelling with a larger group of friends to open up the dialogue further.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - A good dinner party: Food as a medium for social
           change
    • Abstract: Coombs, Courtney
      The last ten years have seen a re-emergence of artists who use food and the participatory act of dining as a platform from which to generate political and social discourse. When it comes to "free speech" it has become apparent that the politically correct mask donned throughout the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s has now been dropped, as witnessed in the escalation of unashamedly racist, sexist and capitalist rhetoric. In the dominant English-speaking nations of the Western world, elected leaders are outspoken in their promotion of intolerant, misogynist and neoliberal ideologies. The world is literally burning and our "leaders" are denying the reality of climate change, building real and invisible walls, imprisoning those fleeing from unliveable conditions and eroding hard-won rights, the implications of which disproportionately affect First Nations peoples, diasporic communities and other minority groups.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - The future of work: Public share and John Vea
    • Abstract: Roelants, Altair
      In 'The Future of Work', a recent exhibition at The Dowse Art Museum in Lower Hutt, Aotearoa New Zealand, projects by the artist collective Public Share and Tongan Auckland-based artist John Vea explored the relationship between the daily rituals and conditions of working life and the food stuffs that are produced and consumed, to forefront labour relations in a region that has been a historical hub for the production of food on an industrial scale.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Weaving the way
    • Abstract: Lawrence, Kay
      Review(s) of: Weaving the way, by University of Queensland Art Museum, 26 July 2019 - 18 January 2020.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 4 - Tarnanthi festival of contemporary Aboriginal and
           Torres Strait Islander art
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      Review(s) of: Tarnanthi festival of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, by Art Gallery of South Australia and other venues 18 October 2019 - 27 January 2020.

      PubDate: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 16:02:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: MacGill, Belinda; Bilske, Maria
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Other suns: Cult sci-fi cinema and art
    • Abstract: Russell, Francis
      Review(s) of: Other suns: Cult sci‑fi cinema and art, by Fremantle Arts Centre, 27 July-14 September 2019.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Being an artist and an art teacher
    • Abstract: Ward, Henry
      Teaching art does at times feel like it might be getting in the way of time I could be spending in the studio. But I recognise that the space of teaching has become a vital and integral part of my artistic practice. Artists have almost always been involved in teaching art in schools. Sometimes this has been described as an unwanted but necessary evil to fund the making of work. Sometimes teaching is described as being an essential part of how an artist, like Phyllida Barlow, thinks about their work and ideas. Sometimes, as in the obvious case of Joseph Beuys or the less well‑known Jef Geys, teaching has become an approach to practice itself. The pedagogical role is often the catalyst for the production of the most interesting and engaging elements of an artist's oeuvre, as in the case of John Baldessari. In art schools the teaching is traditionally undertaken by practising artists. There is an expectation that the person delivering the lecture, leading the group crit or undertaking the tutorial has their own creative practice to bolster their teaching. The point being made here is that teaching provides these artists with an income as well as a critical dialogic space, where ideas are discussed, theories generated and developed.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Trying to be at home in the world: New parameters for
           art education
    • Abstract: Biesta, Gert
      In my short book 'Letting Art Teach', I try to respond to what I see as a double crisis in art education. One part of this crisis has to do with the disappearance of art from art education - something that is visible in the ongoing instrumentalisation of the arts in education. The other part of the crisis has to do with the disappearance of education from contemporary art education - something that is visible in what I refer to as "expressivist" approaches to art. In response to these developments I outline a "world‑centred" approach. This approach is neither focused on what children should learn (knowledge or skills) nor on how they should develop and who they should become (the question of identity), but rather puts the question of human existence - the question of what it means to live one's life, and to live it well - at the very heart of art education.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - The housing question
    • Abstract: Wolifson, Chloe
      Review(s) of: The housing question, by Penrith Regional Gallery, 22 June - 25 August 2019.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Choose your own immersion: Art schools as a site of
           creative becoming
    • Abstract: Rey, Una
      The Bauhaus, as the best‑known model of immersive studio‑based teaching and learning across art, craft and design that inspired the "Modern" post‑WW2 art school, opened in Weimar in 1919. What can it teach us a hundred years later, when the model is in retreat' The Bauhaus lasted fourteen years, having relocated three times under three directors, each one amending doctrines and agendas. Ideological bloodletting and stylistic jostling - Expressionism, de Stijl, Functionalism, New Objectivity - along with petty internal politics were part of the Bauhaus fabric, just as they remain constant in all art teaching institutions. The forced closure of the Bauhaus in 1933, during the rise of National Socialism in Germany, puts current anxieties surrounding the pressures on the global tertiary sector and its impact on the traditional late modern art school into context. So, too, does the very idea of the artist's studio as a site of learning and becoming, seem like a golden age privileging our collective desires for more time at the creative coal face, galvanised by romantic recollections of a period when the immersive studio experience was a central tenet of transmitting the skills and ideas through which one might realise one's identity as an artist.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Vanishing into action: Art beyond the contemporary
    • Abstract: Foster, Alasdair
      Suhail Malik, co‑director of the Master of Fine Art at Goldsmiths, University of London, argues in a forthcoming book that there is an urgent necessity for "art to exit from Contemporary Art". This is not a paradox, but a clear differentiation between what he considers the purpose of art to be and the neoliberal system that in his view defines the term Contemporary Art. As such, Contemporary Art describes the dominant system of art and not simply art made in the present time. Malik is not alone. Even key players within the contemporary artworld are despairing of the malaise that has overtaken it. In 2012, the art critic, Dave Hickey, a long‑term advocate of art in a free market economy, announced he was quitting an artworld he is reported to have described as "calcified, self‑reverential and a hostage to rich collectors." "It's nasty and it's stupid," he said, "Art editors and critics - people like me - have become a courtier class. All we do is wander around the palace and advise very rich people."

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Shapes of knowledge: A conversation
    • Abstract: Bilske, Maria; Roe, Alex Martinis; Mathews, Hannah
      Maria Bilske: This exhibition, Shapes of Knowledge, is in your own words, Hannah, an acknowledgment of the shapes, forms, meanings and audiences that connect art with knowledge-making as a form of participation. Why do you think there seems to be a prevalence of pedagogical modes and methods in contemporary art' Is it a natural progression of performative and relational ways of working'

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - MCAD Manila: Learning, sharing and conversation
    • Abstract: Cruz, Joselina; Acuin, Paula
      Dominga Street is in one of the busiest areas of Metro Manila. Lined by street food sellers, it is a thoroughfare for all possible transportation options in Manila that go this way: pedicabs, tricycles, jeepneys, private cars, trucks, bicycles, etc. There is a public school on one side, its gates hugging the sliver of a sidewalk, and every day at noon children spill out from its gates, where parents and guardians, a gaggle of nannies and grandparents, wait outside. A queue of tricycles wait for passengers, while empty jeepneys are double parked. Sometimes a medium-sized cement truck passes through this throng, while food vendors wend their way through the length of the road, avoiding potholes, humps, piles of garbage and the odd homeless person. The street is about six metres wide and runs from a main avenue of the city into a busy one-way street at the end. Just before reaching the street corners where a printing shop and a 7/11 bookend the street there is an unobtrusive metal gate, a side door to the building of the College of Saint Benilde's School of Design and Arts that is the entrance to the Museum of Contemporary Art and Design (MCAD).

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Museum MACAN: Critical conversations through art
    • Abstract: Seeto, Aaron
      The Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara (Museum MACAN) in West Jakarta opened its doors to the public in November 2017. Founded by the collector and philanthropist Haryanto Adikoesoemo, it has been developed and run as a private foundation operating within the public sphere, and currently houses a collection of around 800 works of Indonesian and International modern and contemporary art that has been built up over 25 years. Though Indonesia has many museums (Jakarta alone has 64 registered museums), Museum MACAN's purpose‑built facilities providing a vital and necessary museum infrastructure to support the ambitious program of exhibitions sets it apart; as does the focus on public programs promoting outreach and a broader philosophy of cultural exchange.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Falling in love (or, is the curatorial a
           methodology')
    • Abstract: McDowell, Tara
      What is curatorial research' And what is a curatorial methodology' I founded the Curatorial Practice PhD at Monash University in 2014. Though new and at the time unprecedented in Australia, it is entirely modelled on the Fine Art PhD, which is now offered by more than two dozen courses in this country. And so these questions were put to me repeatedly. They often felt bewildering, the result of putting the square peg of curating into the round hole of academia. Curating's entry into academia was an awkward and artificial event, but I believe this event continues to have tremendous potential, and I hope to tease out its implications and possible paths forward in the essay that follows.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Agatha Gothe-Snape: On art and education eve
    • Abstract: Sullivan, Eve; Gothe‑Snape, Agatha
      Eve Sullivan: How did you become the creative lead for the Kaldor Public Art Project Symposium on Art Education' What did this entail'

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - FEM-aFFINITY
    • Abstract: Millner, Jacqueline
      Review(s) of: FEM‑aFFINITY, by Arts Project Australia, 15 June - 20 July 2019.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - Risky business: Engaging adolescents in activities at
           the art gallery of South Australia
    • Abstract: Neagle, Kylie
      In a recent keynote address for the Arts Inspire conference in Adelaide on the implementation of arts education in schools, Robin Pascoe suggested that the importance of communicating knowledge and expertise is secondary to the creation of opportunities for participation, engagement and self‑expression. These goals are echoed in the Art Gallery of South Australia's focus on expanded models of museum and gallery programming, empowering students and teachers to be self‑directed, rather than relying on a guided tour or lecture by an industry expert. This shift is risky, potentially alienating educators by not providing the kind of support they think they need to justify an excursion.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 3 - About being here
    • Abstract: Spiers, Liv
      Review(s) of: About being here, by Angela Valamanesh, Jam Factory, 26 July - 22 September 2019.

      PubDate: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 21:35:26 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Clague, Pauline; Behrendt, Larissa
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - A personal reflection on self-determining documentary
           filmmaking practice
    • Abstract: Behrendt, Larissa
      I remember the first documentary I saw in a movie theatre. I was fourteen years old and my father took me to a screening of 'Lousy Little Sixpence' (Alec Morgan and Gerald Bostock, 1983). I knew about the stolen generations policy through its impact on my own family but I had never seen Aboriginal people on a cinema screen telling their stories in their own words. There was both power in the telling of the lived experience and a subversive about it. While my brother and I knew this part of Australian history, in this period after the end of the formal removal policy and before the 'Bringing them Home Report and a National Apology', no other student at our high school seemed to. The voices in 'Lousy Little Sixpence' challenged that ignorance but also validated the lived experience of members of our family.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Indigenous storytelling: Deconstructing the archetypes
    • Abstract: Clague, Pauline
      Indigenous archetypes have different rules to our non‑Indigenous counterparts and so in any interpretation of our films it is important to see what sort of lens is being created by Indigenous cinema. As a programmer for imagineNATIVE and Winda Film Festival, I am immersed in Indigenous films made by Indigenous directors and writers. In the last three years I have watched around 400 to 500 Indigenous films made by Indigenous filmmakers, each year observing the vast spectrum across genres and have witnessed a real growth of a strong industry of shorts, features and documentaries. The more I watch these films, the more I see a subtle difference and sometimes not so subtle difference in the portrayal of the central characters as universal archetypes.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Amala Groom: Cosmic body of remembrance
    • Abstract: Donnelly, Hannah
      I remember the first time I saw conceptual video work by an Aboriginal artist. Sitting in a back row, anxious and close to the exit in case I had to leave, I watched the performance projected through video in a sandstone university lecture hall. The scene was from rea's 'Poles Apart' (2009).

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - ImagineNATIVE at 20
    • Abstract: Clague, Pauline; Ryle, Jason
      In October 2019 the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival celebrates its 20th anniversary. As the world's largest presenter of Indigenous‑made screen content, the Toronto‑based imagineNATIVE plays a central role in the international Indigenous screen sector and a vital role in the Canadian media arts landscape. With a specific mandate to support the work of Aboriginal directors, screenwriters, and producers, imagineNATIVE has been a leader in its adherence to fostering and supporting Indigenous narrative sovereignty on screen, at a time when screen‑based storytelling continues to grow in prominence and as more Indigenous storytellers create work.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Sydney Elders: Continuing Aboriginal stories at the
           state library of New South Wales
    • Abstract: Jones, Jonathan
      In 2016 I was asked by the State Library of New South Wales (SLNSW) to curate a project for the redevelopment and launch of their new exhibition spaces. While being briefed on the significance of the library I considered how its collection represents Aboriginal communities and how Aboriginal communities would want to be represented. In order to understand and negotiate these notions of representation and the relations of power they create and reflect, I thought about how our communities self‑represent, where community knowledge accumulates and is maintained, and who we go to for our stories. Within this context elders are familiar anchor points. They are to whom we go for knowledge, and in doing so they continually connect us to our past while strengthening our future. Indeed, within our communities our elders are our libraries.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Speaking back to colonial collections: Building living
           Aboriginal archives
    • Abstract: Thorpe, Kirsten
      During the late‑nineteenth and earlytwentieth centuries a significant number of amateur collectors were on a quest to record, categorise and preserve what they perceived to be the "dying races" of Aboriginal Australia. In New South Wales, collectors such as Alan Carroll (1823-1911) and Clifton Cappie Towle (1888-1946) set out to capture information on Aboriginal cultural practices and languages and to disseminate these through their networks and in published journals. Both used various kinds of methods to gather and document cultural content, be it in the form of diaries, paintings, manuscripts or photographs. This knowledge had previously been held by Aboriginal people in specific locations on Country or transmitted in fluid ways through relationships between people and informed by community protocols.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Unravelling the past: Barbed wire and campfire
           learnings
    • Abstract: Eckermann, Ali Cobby
      How does one truly unravel their past, stripping the barbs of hurt to create a new vessel free from thorns' For me, it took years of journey, searching for my ideal personal paradise even without a definition of what that could be. When a sense of peacefulness arrived in spurting moments, I did not have the skills to retain it in my life, and mourned each time it slipped away. Always I continued my nomadic travel across this land, through its desert heart of richness, the red sand sweeping my footprints away with its wind of wisdom, only my most recent footprints remaining to be seen. Each time I chose to return to the losses of my past, I had to endure a cyclic reoccurrence of the pain. It has taken me years to lessen those cycles. It has taken years of practice, working on my as‑yet‑unseen footprints, centring toward my future.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Dark Emu: Thank the earth
    • Abstract: Pascoe, Bruce
      When Australia fabricated a fairy story of how it came by the country it was so confident of the people's complicity in the fraud that it thought it unnecessary to wash the blood off the knife.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Deaths in custody: We've got to give it everything
    • Abstract: Allum, Lorena
      As an ABC radio news cadet in 1989 I travelled with the Royal Commission into Aboriginal deaths in custody to Walgett in northwest NSW in a small twin‑engine Cessna. It was so cramped that the Commissioner, the wry and avuncular Hal Wootten QC, had to sit in the co‑pilot's seat and hand out the in‑flight biscuits.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Network sovereignty: The internet is Blak
    • Abstract: Hepi, Amrita; Mailangi, Enoch
      Amrita Hepi: Cathy Freeman winning gold in the 2000 Sydney Olympics reverberated through my whole body. I've watched and replayed the great moments of history on screen, let them sink in, commented, liked and subscribed to elevate the accompanying euphoria. The video clips comforted and spurred on my desire to make things.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - The national 2019: New Australian art
    • Abstract: Judd, Craig
      Review(s) of: The national 2019: New Australian art, by Art Gallery of New South Wales 29 March - 21 July 2019; The national 2019: New Australian art, by Carriageworks 29 March - 23 June 2019; The national 2019: New Australian art, by Museum of Contemporary Art Australia - 29 March - 23 June 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Bush women: 25 years on
    • Abstract: Weston, Gemma
      Review(s) of: Bush women: 25 years on, by Fremantle Arts Centre.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 2 - Yurtu Ardla
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren
      Review(s) of: Yurtu Ardla, by South Australian Museum 16 March - 16 June 2019.

      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 12:48:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Baumann, Rebecca; Sequiera, David; Eliasson, Olafur
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Local colour: Dyeing and women's wealth
    • Abstract: Ewington, Julie
      In retrospect, perhaps I imagined it. These fugitive perfumes-earthy, humid, slightly vegetal-were an olfactory epiphany, possibly even a synaesthetic moment. I was visiting 'Local Colour: Experiments in Nature' at the UNSW Galleries in Sydney's Paddington, surrounded by floating lengths of cloth, a brace of Aboriginal baskets, a row of tiny weavings. Gentle and understated, 'Local Colour' was nevertheless a powerful sensory experience. It addressed the twinned subtlety and intensity of natural dyes married to cloth and fibre, ancient practices being revisited and revised today. Contemporary artists and community-based artisans with generations of knowledge are everywhere experimenting with natural alternatives to industrial chemical dyes and addressing urgent questions of environmental sustainability.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Hi-vis commodities: A body corporate's toxic economy
    • Abstract: Facility, Debris; Laird, Tessa
      Tessa Laird Debris Facility is a Melbourne-based entity dedicated to jewellery-in-the-expanded-field; that is, the propagation of affordable adornments fabricated from waste materials, but also permanently embodied colour in the form of abstract, geometric tattooing, installation practices, guided meditations, the imbibing of elixirs and ritual ablutions.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Revisiting colour problems: Emily Vanderpoel, Hilma af
           Klint, Becca Albee, Claire Milledge
    • Abstract: Wallin, Amelia
      In 1902 American artist, scholar and historian Emily Noyes Vanderpoel published 'Colour Problems: A Practical Manual for the Lay Student of Colour', an extensive analysis of the proportions and harmonies of colour. Her study derived from objects, many of which were from her own collection, including Persian rugs, pottery, and enamelware. Marketed to dressmakers, interior designers and watercolourists, 'Colour Problems' advised its readers to look to nature to find essential harmonies between complementary colours. Many pages of Vanderpoel's book are devoted to hand-drawn rectilinear grids of harmonious coloured squares with captions such as 'Colour Analysis from a Butterfly and Colour Analysis from a Rose-Coloured Vase'.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Vincent Namatjira: Colourful optimism
    • Abstract: Hill, Wes
      Perceptions of colour cannot be trusted. This is something I know because I'm colour blind. Being colour blind means I'm mostly bored by the sunsets that other people enjoy (their vivid pinks just look like greys to me) and I'm also sceptical about the need for exactitude when naming what colour it is that one sees. No wonder the works of Vincent van Gogh first stood out to me. Here was an artist who used colour not to reproduce reality but, remarkably for the 1880s, as a conceptual tool, unafraid to use something like cerulean blue to render a corn field, every tone a metaphor for a particular life force ("What colour is in painting, enthusiasm is in life," he wrote to Theo in 1886). Against the unstructured inclinations of his Impressionist peers, colour in a van Gogh painting is always in dialogue with his rigid, drawing-like forms, waging his own very different battle with the chromophobic tendencies of Western art, which, at least since the time of Aristotle, equated colourful extravagances with modes of vulgar, feminine, Orientalist, primitive or infantile excess.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Jane Skeer: True blue
    • Abstract: Wong, Serena; Sullivan, Eve
      Jane Skeer's art has always been about the sum of its parts. Her works of sculptural assemblage and installation defer to the serial arrangement of mass-manufactured commodities. These found and repurposed waste materials are often derived from packaging or remaindered print stock-bits of old rope, plastic containers, previous year's festival flyers, newspapers and magazines (including remaindered back issues of Artlink). As a comment on the excesses of production, framed through the repetition and amplification of subtle details, there is beauty in obsolescence.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Wardlipari Homeriver: Vulnerable observations
    • Abstract: O'Brien, Lewis Yarluburka; Baker, Ali Gumillya
      Wardlipari is the homeriver in the Milky Way. Purlirna kardlarna ngadluku miyurnaku yaintya tikkiarna.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Queer uses of colour: A tinted hermeneutics
    • Abstract: Kotlarczyk, Abbra
      In her keynote lecture for the 2018 AAANZ conference, 'Aesthetics, Politics and Histories: The Social Context of Art', the prominent art historian and critical feminist scholar Griselda Pollock posed the following question with regards to a cultural hermeneutics: how is the study of a culture a way to understand its "double space", considering "what it is to belong, who we are, and at the same time how meanings are being formed for us and ... lived by us"' Pollock's concerns, while specific to a field of interpretation that pertains to modernity's relationship to the Holocaust, exists as part of her enduring practice of extending cultural and visual analysis through the centering of minority subjects and positions. Her questioning of how a cultural hermeneutics might be embodied, as opposed to externally materialised, is pivotal in considering how minoritarian cultures-in this case LGBTQIA+ cultures-navigate and articulate identities in relationship to majoritarian cultures. Specifically, it is the distinction that Pollock makes between cultural meaning that is being formed for as opposed to lived by, that makes this provocation so essential for thinking through queer uses of colour.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Partnershipping
    • Abstract: Kelly, Sean
      Review(s) of: Partnershipping, by Burnie Regional Art Gallery, 10 November - 16 December 2018.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Unhallowed arts
    • Abstract: Jorgensen, Darren; Weston, Gemma
      Review(s) of: Unhallowed arts, Various venues, Perth, 25 September - 23 December 2018.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - James Turrell: Night life in Brisbane
    • Abstract: Young, Diana
      To coincide with the tenth anniversary of Brisbane's Gallery of Modern Art, QAGOMA commissioned a work by James Turrell to effect an ambitious and astonishing transformation of the gallery's architecture at night. Like much of Turrell's work this one is a response to the building and perhaps also to the position of the gallery in Brisbane's South Bank entertainment precinct. There is a tension which I'll explore here between Turrell's work as a renowned artist making international art and the localness of this work with its public presence creating nightly modifications to the Brisbane cityscape.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Jacky Redgate's patch of yellow (and blue)
    • Abstract: Lakin, Shaune
      There is no substantial discourse of colour photography, no convincing interpretive framework through which we might account for its phenomenology. Perhaps this is because there is no "material indexicality" in a colour photograph, the optical basis of which is wavelengths of reflected light that are themselves invisible and the experience of which is always subjective and cultural. While a colour photograph might approximate perceptual experience, it is only ever a translation. As an example of the sceptical view of the colour photograph held by prominent photographers during the 1970s, the historian Max Kozloff characterised colour as "antirealist" and as "perfectly unsound as a reliable witness." Contemporary commentators remain uncomfortable with colour, or fail to even recognise it: try to find a reference to colour in Michael Fried's resolutely formalist 'Why Photography Matters as Art as Never Before (2008)'.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Gerry Wedd: My blue and white china
    • Abstract: Wedd, Gerry
      As an aesthete Wilde surrounded himself with beautiful objects. This epigram from his Oxford days paid tribute to and satirised the Victorian craze for the exotic. At Oxford University Wilde was introduced to the culture of aesthetes by art critic and philanthropist John Ruskin whose writings on craft also influenced William Morris.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
  • Volume 39 Issue 1 - Dress code
    • Abstract: Finegan, Ann
      Review(s) of: Dress code, by Museum of Brisbane - 3 November 2018 - 28 January 2019.

      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:32:10 GMT
       
 
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